• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 The Little People.
 Preface
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 Infancy. The Baby.
 Old Gaelic Lullaby.
 Little Birdie.
 A Sleeping Child
 Polly
 My Good-For-Nothing.
 Willie Winkie.
 Choosing A Name.
 Philip, My King.
 A Mother's Excuse.
 Christ and the Little Ones.
 Sleep, Baby, Sleep!
 The Ballad of Babie Bell.
 The Morning-Glory.
 Our Little Queen.
 Death of An Infant.
 How the Gates Came Ajar.
 Out of Doors.
 The Child's World.
 The Country Child.
 The Barefoot Boy.
 Little Bell.
 Seven Times One.
 A Wish.
 A Little Girl's Fancies.
 Grace and Her Friends.
 Over in the Meadow.
 Wishing.
 Stop, Stop, Pretty Water.
 Child's Wish in June.
 Under My Window.
 The School.
 "Hold Fast What I Give You."
 The Tree.
 Good-Night and Good-Morning.
 The Little Maiden and the Little...
 The Orioles.
 A Bird's-Eye View.
 Sing On, Blithe Bird.
 The Sandpiper.
 The Sorrowful Sea-Gull.
 The Brown Thrush.
 Robert of Lincoln.
 The Bluebird.
 Milking.
 The Cow-Boys Song.
 Old Dobbin.
 Farm-Yard Song.
 Boys' Play and Girls' Play.
 Little White Lily.
 Buttercups and Daisies.
 Little Dandelion.
 The Bramble-Flower.
 Jack in the Pulpit.
 The Violet.
 Winter.
 The Cuckoo.
 The Brook.
 The Gladness of Nature.
 Corn-Fields.
 Legendary.
 Among Green Pleasant Meadows.
 The Fairies of the Caldon-Low.
 The Children in the Moon.
 Hiawatha's Childhood.
 The Pied Piper of Hamelin.
 Greediness Punished.
 The Toy of the Giant's Child.
 Pictures, Fancies, and Memorie...
 The Piper.
 Song of the Elfin Miller.
 The Fairy Folk.
 Castles in the Air.
 Lady Moon.
 The New Moon.
 The Owl and the Pussy-Cat.
 Topsy-Turvy World.
 A Visit From St. Nicholas.
 Jack Frost.
 Kitty.
 What?
 Romance of the Swan's Nest.
 A Masquerade.
 Little Sorrow.
 "A Bird in the Hand is Worth Two...
 A Child's Thought of God.
 Larvae.
 Little Christel.
 I Remember, I Remember.
 Our Homestead.
 The Afternoon Nap.
 Saturday Afternoon.
 In School-Days.
 Jeanie Morrison.
 The Little Brother.
 The Graves of a Household.
 Miscellaneous.
 The Children's Hour.
 Father is Coming.
 A Little Goose.
 The Johnny-Cake.
 Thanksgiving-Day.
 The Clocking Hen.
 The Crow's Children.
 Dame Duck's First Lecture...
 The Motherless Turkeys.
 The Water-Mill.
 Charley, the Story-Teller.
 The Little Nurse.
 Benny.
 Sunday Morning.
 We are Seven.
 The Child-Judge.
 Avis.
 The First Snow-Fall.
 Child and Mother.
 A Comforter.
 A Story By the Fire.
 A Night With a Wolf.
 Lost on the Prairie.
 Lucy Gray.
 The Captain's Daughter.
 The Gray Swan.
 The Batter of Blenheim.
 John Gilpin.
 The Spider and the Fly.
 The Mountain and the Squirrel.
 Little Brown Hands.
 Hymns.
 Mother's Hymn.
 A Mother's Morning Prayer.
 Hymn of a Child.
 An Evening Prayer.
 All Things Beautiful.
 Falling to Sleep.
 The God of My Childhood.
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Child life : a collection of poems
Title: Child life
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00026318/00001
 Material Information
Title: Child life a collection of poems
Physical Description: xiii, 263 p. : ill. ; 20 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Whittier, John Greenleaf, 1807-1892 ( Editor )
James R. Osgood and Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: James R. Osgood & Co.
Place of Publication: Boston
Publication Date: 1872, c1871
Copyright Date: 1871
 Subjects
Subject: Christian life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children and death -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Natural history -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1872   ( lcsh )
Hymns -- 1872   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1872
Genre: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Hymns   ( rbgenr )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
Summary: An anthology of poems by nineteenth-century authors from various countries about the experiences of childhood.
Statement of Responsibility: edited by John Greenleaf Whittier.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00026318
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002239678
notis - ALJ0212
oclc - 03000177
lccn - 04013940

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Frontispiece
        Page 4
    Title Page
        Page 5
        Page 6
    The Little People.
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Preface
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Table of Contents
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    List of Illustrations
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Infancy. The Baby.
        Page 17
    Old Gaelic Lullaby.
        Page 18
    Little Birdie.
        Page 19
    A Sleeping Child
        Page 20
    Polly
        Page 21
        Page 22
    My Good-For-Nothing.
        Page 23
    Willie Winkie.
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Choosing A Name.
        Page 26
    Philip, My King.
        Page 27
        Page 28
    A Mother's Excuse.
        Page 29
    Christ and the Little Ones.
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Sleep, Baby, Sleep!
        Page 32
    The Ballad of Babie Bell.
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
    The Morning-Glory.
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
    Our Little Queen.
        Page 39
        Page 40
    Death of An Infant.
        Page 41
    How the Gates Came Ajar.
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
    Out of Doors.
        Page 45
        Page 46
    The Child's World.
        Page 47
        Page 48
    The Country Child.
        Page 49
    The Barefoot Boy.
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
    Little Bell.
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
    Seven Times One.
        Page 57
    A Wish.
        Page 58
    A Little Girl's Fancies.
        Page 59
        Page 60
    Grace and Her Friends.
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Over in the Meadow.
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
    Wishing.
        Page 68
    Stop, Stop, Pretty Water.
        Page 69
    Child's Wish in June.
        Page 70
    Under My Window.
        Page 71
    The School.
        Page 72
    "Hold Fast What I Give You."
        Page 73
        Page 74
    The Tree.
        Page 75
    Good-Night and Good-Morning.
        Page 76
    The Little Maiden and the Little Bird.
        Page 77
    The Orioles.
        Page 78
    A Bird's-Eye View.
        Page 79
    Sing On, Blithe Bird.
        Page 80
    The Sandpiper.
        Page 81
    The Sorrowful Sea-Gull.
        Page 82
        Page 83
    The Brown Thrush.
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
    Robert of Lincoln.
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
    The Bluebird.
        Page 90
    Milking.
        Page 91
        Page 92
    The Cow-Boys Song.
        Page 93
        Page 94
    Old Dobbin.
        Page 95
        Page 96
    Farm-Yard Song.
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
    Boys' Play and Girls' Play.
        Page 100
        Page 101
    Little White Lily.
        Page 102
    Buttercups and Daisies.
        Page 103
    Little Dandelion.
        Page 104
        Page 105
    The Bramble-Flower.
        Page 106
    Jack in the Pulpit.
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
    The Violet.
        Page 110
        Page 111
    Winter.
        Page 112
        Page 113
    The Cuckoo.
        Page 114
    The Brook.
        Page 115
        Page 116
    The Gladness of Nature.
        Page 117
        Page 118
    Corn-Fields.
        Page 119
        Page 120
    Legendary.
        Page 121
        Page 122
    Among Green Pleasant Meadows.
        Page 123
        Page 124
    The Fairies of the Caldon-Low.
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
    The Children in the Moon.
        Page 129
        Page 130
    Hiawatha's Childhood.
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
    The Pied Piper of Hamelin.
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
    Greediness Punished.
        Page 144
    The Toy of the Giant's Child.
        Page 145
        Page 146
    Pictures, Fancies, and Memories.
        Page 147
        Page 148
    The Piper.
        Page 149
    Song of the Elfin Miller.
        Page 150
    The Fairy Folk.
        Page 151
        Page 152
    Castles in the Air.
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
    Lady Moon.
        Page 156
    The New Moon.
        Page 157
        Page 158
    The Owl and the Pussy-Cat.
        Page 159
    Topsy-Turvy World.
        Page 160
    A Visit From St. Nicholas.
        Page 161
        Page 162
    Jack Frost.
        Page 163
    Kitty.
        Page 164
    What?
        Page 165
    Romance of the Swan's Nest.
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
    A Masquerade.
        Page 169
    Little Sorrow.
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
    "A Bird in the Hand is Worth Two in the Bush."
        Page 173
        Page 174
    A Child's Thought of God.
        Page 175
    Larvae.
        Page 176
        Page 177
    Little Christel.
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
    I Remember, I Remember.
        Page 182
    Our Homestead.
        Page 183
        Page 184
    The Afternoon Nap.
        Page 185
    Saturday Afternoon.
        Page 186
    In School-Days.
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
    Jeanie Morrison.
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
    The Little Brother.
        Page 194
    The Graves of a Household.
        Page 195
        Page 196
    Miscellaneous.
        Page 197
        Page 198
    The Children's Hour.
        Page 199
        Page 200
    Father is Coming.
        Page 201
    A Little Goose.
        Page 202
        Page 203
    The Johnny-Cake.
        Page 204
        Page 205
    Thanksgiving-Day.
        Page 206
        Page 207
    The Clocking Hen.
        Page 208
    The Crow's Children.
        Page 209
        Page 210
    Dame Duck's First Lecture on Education.
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
    The Motherless Turkeys.
        Page 214
        Page 215
    The Water-Mill.
        Page 216
        Page 217
    Charley, the Story-Teller.
        Page 218
    The Little Nurse.
        Page 219
        Page 220
        Page 221
    Benny.
        Page 222
        Page 223
    Sunday Morning.
        Page 224
        Page 225
    We are Seven.
        Page 226
        Page 227
        Page 228
    The Child-Judge.
        Page 229
        Page 230
    Avis.
        Page 231
        Page 232
        Page 233
    The First Snow-Fall.
        Page 234
        Page 235
    Child and Mother.
        Page 236
        Page 237
    A Comforter.
        Page 238
    A Story By the Fire.
        Page 239
        Page 240
    A Night With a Wolf.
        Page 241
    Lost on the Prairie.
        Page 242
    Lucy Gray.
        Page 243
        Page 244
        Page 245
    The Captain's Daughter.
        Page 246
    The Gray Swan.
        Page 247
        Page 248
    The Batter of Blenheim.
        Page 249
        Page 250
    John Gilpin.
        Page 251
        Page 252
        Page 253
        Page 254
        Page 255
        Page 256
        Page 257
        Page 258
        Page 259
    The Spider and the Fly.
        Page 260
        Page 261
        Page 262
        Page 263
    The Mountain and the Squirrel.
        Page 264
    Little Brown Hands.
        Page 265
        Page 266
    Hymns.
        Page 267
        Page 268
    Mother's Hymn.
        Page 269
    A Mother's Morning Prayer.
        Page 270
    Hymn of a Child.
        Page 271
    An Evening Prayer.
        Page 272
        Page 273
    All Things Beautiful.
        Page 274
    Falling to Sleep.
        Page 275
    The God of My Childhood.
        Page 276
        Page 277
        Page 278
    Back Cover
        Page 279
        Page 280
    Spine
        Page 281
Full Text
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L ..L-. " ----. :, .,1,7. ... ....- jl~ LIAl.pr,,f I//` b\ >/ /,CHILD LIFE.- 'I" ,C,y.-t .../. :.iJ I'.o-f .,__ ..j- J-" ~ ~ ~ 9 I" " "" "',-'i"\: '-I .. .t !, ; 1. v, z .-CHID LFE


CHILD LIFE:A COLLECTION OF POEMS,EDITED BYJOHN GREENLEAF WHITTIER.WITH ILLUSTRATIONS.BOSTON:JAMES R. OSGOOD AND COMPANY,LATE TICKNOR & FIELDS, AND FIELDS, OSGOOD & Co.1872.


Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1871, byJAMES R. OSGOOD & COMPANY,in the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington, D. C.CAMBRinmE.MArSS


THE LITTLE PEOPLE.A DREARY place would be this earth,"Were there nio little people in it;The song of life would lose its mirth,Were there no children to begin it ;No little forms, like buds to grow,And make the admiring heart surrender ;No little hands on breast and brow,To keep the thrilling love-chords tender.The sterner souls would grow more stern,Unfeeling nature more inhuman,And man to stoic coldness turn,And woman would be less than woman.Life's song, indeed, would lose its charm,Were there no babies to begin it ;A doleful place this world would be,Were there no little people in it.I ,M~ ~L~,__ rV^^^^^ ;y^^^^-


A


PREFACE.HAVING had occasion, some time since, to look over several volumes ofselected verse intended for juvenile readers, and noticing in nearly all ofthem much that seemed lacking in literary merit or adaptation, it occur-red to the compiler of this volume that, taking advantage of the merits aswell as deficiencies of existing publications in this department, a selec-tion might be made combining simplicity with a certain degree of literaryexcellence, without on the one hand descending to silliness, or, on theother rising above the average comprehension of childhood.How far the present volume has made this thought a reality it is not forhim to decide. He can only say that it is the result of a patient examina-tion of the accessible juvenile literature of our own and other countries.Our English tongue is peculiarly rich in the lore of home and fireside;and the editor has availed himself of selections from the folk-songs andballads of continental Europe. Where a doubt existed in regard to anyparticular poem he has not hesitated to take counsel of those whosejudgment seemed to him reliable; and, in more than one instance, hehas deferred to the instinctive and natural criticisms of childhood.It is but just to acknowledge his obligations to kind friends whosevaluable suggestions have materially aided him ; and, in an especial man-ner, his indebtedness to LucY LARCOM, so well known in connexion with"OUR YOUNG FOLKS," who has given him the benefit of her cultivatedtaste and very thorough acquaintance with whatever is valuable in thepoetical literature of Child-Life.Doubtless all readers will miss some favorite pieces which the necessityof giving as great a variety as possible to the compilation compelled himto pass over. He trusts, however, that a very large proportion of all thatis permanently valuable will be found in these pages. He hopes andbelieves that no well-grounded exceptions can be taken to the characterof the selections in a moral and religious point of view. He has endeav-ored, avoiding everything like cant and sectarianism, to find expressionfor the reverence, love, and grateful trust, so natural and beautiful inthose whom the Divine Teacher held up as examples to His disciples: "Ofsuch is the kingdom of Heaven." The deep significance of His languageis confirmed by the spiritual experience of all ages." The paths that lead us to God's throneAre worn by children's feet."


viii PREFACE.In the department of hymns and strictly devotional pieces, the numberwhich seemed really appropriate in language and thought proved, on ex-amination, to be much smaller than was anticipated. Something moreperhaps might have been added from Watts and Jane Taylor, but the onebeautiful hymn of Faber, with which the volume closes, contains in itselfthe substance and spirit of allOf course, fancy and imagination must play a prominent part in such acompilation, as they do in all healthful young minds, but the editor truststhat little will be found which can, by any possibility, leave an impressionof evil, or really confuse the distinctions of truth and error. Even pure non-sense, as in the case of Lear's "Owl and Pussy Cat," may not be withouta certain moral value as a fitting caricature of the affectation of senti-ment. In Hauffs " Fortunes of Fairy-Lore," the heroine corqplains, to hermother Fancy, that the world has grown uncomfortably wise, and that thevery children who used to love her so dearly have become too knowing fortheir tender age, and, no longer capable of wonder, laugh at her storiesand turn their backs upon her. Poor Fairy-Lore is doubtless justified inher complaint,-the school-master and newspaper are busy with theirdisenchantments,-but, as there may be still left among us something ofthat beautiful unwisdom which once peopled the child's world with vision-ary shapes, it should have the benefit of such poems as Mary Howitt's" Caldon Low," Allingham's "Fairies," and Allan Cunningham's "Songof the Elfin Miller."While the compiler has endeavored to accommodate his book to the espe-cial tastes of the young, he has not been without hope that maturer read-ers may find something of interest in it,-something to bring back thefreshness of the past,--hints and echoes from the lost world of childhood.He is happy in believing that, in this way, some noontide wayfarer maybe able to discover shadowy places of memory where the dew of the morn-ing of life has not wholly dried up, and where may still be heard the musicof the birds of sunrise.Sincerely hoping that in the selection of these poems of Child-Life, hehas not altogether misunderstood the tastes, wishes, and needs of hisyoung readers ; he leaves it in their hands, commending to each of themthe words of one who has himself written well and wisely for their class :" Be good dear child, and let who will be cleverDo noble things, not dream them, all day long;And so make life, death, and that vast foreverOne grand sweet song."J. G. W.AMESBURY, 4th Month, 1871.


CONTENTS.INFANCY. PA tThe Baby..............................................George Macdonald, 3Old Gaelic Lullaby....................................... 4Little Birdie................... ..........................Alfred Tennyson, 5A Sleeping Child.................................... Arthur Hugh Clough, 6Polly ................. ............................... "Lilliput Levee," 7My Good-for-Nothing...........................Emily untington Miller, 9W illie W inkie................... ........................... W illiam Miller, 10Choosing a Name................... ..........................Mary Lamb, 12Philip, my King..... .........................Author of "John Halifax," 13A Mother's Excuse.....................................Grace Greenwood, 15Christ and the Little Ones........................................Julia Gill, 16Sleep, Baby, Sleep.................................... From the German, 18The Ballad of Babie Bell...................................... Aldrich, 19The Morning-Glory.................................. Maria White Lowell, 22Our Little Queen........................................ Overland Monthly, 25The Changeling.....................................James Russell Lowell, 25Death of an Infant........................From the Dutch of Dirkc Smits, 27How the Gates came Ajar................... ........... From the Italian, 28OUT OF DOORS.The Child's World...................................." Lilliput Lectures," 33The Country Child....................................... Marian Douglas, 35The Barefoot Boy................. .................... John G. Whittier, 36Little Bell................................. ...........T. Westwood, 40Seven Times One.................. ......................Jean Ingelow, 43"A Wish ................. ...........................................Rose Terry, 44"A Little Girl's Fancies......................... Poems Writtenfor a Child, 45Grace and her Friends....................................... Lucy Larcom, 47Over in the Meadow.................................Olive A. Wadsworth, 51Wishing........................................... William Allingham, 54Stop, Stop, Pretty Water...................................... irs. Follen, 55Child's Wish in June................... ...................Mrs. Gilman, 56Under my Window..........................................T. Westwood, 57The School............................................Fitz-Hugh Ludlow, 58"Hold Fast What I Give You,". ..............................Lily Warner, 59The Tree............................................ B)brnstjerne Bf)rnson, 61Good-Night and Good-Morning ............................Lord Houghton, 62The Little Maiden and the Little Bird..................... 63The Orioles.................... ............... ............ 64A Bird's-Eye View............................Poems Writtenfor a Child, 65Sing on, Blithe Bird................................ William Motherwell, 66


x CONTENTS.The Sandpiper..............................................Celia Thaxter, 67The Sorrowful Sea-Gull...................................... Child- World, 68The Brown Thrush.........................................Lucy Larcom, 70Who Stole the Bird's-Nest? .................................L. Maria Child, 70Robert of Lincoln................................. William Cullen Bryant, 73The Bluebird ....................................Emily Huntington Miller, 76Milking... ............................................... Celia Thaxter, 77The Cow-Boy's Song ................................Mrs. Anna M. Wells, 79Old Dobbin....................................................Eliza Cook, 81Farm-Yard Song......................................... T. Trowbridge, 83Boys' Play and Girls' Play.................................. Mrs. Hawtrey, 86Little White Lily........................................ George Macdonald, 88Buttercups and Daisies....................................... Mary Hlowitt, 89Little Dandelion ........................................Helen B. Bostwiclc, 90The Bramble-Flower...................................... Ebenezer Elliott, 92Jack in the Pulpit.................................... ...93The Violet ....................................................Jane Taylor, 96Winter ................................................. From the German, 98The Cuckoo.................................................John Logan, 100The Brook.................................................Alfred Tennyson, 101The Gladness of Nature........................... William Cullen Bryant, 103Corn-Fields................................................. Mary Howitt, 105LEGENDARY.Among Green Pleasant Meadows .......................... 109The Fairies of the Caldon-Low..............................Mary Howitt, 111The Children in the Moon....................... From the Scandinavian, 115Hiawatha's Childhood ................................. IV. Longfellow, 117The Pied Piper of Hamelin..............................Robert Browning, 121Greediness Punished........................From the German of Riickert, 130The Toy of the Giant's Child..............From the German of Chamisso, 131PICTURES, FANCIES, AND MEMORIES.The Piper ................................................. William Blake, 135Song of the Elfin Miller ................................Allan Cunningham, 136The Fairy Folk........................................ William Allingham, 137Castles in the Air....................................... James Ballantyne, 139Lady Moon..............................................Lord Houghton, 142The New Moon ...............................................Mrs. Follen, 143The Owl and the Pussy-Cat ...................................EdwardLear, 145Topsy-Turvy World......................................."Lilliput Levee," 146A Visit from St. Nicholas............................... clement C. Moore, 147Jack Frost .......................... ...................Hannah F. Gould, 149Kitty........................... ............... Marian Douglas, 150What?.............................................Kate Putnam Osgood, 151Romance of the Swan's Nest.... .............Elizabeth Barrett Browning, 152A Masquerade.................. ................... 155Little Sorrow.............................................Marian Douglas, 156" A Bird in the Hand is worth Two in the Bush,"Poems Writtenfor a Child, 159The Shadows ............. ................... George Macdonald, 159


CONTENTS. xiPAQOA Child's Thought of God...................Elizabeth Barrett Browning, 161Larvae............................................Mrs. AD. T. .Whiitney, 162Little Christel............... ..... ......................"L illiputLevee," 164I Remember, I Remember................................. Thomas Hood, 168Our Homestead.................... ..................... Phbe Cary, 169The Afternoon Nap................ ...................Charles G. Eastman, 171Saturday Afternoon......... ..............................N. P. Willis, 172In School-Days.............................. ...........John G. Whittier, 173JeanieMorrison..................................... William Motherwell, 176The Little Brother .......................................... Alice Cary, 180The Graves of a Household................................ Mrs. Hemans, 181MISCELLANEOUS.The Children's Hour ............ .............Henry WV. Longfellow, 185Father is Coming. ...........................................Mary Howitt, 187A Little Goose........................ ............ Eliza Sproat Turner, 188TheJohnny-Cake.......... ..... .................... 190Thanksgiving-Day ..... ........... .....................L. Maria Child, 192The Clocking Hen...................................Aunt Efle's Rhymes, 194The Crow's Children ..................................... ..Phoebe Cary, 195Dame Duck's First Lecture on Education ............Aunt ffle's Rhymes, 197The Motherless Turkeys...................................Marian Douglas, 200The Water-Mill................... ................Aunt Eie's Rhymes, 202Charley, the Story-Teller............................... From the German, 204The Little Nurse ...................................... 205Benny........................ ........................ 208Sunday Morning.............................From the German of Hebel, 210We are Seven................... ................... William Wordsworth, 212The Child-Judge ................................... 215Avis............................................Oliver Wendell Holmes, 217The First Snow-Fall................................ James Russell Lowell, 220Child and Mother................... ......................Thomas Hood, 222A Comforter....................................Adelaide Anne Proctor, 224A Story by the Fire.......................................Dora Greenwell, 225A Night with a Wolf.......................................Bayard Taylor, 227Lost on the Prairie................... ....................Rose Terry, 228Lucy Gray.......................................William Wordsworth, 229The Captain's Daughter.................................. James T Fields, 232The Gray Swan...............................................Alice Cary, 233The Battle of Blenheim...................................Robert Southey, 235John Gilpin............................................. William Cowper, 237The Spider and the Fly................... ................... Mary Howitt, 246The Mountain and the Squirrel...........................R. W. Emerson, 250Little Brown Hands.........................................A. H. Krout, 251HYMNS.SMother's Hymn........................................From the Swedish, 255The Nearest Friend...........................................F. W. Faber, 255A Mother's Morning Prayer ............................. 256Hymn of a Child................................Abridged.from C. Wesley, 257An Evening Prayer......................................Bernard Barton, 258


xii CONTENTS.PAGEAll Things Beautiful.........................................John Keble, 260Falling to Sleep....................................... From the German, 261The God of my Childhood.................................... F. W. Faber, 262LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.Frontispiece....................................................................Old Gaelic Lullaby...................................... ..... .... ............. 4A Sleeping Child. ........................ ................... ................... 6Polly............... .... ............. ... .... ..... ................... 8Willie Winkie......................... .............. ......................... 1Philip, my King............................. ................................. 13Sleep Baby, Sleep .............. .. ............ ....................... 18The Morning-Glory................. ................................. ..... 24How the Gates came Ajar..................................................... 29The Child s World ..................................... ....................... 34The Barefoot Boy ............................... ..................... ........ 38Seven Times One.......................................................... 43A Little Girl's Fancies........ .............................................. 46Grace and her Friends ..................................... .... ...........48 & 50Wishing ................ ................................ .............. .. 54The Tree.................. .................. .................................... 61The Little Maiden and the Little Bird.......................................... 63The Sorrowful Sea-Gull..................... .................. ............ 69Robert of Lincoln........................................ ..... ................ 74The Bluebird..................................................................... 77The Cow-Boy's Song ....... ....... ........................................ 80Farm-Yard Song.............................................................. 83Boys' Play and Girls' Play. .................................................. 86Little Dandelion ...... ..................................................... 91The Violet......................... ...................... ...................... 97Winter ............... ....................................................98 & 99The Cuckoo. ................. ................ .............. ...... ............. 100The Brook ................... ....... ... ................. ..... ....... ..... 101The Gladness of Nature.......................................................... 104Corn-Fields.... ............... .. .. ....... .... ....................... 105Hiawatha's Childhood................. .. ............................... 118The Pied Piper of Hamelin... ... ........ ................................ 121Castles in the Air .................................. ............. ... ........... 140Lady Moon ......... ..................................................... 142The New Moon........................... ..................................... 144The Owl and the Pussy-Cat................................................... 145Little Sorrow............................................................. 157 & 158The Shadows.... ........................................... .. ...... 160Larv ...... ..................................................... 162&163Our Iomestead................... ................................. ........6.9. 169In School-Days......................................... ........ .... 173 & 175Jeanie Morrison... .......................... ....... ... ... .. .. .... -. 177The Children's Hour ............................. .................... .............. 185


CONTENTS. xiiiPAEoThanksgiving-Day........................................ ... ............... 193The Clocking Hen............. ........................... .................. 194 & 195Dame Duck's First Lecture on Education..................................... 198The Motherless Turkeys....................................................... 200Charley, the Story-Teller.................... ....................................... 204The First Snow-Fall .......... ....... ................................ 220Child and Mother. ................. .... .................................... 223The Spider and the Fly ........................................................ 247Little Brown Hands ........................... .............. .......... .. 252An Evening Prayer.... ............. ........................................ 259All Things Beautiful ........................................................ 260The God of my Childhood...... ... .............................................. 263


I


INFANCY.THE BABY.WHERE did you come from, baby dear?Out of the everywhere into the here.Where did you get your eyes so blue?Out of the sky as I came through.What makes the light in them sparkle and spin?Some of the starry spikes left in.Where did you get that little tear ?I found it waiting when I got here.What makes your forehead so smooth and high?A soft hand stroked it as I went by.What makes your cheek like a warm white rose?Something better than any one knows.Whence that three-cornered smile of bliss ?Three angels gave me at once a kiss.Where did you get that pearly ear ?God spoke, and it came out to hear.Where did you get those arms and hands?Love made itself into hooks and bands.Feet, whence did you come, you darling things?From the same box as the cherub's wings.


4 CHILD LIFE.How did they all just come to be you ?God thought about me, and so I grew.But how did you come to us, you dear ?God thought of you, and so I am here.- George Macdonald.OLD GAELIC LULLABY.HUSH the waves are rolling in,White with foam, white with foam;Father toils amid the din;But baby sleeps at home.A p


INFANCY.Hush the winds roar hoarse and deep, -On they come, on they come !Brother seeks the wandering sheep:But baby sleeps at home.Hush the rain sweeps o'er the knows,Where they roam, where they roam;Sister goes to seek the cows;But baby sleeps at home.LITTLE BIRDIE.WHAT does little birdie say,In her nest at peep of day ?" Let me fly," says little birdie,"Mother, let me fly away."" Birdie, rest a little longer,Till the little wings are stronger."So she rests a little longer,Then she flies away.What does little baby say,In her bed at peep of day ?Baby says, like little birdie," Let me rise and fly away.""Baby, sleep a little longer,Till the little limbs are stronger.If she sleeps a little longer,Baby, too, shall fly away."-Alfred Tennyson.


6 CHILD LIFE.A SLEEPING CHILD.LIPS, lips, open !Up comes a little bird that lives inside,Up comes a little bird, and peeps, and out he flies.All the day he sits inside, and sometimes he sings ;Up he comes and out he goes at night to spread his wings.Little bird, little bird, whither will you go ?Round about the world while nobody can know.Little bird, little bird, whither do you flee?Far away round the world while nobody can see.Little bird, little bird, how long will you roam ?All round the world and around again home.Round the round world, and back through the air,When the morning comes, the little bird is there.Back comes the little bird, and looks,, and in he fliesUp wakes the little boy, and opens both his eyes.Sleep, sleep, little boy, little bird's away,Little bird will come again, by the peep of day;


INFANCY.Sleep, sleep, little boy, little bird must goRound about the world, while nobody can know.Sleep, sleep sound, little bird goes round,Round and round he goes, sleep, sleep sound !- Arthur Hugh Clough.POLLY.BRowN eyes, straight nose ;Dirt pies,, rumpled clothes.Torn books, spoilt toys ;Arch looks, unlike a boy's ;Little rages, obvious arts ;(Three her age is), cakes, tarts;Falling down off chairs ;Breaking crown down stairs ;Catching flies on the pane ;Deep sighs cause not plain ;Bribing you with kissesFor a few farthing blisses.Wide-awake ; as you hear,"Mercy's sake, quiet, dear !"New shoes, new frock ;Vague views of what's o'clockWhen it's time to go to bed,And scorn sublime for what's said.


8 CHILD LIFE.Folded hands, saying prayersUnderstands not, nor cares


INFANCY.Thinks it odd ; smiles away ;Yet may God hear her pray !Bed-gown white; kiss Dolly ;Good-night that's Polly.Fast asleep, as you see ;SHeaven keep my girl for me-" Lilliput Levee"MY GOOD-FOR-NOTHING." WHAT are you good for, my brave little man ?Answer that question for me, if you can, -You, with your fingers as white as a nun, -You, with your ringlets as bright as the sun.All the day long, with your busy contriving,Into all mischief and fun you are driving ;See if your wise little noddle can tellWhat you are good for. Now ponder it well."Over the carpet the dear little feetCame with a patter to climb on my seat ;Two merry eyes, full of frolic and glee,Under their lashes looked up unto me ;Two little hands pressing soft on my face,Drew me down close in a loving embrace ;Two rosy lips gave the answer so true," Good to love you, mamma, good to love you."-Emily Huntington Miller.


10 CHILD LIFE.1 :. ,. 5,.:'* ,' ,iijI---~-WILLIE WINKIE.Wee Willie WinkieRuns through the town,Up-stairs and down-stairsIn his night-gown,Tapping at the window,Crying at the lock," Are the weans in their bed,For it's now ten o'clock ?"


INFANCY. 11" Hey Willie Winkie,Are you coming then ?The cat's singing purrieTo the sleeping hen;The dog is lying on the floorAnd does not even peep ;But here's a wakeful laddieThat will not fall asleep."Anything but sleep, you rogue !Glowering like the moon;Rattling in an iron jugWith an iron spoon ;Rumbling, tumbling all about,Crowing like a cock,Screaming like I don't know what,Waking sleeping folk." Hey Willie Winkie,Can't you keep him still ?Wriggling off a body's kneeLike a very eel;Pulling at the cat's ear,As she drowsy hums ; -Heigh, Willie Winkie !See !-there he comes "Wearied is the motherThat has a restless wean,A wee, stumpy bairnie,Heard whene'er he's seen -That has a battle aye with sleepBefore he'll close an e'e ;But a kiss from off his rosy lipsGives strength anew to me.- William Miller.


12 CHILD LIFE.CHOOSING A NAME.I HAVE got a new-born sister.I was nigh the first that kissed her.When the nursing-woman brought herTo papa, his infant daughter,How papa's dear eyes did glisten !-She will shortly be to christen ;And papa has made the offerI shall have the naming of her.Now, I wonder what would please her-Charlotte, Julia or Louisa ?Ann and Mary they're too common ;Joan's too formal for a woman;Jane's a prettier name beside ;But we had a Jane that died.They would say, if 'twas Rebecca,That she was a little Quaker.Edith's pretty, but that looksBetter in old English books ;Ellen's left off long ago ;Blanche is out of fashion now.None that I have named as yetAre so good as Margaret.Emily is neat and-fine ;What do you think of Caroline?How I'm puzzled and perplexedWhat to choose or think of next !I am in a little feverLest the name that I should give herShould disgrace her or defame her :-I will leave papa to name her.- Mary Lamb0


INFANCY 13aiI -* ,S_ *,,- -.^ ;'''- i 'PHILIP, MY KING.LoOK at me with thy large, brown eyes,Philip, my King !For round thee the purple shadow liesOf babyhood's regal dignitiesLay on my neck thy tiny handWith Love's invisible sceptre laden ;I am thine Esther, to commandTill thou shalt find thy queen hand-maiden,Philip, my King I


14 CHILD LIFE.Oh, the day when thou goest a-wooing,Philip, my King !When those beautiful lips are suing,And, some gentle heart's bars undoing,Thou dost enter, love-crowned, and thereSittest all glorified Rule kindly,Tenderly, over thy kingdom fair ;For we that love, ah we love so blindly,Philip, my King !I gaze from thy sweet mouth up to thy brow,Philip, my King !Aye, there lies the spirit, all sleeping now,That may rise like a giant, and make men bowAs to one God-throned amidst his peers.My Saul, than thy brethren higher and fairer,Let me behold thee in coming years !Yet thy head needeth a circlet rarer,Philip, my King -A wreath, not of gold, but palm One day,Philip, my King !Thou too must tread, as we tread, a wayThorny, and bitter, and cold, and gray;Rebels within thee, and foes withoutWill snatch at thy crown ; but go on, gloriousMartyr, yet monarch till angels shout,As thou sittest at the feet of God victorious," Philip, the King !"- Author of " John Halifax."


INFANCY. 15A MOTHER'S EXCUSE.IT comes again, the blessed day,Made glorious by the Saviour's birth,When faintly in a manger dawnedThe light of God which fills the earth.Along a weary, wintry waste,My heart a loving pilgrim wendsHer pious way, this holy time,To greet you, 0 beloved friends!Fondly I long to take my placeBeside your hearth, itsjoys to share,-To sun me in the summer smilesOf the dear faces gathered there.But baby eyes upraised to mine,And baby fingers on my breast,Steep all my soul in sweet content, -Charm even such longings into rest.Yet, dear ones, let my name be breathedKindly around your Christmas-tree,And the still presence of a soulMake welcome in the place of me.No unadorned and humble guestComes that fond soul this blessed even,She bears a jewel on her breastThe fairest of the gifts of heaven.-A rose that breathes of Paradise,Just budded from the life divine,A little, tender, smiling babe,As yet more God's and heaven's than mine 1


16 CHILD LIFE.Born in the Saviour's hallowed month,A blessed Christ-child may she be,A little maiden of the Lord; -Room for her by the Christmas-tree !- Grace Greenwood.CHRIST AND THE LITTLE ONES." THE Master has come over Jordan,"Said Hannah the mother one day ;" He is healing the people who throng Him,With a touch of His finger, they say." And now I shall carry the children,Little Rachel and Samuel and John,I shall carry the baby, Esther,For the Lord to look upon."The father looked at her kindly,But he shook his head and smiled :"Now who but a doting motherWould think of a thing so wild ?" If the children were tortured by demons,Or dying of fever, 'twere well;Or had they the taint of the leper,Like many in Israel."" Nay, do not hinder me, Nathan,I feel such a burden of care,If I carry it to the Master,Perhaps I shall leave it there."If He lay His hand on the childrenMy heart will be lighter, I know,


INFANCY. 17For a blessing for ever and everWill follow them as they go."So over the hills of Judah,Along by the vine-rows green,With Esther asleep on her bosom,And Rachel her brothers between;'Mid the people who hung on His teaching,Or waited His touch and His word,-Through the row of proud Pharisees listeningShe pressed to the feet of the Lord." Now why shouldst thou hinder the Master,"Said Peter, " with children like these ?Seest not how from morning to eveningHe teacheth and health disease ? "Then Christ said, " Forbid not the children,Permit them to come unto me !"And He took in His arms little Esther,And Rachel He set on His knee ;And the heavy heart of the motherWas lifted all earth-care above,As He laid His hand on the brothers,And blest them with tenderest love;As He said of the babes in His bosom," Of such are the kingdom of heaven --And strength for all duty and trial,That hour to her spirit were given.--Julia Gill.


18 CHILD LIFE., kSLEEP, BABY, SLEEP ISLEEP, baby, sleep !Thy father watches his sheep ;Thy mother is shaking the dreamland tree,And down comes a little dream on thee.Sleep, baby, sleep !Sleep, baby, sleep !The large stars are the sheep;


INFANCY. 19The little stars are the lambs, I guess;And the gentle moon is the shepherdess.Sleep, baby, sleep!Sleep, baby, sleep!Our Saviour loves His sheep ;He is the Lamb of God on high,Who for our sakes came down to die.Sleep, baby, sleep !-From the German.THE BALLAD OF BABIE BELL.HAVE you not heard the poets tellHow came the dainty Babie BellInto this world of ours ?The gates of heaven were left ajar ;With folded hands and dreamy eyes,Wandering out of Paradise,She saw this planet, like a star,Hung in the glistening depths of even, -Its bridges, running to and fro,O'er which the white-winged angels go,Bearing the holy dead to heaven.She touched a bridge of flowers, those feet,So light they did not bend the bellsOf the celestial asphodels !They fell like dew upon the flowers,Then all the air grew strangely sweet !And thus came dainty Babie BellInto this world of ours.


20 CHILD LIFE.She came and brought delicious May.The swallows built beneath the eaves;Like sunlight in and out the leaves,The robins went the livelong day ;The lily swung its noiseless bell,And o'er the porch the trembling vineSeemed bursting with its veins of wine.How sweetly, softly, twilight fell !O, earth was full of singing-birds,And opening spring-tide flowers,When the dainty Babie BellCame to this world of ours !O Babie, dainty Babie Bell,How fair she grew from day to day !What woman-nature filled her eyes,What poetry within.them lay !Those deep and tender twilight eyes,So full of meaning, pure and bright,As if she yet stood in the lightOf those oped gates of Paradise.And so we loved her more and more;Ah, never in our hearts beforeWas love so lovely born :We felt we had a link betweenThis real world and that unseen -The land beyond the morn.And for the love of those dear eyes,For love of hb r whom God led forth,(The mother's being ceased on earthWhen Babie came from Paradise), -For love of Him who smote our lives,And woke the chords of joy and pain,We said, Dear Christ! our hearts bent downLike violets after rain.


INFANCY. 21And now the orchards, which were whiteAnd red with blossoms when she came,Were rich in autumn's mellow prime.The clustered apples burnt like flame,The soft-cheeked peaches blushed and fell,The ivory chestnut burst its shell,The grapes hung purpling in the grange ;And time wrought just as rich a changeIn little Babie Bell.Her lissome form more perfect grew,And in her features we could trace,In softened curves, her mother's face !Her angel-nature ripened too.We thought her lovely when she cameBut she was holy, saintly now :--Around her pale angelic browWe saw a slender ring of flame !God's hand had taken away the sealThat held the portals of her speechAnd oft she said a few strange wordsWhose meaning lay beyond our reach.She never was a child to us,We never held her being's key,We could not teach her holy things;She was Christ's self in purity.It came upon us by degrees :We saw its shadow ere it fell,The knowledge that our God had sentHis messenger for Babie Bell.We shuddered with unlanguaged pain,And all our hopes were changed to fears,And all our thoughts ran into tearsLike sunshine into rain.


22 CHILD LIFE.We cried aloud in our belief," O, smite us gently, gently, God !Teach us to bend and kiss the rod,And perfect grow through grief."Ah, how we loved her, God can tell;Her heart was folded deep in ours.Our hearts are broken, Babie Bell!At last he came, the messenger,The messenger from unseen lands :And what did dainty Babie Bell ?She only crossed her little hands,She only looked more meek and fair !We parted back her silken hair,We wove the roses round her brow,-White buds, the summer's drifted snow,-Wrapt her from head to foot in flowers !And then went dainty Babie BellOut of this world of ours !- T. B. Aldrich.THE MORNING-GLORY.WE wreathed about our darling's headThe morning-glory bright ;Her little face looked out beneath,So full of life and light,So lit as with a clear sunrise,That we could only say," She is the morning-glory true,And her poor types are they."So always from that happy timeWe called her by their name,


INFANCY. 23And very fitting did it seem;For sure as morning came,Behind her cradle bars she smiledTo catch the first faint ray,As from the trellis smiles the flower,And opens to the day.But not so beautiful they rearTheir airy cups of blue,As turned her sweet eyes to the light,Brimmed with sleep's tender dew ;And not so close their tendrils fineRound their supports are thrown,As those dear arms whose outstretched pleaClasped all hearts to her own.We used to think how she had come,Even as comes the flower,The last fi.i r. i-. r added giftTo crown Love's morning hour ;And how in her was imaged forthThe love we could not say,As on the little dewdrops roundShines back the heart of day.We never could have thought, O God,That she must wither up,Almost before a day was flown,Like the morning-glory's cup ;We never thought to see her droopHer fair and noble head,Till she lay stretched before our eyes,Wilted, and cold, and dead


24 CHILD LIFE.The morning-glory's blossomingWill soon be coming round;We see their rows of heart-shaped leavesUpspringing from the ground. !The tender things the winter killedRenew again their birth ; .But the glory of our morning .. .Has passed away from earth.Oh, Earth in vain our aching eyesStretch over thy green plain !Too harsh thy dews, too gross thine air,Her spirit to sustain ;But up in groves of Paradise -Full surely we shall seeOur morning-glory beautifulTwine round our dear Lord's knee. S_-Maria White Lowell. ,) .. f


INFANCY. 25OUR LITTLE QUEEN.COULD you have seen the violetsThat blossomed in her eyes;Could you have kissed that golden hair,And drank those holy sighs;You would have been her tiring-maidAs joyfully as I, -Content to dress your little queen,And let the world go by.Could you have seen those violetsHide in their graves of snow ;Drawn all that gold along your handWhile she lay smiling so ; -O, you would tread this weary earthAs heavily as I !-Content to clasp her little grave,And let the world go by.- Overland Monthly.THE CHANGELING.I HAD a little daughter,And she was given to me,To lead me gently backwardTo the Heavenly Father's knee,That I, by the force of Nature,Might in some dim-wise divineThe depth of His infinite patienceTo this wayward soul of mine.


26 CHILD LIFE.I know not how others saw her,But to me she was wholly fair,And the light of the heaven she came fromStill lingered and gleamed in her hair ;For it was as wavy and golden,And as many changes took,As the shadows of sun-gilt ripplesOn the yellow bed of the brook.To what can I liken her smilingUpon me, her kneeling lover ?How it leaped from her lips to her eyelids,And dimpled her wholly over,Till her outstretched hands smiled also,And I almost seemed to seeThe very heart of her motherSending sun through her veins to me !She had been with us scarce a twelvemonth,And it hardly seemed a day,When a troop of wandering angelsStole my little daughter away ;Or perhaps those heavenly ZincaliBut loosed the hampering strings,And when they opened her cage-door,My little bird used her wings.But they left in her stead a changeling,A little angel child,That seems like her bud in full blossom,And smiles as she never smiled:When I wake in the morning, I see itWhere she always used to lie,And I feel as weak as a violetAlone neathh the awful sky :-


INFANCY. 27As weak, yet as trustful also ;For the whole year long I see,All the wonders of faithful NatureStill worked for the love of me ;Winds wander, and dews drip earthward,Rain falls, suns rise and set,Earth whirls, and all but to prosperA poor little violet.This child is not mine as the first was,I cannot sing it to rest,I cannot lift it up fatherlyAnd bless it upon my breast ;Yet it lies in my little one's cradle,And sits in my little one's chair,And the light of the heaven she's gone to,Transfigures its golden hair.- James Russell Lowell.DEATH OF AN INFANT.A HOST of angels flying,Through cloudless skies impelled,Upon the earth beheldA pearl of beauty lying,Worthy to glitter brightIn heaven's vast halls of light.They saw, with glances tender,An infant newly born,O'er whom life's earliest mornJust cast its opening splendor.Virtue it could not know,Nor vice, nor joy, nor woe.


28 CHILD LIFE.The blest angelic legionGreeted its birth above,And came on wings of loveFrom heaven's enchanting region,Bending their winged wayTo where the infant lay.They spread their pinions o'er it, -That little pearl which shoneWith lustre all its own, -And then on high they bore it,Where glory has its birth ;-But left the shell on earth.- Front the Dutch of Dirk Smits.HOW THE GATES CAME AJAR.'TWAS whispered one morning in heavenHow the little child-angel May,In the shade of the great, white portal,Sat sorrowing night and day.How she said to the stately warden -He of the key and bar -"0 angel, sweet angel I pray you,Set the beautiful gates ajar, -Only a little, I pray you,Set the beautiful gates ajar !"I can hear my mother weeping;She is lonely ; she cannot seeA glimmer of light in the darkness,Where the gates shut after me.Oh turn me the key, sweet angel,


INFANCY. 29The splendor will shine so far !"But the warden answered: "I dare notSet the beautiful gates ajar,"-Spoke low and answered: "I dare notSet the beautiful gates ajar !". -- --- -" -~ ~--- _-- ----- ----- -_ : -__ =-_ -- __ -e __ __ __ -. ---.^ _F _-P. Wr -MV-;- imP 5 F- xt9f m m9AW 99wggEf -TI a~lgM-~1----A~mm-~--~-~-~~---AL~


30 CHILD LIFE.Then rose up Mary the Blessed,Sweet Mary, Mother of Christ :Her hand on the hand of the angelShe laid, and her touch sufficed;Turned was the key in the portal,Fell ringing the golden bar ;And lo in the little child's fingersStood the beautiful gates ajar !In the little child-angel's fingersStood the beautiful gates ajar !"And this key, for further using,To my blessed Son shall be given ;"Said Mary, Mother of Jesus -Tenderest heart in heaven.Now, never a sad-eyed motherBut may catch the glory afar ;Since safe in the Lord Christ's bosom,Are the keys of the gates ajar ;Close hid in the dear Christ's bosom,And the gates forever ajar !--From the Italian.


OUT OF DOORS.


ii


OUT OF DOORS.THE CHILD'S WORLD." GREAT, wide, beautiful, wonderful world,With the wonderful water round you curled,And the wonderful grass upon your breast, -World, you are beautifully drest." The wonderful air is over me,And the wonderful wind is shaking the tree,It walks on the water, and whirls the mills,And talks to itself on the tops of the hills." You, friendly Earth how far do you goWith the wheat-fields that nod and the rivers that flow,With cities and gardens, and cliffs, and islesAnd people upon you for thousands of miles ?" Ah, you are so great, and I am so small,I tremble to think of you, World, at all ;And yet, when I said my prayers, to-day,A whisper inside me seemed to say,


34 CHILD LIFE.. .3 ._ .'You are more than the Earth, though you are such a dot:You can love and think, and the Earth cannot !-" Lilliput Lectures."~~ .. ..--- ilpt etrs


OUT OF DOORS. 35THE COUNTRY CHILD.WITH mingled trembling and delight,And slowly falling feet,A little country maiden nowIs passing down the street :A country child, I know it byHer timid air, her wondering eye.The sunlight warm has kissed her brow,And tinged her cheek with brown ;The odor of the violetsComes with her to the town ;We almost guess the woodland placeWhere she has dwelt, from her sweet face IWe almost read her inner thoughts,Through her large, wistful eyes;How bright to her the city seems,How much like Paradise,As Nature's child, with bounding heart,Looks, for the first glad time, on ArtThe merchant, in his store-house door,Smiles as she passes by ;The laborer pauses in his work,To watch her, with a sigh :Where'er she goes, she wakens dreamsOf shady nooks and rippling streams.She seems to bring the country here, -Its birds, its flowers, its dew;And slowly, as amid the throng,She passes from our view,We watch her sadly, as we mightSome pleasant landscape fade from sight.


36 CHILD LIFE.Ah, well! we would not keep her here,These dusty streets to roam,-So fair a flower should open withThe daisy buds at home;Mid primrose stars, as sweet and wild,As she will be, dear woodland child !- Marian Douglas.THE BAREFOOT BOY.BLESSINGS on thee, little man,Barefoot boy, with cheek of tan iWith thy turned-up pantaloons,And thy merry whistled tunes ;With thy red lip, redder stillKissed by strawberries on the hill;With the sunshine on thy face,Through thy torn brim's jaunty grace:From my heart I give thee joy II was once a barefoot boy.Prince thou art, the grown-up manOnly is republican.Let the million-dollared ride !Barefoot, trudging at his side,Thou hast more than he can buy,In the reach of ear and eye, -Outward sunshine, inward joy :Blessings on thee, barefoot boy IO, for boyhood's painless play;Sleep that wakes in laughing day ;Health that mocks the doctor's rules;Knowledge never learned of schools,


OUT OF DOORS. 37Of the wild bee's morning chase,Of the wild-flower's time and place,Flight of fowl and habitudeOf the tenants of the wood;How the tortoise bears his shell;How the wood-chuck digs his cell,And the ground-mole sinks his well.How the robin feeds her young ;How the oriole's nest is hung ;Where the whitest lilies blow ;Where the freshest berries grow ;Where the ground-nut trails its vine;Where the wood-grape's clusters shine:Of the black wasp's cunning way, -Mason of his walls of clay, -And the architectural plansOf gray hornet artisans -For, eschewing books and tasks,Nature answers all he asks ;Hand in hand with her he walks,Face to face with her he talks,Part and parcel of her joy, -Blessings on the barefoot boy !0, for boyhood's time of June,Crowding years in one brief moon,When all things I heard or saw,Me, their master, waited for.I was rich in flowers and trees,Humming-birds and honey-beesFor my sport the squirrel played;Plied the snouted mole his spade;For my taste the blackberry conePurpled over hedge and stone ;Laughed the brook for my delight


38 CHILD IF..jil- v-z .- ._% -L -..... ._ ...i~ -'.__. t,S


OUT OF DOORS. 39Through the day and through the night,Whispering at the garden wall,Talked with me from fall to fall;Mine the sand-rimmed pickerel pond ;Mine the walnut slopes beyond ;Mine, on bending orchard trees,Apples of Hesperides !Still, as my horizon grewLarger grew my riches too ;All the world I saw or knew,Seemed a complex Chinese toy,Fashioned for a barefoot boy !O, for festal dainties spread,Like my bowl of milk and bread, -Pewter spoon and bow] of wood,On the door-stone, gray and rude !O'er me, like a regal tent,Cloudy-ribbed, the sunset bent,Purple-curtained, fringed with gold,Looped in many a wind-swung fold ;While for music came the playOf the pied frog's orchestra ;And, to light the noisy choir,Lit the fly his lamp of fire.I was monarch : pomp and joyWaited on the barefoot boy !Cheerily, then, my little man,Live and laugh, as boyhood can !Though the flinty slopes be hard,Stubble-speared the new-mown sward,Every morn shall lead thee throughFresh baptisms of the dew ;


40 CHILD LIFE.Every evening from thy feetShall the cool wind kiss the heat:All too soon these feet must hideIn the prison cells of pride,Lose the freedom of the sod,Like a colt's for work be shod,Made to tread the mills of toil,Up and down in ceaseless moil:Happy if their track be foundNever on forbidden ground;Happy if they sink not inQuick and treacherous sands of sin.Ah that thou could'st know thy joy,Ere it passes, barefoot boy !-John G. Whittier.LITTLE BELL.PIPED the blackbird on the beechwood spray," Pretty maid, slow wandering this way,What's your name ?" quoth he -" What's your name ? 0 stop, afid straight unfold,Pretty maid with showery curls of gold."" Little Bell," said she.Little Bell sat down beneath the rocks-Tossed aside her gleaming golden locks -" Bonny bird," quoth she," Sing me your best song, before I go."" Here 's the very finest song I know,Little Bell," said he.


OUT OF DOORS. 41And the blackbird piped; you never heardHalf so gay a song from any bird ; -Full of quips and wiles,Now so round and rich, now soft and slow,All for love of that sweet face below,Dimpled o'er with smiles.And the while the bonny bird did pourHis full heart out freely o'er and o'er,'Neath the morning skies,In the little childish heart below,All the sweetness seemed to grow and grow,And shine forth in happy overflowFrom the blue, bright eyes.Down the dell she tripped, and through the gladePeeped the squirrel from the hazel shade,And, from out the treeSwung, and leaped, and frolicked, void of fear,-While bold blackbird piped, that all might hear,"Little Bell !" piped he.Little Bell sat down amid the fern:"Squirrel, squirrel, to your task return-Bring me nuts," quoth she.Up, away the frisky squirrel hies-Golden wood-lights glancing in his eyes -And down the tree,Great ripe nuts, kissed brown by July sun,In the little lap, dropped one by one ;-Hark, how blackbird pipes to see the fun !" Happy Bell !" pipes he.Little Bell looked up and down the glade ;--" Squirrel, squirrel, if you're not afraid,Come and share with me !"


42 CHILD LIFE.Down came squirrel, eager for his fare,-Down came bonny blackbird, I declare ILittle Bell gave each his honest share;Ah, the merry three !And the while these frolic playmates twainPiped and frisked from bough to bough again,'Neath the morning skies,In the little childish heart below,All the sweetness seemed to grow and grow,And shine out in happy overflow,From her blue, bright eyes.By her snow-white cot at close of day,Knelt sweet Bell, with folded palms to pray:Very calm and clearRose the praying voice to where, unseen,In blue heaven, an angel shape serenePaused awhile to hear."What good child is this," the angel said," That, with happy heart, beside her bedPrays so lovingly? "Low and soft, oh very low and soft,Crooned the blackbird in the orchard croft," Bell, dear Bell " crooned he."Whom God's creatures love," the angel fairMurmured, " God doth bless with angels' care;Child, thy bed shall beFolded safe from harm. Love, deep and kind,Shall watch around, and leave good gifts behind,Little Bell, for thee."- T. Westwood.


OUT OF DOORS. 43SEVEN TIMES ONE.THERE'S no dew left on the daisies and clover,There's no rain left in heaven :I've said my " seven times" over and over,Seven times one are seven.A"-.+.. ~ ~ -'.IS -, ,.i r,- .. ;--


44 CHILD LIFE.I am old, so old I can write a letter ;My birthday lessons are done ;The lambs play always, they know no better, -They are only one times one.0 Moon in the night I have seen you sailingAnd shining so round and low ;You were bright, ah bright but your light is failing,You are nothing now but a bow.You Moon, have you done something wrong in heaven,That God has hidden your face ?I hope if you have, you will soon be forgiven,And shine again in your place.O velvet bee, you're a dusty fellow ;You've powdered your legs with gold !O brave marshmary buds, rich and yellow,Give me your money to hold !0 columbine, open your folded wrapper,Where two twin turtle-doves dwell!0 cuckoo-pint, toll me the purple clapperThat hangs in your clear green bell !And show me your nest, with the young ones in it,-I will not steal it away ;I am old you may trust me, linnet, linnet, -I am seven times one to-day.-Jean Ingelow.A WISH." BE my fairy, mother,Give me a wish a day ;Something, as well in sunshineAs when the rain-drops play."


OUT OF DOORS. 45" And if I were a fairy,With but one wish to spare,What should I give thee, darling,-To quiet thine earnest prayer?""I'd like a little brook, mother,All for my very own,To laugh all day among the trees,And shine on the mossy stone ;" To run right under the window,And sing me fast asleep ;With soft steps and a tender sound,Over the grass to creep."Make it run down the hill, mother,With a leap like a tinkling bell,So fast I never can catch the leafThat into its fountain fell."Make it as wild as a frightened bird,As crazy as a bee,With a noise like the baby's funny laugh ;-That's the brook for me "- Bose Terry.A LITTLE GIRL'S FANCIES.O LITTLE flowers, you love me so,You could not do without me;O little birds that come and go,You sing sweet songs about me;O little moss, observed by few,That round the tree is creeping,You like my head to rest on you,When I am idly sleeping.


46 CHILD LIFE.0 rushes by the river side,You bow when I come near you;O fish, you leap about with pride,Because you think I hear you ;0 river, you shine clear and bright,To tempt me to look in you;0 water-lilies, pure and white,You hope that I shall win you.,t j j -. '. -My flowers, you need not shiverMy little buds, don't look so crossDon't talk so loud, my river


OUT OF DOORS. 47I'm telling you I will not go,It's foolish to feel slighted;It's rude to interrupt me so,You ought to be delighted.Ah now you're growing good, I see,Though anger is beguiling :The pretty blossoms nod at me;-I see a robin smiling.And I will make a promise, dears,That will content you, may be :I'll love you through the happy years,Till I'm a nice old lady !True love (like yours and mine) they sayCan never think of ceasing,But year by year, and day by day,Keeps steadily increasing.- Poems written for a Child.GRACE AND HER FRIENDS."YoUR walk is lonely, blue-eyed Grace,Down the long forest-road to school,Where shadows troop, in many a place,From sullen chasm to sunless pool.Are you not often, little maid,Beneath the sighing trees afraid ?""Afraid, beneath the tall, strong treesThat bend their arms to shelter me,And whisper down, with dew and breeze,Sweet sounds that float on lovingly,Till every gorge and cavern seemsThrilled through and through with fairy dreams ?


48 CHILD LIFE." Afraid, beside the water dimThat holds the baby-lilies whiteUpon its bosom, where a hymnRipples forth softly to the lightThat now and then comes gliding in,A lily's budding smile to win?" :,':. -"I Fstto the sldipper prebcipieIn that blue eye no ear there is;"Its hold is firm, the frail, free thing !The harebell's Guardian cares for me :So I am in safe company."-Fast to the slippery precipiceIts hold is firm, the frail, free thing


OUT OF DOORS. 49"The woodbine clambers up the cliffAnd seems to murmur, Little Grace,The sunshine were less welcome, ifIt brought not every day your face.'Red leaves slip down from maples high,And touch my cheek as they flit by."I feel at home with everythingThat has its dwelling in the wood;With flowers that laugh, and birds that sing, -Companions beautiful and good,Brothers and sisters everywhere;And over all, our Father's care."In rose-time or in berry-time,-When ripe seeds fall, or buds peep out, -When green the turf, or white the rime,There's something to be glad about.It makes my heart bound, just to passThe sunbeams dancing on the grass." And when the bare rocks shut me inWhere not a blade of grass will grow,My happy fancies soon beginTo warble music, rich and low,And paint what eyes could never see:My thoughts are company for me."What does it mean to be alone ?And how is any one afraid,Who feels the dear God on His throneBeaming like sunshine through the shade,Warming the damp sod into bloom,And smiling off the thicket's gloom ?


50 CHILD LIFE." At morning, down the wood-path cool,The fluttering leaves make cheerful talk ;After the stifled day at school,I hear, along my homeward walk,The airy wisdom of the wood, -Far easiest to be understood." I whisper to the winds ; I kissThe rough old oak, and clasp his barkNo farewell of the thrush I miss ;I lift the soft veil of the dark,And say to bird, and breeze, and tree,' Good night Good friends you are to me !'-Lucy Larcom..01--g ~i~'I--


OUT OF DOORS. 51OVER IN THE MEADOW.OVER in the meadow,In the sand, in the sun,Lived an old mother-toadAnd her little toadie one."Wink " said the mother ;" I wink," said the one:So she winked and she blinkedIn the sand, in the sun.Over in the meadow,Where the stream runs blue,Lived an old mother-fishAnd her little fishes two." Swim !" said the mother ;" We swim," said the two :So they swam and they leapedWhere the stream runs blue.Over in the meadow,In a hole in a tree,Lived a mother-bluebirdAnd her little birdies three" Sing " said the mother;" We sing," said the three:So they sang, and were glad,In the hole in the tree.Over in the meadow,I In the reeds on the shore,Lived a mother-muskratAnd her little ratties four.


52 CHILD LIFE."Dive !" said the mother ;"We dive," said the four :So they dived and they burrowedIn the reeds on the shore.Over in the meadow,In a snug beehive,Lived a mother-honeybeeAnd her little honeys five."Buzz " said the mother ;" We buzz," said the five:So they buzzed and they hummedIn the snug beehive.Over in the meadow,In a nest built of sticks,Lived a black mother-crowAnd her little crows six." Caw " said the mother;"We caw," said the six :So they cawed and they calledIn their nest built of sticks.Over in the meadow,Where the grass is so even,Lived a gay mother-cricketAnd her little crickets seven."Chirp " said the mother ;"We chirp," said the seven:So they chirped cheery notesIn the grass soft and even.Over in the meadow,By the old mossy gate,Lived a brown mother-lizardAnd her little lizards eight.


OUT OF DOORS."Bask " said the mother;"We bask," said the eight :So they basked in the sunOn the old mossy gate.Over in the meadow,Where the clear pools shine,Lived a green mother-frogAnd her little froggies nine."Croak " said the mother ;" We croak,'" said the nine :So they croaked, and they plashed,Where the clear pools shine.Over in the meadow,In a sly little den,Lived a gray mother-spiderAnd her little spiders ten." Spin " said the mother ;" We spin," said the ten :So they spun lace websIn their sly little den.Over in the meadow,In the soft summer even,Lived a mother-fire-flyAnd her little flies eleven."Shine !" said the mother;"We shine," said the eleven:So they shone like starsIn the soft summer even.Over in the meadow,Where the men dig and delve,Lived a wise mother-antAnd her little anties twelve,


54 CHILD LIFE."Toil " said the mother;"We toil," said the twelve :So they toiled, and were wise,Where the men dig and delve.- Olive A. Wadsworth.WISHING.RING-TING I wish I were a Primrose,A bright yellow Primrose, blowing in the spring !The stooping boughs above me,The wandering bee to love me,The fern and moss to creep across,And the Elm-tree for our king I. -' ., .. ..Nay-stay! I wish I were an Elm-tree,A great, lofty Elm-tree, with green leaves gay!The winds would set them dancing,The sun and moonshine glance in,The birds would house among the boughs,And sweetly sing.O no I wish I were a Robin,A Robin or a little Wren, everywhere to go


OUT OF DOORS. 55Through forest, field, or garden,And ask no leave or pardon,Till winter comes with icy thumbsTo ruffle up our wing !Well--tell! Where should I fly to,Where go to sleep in the dark wood or dell ?Before a day was over,Home comes the rover,For mother's kiss sweeter thisThan any other thing.- William Allingham.STOP, STOP, PRETTY WATER."STOP, stop, pretty water !"Said Mary, one day,To a frolicsome brook,That was running away."You run on so fast!I wish you would stay;My boat and my flowersYou will carry away."But I will run after :Mother says that I may;For I would know whereYou are running away."So Mary ran on ;But I have heard say,That she never could findWhere the brook ran away.- Mrs. Follen.


56 CHILD LIFE.CHILD'S WISH IN JUNE.MOTHER, mother, the winds are at play,Prithee let me be idle to-day,Look, dear mother, the flowers all lieLanguidly under the bright blue sky.See how slowly the streamlet glides;Look how the violet roguishly hides ;Even the butterfly rests on the rose,And scarcely sips the sweets as he goes.Poor Tray is asleep in the noonday sun,And the flies go about him one by one;And Pussy sits near with a sleepy grace,Without ever thinking of washing her face.There flies a bird to a neighboring tree,But very lazily flutters he ;And he sits and twitters a gentle note,That scarcely ruffles his little throat.You bid me be busy ; but, mother, hear,The hum-drum Grasshopper droning near;And the soft west wind is so light in its play,It scarcely moves a leaf on the spray.I wish, oh I wish, I was yonder cloud,'That sails about with its misty shroud;Books and work I no more should see,But I'd come and float, dear mother, o'er thee.-Mrs. Gilman.


OUT OF DOORS. 57UNDER MY WINDOW.UNDER my window, under my window.All in the midsummer weather,Three little girls, with fluttering curls,Flit to and fro together :-There's Bell with her bonnet of satin sheen,And Maud with her mantle of silver-green,And Kate with her scarlet feather.Under my window, under my window,Leaning stealthily over,Merry and clear, the voice I hearOf each glad-hearted rover.Ah sly little Kate, she steals my roses,And Maud and Bell twine wreaths and posies,As merry as bees in clover.Under my window, under my window,In the blue midsummer weather,Stealing slow, on a hushed tip-toe,I catch them all together :-Bell with her bonnet of satin sheen,And Maud with her mantle of silver-green,And Kate with the scarlet feather.Under my window, under my window,And off through the orchard closes ;While Maud she flouts, and Bell she pouts,They scamper, and drop their posies ;But dear little Kate takes naught amiss,And leaps in my arms with a loving kiss,And I give her all my roses.- T. Westwood.


58 CHILD LIFE.THE SCHOOL."LITTLE girl, where do you go to school,And when do you go, little girl ?Over the grass, from dawn till dark,Your feet are in a whirl:You and the cat jump here and there,You and the robins sing ;But what do you know in the spelling-book ?Have you ever learned any thing ?"Thus the little girl answered, -Only stopping to clingTo my finger a minute,As a bird on the wingCatches a twig of sumach,And stops to twitter and swing,-" When the daisies' eyes are a-twinkleWith happy tears of dew ;When swallows waken in the eaves,And the lamb bleats to the ewe;When the lawns are golden-barred,And the kiss of the wind is cool;When morning's breath blows out the stars, -Then do I go to school !" My school-roof is the dappled sky;And the bells that ring for me thereAre all the voices of morningAfloat in the dewy air.Kind Nature is the Madame ;And the book whereout I spellIs dog's-eared by the brooks and glensWhere I know the lesson well."


OUT OF DOORS. 59Thus the little girl answered,In her musical out-door tone:She was up to my pocket,I was a man full-grown;But the next time that she goes to school,She will not go alone !- Fitz-Hugh Ludlow."HOLD FAST WHAT I GIVE YOU."" MOLLY, and Maggie, and Alice,Three little maids in a row,At play in an arbor palace,Where the honeysuckles grow,"Six dimpled palms pressed together,Even and firm, two by two, --Three eager, upturned faces,Bonny brown eyes and blue."Which shall it be, O you charmers?Alas I am sorely tried, -I, a hard-hearted old hermit,Who the question am set to decide." Molly, the sprite, the darling,Shaking her shower of curls,Whose laugh is the brook's own ripple,Gayest and gladdest of girls ?" Maggie, the wild little brownie,Every one's plaything and pet,Who leads me a chase through the gardenFor a kiss, the wicked coquette ?


60 CHILD LIFE." Or Alice ? ah shy-eyed Alice,Looking so softly downUnder her long, dark lashesAnd hair so golden brown,"Alice, who talks with the flowers,And says there are none so wise,Who knows there are elves and fairies,For has n't she seen their bright eyes ?"There, there, at last I am readyTo go down the bright, eager row ;So, up with your hands, my Graces,- Close, nobody else must know." 'Hold fast what I give you,' Molly !(Poor little empty palms )'Hold fast what I give you,' Maggie !(A frown steals over her charms.)" Hold fast what I give you,' Alice !You smile, do you so much care ?Unclasp your little pink fingers:Ah ha the button is there !" But do you know, sweet Alice,All that I give you to keep ?For into my heart you have stolen,As sunbeams to shadows creep."You, a glad little maiden,-How old arc you ? Only nine,-With your bright, brown hair all shining,While the gray is coming to mine."No matter, you'll be my true-love,And come to my old arms so ;And 'hold fast what I give you,' Alice,For nobody else must know." Lily Warner.


OUT OF DOORS. 61THE TREE. :-."THE Tree's early leaf-buds were,bursting their brown ; ':"Shall I take them away?" saidthe Frost, sweeping down. -e ." No, leave them aloneTillthe blossoms have grown,"Prayed the Tree, while he trembled -from rootlet to crown.'The Tree bore his blossoms, andall the birds sung:" Shall I take them away ?" saidthe Wind, as he swung."No, leave them aloneTill the berries have grown,"Said the Tree, while his leafletsquivering hung.The Tree bore his fruit in the mid-summer glow:Said the girl, " May I gather thyberries now ?""Yes, all thou canst see:Take them ; all are for thee,"Said the Tree, while he bent downhis laden boughs low.- Bjdirnsiterne Bjirnson


62 CHILD LIFE.GOOD-NIGHT AND GOOD-MORNING.A FAIR little girl sat under a tree,Sewing as long as her eyes could see;Then smoothed her work and folded it right,And said, " Dear work, good-night, good-night !Such a number of rooks came over her head,Crying " Caw Caw " on their way to bed,She said, as she watched their curious flight," Little black things, good-night, good-night !"The horses neighed, and the oxen lowed,The sheep's " Bleat Bleat !" came over the road ;All seeming to say, with a quiet delight,"Good little girl, good-night, good-night !"She did not say to the sun, " Good-night "Though she saw him there like a ball of light ;For she knew he had God's time to keepAll over the world, and never could sleep.The tall pink foxglove bowed his head;The violets curtsied, and went to bed ;And good little Lucy tied up her hair,And said, on her knees, her favorite prayer.And, while on her pillow she softly lay,She knew nothing more till again it was day;And all things said to the beautiful sun," Good-morning, good-morning our work is begun."-Lord Houghton.


OUT OF DOORS. 63THE LITTLE MAIDEN AND THE LITTLE BIRD.- _- i' I ^ '*. '* 2 0 ,.1. ,- I '." J 'i. "*. '. .. ..... *'" " t" Thanks, little maiden, for all thy care, -But I love dearly, the clear, cool air,And my snug little nest in the old oak-tree."" Little bird little bird stay with me."lf, ti ,] ," h cks ltle mien fo l hycr,But loe derly thecler, co] ir,An ysu ltl et nteod ,kte."r- Littl b ird!ltl id!sa ihm


64 CHILD LIFE." Nay, little damsel away I'll flyTo greener fields and warmer sky ;When Spring returns with pattering rain,You'll hear my merry song again.""Little bird little bird who'll guide theeOver the hills and over the sea ?Foolish one come in the house to stay,For I'm very sure you'll lose your way."" Ah, no, little maiden God guides meOver the hills, and over the sea;I will be free as the rushing air,And sing of sunshine everywhere."- L. Maria Child.THE ORIOLES.FouR little mouths agape for ever ;Four little throats which are never full ;Four little nestlings, who disseverOne big worm, by a mighty pull.Up on a limb the lazy fellow -Perches the father, bold and gay,Proud of his coat of black and yellow,Always singing throughout the day.Close at their side, the watchful mother,Quietly sober in dress and song,Chooses her place, and asks no other,Flying and gleaning all day long.Four little mouths in time grow smaller,Four little throats in time are filled;Four little nestlings quite appall her,Spreading their wings for the sun to gild.


OUT OF DOORS. 65Lazy no longer sits the father, -His is the care of the singing-school ;He must teach them to fly, and gatherSplendid worms by the nearest pool.Singing away on the shaken branches,Under the light of the happy sun;Dropping through blossoms like avalanches, -Father Oriole's work is done.Four little beaks their mouths embolden,Four little throats are round and strong ;Four little nestlings, fledged and golden,Graduate in the world of song.A BIRD'S-EYE VIEW.QUOTH the boy, " I'll climb that tree,And bring down a nest I know."Quoth the girl, "I will not seeLittle birds defrauded so !Cowardly, their nests to take,And their little hearts to break,And their little nests to stealLeave them happy for my sake !Surely little birds can feel! "Quoth the boy, " My senses whirl;Until now I never heardOf the wisdom of a girl,Or the feelings of a bird!Pretty Mrs. Solomon,Tell me what you reckon on


66 CHILD LIFE.When you prate in such a strain;If I wring their necks anon,Certainly they might feel-pain !"Quoth the girl, I watch them talk,Making love and making fun,In the pretty ash-tree walk,When my daily task is done :In their little eyes I findThey are very fond and kind.Every change of song or voicePlainly proveth to my soulThey can suffer and rejoice."And the little Robin-bird(Nice brown back and crimson breast)All the conversation heard,Sitting trembling in his nest." What a world," he cried, "of bliss-Full of birds and girls, were this !Blithe we'd answer to their call;But a great mistake it isBoys were ever made at all."- Poems writtenfor a Child.SING ON, BLITHE BIRD!I 'VE plucked the berry from the bush, the brown nut from the treo,But heart of happy little bird ne'er broken was by me.I saw them in their curious nests, close couching, slyly peerWith their wild eyes, like glittering beads, to note if harm werenear ;I passed them by, and blessed them all; I felt that it was goodTo leave unmoved the creatures small whose home was in the wood.


OUT OF DOORS. 67And here, even now, above my head, a lusty rogue doth sing,He pecks his swelling breast and neck, and trims his little wing.He will not fly ; he knows full well, while chirping on that spray,I would not harm him for a world, or interrupt his lay.Sing on, sing on, blithe bird and fill my heart with summer glad-ness,It has been aching many a day with measures full of sadness !- William Motherwell.THE SANDPIPER.AcRoss the lonely beach we flit,One little sandpiper and I,And fast I gather, bit by bit,The scattered drift-wood, bleached and dry.The wild waves reach their hands for it,The wild wind raves, the tide runs high,As up and down the beach we flit,One little sandpiper and I.Above our heads the sullen cloudsScud, black and swift, across the sky;Like silent ghosts in misty shroudsStand out the white light-houses high.Almost as far as eye can reachI see the close-reefed vessels fly,As fast we flit along the beach,One little sandpiper and I.I watch him as he skims along,Uttering his sweet and mournful cry ;He starts not at my fitful song,Nor flash of fluttering drapery.


68 CHILD LIFE.He has no thought of any wrong,He scans me with a fearless eye ;Stanch friends are we, well tried and strong,The little sandpiper and I.Comrade, where wilt thou be to-night,When the loosed storm breaks furiously ?My drift-wood fire will burn so bright !To what warm shelter canst thou fly ?I do not fear for thee, though wrothThe tempest rushes through the sky ;For are we not God's children both,Thou, little sandpiper, and I ?- Celia Thaxter.THE SORROWFUL SEA-GULL.THE sea-gull is so sorry !She flings herself about,And utters little, wailing cries,And flutters in and out.The fishes do not sympathize, -Fish are so very cool !They make so many rules, you know;And who canfeel by rule ?They have a rule for swimming,A rule for taking food ;They have a rule for pleasure trips,A rule for doing good.And people who make rules like thatMay drive, and work, and swim,But never know how sweet a thingIt is to take a whim


OUT OF DOORS. 69I'd like to be a sea-gull,With lovely beak and claws ;I would not like to be a fish,Subject to fishy laws.And if they make more changes soonBy acts of Parliament,I won't consent to be a fish, -I never will consent !Why is the sea-gull sorry ?I 'm not allowed to tell.The fish, who will not sympathize,Know what's the matter well !And you who feel with all your hearts,And give her love and tears,Are not allowed to hear a word ; -And such is life, my dears I- Child- World.


70 CHILD LIFE.THE BROWN THRUSH.THERE 'S a merry brown thrush sitting up in the tree," He's singing to me He's singing to me "And what does he say, little girl, little boy?"Oh, the world's running over with joy !Don't you hear ? Don't you see ?Hush! Look! In my tree,I'm as happy as happy can be "And the brown thrush keeps singing, " A nest do you see,And five eggs hid by me in the juniper-tree ?Don't meddle I don't touch little girl, little boy,Or the world will lose some of its joy !Now I'm glad now I'm free !And I always shall be,If you never bring sorrow to me."So the merry brown thrush sings away in the tree,To you and to me, to you and to me,And he sings all the day, little girl, little boy," Oh, the world's running over with joy ;But long it won't be,Don't you know ? don't you see?Unless we are as good as can be ? "- Lucy Larcom.WHO STOLE THE BIRD'S NEST." T-WHIT to-whit to-whee !Will you listen to me ?Who stole four eggs I laid,And the nice nest I made ? "


OUT OF DOORS. 71"Not I," said the cow, " Moo-oo !Such a thing I'd never do.I gave you a wisp of hay,But did n't take your nest away.Not I," said the cow, " Moo-oo!Such a thing I 'd never do."" To-whit! to-whit to-whee !Will you listen to me ?Who stole four eggs I laid,And the nice nest I made ?"" Bob-o'-link Bob-o'-link !Now what do you think ?Who stole a nest awayFrom the plum-tree, to-day ?"" Not I," said the dog, " Bow-wow !I would n't be so mean, any how !I gave hairs the nest to make,But the nest I did not take.Not I," said the dog, " Bow-wow !I'm not so mean, any how."" To-whit! to-whit! to-whee!Will you listen to me ?Who stole four eggs I laid,And the nice nest I made ?""Bob-o'-link! Bob-o'-link !Now what do you think ?Who stole a nest awayFrom the plum-tree, to-day ?"" Coo-coo Coo-coo! Coo-coo !Let me speak a word, too!Who stole that pretty nestFrom little yellow-breast ?"


T2 CHILD LIFE." Not I," said the sheep ; " Oh, no II would n't treat a poor bird so.I gave wool the nest to line,But the nest was none of mine.Baa Baa !" said the sheep, " Oh, no,I would n't treat a poor bird so."" To-whit to-whit to-wheeWill you listen to me ?Who stole four eggs I laid,And the nice nest I made ?""Bob-o'-link Bob-o'-link!Now what do you think ?Who stole a nest awayFrom the plum-tree, to-day ?""Coo-coo! Coo-coo! Coo-coo!Let me speak a word, too!Who stole that pretty nestFrom little yellow-breast ?" Caw Caw! " cried the crow ;"I should like to knowWhat thief took awayA bird's nest, to-day ?"" Cluck Cluck !" said the hen ;"Don't ask me again,Why, I have n't a chickWould do such a trick.We all gave her a feather,And she wove them together.I'd scorn to intrudeOn her and her brood.Cluck! Cluck !" said the hen," Don't ask me again."


OUT OF DOORS. 73" Chirr-a-whirr Chirr-a-whirr !All the birds make a stir !Let us find out his name,And all cry 'for shame!' "" I would not rob a bird,"Said little Mary Green" I think I never heardOf anything so mean."" It is very cruel, too,"Said little Alice Neal ;" I wonder if he knewHow sad the bird would feel ? "A little boy hung down his head,And went and hid behind the bed,For he stole that pretty nestFrom poor little yellow-breast ;And he felt so full of shame,He did n't like to tell his name.-L. Maria Child.ROBERT OF LINCOLN.MERRILY swinging on briar and weed,Near to the nest of his little dame,Over the mountain-side or mead,Robert of Lincoln is telling his name.Bob-o'-link, bob-o'-link,Spink, spank, spink,Snug and safe is this nest of ours,Hidden among the summer flowers.Chee, chee, chee.


74 OHILD LIFE.Robert of Lincoln is gayly dressed,Wearing a bright, black wedding-coat ;White are his shoulders, and white his crest,Hear him call in his merry note,Bob-o'-link, bob-o'-link,Spink, spank, spink,Look what a nice, new coat is mine;Sure there was never a bird so fine.Chee, chee, chee.i 'Pretty and quiet, with plain brown wings,Passing at home a patient life,Broods in the grass while her husband sings,Bob-o'-link, bob-o'-link,Spink, spank, spink,Brood, kind creature, you need not fearThieves and robbers while I am here.Chee, chee, chee.


OUT OF DOORS. 75Modest and shy as a nun is she;One weak chirp is her only note;Braggart, and prince of braggarts is he,Pouring boasts from his little throat,Bob-o'-link, bob-o'-link,Spink, spank, spink,Never was I afraid of man,Catch me, cowardly knaves, if you can.Chee, chee, chee.Six white eggs on a bed of hay,Flecked with purple, a pretty sight :There as the mother sits all day,Robert is singing with all his might,Bob-o'-link, bob-o'-link,Spink, spank, spink,Nice good wife that never goes out,Keeping house while I frolic about.Chee, chee, chee.Soon as the little ones chip the shell,Six wide mouths are open for food ;Robert of Lincoln bestirs him well,Gathering seeds for the hungry brood :Bob-o'-link, bob-o'-link,Spink, spank, spink,This new life is likely to beHard for a gay young fellow like me.Chee, chee, chee.Robert of Lincoln at length is madeSober with work, and silent with care,Off is his holiday garment laid,Half forgotten that merry airBob-o'-link, bob-o'-link,Spink, spank, spink,


76 CHILD LIFE.Nobody knows, but my mate and I,Where our nest and our nestlings lie.Chee, chee, chee.Summer wanes ; the children are grown;Fun and frolic no more he knows,Robert of Lincoln's a hum-drum crone ;Off he flies and we sing as he goes,Bob-o'-link, bob-o'-link,Spink, spank, spink,When you can pipe that merry old strain,Robert of Lincoln, come back again.Chee, chee, chee.- William Cullen Bryant.THE BLUEBIRD.I KNOW the song that the bluebird is singing,Out in the apple-tree where he is swinging.Brave little fellow the skies may be dreary,-Nothing cares he while his heart is so cheery.Hark how the music leaps out from his throat IHark was there ever so merry a note ?Listen a while, and you'll hear what he's saying,Up in the apple-tree swinging and swaying." Dear little blossoms down under the snow,You must be weary of winter, I know ;Hark while I sing you a message of cheer !Summer is coming and spring-time is here !" Little white snow-drop I pray you arise ;Bright yellow crocus come open your eyes-;


OUT OF DOORS. 77LSweet little violets, hid from the cold,Put on your mantles of purple and goldDaffodils daffodils say, do you hear ? -Summer is coming and spring-time is here !- Emily Huntington Miller.MILKING.LITTLE dun cow to the apple-tree tied.Chewing the cud of reflection,I that am milking you, sit by your side,Lost in a sad retrospection.


78 CHILD LIFE.Far o'er the fields the tall daisies blush warm,For rosy the sunset is dying ;Across the still valley, o'er meadow and farm,The flush of its beauty is lying.White foams the milk in the pail at my feet ;Clearly the robins are calling:Soft blows the evening wind after the heat;Cool the long shadows are falling.Little dun cow, 'tis so tranquil and sweet !Are you light-hearted, I wonder?What do you think about something to eat ?On clover and grass do you ponder ?I am remembering days that are dead,And a brown little maid in the gloaming,Milking her cow, with the west burning redOver waves that about her were foaming.Up from the sad east the deep shadows gloomedOut of the distance and found her ;Lightly she sang, while the solemn sea boomedLike a great organ, around her.Under the light-house no sweet-brier grew,Dry was the grass, and no daisiesWaved in the wind, and the flowers were fewThat lifted their delicate faces.But 0, she was happy, and careless, and blest,Full of the song-sparrow's spirit ;Grateful for life, for the least and the bestOf the blessings that mortals inherit.


OUT OF DOORS. 79Fairer than gardens of Paradise seemedThe desolate spaces of water;Nature was hers clouds that frowned, stars that gleamed, -What beautiful lessons they taught her !Would I could find you again, little maid,Striving with utmost endeavor, -Could find in my breast that light heart, unafraid,That has vanished forever and ever !- Celia Thaxter.THE COW-BOY'S SONG." MooLY cow, mooly cow, home from the woodThey sent me to fetch you as fast as I could.The sun has gone down : it is time to go home.Mooly cow, mooly cow, why don't you come ?Your udders are full, and the milkmaid is there,And the children all waiting their supper to share.I have let the long bars down,- why don't you pass through ?"The mooly cow only said, "Moo-o-o I""Mooly cow, mooly cow, have you not beenRegaling all day where the pastures are green ?No doubt it was pleasant, dear mooly, to seeThe clear running brook and the wide-spreading tree,The clover to crop, and the streamlet to wade,To drink the cool water and lie in the shade ;But now it is night : they are waiting for you. "The mooly cow only said, "Moo-o-o !"" Mooly cow, mooly cow, where do you go,When all the green pastures are covered with snow ?


80 CHILD LIFE.You go to the barn, and we feed you with hay,And the maid goes to milk you there, every dayShe pats you, she loves you, she strokes your sleek hide,She speaks to you kindly, and sits by your side :Then come along home, pretty mooly cow, do."The mooly cow only said, " Moo-o-o I"2-----"^ :------==-=-:^^ ^ __-:"Mooly cow, mooly cow, whisking your tail,The milkmaid is waiting, I say, with her pail ;She tucks up her petticoats, tidy and neat,And places the three-legged stool for her seat: -What can you be staring at, mooly? You knowThat we ought to have gone home an hour ago.How dark it is growing! 0, what shallI do?"The mooly cow only said, "Moo-o-o !"- Mrs. Anna M. Wells.


OUT OF DOORS. 81OLD DOBBIN.HERE 's a song for old Dobbin, whose temper and worthWere too rare to be spurned on the score of his birth.He's a creature of trust, and what more should we heed ?'Tis deeds, and not blood, make the man and the steed.He was bred in the forest, and turned on the plain,Where the thistle-burs clung to his fetlocks and mane :All ugly and rough, not a soul could espyThe spark of good-nature that dwelt in his eye.The summer had waned, and the autumn months rolledInto those of stern winter, so dreary and cold ;But the north wind might whistle, the snow-flake might dance, -The colt of the common was left to his chance.Half-starved and half-frozen, the hail storm would peltTill his shivering limbs told the pangs that he felt ;But we pitied the brute, and, though laughed at by all,We filled him a manger and gave him a stall.He was fond as a spaniel, and soon he becameThe pride of the herd-boy, the pet of the dame.'Tis well that his market-price cannot be known ;But we christened him Dobbin, and called him our own.He grew out of colthood, and, lo! what a change!The knowing ones said it was "mortally strange ;"For the foal of the forest, the colt of the waste,Attracted the notice of jockeys of taste.The line of his symmetry was not exact,But his paces were clever, his mould was compact;And his shaggy thick coat now appeared with a gloss,Shining out like the gold that 's been purged of its dross.


82 CHILD LIFE.We broke him for service, and tamely he woreGirth and rein, seeming proud of the thraldom he bore ;Each farm, it is known, must possess an " odd" steedAnd Dobbin was ours, for all times and all need.He carried the master to barter his grain,And ever returned with him safely again:There was merit in that, for deny it who may -When the master could not, Dobbin could find his way.The dairy-maid ventured her eggs on his back,'Twas him, and him only, she 'd trust with the pack;The team-horses jolted, the roadster played pranksSo Dobbin alone had her faith and her thanks.We fun-loving urchins would group by his side ;We might fearlessly mount him, and daringly ride;We might creep through his legs, we might plait his long tail,But his temper and patience were sure not to fail.We would brush his bright hide till 'twas free from a speck ;We kissed his brown muzzle, and hugged his thick neck;Oh we prized him like life, and a heart-breaking sobEver burst when they threatened to sell our dear Dob.He stood to the collar, and tugged up the hill,With the pigs to the market, the grist to the mill;With saddle or halter, in shaft or in trace,He was stanch to his work, and content with his place.When the hot sun was crowning the toil of the year,He was sent to the reapers with ale and good cheer ;And none in the corn-field more welcome were seenThan Dob and his well-laden panniers, I ween.Oh those days of pure bliss shall I ever forgetWhen we decked out his head with the azure rosette ?


OUT OF DOORS. 83All frantic with joy to be off to the fair,With Dobbin, good Dobbin, to carry us there ?He was dear to us all, ay, for many long years ;-But, mercy how's this ? my eye's filling with tears.Oh, how cruelly sweet are the echoes that startWhen memory plays an old tune on the heart!There are drops on my cheek; there's a throb in my breast,But my song shall not cease, nor my pen take its rest,Till I tell that old Dobbin still lives to be seen,With his oats in the stable, his tares on the green.His best years have gone by, and the master who gaveThe stern yoke to his youth has enfranchised the slave;So browse on, my old Dobbin, nor dream of the knife,For the wealth of a king should not purchase thy life.- Eliza Cook.FARM-YARD SONG.OVER the hill the farm-boy goes,His shadow lengthens along the land,A giant staff in a giant hand ;In the poplar-tree, above the spring,The katydid begins to sing ;The early dews are falling ; -Into the stone-heap darts the mink ;The swallows skim the river's brink ;And home to the woodland fly the crows,When over the hill the farm-boy goes,Cheerily calling, -" Co', boss co', boss co' co' I co' !"


84 CHILD LIFE.Farther, farther over the hill,Faintly calling, calling still, -" Co', boss co', boss co' co' !"- -Into the yard the farmer goes,With grateful heart, at the close of day :Harness and chain are hung away ;In the wagon-shed stand yoke and plough ;The straw's in the stack, the hay in the mow,The cooling dews are falling ; -The friendly sheep his welcome bleat,The pigs come grunting to his feet,The whinnying mare her master knows,When into the yard the farmer goes,His cattle calling, -" Co', boss I co', boss co' I co' co' I"


OUT OF DOORS. 85While still the cow-boy, far away,Goes seeking those that have gone astray, -" Co', boss co', boss co' co'! "Now to her task the milkmaid goes.The cattle come crowding through the gate,Lowing, pushing, little and great ;About the trough, by the farm-yard pump,The frolicsome yearlings frisk and jump,While the pleasant dews are falling; -The new-milch heifer is quick and shy,But the old cow waits with tranquil eye;And the white stream into the bright pail flows,When to her task the milkmaid goes,Soothingly calling, -" So, boss so, boss so so so !"The cheerful milkmaid takes her stool,And sits and milks in the twilight cool,Saying, " So so, boss so so !"To supper at last the farmer goes.The apples are pared, the paper read,The stories are told, then all to bed.Without, the crickets' ceaseless songMakes shrill the silence all night long ;The heavy dews are falling.The housewife's hand has turned the lock;Drowsily ticks the kitchen clock ;The household sinks to deep repose ;But still in sleep the farm-boy goesSinging, calling, -" Co', boss co', boss! co'! co'! co'!"And oft the milkmaid, in her dreams,Drums in the pail with the flashing streams,Murmuring, "So, boss! so!"-, Trowbridge.


86 CHILD LIFE.,,, ,, N ,I'I, --'- --BOYS' PLAY AND GIRLS' PLAY."Now, let's have a game of play,Lucy, Jane, and little May !I will be a grizzly bear :Prowling here and prowling there,


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