The third reader of the United States series

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Material Information

Title:
The third reader of the United States series
Series Title:
Harper's United States readers
Physical Description:
154 p. : ill., charts ; 19 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Willson, Marcius, 1813-1905
Harper & Brothers ( Publisher )
Publisher:
Harper & Bros.
Place of Publication:
New York
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Textbooks -- 1872   ( rbgenr )
Hand-colored illustrations -- 1872   ( local )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1872   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1872
Genre:
Textbooks   ( rbgenr )
Hand-colored illustrations   ( local )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by Marcius Willson.
General Note:
Publisher's advertisements follow text and on endpapers.
General Note:
Some Baldwin Library copy illustrations are hand-colored: probably by young owner.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002239824
notis - ALJ0360
oclc - 28124456
System ID:
UF00026314:00001

Full Text
S04i4iAS


ENGLISH CLASSICSEDITED WITH NOTESBY WM J ROLFE A MSHAKESPEARE S PLAYSThe Merchant of Venice King LearThe Tempest The Taming of the ShrewJulius Caesar All s Well That Ends WellHamlet CoriolanusAs You Like It Comedy of ErrorsHenry the Fifth CymbelineMacbeth Merry Wives of WindsorHenry the Eighth Measure for MeasureA Midsummer Night s Dream Two Gentlemen of VeronaRichard the Second Love s Labour s LostRichard the Third Timon of AthensMuch Ado About Nothing Henry VI Part IAntony and Cleopatra Henry VI Part IIRomeo and Juliet Henry VI Part IIISOthello Troilus and Cressidael Night Pericles Prince of TyreT ter s Tale The Two Noble KinsmenKig n Venus and AdonisHenry IV Part I SonnetsHenry IV Part II Titus AndronicusSelect Poems of Oliver GoldsmithSelect Poems of Thomas GrayCorPIOuSL ILLUTRATn 16E MO CLOTH 56 CTS PEa VoL PAPER 40 CTS PER VOLIn the preparation of this edition of the English Classics it has been the aimto adapt them for school and home reading The chief requisites are a pure textexpnrgated if necessary and the notes needed for its thorough explanation andSllustrationEach of Shakespeare s plays is complete in one volnme and Is preceded by anintroduction containing the History of the Play the s onrces of the Plot andCritical Comments on the PlayPUBLISHED BY HARPER BROTHERS NEW YORK7f HABPi z BROTHRS will send any of the above works by mail postage prepaid to any part of the United States on receipt of the priceThe Baldwin LibraryB u mn v F ida


INTERESTING BOOKS FOR BOYS AND GIRLSTHE BOY TRAVELLERS IN THE FAR EAST By THOMASW KNOX Profusely Illustrated Five Parts 8vo Cloth 3 00 eachPart I ADVENTURES OF TWO YOUTHS IN JAPAN AND CHINAPart II ADVENTURES OF TWO YOUTHS IN SIAM AND JAVA With Descriptions ofCochin China Cambodia Sumatra and the Malay ArchipelagoPart III ADVENTURES OF TWO YOUTHS IN CEYLON AND INDIA With Descriptions of Borneo the Philippine Islands and BurmahPart IV ADVENTURES OF TWO YOUTHS IN EGYPT AND THE HOLY LANDPart V ADVENTURES OF TWO YOUTIS IN A JOURNEY THROUGH CENTRAL AFRICATHE STORY OF LIBERTY By CHARLES CARLETON COFFIN Illustrated 8vo Cloth 3 00OLD TIMES IN THE COLONIES By CHARLES CARLETON COFFINIllustrated 8vo Cloth 3 00THE BOYS OF 76 A History of the Battles of the Revolution ByCHARLES CARLETON COFFIN Illustrated 8Vo Cloth 3 00BUILDING THE NATION From 1783 to 1861 By CHARLES CARLETONCOFFIN Illustrated 8vo Cloth 3 00HARPER S YOUNG PEOPLE SERIES Illustrated 16mo Cloth1 00 per volumeTOBY TYLER By JaMES OTISMR STUBBS S BROTHER A Sequel to Toby Tyler By JAMES OTISTIM AND TIP By JAMES OTISRAISING THE PEARL By JAMES OTISTHE MORAL PIRATES By W L ALDENTHE CRUISE OF THE GHOST By W L ALDENTHE CRUISE OF THE CANOE CLUB By W L ALDENTHE TALKING LEAVES An Indian Story By W O STODDARDMILDRED S BARGAIN and Other Stories By LuCY C LILLIENAN By LUcY C LILLIETHE FOUR MACNICOLS By WILLIAM BLACKWHO WAS PAUL GRAYSON By JOHN HABBERTONTHE ICE QUEEN By ERNEST INGERSOLLPRINCE LAZYBONES By Mrs HAYSLEFT BEHIND or Ten Days a Newsboy By JAMES OTISNEW GAMES FOR PARLOR AND LAWN By G B BARTLETT16mo Cloth 1 00PUBLISHED BY HARPER BROTHERS NEW YORKrJP HARPER BROTHERS will send any of the above works by mail postage prepaid toany part of the United States or Canada on receipt of the price0


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HARPER SUNITED STATESREADERSTHETHIRDREAD EROF TMEUNITED STATES SERIESBYSAUTHOR OF PRIMARY HISTORY HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATESAMERICAN HISTORY AND OUTLINES OF GENERAL HISTORYIeNo porbSHARPER BROTHERSPUBLISHERS4 d TO 331 PEARL STBETn4c p i i C njE EiXb


Entered according to Act of Congress in the year 1872 byHARPER BROTHERSIn the Office of the Librarian of Congress at Washington


CONTENTSPageTo the Teacher 5InflectionsPART IGeneral Rules for the Rising Inflection 8Lesson Page Lesson PageI Girl and Doll 9 IX Two Boys on a Horse 15II Flag and Drum 10 X At Play 10III The Fox and the Ox 10 XI Earth Sun and Moon 17IV The Young Ducks 11 XII Making Hay 18V The Bird s Nest 12 XIII The Fox 19VI The Play Ground 12 XIV The Snail 25VII Going a Fishing 13 XV Harvest Time 22VIU Going to School 14PART IIGeneral Rules for the Falling Inflection 22Lesson Page Lesson PagI The Fishing Scene 23 IX Plants Fishes Birds Beasts andI The Idle Boy 24 Men 31II The Idle Boy again 25 X Seeds and Fruits SSIV Feeding the Dog 26 XI Goats and Sheep 33V Geese Marching 27 XII Flying Kites 34VI An Odd Team 28 XIII The Moon is very Fair andVII A Cluster of Grapes 29 Bright 35VIII Crossing the Brook 30 XIV The Boy who stole Pears 36XV The Gentle Sheep 37PART IIIModifications of Rule I 88Lesson Page Lesson PagoI The Barn yard Fowls 39 X Sliding down Hill 49n Fowls Going to Roost 40 XI The Boy and the Rabbits 51III Respect 41 XII Leading the Cow 53IV Indifference 42 XIII The Lark and her Young 54V The Young Sailor s Return 42 XIV The Garden 56VI Robert and Mary 44 XV John Brown and Charlie Gray 58VII Birds 45 XVL The Boy and the Wolf 58VIII John Brown and Bruno 46 XVII The Book Store 60IX The Ruins and the Fire 47 XVIII The Old Beggar Man 61PART IVContrasted Words and Clauses 69Lesson Page Lesson PageI Reading from Books and from IX Never Tell a Lie 79Faces 63 X The Truthfful Boy 74II Kittens Playing 64 XI A Fox Story 75III The Good Student 66 XII God is Near 76IV The Golden Rule 67 XII Making Pies 7TV Child Going to Play 67 XIV Lakes in the Woods 79VI The Fish 68 XV The Robin 81VII Going Away 70 XVI The TwoFriends 82VIIL The Sick Child 71 XVII The Idle Word S8


iv CONTENTSPART VRules VII and VIII PLesson Page Lesson PageI The Mansion 85 X Building a Pier 95II The Spring Time 86 XI The Gentle Cow 97III Man and his Maker 87 XII UncleToby 98IV LazySlokins the School Boy 89 XIII The Works of God 100V Lazy Slokins the Young Man 90 XIV Boats on the Water 1lVI Lazy Slokins the Drunkard 91 XV Story of the Rail road Thief 102VII Lazy Slokins the Thief 92 XVI Winter Scenes 16VIII The Robin s Temperance Song 93 XVII The Way to be Happy 108IX The Load of Grain 94 XVIII What is Earth 109PART VIRules IX and X 110Lesson Page Lesson PageI Old Age and Youth 111 XI A Good Name 1 4II Don t kill the Birds 112 XII Money 12III Don t kill the Birds 113 XIII The Stars 16IV The Poor Woman 114 XIV Twinkle Little Star 128V Early Risin XV Work and Play X ork 128VI Childhood s Hours 116 XVI A quiet Summer Morning inVII The Egg Hunters 117 the Country 130VIII I ll never use Tobacco 120 XVII Praise ye the Lord 133IX The Angry Man 121 XVIII Boy and Lark 134X Houses Hamlets Villages and XIX The Ten Commandments 135Cities 122 The World isfull of Beauty 185PART VIILESSONS ON OBJECTSLeson Page Lesson PageI Lines Surfaces and Solids 137 IV Apple Pie 149II Lines Angles andPlaneFigures 139 V A first Lesson on Colors 151III TheVoyage of the Grasshopper 142 Colors and their Combinations 155


TO THE TEACHERIN explanation and defense of the system of instruction in reading adopted in the First and the Second Readers and here continued in the ThirdReader to wit the formation at the very beginning of the pupil s course ofcorrect habits of reading we submit to teachers the following remarksIf he rules for correct reading which we find in our Reading Books areworth any thing they are worth being applied when they can be made ofmost utility they are worth being used by the teacher to teach correcthabits in his pupils before bad habits have been formed But instead ofthis we find these rules in the more advanced Reading Books only andthere they are almost wholly ineffectual to accomplish any good becausethey are brought into use after pupils have already formed bad habits ofreading In fact the greater part of the pupils in our public schools leaveschool before they are sufficiently advanced to get into the classes whichuse the Reading Books that give any instruction in rhetorical reading andtho3e who remain longer and then are drilled in the Rules make very littleprogress against the inveteracy of habit So true is this that many eminent teachers and several distinguished compilers of Reading Books pointedly discard as positively injurious the use of any formal rules in teachingreadingWe have taken a different course in these Readers and one that meetsthe objectors of both extremes We begin at the very outset in the FirstReader to teach correct reading by giving numerous examples in nearlyevery lesson of the various kinds of easy and natural questions and answers thus exercising the pupils in reading with the proper inflectionsthe very sentences which they are constantly speaking We give them norules here Children do not speak by rule why should they learn rules toread by if they can read correctly by habit just as they speak We continue the same system in the Second Reader and here we introduce it alsoin the Third Reader Here we first lay down a few general rules of inflection because we think they will be of service to many teachers and notbecause we think it desirable in many cases that the pupils should yetlearn them Let the pupils constantly practice reading aright from thevery beginning just as Nature teaches them to speak aright and they willneed no rules to insure correctness On the contrary a continual recurrence to rules is a serious impediment to advancement in reading Indeedthe only use of a rule in reading is to aid in forming a habit which shalleventually take the place of thinking what the rule isThe marks in the early Readers denoting the inflections to be used aretherefore designed merely to aid in the formation of correct habits at aperiod before bad habits have been formed


vi HARPER S UNITED STATES SERIESIf there are any teachers who think these marks useless they may discard their suggestions and then get along as well as they would with otherReaders These marks need not be at all in their way It is probablehowever that some teachers and pupils will be benefited by them andfor the sake of such other teachers who may not use them should be willing to tolerate their presenceWe presume however that most teachers will find these marks usefulauxiliaries in elocutionary instruction and will make use of them asguides for themselves at least in the reading which they wish their pupilsto imitate Some may think it best to instruct their pupils in the rulesbult it is our opinion that this should be done to a limited extent only if atall at this early stage of the pupil s progressOur motto therefore is Teach pupils at the very beginning notI ules but correct HABITS of readingWe would also here very briefly call the reader s attention to the character of the Reading Lessons in the early numbers of the seriesWe would say to those who approve as doubtless all do of impartinginstruction to children and at the same time cultivating their perceptivefaculties by familiar Lessons on Objects a system now generally introduced into our best public schools that they will find the leading principles of this system running throughout the plan of these Primary ReadersWe have also given a few separate lessons on the same general subject atthe close of this Third BookWith a view to the advantages of the system embraced in these earlyReaders superior Illustrative Engravings are made the subjects of probablymore than half of the Reading Lessons and the Lessons themselves aboundin questions and remarks which not only give life and variety to the reading but which also direct the attention of the pupil to the engravings andteach him to notice their leading characteristics of expression figurespositions actions supposed sayings etc and suggest numerous probabilities which keep the mind of the pupil constantly on the alert In finemost of the Lessons in these early numbers of the series are designed topresent to the mind of the pupil a moving panorama of a real busy lifewhich he can comprehend and which at the same time will suggest andcall forth whatever of interest and instruction can be connected with thescenes that thus pass before him We have kept in view the principlethat in childhood it is through the medium of the perceptive faculties thatthe attention is the most readily awakened and memory and judgmentthe most successfully cultivatedWe trust we are not over sanguine in the belief inspired by an experience of more than twelve years in the duties of the school room that thepupils who practice the system here laid down will easily and naturallyas opposed to artificially make good readers that they will be much interested in the character of the Reading Lessons and that they will derive a considerable amount of instruction from them also


INFLECTIONSInflections in reading are turns or slides of the voice either upward ordownward There are two inflections the Rising Inflection and the Falling Inflection These when united in the pronunciation of the same wordare sometimes called the Circumflex or WaveIn the Rising Inflection the voice beginning at the general pitch atwhich the preceding part of the sentence was spoken rises upward as inthe following questions Did he act prudently Has he comeIn the first the voice continues on the general pitch until it has pronouncedthe first syllable of the word prudently Thus Did he act pruThe proper reading of the second example may be illustrated thus Han0he 6oIn the Falling Inflection the voice usually begins above the generalpitch and suddenly descends to it but seldom falls below it Thus Has10he gone to town to or will he go to Here the word morrowbeginning high erfds on the general pitch at which the preceding part ofthe sentence was readThe rising inflection is denoted by a downward dash from right to leftthe falling by a downward dash from left to rightThose whose ears are not well trained often mistake the falling for thprising inflection in cases of short words of one syllable and for thinreason In the falling inflection the voice usually rises suddenly abovthe general pitch to strike the word and from that point its descendinbslide in short words is scarcely perceived Thus in the two examplesWhat wilt thou do and What art thou doing the falling inflection is used in both although the inexperienced ear might suppose therising inflection used in the first example The difference between therising and the falling inflection in short words may perhaps be more plainly perceived by using the same words as above but in questions that require the rising inflection Thus Is this what you do Is this whatyou are doing We think almost any person will perceive that the inflections used in the latter two examples differ from those used in theformer two 1


PART FIRSTChild asleep in the Wood and Doves watching itGENERAL RULES FOP THE RISING INFLECTIONFor the Use of the Teacher onlyRULE I Direct questions or those that can be answeredty yes or no generally require the rising inflection and theiranswers the ftllingE XAPLEr Do you think he will come to day No I think he willnot See Modifications p 38RULE II Thee paue of suspension denoting that the senseis unfinished such as a succession of particulars that are notemphatic cases of direct address sentences implying condition the case absolute etc generally requires the rising inflectionEXAaMPLES John James and William come here The great thegood the honored the noble the wealthy alike pass awayNOTE For cases in which emphatic succession of particulars modifies this Rulesee Rule VIII p 84


PART L THIRD READERLESSON LGIRL AND DOLLgirl left would ver y telldoll nice like whip playThe girl has a doll DoSyou see it Do you see herlift it up Is it a nice dollAnn would you like adoll 0 yes I would likeone very much Will youget one for meHas the boy a doll tooNo the boy has a whip Can not you tell awhip from a doll Do you think the boy wantsa doll to play withI have a little dollI take care of her clothesShe has soft flaxen hairAnd her name is RoseShe has pretty blue eyesAnd a very small noseAnd a sweet little mouthAnd her name is RoseYou must take good care of the doll and goodcare of her clothesCan you make a hood or a bonnet for her andlittle shoes for her feetDo you think she needs them to keep herwarm Can you tell me why a doll can not becold


10 HARPER S UNITED STATES SERIES PART LLESSON IIFLAG AND DRU Miere are four boysThe large boy has a drumJ hand They are drumsticks Do you see himnbeat the drum Can youShear the drum O noI can not hear it Is itt o far offDo you see the boy who has a flag Yes Isee him He has a cap on his head I see twoboys more The are all in a row The dog iswith themLESSON IIITHlE Fox AND THE OXDid you say you sawa fox Are you theboy 2 Did the fox runby the ox Did theox see itYes I am the boyiI saw the fox The oxsaw it too but the oxdid not runDid the dog see the fox too No the dog didnot see it Is a fox sly Yes a fox is slyWas it an old fox No it was not old


PART I THIRD READER IDid the fox get the hen No it did not Isthat all Yes that is all Now you may goLESSON IVTHE YOUNG DUCKSThe old hen has a broodof little ducks The duckshave gone into the pondSee how they swim about4 in the water It is fine12 sport for them The oldhen thinks they willdrown and so she tries tocall them back See how the hen runs aboutWhat a fright she is in0 do see how they dive and swimAnd what a fiight the hen is inShe runs about and clucks and clucksTo call away the little ducksBut the little ducks will not mind the old henDo you see how the old hen acts Do you thinkshe is afraid She thinks the little ducks arechickens Chickens will not go into the waterHere is a large full grown duckDoes it look like a hen Doyou see the duck s bill Doesthat look like the bill of a hens A hen s bill is not so large Aduck has large and broad feet sothat it can swim well


2 IIARPER S UNITED STATES SERIES PART ILESSON VTHE BIRD S NESTS Do you know whatthis is Yes it is abird s nest Do youar see the eggs in itYes there are fiveeggs The eggs areSlarge and it is the nestof a large birdThe nest is high upin a large tree Doyou know where theold birds are I do not know where both of themare but I can see one of them We must not touchthe eggs We must let them be in the nestLESSOON VLTnE PLAY GROUNDDo you know what housethis is Yes it is a schoolhouse Boys and girls gothere to schoolDo you see the boys onthe play ground Theyhave just come out of schoolSome run and jump someplay ball some fly kitessome roll the hoop and some try the wing


IART THIRD READER 13Boys and girls should learn well in school butwhen school is out they may run and play Howglad they are to be out in the fresh air again ILESSON VIIGOING A FISHINGThere John has caughti a fish It is a trout Canhe pull him out Takecare John Don t let himbreak your lineIt is a cloudy day ItSrains a little Is a rainyday the best time to fishYes The best time to fishis when it is cloudy or whenit rains a very little and when it is warmJames too will soon have a fish You can seethat he thinks so Do you see his face A fishhad hold of his hook just now He will sooncome back and try again If he should get holdagain James will pull him outSHenry has a fine string of fish in his hand Doyou see him lift them up to show them DidHenry catch them No John caught some andJames caught someHenry has no hook and line but John andJames told him if he would go with them andcarry the bait he should have part of the fishand he might take them home in his basket


14 HARPER S UNITED STATES SERIES PART IDo you think it is right to catch fish Yes itis right to catch fish to eat but it is not right tocatch them for sport and then throw them awayLESSON VIIIGOING TO SCHOOLA boy a girl and a dog The boy and the girlare on their way to school The dog goes withthem Do you see how fast the boy walksCould you walk so fastThe name of the girl is Ann She says Henry you walk too fast I can not keep up withyou Henry says Take my arm Ann and I canhelp youDoes she take his arm Can she keep upnow Do you think Henry is a good boy Do


PAMT I THIRD READER 15you think he likes to go to school Do youthink he goes to school to study and to learn hislessonsLESSON IXTwo BOYS ON A HoRSEThis must be a kindhorse for he lets two boysride him and he does notrun nor kick Does thehorse stand still nowCan you tell How canyou tellThe horse has one ofhis feet up and he hasjust put one of his hindfeet down and this shows that he does not standstill He walks along or trots slowlyDo you know what the boy who sits beforeholds in his hands Can you see both of hishands No I can see his right hand but I cannot see his left handCan you see the other boy s hands No Ican not see his hands but I can see one of hishands It is his right handCan you ride on a horse Would you like agood and kind old horse to ride on I shouldnot like an old horse so well as a young oneBut I should wish the horse to be kind andgentle and not run away with me


t6 HARPER S UNITED STATES SERIES PART ILESSON XAT PLAYThe boys have come out to see the men at workFour of the boys sit on the ground and two ofthem play at see sawOne boy is up and the other boy is down Doyou see the boy who is up hold up both of hishands Do you think he will fallDo you see any tools of the men near the boysDo you know what tools they are One is anax and the other is a sawWhen boys go where men are at work theyshould not touch the tools They might get hurtor they might dull the toolsDo you see those little black specks up in thesky Do you know what they are They arebirds They are up very highDo you see any men at work Yes there are


PART I 1 THIRDI READER 17two men at work but they are not so near us asthe boys are Do you know what the men aredoing They are sawing timberLESSON XIEARTH SUN AND MOONWe live on the earthThe earth is not flat asit seems to us to beSIt is like a round balloo r Men sail round thee s earth or the world inshipsk The world does nothet stand still but it turnsround like a top Itis said to turn on itsaxis But it also goes round the sun It turnsround on its axis once each day but it takes ayear to go round the sunThe sun also is a great globe or ball It seemslike a ball of fire The sun gives us light andheat We see the sun by day but not by nightDo you know why we do not see the sun in thenightThe sun rises in the east and it sets or goesdown in the west When the sun sets then it isnight The moon and stars give light by nightThe moon is a globe or ball but not so large asthe sun or the earth The moon goes round the


18 IIARPER S UNITED STATES SERIES PART Learth while the earth goes round the sun Themoon has no light in herself but she gets her lightfrom the sunThe Bible tells us God made these great lightsHe made the sun to rule the day and the moon torule the night We call the sun the king of theday and the moon the queen of the nightLESSON XIIMIAKING HAYLet us go out and seethe men mow the grassThe grass will be cut today Do you think itwill rain No I doSnot think it will rain totayWe may sit on a heapof hay and see the menmow How sweet thehay isl May we play on the hay May we tossthe hay up in the air May our dog Tip playwith us Yes Tip may play with youSee Tip run Do you hear him bark Tiplikes to play with us When the men put the hayon the cart and take it to the barn we can ride onthe load of hayThe hay is for the horse and the cow and thesheep to eat Do pigs eat hay No pigs donot eat hay but they eat grass when it is greenPigs like to eat corn


PART I THIRD READER I9LESSON XIIITHE Foxbush y match rock chasedes cape pieces roots gooseoft en sly ly be fore fightsThe fox is like a dog Itis a beast of preyIt has a broad head asharp snout sharp ears and4 a long bushy tailSThe fox lives in a denor hole which he oftenmakes near a farm houseHe hides in this den by dayand when night comes on he leaves his den andgoes slyly to the farm yardHe is fond of a duck or a hen or a goose ora lamb But he will also eat fruit mice andfrogs When he gets hold of a hen or a duck heruns home to his denSome men keep packs of hounds or dogs tohunt and kill the fox and they will ride a longway sometimes before they can catch himWhen the fox finds that he is chased he runsto his hole where he lies still till some dog is sentin to drive him outIf his den is below a rock or the roots of treeshe is safe for the dog is no match for him therehe can not be dug outBut if he can not get to his den he runs tothe thick woods and seeks the most thorny paths


20 IIARPER S UNITED STATES SERIES PART IHe tries all sorts of plans to get out of the wayof the dogs But when he finds that he can notescape he turns and fights till he is sometimestorn in pieces We call a young fox a cubLESSON XIVTIE SNAILsnail tor pid light walkgrows re pair eggs leaveseyes bro ken crawls newThe snail crawls on the ground it does notwalk for it has no feetSnails come from eggs which are of the size ofa small pea These eggs are put into the groundwhere they lie till the young ones come outWhen the snail comes from the egg it has asmall shell on its back The shell grows with thegrowth of the snail The shell is light and firmand keeps the snail from harm When the snailfears that it shall be hurt it draws back into itsshell or houseAs snails crawl along they put out their hornsThere are four of these horns and on the top oftwo of them you can see two small black spotsThese are the eyes of the snailBelow the other two horns is the mouth of thesnail The snail lives for the most part on theleaves of plants and treesWhen the cold days come the snail seeks outsome hole where it lies till the spring returnsIt lies in a torpid state for five or six months


PART I THIIRD READER 1LESSON XVHARVEST TIMEDo you think this is a fine picture Do yousee the boys and the girls and the donkey Isit winter there or is it summer How can youtellSome of the boys swing on the gate and sometry to ride on the donkey Do you think the boysare too large and too heavy to ride on the donkeyDo you see the load of grain in the fieldWhy does the load of grain look so small Is itbecause it is so far offIs the gate shut or is it open Is it wideopen No it is not wide open it is only partlySopen The boys will open the gate wide to letthe load of grain pass throughTake care boys and do not break the gatet


PART SECONDGENERAL RULES FOR THE FALLING INFLECTIONFor the use of the Teacher onlyRULE III Indirect questions or those which can not heanswered by yes or no generally require the falling inflection and the answers the sameEXAMPLEs When did you see him Yesterday When will hecome again To morrowNOTE But when the indirect question is one asking a repetition of what was not atfirst understood it takes the rising inflection as What did you sayRULE IV A completion of the sense whether at theclose or any other part of the sentence requires the fallinginflectionEXAMPLEs Ie that saw me saw you also and he who aided meonce will aid me againNOTE But when strong emphasis with the falling inflection comes near the close ofa sentence the voice takes the rising inflection at the close as If William does notcome I think John will be here If he should come what would you do


PART IL THIRD READER 23LESSON ITHE FISHING SCENEpic ture fish ing bask et wood ena fiaid try ing stand ing bridg esWhat does the picture on the other page showWhat do you see there I see a man and a boyand both of them stand in the water Do youknow what they are doingYes they have caught a fish and a large oneit is too The man has hold of the line but he isafraid it will break if he pulls hardWhat do you think the boy has in his handsIt is a kind of net called a scoop net He hasbeen fishing with it He is now trying to takethe fish up in itThe man has a scoop net also In which handdoes he hold it What do you see at the man sside It is a basket and it has a cover on itWhat do you think the basket is forDo you think the water is very deep thereHow deep do you think it is where the man andthe boy are standing Do you see the bridgeover the stream What is the bridge made ofDoes it look like a new bridge or an old oneIt does not look like a new bridge Somebridges are made of stone and some of iron andsome of wood This is a wooden bridgeThe water is not deep where the man is for ifit were deep the man could not stand in it Thewater is not cold for it is summer there2


4 HIARPER S UNITED STATES SERIES PART IILESSON ILTHE IDLE BOYHow old do you thinkthis boy is I think heis about ten years oldWhy do you think he isan idle boy He is idlenow because he doesS not work nor studySnor pla y He might bea smart boy if he werenot an idle boyB How much older isthis boy than you are Where is this boy sright arm What does it rest on It rests ona postWhat kind of a post do you think the boy leansupon I think it is a large stone post Theboy seems to be looking at something a great wayoff What do vou think he seesI think he sees some one coming He seemsto expect some one and perhaps he is waitingfor some other boy to come and play with himPerhaps some other boy promised to come Ithink it must be one of his schoolmates Boyslove to play and that is right but they shouldalso love to go to school and to studyThere is a time to play and a time to studyThose who are always idle when they are boyswill not grow up to be wise men


PAET 11 1 THIRD READER 25LESSON IIITHE IDLE BoY AGAINHere is the idle boy again He was told to goto school Why does he not go to school Whydoes he play by the way Is it not school timeYes school has begun and it is time for him tobe thereMhy does he stop here He stops to playwith a dog and with another idle boyWhere are his books He has left his booksat home and when he gets to the school he willbe sent back for themGood boys love their books and love to go toschool They do not play by the way when it isschool timeWhile at school they study and learn well andare often at the head of the class


26 HARPER S UNITED STATES SERIES PART ILLESSON IVFEEDING TIE DOGThe name of this dog is Fido It is Lucy sdog and she is feeding him with bread and milkWhat is that around Fido s neck That is anapron Who put it on Fido Lucy s cousinRobert put it on Which is Lucy Which isRobertDo you think Fido loves bread and milkDoes he like to be fixed up in that way I thinkhe does not care for he is a good old dog Heis not cross Do you think he looks crossThat is Lucy s sister who sits near her Whado you think she holds in her hand In whichj


PUCT II THIRD READER 27hand does she hold it Do you think she hasbread and milk in that bowlHow old do you think Robert is Do youknow what he is doing He is looking at Fidoto see if he will eat He says Fido you musteat It is good for youLESSON VGEESE iARCHINGOne two threefour five six seven geese in a rowDo you see themmarch Yes onegoose is the leader and the rest follow3 Where do youthink these geese have been They have beendown to the pond to have a nice swim Do yousee the water Yes and I see some large stonesin the water I think they are on the edge of thepond where the water runs overWhere do you suppose these geese are goingnow They are going home to the barn Do yousee the path Yes they are marching in thepath and the path leads to the bars in the hedgeThe geese will get under the bars and then goalong on tle other side of the hedge When theyget on the other side of the hedge we can not seethem


28 HARPER S UNITED STATES SERIES PART ILESSON VIAN ODD TEAMWhat kind of a team do you think this is lIsit a nice team Do you like to see such a teamA horse and an ox What an odd team theymakeWhat are the horse and ox drawing Canyou tell Why not It must be a wagon butwe can not see it Which way is the wagon onyour right hand or on your left It is on therightDoes the man ride on the horse or on the oxHe is on the ox Has he any thing for a seat onthe back of the ox What is it What doesthe man hold in his hand Do you see both ofhis feet Do you see one of them Where isit What does he put the toe of his shoe in


FTRT 11 1 THIRD READER 29LESSON VIIA CLUSTER OF GRAPESWhat vine is this whichSwe see and what kind offruit is on it It is a grapevine and it bears grapesThere is one bunch ofgrapes on it now A bunchof grapes is called a clusterHow fine these grapes areMost grapes are round butthese are not There is some other fruit lyingon the groundNow the grapes are ripe and we may picksome and eat them How sweet they are Arethese all the grapes which grew on the vine Ono the vine bore a great many grapes but thevine has been broken and most of the grapes havebeen taken awayAre all grapes as sweet asthese No some grapesare sour Most of the wildgrapes which grow in thewoods are sourHere are some peoplegathering the grapes TheyP put them in baskets andcarry them away Wine ismade from grapes The season of gathering grapesis called the vintage


30 HARPER S UNITED STATES SERIES PART ITLESSON VIIICROSSING THE BROOKHere is a man whoSwantedto cross abrooke bbut he did not like toSwade across and gethis feet wet so he gotA a man to carry himacrossWould you like tocross a brook in thatway or would you rather wade across Doyou think both of thesemen are white menia te Which one is blackDo you think thewhite man will fall Does he look afraid Ifthe black man should fall the white man wouldfall too and then both would get wet The whitcman might get hurt tooDo you think the water in the brook is deepDo you think it is deep enough to drown the menif they should fall Why do you think it is notvery deepBecause if it were very deep the man wouldnot try to wade acrossIt is a warm country where those men are Wecan tell by the palm tree which grows there Palmtrees do not grow in this country


PART II I THIRD READER 81LESSON IXPLANTS FISHES BIRDS BEASTS AND MEITPlants and shrubs and trees are things thatlive and grow and die but they do not thinkand feel as we do They have roots to draw uptheir food from the earth and leaves to breathewith but they do not move from place to placelike birds and beastsFishes have fins to swim with A whale is alarge fish that swims in the sea and a trout is asmall fish that swims in a brook or in a lakeFishes can not live out of the waterA bird has two legs and two feet and twowings Most birds can fly in the air and somebirds can swim on the waterBeasts live on the land They have four legsand four feet What then are dogs and cowsand bears and wolves Fishes and birds andbeasts feel but they do not thinkMen walk on the earth They can sail on thesea in ships and some men can swim but noneof them can fly in the air God made man tothink as well as to feel and to actGod made the sun the moon the stars theearth the plants and trees the fishes of the seathe birds of the air and the beasts of the fieldLast of all he made manAnd God gave to man dominion over the fishesof the sea over the fowls of the air over thecattle and over every creeping thing


32 HARPER S UNITED STATES SERIES PAR IILESSON XSEEDS AND FRUITSHow many kinds of fruits and seeds do youknowWould you know peas and beans if you shouldsee the pods in the garden Would you knowwheat and oats and rye if you should see themas they grow in the fieldAll plants have seeds Some seeds such as thebean and the pea are found in pods some suchas nuts are found in hard shells and some likethe seeds of the plum the apple and the orangeare found inside of the fruitWe use sone seeds for food such as wheat oatsrye peas and beans Some seeds are large andsome are small Some are heavy and fall to theground where they grow and some have wingsby which they float in the air from place toplaceFrom the seeds new plants come The seedsare put into the ground where the moist earthmakes them swell and burst One part then goesdown and forms the root and one part goes upand forms the stalk or stemLeaves grow on the stems and branches It isby the roots that plants are fed and by the leavesthat they breathe If you were to cut off theroots of a tree the tree would starve and die orthe sap would run out so that the tree would soonbleed to death


PART II THIRD READER 33LESSON XIGOATS AND SHEEPThe goat is found in mostSparts of the world It haslong horns and a lonbeardIt is for the most partblack and white or palebrown with a black stripedown the backGoats will climb steeprocks to find the shrubs onwhich they love to feed But they can eat grassand are fond of the bark of treesThe goat can be made tame but if we tease itit will butt at us with its hornsIts flesh is good for food and its milk is sweetand of great use to those who are sickWe call a young goat a kid Its flesh is niceand sweet and of its skin we make glovesThe sheep has no beard like the goat There aresome sheep which have hornsland there are some whichhave noneThe horns of the sheep arenot like those of the goatSheep go in flocks and live7 on grass or hay They arefond of mealFrom the sheep we getwool and from the wool cloth is made The skin


34 HARPER S UNITED STATES SERIES PART IIof the sheep when dressed is used for the coversof books A lamb is a young sheepLESSON XIIFLYING KITESI like to have my kite fly high said WillieBrown Do you see it away up in the sky ashigh as a bird can fly It is almost out of sightBut I tried six times before I could make it stayupI like to have mine go high too said CharlieGray whose kite had just fallen into a peach treeBut I can not make my kite go up high andstay up said Charlie It will come downbut I mean to try once moreMine will come down too said John Jonesbut I don t care if it does Why don t youcare said Willie Why don t you keep trying


PART II THIRD READER 35as I did Because it does no good to care andno good to try said John If it will not goup and stay up it may come down I shall nottry any more to make it stay up I don t care ifmy kite don t go upYes John you do care If you did not careyou would not get vexed about itLESSON XIIITHE MOON IS VERY FAIR AND BRIGHTThe moon is very fair and brightAnd rises very highI think it is a pretty sightTo see it in the skyIt shone upon me where I layAnd seemed almost as bright as dayThe stars are very pretty tooAnd scattered all aboutAt first there seem a very fewBut soon the rest come outI m sure I could not count them allThey are so very bright and smallThe sun is brighter still than theyle blazes in the skiesI dare not turn my face that wayUnless I shut my eyesYet when he shines our hearts reviveAnd all the trees rejoice and thriveGod made and keeps them every oneBy his great power and mightHe is more glorious than the sunAnd all the stars of nightBut when we end our mortal raceThe pure in heart shall see his face


36 HARPER S UNITED STATES SERIES PART ILLESSON XIVTHE BOY WHO STOLE PEARSThis is a bad boy What do you think he hasin his hat He has some pears The pears arenot his for he stole themThe dogs saw him as he was getting over thefence and one of them has caught hold of himDo you see the boy cry D6 you almost hearhim screamThe boy holds on to the fence and the dog holdson to him You can see the ripe pears in the boy shat but the boy must throw down the pears andthen perhaps the dog will let him goIt is very wicked to steal Good boys will nottake what does not belong to themWhat a pity it is that boys will ever be badNIow much better it would be if they would alwaysbe good If all were good what a happy worldit would be Much is gained by being goodwhile nothing is gained by being bad


PART IL THIRD READER 37LESSON XVTHE GENTLE SHEEPWhat do you want pretty sheep Do youwant some meal Do you like corn as well asyou like meal I have no meal for you and nocorn for you You must go and eat grassThe sheep s mouth is open Do you know whatkind of a noise the sheep makes when it talksThe sheep bleats That is what the sheep doeswhen it talks Did you ever hear a sheep bl6atHow tame the sheep is It has horns but itwill not hurt the little girls They do not fearthe sheep They can go up to it and take holdof its woolDo you know what the sheep s wool is goodI for It is good to spin into yarn and to makecloth of Do you know what kind of cloth ismade of wool Woolen cloth is made of woolMen shear off the wool with shears


PART THIRDMODIFICATIONS OF RULE IFor the use of the Teacher onlyI Answers that are given in a careless or indifferent manner or in a tone of slight disrespect take the rising inflection in all cases whether the questions are direct or indirectSee page 42II Direct questions when they have the nature of an appeal and are spoken in an exclamatory manner take thefalling inflection In these cases also the voice often fallsbelow the general pitch contrary to the general rule for thefalling inflectionEXAMPLES Is not that a beautiful sight Willyou persist in doingit Is it right Is it justIII When a direct question is not understood and is repeated with emphasis the repeated question takes the faling inflectionEXAMPLE Will you speak to him to day If the question is notunderstood it is repeated with the falling inflection Will you speak tohim to day


PART III THIRD READER 33LESSON ITHE BARN YARD FOWLSWhat do you see in the picture on the otherpage I see one two three four fowls I seea house also and a barn or shedAre these all that you see No I see a treebeyond the house and a brush broom leaningagainst the fence and a basin or tub for the fowlsto drink out ofDo you think there is any water in the basinWhat is there to show that there is water in thebasin Is the top of the basin level How doyou know that it is not level4 We can see that the water is nearer the top ofthe basin on one side than on the other and asthe surface of the water is level this shows thatthe top of the basin is not level Do you knowwhat is meant by the surface of the waterThe surface of water is the top of the waterthe upper part of it When you can see the surface of water your eye is higher than the waterIf a basin were full of water could you see thewater if your eye were below the surfaceDid you ever see fowls drink water Do theydrink in the same way that a cow or a horsedrinksFowls can not drink with the head down butwhen they take a little water into the mouth theyhold up the head to let the water run down thethroat


40 HARPER S UNITED STATES SERIES Pa T I0LESSON IIFOWLS GOING TO ROOSTWhat kind of a place do youthink this is It is just outside of the barn and the hensare going up a ladder to theroostHow many rounds of the ladder do you see What is around of a ladder It is a stepof the ladderOn which round of the ladder is the rooster What doyou see below the ladder Twoducks and two Guinea hensWhat do you think the ducksare eating Do the Guineahens look like other hensHere is a picture of a Guineahen Its head is not like thehead of the common hen and allover its feathers you see smallSwhite round spots The GuineaA s hen is a very noisy fowlOur common fowls were once wild birds andwere brought from a warmer country to thisThey have changed very much by being tamedSome new kinds have recently been brought herefrom Asia Fowls do not grow so large in a coldas in a warm country


PArr III THIRD READER 4iLESSON IIIRESPECTJohn John come hereJohn Did you get the bookthatyouwentfor No sirI could not find it Didyou look on the desk Yessir but it was not thereDid you look for the penYes sir Did you get itYes sir and I put it on the desk as you told meto Did you use the pen No sirHave you seewn James to day Yes sir I sawhim a short time ago Where was he He wason the play ground Were any other boys thereYes sir a great many boys were thereWhat were the boys doing on the play groundSome were playing ball some were flying kitesand some were playing marblesWell that is all Now you may go to yourseat and take your book and you may see howwell you can read your lessonNoTE In these cases the falling inflection given to theanswers Yes sir and No sir indicates a tone of muchrespect The rising inflection would have indicated a careless or indifferent manner on the part of the pupil althoughnot a manner very decidedly disrespectful Let the teacherread the lesson giving to all the answers yes sir and nosir the rising inflection and the difference will be apparentIn the next lesson the similar answers have the rising inflection in accordance with Modification I


42 HARPER S UNITED STATES SERIES PART IIILESSON IVINDIFFERENCEJames you told me youS saw a boy and an ox Canyou tell me the name of theboy No sir I do notknow his name Did theboy drive the ox Nosir Did he lead the oxNo sir he rode the oxWas the ox tame and kindYes sir I think he was He let the boy ridehim and he did not runDid the boy take hold of the horns of the oxNo sir he could not reach them Did you ridethe ox too John T Yes sir Did the ox gofast Not very fast Would your mother liketo have you ride again I don t knowLESSON VTHE YOUNG SAILOR S RETURNJames and William saw threeships coming infrom the seaThe ships wereunder full sailand they had flagsflying from thetops of the masts


SPART III THIRD READER 43The two boys stopped and looked at the shipsIs not that a fine sight said William Yessaid James I never before saw three ships comingin at the same time I guess Ralph Hoyt is onboard one of those shipsS I guess so too said William And won t hisfather and mother be glad to see him Yesthat they will said James And won t Ralphbe glad to get home tooYes Ralph was glad to get home and his fatherand mother were very glad to see him He hadbeen gone almost a yearHe had been around the world and had seenmany strange people He had been many daysat sea out ofsight of land when nothing but thesea and the sky could be seen from the shipThe name of the ship was the Sea Birdand like a bird she floated on the water Sometimes the wind blew and the waves ran high andthe rain fell in torrents but that good ship keptonward right onward in her course and nowshe had brought all safe to landHow thankful ought Ralph to be that he hasbeen saved from so many dangers for manymany that go down upon the sea in ships neverreturn The sea the deep deep sea has beenthe grave of thousandsBut why do people go to sea when it is somuch more safe on the landThey go to sea to visit distant countries andtrade with them How many useful articles canyou think of that we get from other countries


44 HARPER S UNITED STATES SERIES PAL ILESSON VIROBERT AND MARYi KLittle Mary poor child took a severe cold lastwinter and it made her so deaf that she can nothear when Robert speaks to her unless he speaksvery loudMary said Robert will you let me takeyour new book What did you say askedMary I said Will you let me take your newbook 0 yes you may take it said Maryyou will find it in the book case in the parlorSo Robert went and got the book and after hehad read it through he told Mary that he had putit on the table in the study room Where didyou say asked Mary On the table in thestudy room said RobertRobert did not get vexed or angry when Marycould not hear him for he loved his sisterwintr nd i mae Pir s dea tht sh ca nhearwhe Robrt peas t her uness e sea1


SPaT III THIRD READER 45LESSON VIIBIRDSThis bird is a doveS The bird has a bill SomeSbills are long and some arethick and shortWith its bill the birdpicks up its food Somebirds live on corn some onseeds and some on insectsThe eyes of birds are inthe sides of the head so that they can see on bothsides of them at the same time Birds have wingswith which to flySome birds do not live all the time in the airSome swim most of the time on the water Theduck the swan the goose the loon the gull andsolne others swim on the waterBirds have feet with which they kill or catchtheir prey or scrape the ground or climb or walkThe eagle makes use of his feet to seize and tearhis prey The hen scrapes the ground with herfeet to find seeds worms and insectsThe creeper a small bird can run up or downa tree with great ease It runs very fast andlooks into the small holes in the bark of the treefor the food on which it livesMost birds have four toes three before and onebehind but the creeper has two toes before andtwo behind


46 HARPER S UNITED STATES SERIES PART IIILESSON VIIIJOHN BROWN AND BRUNOHere comes John Brown with his dog BrunoDo you think John is kind to Bruno The doglooks up into John s face and wags his tailWhy does Bruno wag his tail Is he glad tosee John Yes he is glad to see John and helikes to follow himJohn do you take good care of your dog Areyou kind to him and do you play with him andpat his head when he does what you wish him toYou can pat Bruno s head and he will not biteyou but he will wag his tail because he is gladto have you notice himJohn do you feed Bruno and do you like tosee him fed Do you ever whip Bruno 0 no


PA RT III THIRD READER 47I hope not What does John Brown say Thisis what he saysI will not hurt my little dogBut stroke and pat his headI like to see him wag his tailI like to see him fedlie is as kind and good a dogAs ever you did seeBecause I take good care of himIHe loves to follow meLESSON IXTHE RUINS AND THE FIREh What does this manstop there for Whatdoes he look at Whatdoes he wish to find thereThis man went awayfrom home a long timeago He has come backbut he can not find hishome He can find onlysome of the walls of hishouse for his house is all in ruinsThe weeds have grown up all around the houseanrid in the garden Do you see the weeds and thebroken gate Do you see how sad the man looksBut what has become of the man s house Hadthe man any little boys and girls when he wentaway


48 HARPER S UNITED STATES SERIES PAurx li1Yes and I will tell you what one of the littleboys did One day he put a piece of paper inthe fire to play with The paper set his clotheson fire and it set the house on fire tooNow the man can not find his house nor hiswife nor his chilaren The poor man does notknow what to do I hope he will find his wifeand childrenHere is a picture of theman s house just as itlookedwhen it was on fireDo you see the flames andthe smoke coming out ofthe roof and through thewindows We can seethe timbers of the roofThey are the raftersDo you see the ladders leaning up against thehouse How many ladders can you see Wecan see two There are men going up the laddersWhat do you think they are going up forThere is a long ladder and a short ladder Themen are trying to put out the fire They try hardbut they can not put it out The house will burndownThe people have all got out of the house Aman ran into the house and took the baby out ofthe cradle when the room was full of smokeChildren should not play with fire for if theydo they may burn themselves and also set thehouse on fire and perhaps burn other buildingsalso


PART III THIRD READER 49LESSON XSLIDING DOWN HILLDid you see me slide down the hill said Willie Jones Did yoT see how fast my sled wentover the ice and over the snowWhen I was going down James was going upbut now I am going up and he is going downThat s the way we go First one and then theotherI can steer my sled straight now There comesJohn Brown He has no sled Come on JohnYou may take my sled and slide down once aloneand then you may slide with meI like to have boys slide with me two and threeon a sled What fine sport we have to day Ifit is cold we can keep warm We can run uphill and that will warm us


50 IARPER S UNITED STATES SERIES PAu 11VDown down the hill how swift I goOver the ice and over the snowA horse or cart I do not fearFor past them both my sled I steerHurrah my boy I m going downWhile yon toil up but never frownThe far hill top vou soon will gainAnd then with dl your might and mainYou ll dash by me while full of gleeI ll up again to dash by theeSo on we glide Oh life of joyWhat pleasure has the little boyHere we can see apart of the hill downwhich the boys weresliding Howcoldandwintry it looks thereThe boys must becareful and not slider across the road whenthat horse is going byWillie says he doesnot fear a horse orcart for he can steerpast them Perhapshe can but some other little boy might not be soskillful and might get hurt It is best not to slideacross the road at allDo you know what those three persons areriding in It is a one horse sleigh Some call ita cutter I suppose it is called a cutter because itgoes so fast for that is the name which is given toa fast sailing vessel


P T II THIRD READER 51LESSON XITHE BOY AND THE RABBITSHere is a picture of a rabbit which has gotaway from a boy gee how fast the rabbit runsDo you see that box by the side of the boyThat is a trap There is a door in front of it thatslides up and down Do you see the doorWhat do you think the trap is for It is tocatch wild rabbits inThere is a little stick under the door Whenthe trap is set to catch the rabbit the door is upThe stick is placed so as to keep it up Wouldyou like to know how the boy caught this rabbitThe boy set his trap with the door up so thatthe rabbit might go in Then he tied a piece ofan apple to the farther end of the little stick whichyou see Then he went away and left the trapall aloneWhen he was gone away this little rabbit which


52 HARPER S UNITED STATES SERIES PART 1IIyou see came out of his hole under an old treeHe looked around and tried to find somethingto eatWhen he saw the box he did not know what itwas He did not think it was a trap He lookedin and saw the apple and then he crept in softlyto get it but as soon as he began to nibble itdown fell the trap and shut him inThe poor rabbit could not get out for the boxwas very strong and tight If he only knewenough to lift up the door he could get out buthe did not know enough for thatBy and by the boy came to see if he had caughta rabbit When he saw that the door had fallendown he said Good good my trap is sprungSo he began to lift up the door gently to seeif the rabbit was there He lifted it up so thathe might peep in As soon as the door was liftedup a little the rabbit pushed his head throughand then giving a spring he crowded his wholebody through and so got awayThe door fell down again as soon as the rabbitbad got through Do you see the boy reachingout his hands Do you think he can catch therabbit in his hands No the little rabbit is tooquick for him Do you think he will be caughtin that trap again No I think he knows toomuch for thatWhat do you think the boy wanted to do withthe rabbit He wanted to take it home andtame it There are many kinds of tame rabbitsand they are larger than the wild rabbits


P T I j THIRD READER 53LESSON XIILEADING THE CowIs not that a gentle cow She does not hookthe boy with her horns nor try to pull awayShe follows the boy and he leads her by aropeThat is John BPown and he is on his way toschool Have you read about John Brown before But why does John take the cow withhim Will he take the cow to schoolO no he is leading her to the pasture which isnear the school What time of the day then doyou think it isBut what is John reading John is readingThe last word is is so short that it seems to have therising inflection But it has not This word begins on ahigh pitch but as soon as the voice begins to pronounce itit takes the falling slide


54 HARPER S UNITED STATES SERIES PART IThis book and getting his lesson John is a goodboy and he loves to readHow does John carry his stick Does he carry it in his hand Look and see if you can tellThere is something on John s back What doyou suppose it is That is his satchel Do youknow what a satchel is It is a little sack orbag I suppose John s mother made it for himto carry his books inLESSON XIIITHE LARK AND HER YOUNGOnce a lark built a nest in a field of corn whichgrew ripe before her young were able to fly Theywere just getting their feathers and their wingswere only half grownAs the old lark was very anxious about thesafety of her little ones she told them when shewent out to get food for them that if the fhrmershould come they must listen with great care towhat he said about cutting down the cornOn her return the young larks told her that thefarmer and his sons had been there and had agreedto send for some of their neighbors to assist themin cutting down the corn the next dayAnd so they depend it seems upon theirneighbors to get the corn cut said the mother Verywell then I think we need not be afraid of tomorrow but may stay a little longer Those whowait for others to help them are not apt to gettheir work done in a hurry


IA T III TIIIRD EADER 55The next day the old lark went out again andleft with them the same command as before telling them to watch for the coming of the farmerand his sons and listen with great care to whatthey saidWhen she returned the young larks told herthat the farmer and his sons had again been therebut as none of their neighbors came to aid themthey had put off cutting the corn till the next daywhen they designed to get their friends and relations to help thems Indeed said the old lark and do they stilldepend upon others to help them Do they thinktheir friends and relations will be any more promptthan their neighbors Since they still dependupon others I think we may venture to remainanother day So the mother went out to get foodagain but before she went she gave the littlelarks strict charge as before to let her know whatpassed in her absenceOn the return of the olft lark the little onestold her that the farmer and his sons had a thirdtime been to the field and finding that neitherfriend nor relation had come to help them theywere resolved not to wait any longer but to comethe next morning and cut down the corn themselvesIf that is the case said the old lark it is timefor us to think of leaving for as the farmer andhis sons now depend on themselves to do theirown work it will certainly be doneWhat the old lark said proved true for scarcely3


56 HARPER S UNITED STATES SERIES PART IIIhad she and her young ones left the field very earlythe next morning when the farmer and his sonscame into the field and began to cut down thecorn in good earnestLESSON XIVK THE GARDENWhen we sow good seeds in the garden we wishthem to grow up and make nice plants and rootsand flowers If we let the weeds grow they willchoke the good seeds and spoil them We musthoe up the weedsWhen boys and girls are sent to school theymust learn to read and spell well and get all theirlessons What their teachers teach them is goodseed sown in their minds When it springs up itmust be taken care of Bad thoughts and wickedwords and wicked deeds are the weeds that some


FART III THIRD READER 57times choke the good seed Such weeds must bepulled upSome boys talk a great deal and tell how hardthey are going to study and how much they aregoing to learn and then go away and do ncthingThey are too lazy to study Other boys say littleand study muchDo you see what the man in the garden in thepicture is doing He is pulling up the weedsNow what are those men and boys like who talkmuch and do nothing who have many wordsand few deeds I will tell youA man of words and not of deedsIs like a garden full of weedsThe mind is like a garden It must be takencare of Good plants and flowers will not befound in the garden unless the seed be plantedAnd then when the seeds come up the youngplants must be taken care ofBut weeds will spring up of themselves without being planted and if they are left to growthey will grow faster and stronger than the goodplants and choke them tadeath You must pullup the weeds if you want the good plants to growIt is so with the mind The soil is good butangry and wicked thoughts are apt to spring upthere and if you let them grow they will chokethe good thoughts anI kill themIf you wish to be good and grow up good youmust pull up all the wicked thoughts and throwthem away just as the man is pulling up the weedsin the garden


i58 HARPER S UNITED STATES SERIES PART IIILESSON XVJOHN BROWN AND CHARLIE GRAYO look at my kiteAlmost out of sightHow pretty it fliesRight up to the skiesPretty kite pretty kiteAlmost out of sightPray what do you spyIn the bright blue skyJohn Brown flew his kite onevery windy dayWhen a gale broke the tail andit soon flew awayAnd while he sat crying and sighing and sadCharlie Gray came that way a good natured ladDon t cry wipe your eye said he little JackStay here never fear and I 11 soon bring it backUp the tree climbed he and brought the kite downMany thanks many thanks said little John BrownLESSON XVITHE BOY AND THE WOLPNever do what you know to be wrong Neverdo what you know to be evil with the hope thatgood will come from it


PART III TIIRD READER 59Never tell an untruth with the hope of gainingany thing by it If you should gain by it itwould still be wrongBut in the end you will not gain by it youwill suffer and the time will come when youwill be sorry for it Tell the exact truth at alltimesWhen you are telling about what you have seenor heard or done be very careful to tell nothingbut the truth If you relate what some one toldyou do not alter or invent any part to make abetter story but tell it just as you heard itDo not tell a lie even in jest Do not say toyour little sister Mary Mary there is a bugon you just to frighten her when there is nobug there If you tell Mary a lie in jest shewill not believe you when you tell her the truthDid you ever hear the story about the boy andthe wolff The boy used to run and screamWolf wolf when there was no wolf thereHe did it to make the men think the wolf wascoming and to make them run to help himWhen they came and found no wolf there hewould laugh at themIn this way he often deceived them One daythe wolf came sure enough and the boy ran andscreamed Wolf ziolf in earnest but as themen thought he did it to deceive them again theydid not go to help him and so the wolf caughthim and came very near killing himIt is an old proverb but a true one that a liarSis not believed when he speaks the truth


60 HARPER S UNITED STATES SERIES PART IIILESSON XVIITHE BOOK STOREDo you know what place this is It is a placewhere books are kept for sale It is a store andwe call it a book storeDo you see the man who has his hat on Ishe an old man or a young man How can youtell Is he as old as the man who is on the otherside of the tableThe man with a hat on hr s come to buy a bookHe has bought one and put it in his pocket Doyou see the book in his pocket You can see oneend of it He has one book open before himIs he looking at the book now No he islooking at the other man Do you think he istalking to him What do you think he is talking about


PART III 1 THIRD READER 61I think he is talking about the book which isopen before him Perhaps he is asking the priceof it Perhaps he is asking the man what kindof a book it is Perhaps he says If it is a goodbook I will buy itLESSON XVIIITHE OLD BEGGAR MANI see an old man sitting thereHis wither d limbs are almost bareAnd very hoary is his hairOld man why are you sitting soFor very cold the wind doth blowWhy don t you to your cottage goAh master in the world so wideI have no home wherein to hideNo comfortable firesideWhen I like you was young and gayI ll tell you what I used to sayThat I would nothing do but playAnd so instead of being taughtSome useful lesson as I oughtTo play about was all I soughtAnd now that I am old and grayI wander on my lonely wayAnd beg my bread from day to dayBut oft I shake my hoary headAnd many a bitter tear I shedTo think the useless life I ve led


PART FOURTHRules for the use of the Teacher only jWhen words or clauses are contrasted they take oppositeinflections The following are the principal rules for suchinflectionsRULE V Words and clauses connected by the disjunctiveor generally require the rising inflection before the disjunctive and the falling after it Where several words are thusconnected in the same clause the rising inflection is given toall but the lastEXAMPLES Will you go or stay I will go Will you go in thebuggy or the carriage or the cars or the coach I will go in the carsThese examples also follow the general rules for questionsNOT 1 When the disjunctive or is made emphatic with the falling inflection as inthe following example it is followed by the rising inflection in accordance with theNote to Rule IV He must have traveled for health or pleasureNoTE 2 When or is used conjunctively as no contrast is denoted by it it requireathe rising inflection after as well as before it except where the clause or sentenee expresses a completion of the sense Example Did he give you money or food or clothIng No he gave me nothing This also follows the general rule for questionsRULE VI When negation is opposed to affirmation the


PART IV THIRD READER 63former takes the rising and the latter the falling inflectionin whatever order they occurEXAMPLES I did not hear him I saw him I said he was a goodsoldier not a good citizenNOTE But when in contrasted sentences negation is attended with deep and calmfeeling it requires the falling inflection Example We are perplexed but not in doepair persecuted but not forsakenLESSON IREADING FROM BOOKS AND FROM FACESThe young man whom you see in the cut orpicture on the opposite page has been readingfrom the book which he has in his hand and hehas just been telling the young woman what hehas been reading aboutDo you think she hears what he says Doesshe seem to pay good attention Yes you cantell by her face that she hears what he is sayingShe has a very thoughtful look We can read itin her facePerhaps he has just read something that is veryimportant and she is thinking about it Perhapshe has asked her some question and is waiting forher reply Do you think they are brother andsister Her face shows that she is not angry atwhat he has been saying We can read it in herfaceThe face tells when we laugh and when wecry when we are sad and when we are happyIf we are angry the face shows it if we aregood and kind in our feelings the face shows itand if we are bad we may be very certain thatothers will read it in our face


64 IIAPER S UNITED STATES SERIES PART IVThe face is a kind of book which is printed allover with the feelings of the heart The face is agreat tell tale It is very important then thatthere should be nothing bad in the heart for ifthere should be any thing bad there the face willbe very apt to tell of itBut is there no other reason why there shouldbe nothing bad in the heartLESSON IIKITTENS PLAYINGWhich do you like best a cat or a dogo Doyou like to see kittens play or do you like to havethem keep still I think you like to see themplayMost young animals like to play as well aschildren do See how one of these kittens playswith a string She will also play with a straw


PAnT I V THIRD READER 65or a stick or a leaf and she will play with hertail if she can not find any other thing to playwith Round and round after it she will go likea topTwo kittens will run after each other throveach other down and roll over each other Theyhave fine sport in that way Dogs will play sotooDid you ever see lambs or colts or calvesplay Yes I think you have seen them playbut sheep and horses and cows do not oftenplay nor do dogs and cats often play when theyare old Old age makes animals sober and itmakes people sober tooThe old cat likes to see her kittens play butshe does not like to have them tumble over herwhen they are playing So old people like to seechildren play but they do not like to be runagainst or have their chairs pulled by themI like little pussy her coat is so warmAnd if I don t hurt her she ll do me no harmSo I ll not pull her tail nor drive her awayBu pussy and I very gently will playShe shall sit by my side and I ll give her some foodAnd she ll love me because I am gentle and goodkit ten tum ble chil dren gen tlyplay ing peo ple a gainst be causeHen ry re cite with out neigh borstu dent Read er knowl edge cit i zenstud y sec ond vir tue hon ories son Prim er pa rent re spectThe falling inflection is required here as the clause expresses a completion of the sense


66 HARPER S UNITED STATES SERIES PART IVLESSON IIITHE GOOD STUDENTIs Henry a good boy in school Is he a goodstudent Yes Henry is a good boy in schooland he is a good student also Did you see himstudy his lesson No I did not see him studyit but I heard him recite itWhat lesson did Henry recite Did he spellor did he read 2 He read a lesson in his Readerand then he spelt some of the words in the lessonDid Henry read in the First or the Secondor the Third or the Fourth Reader He readin the Third Reader He has been through thePrimer and the First and Second Readers alsoI am glad to hear that Henry has done so wellI hope he will love his books and study themthat he may grow up to be a good manWhat can a man be without knowledge andvirtue Can he be a good parent or a goodneighbor or a good friend or a aod citizenCan he have the love the honor or the respectof those who know himHere negation is opposed to affirmation See Rule VIt Here or is used disju nctively See Rule VI Here also or is used disjunctively If it had been usedconjunctively the rising inflection would have been given tothe closing word Reader and the sense would have beendifferentHere or is used conjunctively and the inflection is to begiven in accordance with the note to Rule V It will not failto be observed that in all these cases the general rule forquestions is adhered to


PART IV J THIRD READER 67LESSON IVTHE GOLDEN RULETo do to others as I wouldThat they should do to meWill make me honest kind and goodAs children ought to beSWhether I am at home or schoolOr walking out abroad1 never should forget this ruleOf Jesus Christ our LordLESSON VCHILD GOING TO PLAYS Here is a child going out toplay Is it a boy or a girl PWhat makes you think it is aboyDo you think his dress ispretty What do you thinkit is made of I think it ismade of velvet don t you Ithink it is a very nice dressbut it is too nice to play inDo you see the hoop in theboy s hand Which hand is itin Is it in his right hand or his left handCan you tellWhat do you think this boy is going to doDo you think he can roll the hoop well


68 HARPER S UNITED STATES SERIES PART IVHow do you like the boy s hat Do youthink it is a pretty hat Do you like the boy sface Do you think he is a good boyWe can not tell very well now for he is goingout to play When his mother calls him to comein perhaps he will not be so pleasant If he shouldnot be pleasant then he will not be a good boyHow old do you think this boy is Do you thinkhe is more than five years old How old are youDo you think tnk his boy will live to be an oldman If he should live to be old will he like toroll a hoop then I hope he is a good boy andthat he will be a good manLESSON VITHE FISHS r Do you knowwhatthisis Itis a fish Didyou ever see alive fish Didyou ever catchone What didSome may thmk this is the rising inflection but it followsthe general rule The voice suddenly rises from boy s tohat but as soon as it strikes the word hat it begins todescend The shortness of the word hat renders it difficult to detect the downward slide but if it were a word oftwo syllables hat piece for example the downward slidewould be very perceptible Thus How do you like theboy s hat piece Be careful to notice that the voice mustrise to reach the point at which the downward inflection begins It must rise to reach the word hat


PART IV THIRD READER 69you catch it with Did you have a fish hookand line Did you ever catch little fish in yourhandsFish live in the water They can not live longout of the water A fish swims with its fins andtail Do you see the fins of this fish Do yousee his tail He has scales all along his backand on his sides but they are not so large as hisfinsDo you see the eye of this fish Do you thinkhe has more than one eye Where do you thinkthe other eye is Do you think the fish can seewhen he is away down in the water Whatmakes you think he can see If he could not seehe might hit his head against a stone or a rockand that might kill himCould you see if you were down deep in thewater No not very well But the fish cansee veiy well indeed The eyes of the fish are notlike ours They are made to see with in the water but ours are made to see with in the airThe fish is made to live in the water and we aremade to live in the air Who made the eyes ofthe fish to differ from oursvel vet per haps bask et them selveshon est pleas ant sis ter ex pectwalk ing fish hook say ing lone lya broad wa ter a long thought fulfor get a way let ter an i malpret ty in deed broth er at ten tiongo ing dif fer or phan im por tantmoth er com ing per son op po site


70 HARPER S UNITED STATES SERIES j PAT IVLESSON VIGOING AWAYYes he is going awayHe is just coming down the 1steps from the house Hehas a basket on his armHis sister Mary is on thesteps too He is just sayingto her Good by Mary Ishall write to you when Iget there and let you know howI get along And then you mustwrite to me a nice long letter forI shall be very glad to hear fromyouDo you ask who they areThey are brother and sister Theyare orphans too Do you knowwhat orphans are They are children whose parents are deadWhen these young persons were quite small theylost both of their parents and now they have totake care of themselvesWe do not know how far the young man isgoing nor how long he expects to be gone Butif he can not see his sister he can write to herHow lonely they would be if they could notwrite to each other What a fine thing it is toknow how to write You must learn to write sothat you can write letters too


PART IV THIRD READER 71LESSON VIIITHE SICK CHILDThis is a nice housein the country Whomdo you see at the doorIs one of them a manDo you think herode on that horseWhat do you think hehas come for Howpleasant it looks thereThere is a nice porchSat the door of thec house and that makesit pleasant and there are some fine flowers oneach side of the porch There is a fine gardenover the fence where the horse is tiedSIs it not a pleasant11 place But those wholive in the house maynot be very happy nowthey may be very sadLet us go in and seeO 0 yes I know theyare sad for they havea poor little sick boyDo you see the sickboy His father hasjust taken him up inhis arms What is the boy s name His nameis Charlie4


72 HARPER S UNITED STATES SERIES PAET IVCan you see little Charlie s feet Can you seehis head I can see the back of his head Hisface is turned the other way Look all about thepicture and perhaps you can see his face tooWhere can you see itDo you see the lady in the chair Who doyou think she is I think it is the little sickboy s mother Do you see ho v sad she looksShe loves her little boy and she is afraid hewill not get well She feels very badly Do youhope little Charlie will get wellWhat kind care our parents take of us whenwe are little children How they watch over uswhen we are sick and carry us in their arms anddo all they can to have us get wellAnd should we not loveour parents for all thisShould we not obey themand try to please themShould we not be kind tothem at all timesAnd how should we treatthem when they becomeold We should treat themwith all the kindness in our power We can neverrepay them for all they have done for uscoun try hap py per haps kind nessflow ers fa ther o bey pow ergar den ta ken be come re pay


PART IV 1 THIRD READER 73LESSON IXNEVER TELL A LIENo do not tell a lie Tell the truth at alltimes and be kind and good to all and then allwill love you and you will be happyDo you know that it is wicked to tell liesYes you have often been told so The Bible alsosays so and the Bible tells the truth It is verymean as well as very wicked to tell liesIf you tell lies God will be angry with youall good men will despise you and all good boysand girls will shun you Then what would yougain by telling lies You would not gain anything but you would lose muchA child that lies no one will trustThough he should speak the thing that s trueAnd he that does one wrong at firstAnd lies to hide it makes it two


74 HARPER S UNITED STATES SERIES PA T IVIf you tell lies you will also feel badly yourselfYou will know that you have done wrong andwhen you are wicked you can not help feelingbadly A bad boy can not be happyThen be a good and honest child so that all canlove you If you have been careless and havebroken a window or torn a nice book or lost thedoor key or upset the ink on the table go toyour father or mother or teacher and own itYes that is the best way that is the rightway that is the honest way Would you notlike to be happy Then be an honest child andnever never tell a lie Do you wish to be a childof God Then speak the truthLESSON XTHE TRUTHFUL BOYOnce there was a little boyWith curly hair and pleasant eyeA boy who always loved the truthAnd never never told a lieAnd when he started off to schoolThe children all about would cryThere goes the curly headed boyThe boy that never tells a lieAnd every body loved him soBecause he always told the truthThat often as he older grewTwas said There goes the honest youthAnd when the people that stood nearWould turn to ask the reason whyThe answer would be always thisBecause he never told a lie


PAET IV THIRD READER 7LESSON XLA Fox STORYDid you ever hearany one say as sly asa fox When the catis very sly we sayShe is as sly as a foxBut the fox is notonly very sly but verycunning also Whenany one is very cunning we say he is as cunning as a foxI will tell you a story about the cunning of thefox Some dogs were once in chase of a foxThey came very near him and it seemed as thoughthey would catch him There was no hole orother place for the fox to hide in Then whatcould the fox doThis is what the fox did There was a lowstone wall not far off and the fox ran toward itas fast as he could go But nearer and nearercame the dogs and when the fox had got to thewall they were close to himThe fox made a jump and went over but assoon as he was on the other side he crept to thewall and lay down as close to it as he couldThe dogs in their haste went over both walland fox at a jump and ran straight on Theywere going so fast that they could not stop andthey did not see where the fox had hid


16 HARPER S UNITEL STATES SERIES PART IVAs soon as the dogs were over the fox quickas a flash made a leap back over the wall and wassoon out of sight On went the dogs but theynever saw the fox againWas not that a cunning fox He knew howto cheat the dogs and he saved his life by itLESSON XIIGoD IS NEARIt is God who made all things He made theearth and he made the sun and the moon and thestars alsoGod made the beasts that roam over the earththe birds that fly in the air and the fish that swimin the rivers the lakes and the great sea Hemade man alsoGod makes the tender herb and the grass togrow as well as the tall trees of the forest andhe sends the rain and the dew to water them andthe sun to warm themHe gives us all our food for if he did not takecare of the beasts and the birds and the fish andthe grain that we sow and the seeds that we plantall of them would die and then we should die alsoBut God not only takes care of us and all thingsaround us but he is also near us at all times Hesees us now He sees all that we do and heknows all our thoughts He knows all thingsWe should thank God for all his goodness tous We should pray to him often and ask himto keep us from sin and to bless us


PART IV THIRD READER 77When we rise from bedin the morning and whenwe lie down at night weshould lift up our hearts tohimin prayer God will earus and if we pray to himwith a right heart he willbless us both in this worldand in the world to comeLESSON XIIIMAKING PIESMiss Mary has gone to the kitchen to showSusan how to make pies Do you know whichMiss Mary is What is she doing now What


78 HARPFR S UNITED STATES SERIES PART IVis she holding in her left hand What has shein her right hand What is she cutting off withthe knife She is cutting off some of the doughwhich the pie crust is made ofIs Susan a white woman Do you think Susanis talking now Does she look pleased Whatdo you think she is pleased about I think sheis pleased because Miss Mary has come down tothe kitchen to show her how to make pies Whichhas the biggest nose Miss Mary or SusanWhich has the thickest lipsSusan says she can make pretty good pies butshe says she thinks Miss Mary can make betterpies Do you see the young girl Is she awhite girl Does she look any like Susan Doyou suppose she thinks her curls are prettyWhat has Susan on her head Are herarms as white as Miss Mary s Is her face aswhite Are her hands black Yes but theyare as clean as they would be if they were whiteWhat is the little boy doing IEas he any capon his head What kind of hair has heWhy does he open his mouth so Can he seeany better with his mouth openWhat kind of a pie do you suppose Miss Maryis making It may be a peach pie or a mitcepie or an apple pie or a currant pie or some otherkind of pie What kind of a pie do you love bestWhat do you see on the table I see a bottlewith a long neck and a cork in it and ajar witha spoon in it Do you think there is any thingelse in the jar


PART IV THIRD READER 79LESSON XIVLAKES IN THE WOODSHere is a lake in thewoods Do you seethe water How stillthe water is Do youthink the wind blowsthere nowIs it summer thereor is it winter Whydo you think it is summer Are there anyleaves on the trees inthewinter Do you see any grass and weeds in thisplace Do grass and weeds grow in the winterDo you think there are any birds in those treesor any fish in the lake We do not see any birdsnor any fish If there are any fish in the lake whyS can not we see themnow There may bewild ducks on the water among the weedsWild ducks love quietplacesHere is a picture ofa lake in the woodsalso Is it the samelake that we see aboveat the top of ther page Ycs it is the4


80 HARPER S UNITED STATES SERIES PART IVsame lake but we do not see it in the sameplaceWhat do you see now on the lake How manypersons do you see in the boat What is that inthe man s hand that looks like a long stick Whydoes the man bend forward so Which way isthe boat going to your right hand or to yourleft handiDo we see the same boatin this next picture Noit is not the same boatand it is not a lake thatwe seeThis boat is on the Hudson River Do you knowwhere the Hudson Riveris and can you tell meoa yu what great city is at themouth of itHow many men do you think there are in thisboat There are eight men in it See if youcan point out all of them Do you know howthe men make the boat go They row with theiroars and that pushes the boat alongThere are six men rowing in that boat threeon one side and three on the other How manyoars can you see Why can not you see theother oarsThe boat which we see is called a row boat Aboat that has sails and is moved by the wind iscalled a sail boat A sail boat is not so safe as arow boat


PART IV J THIRD READER 81LESSON XVTHE ROBINDid you ever hearthe robins sing inV the morning whenyou were in bedK The robin sings veryearly almost as soonas it is lightt When the robinsings so early in themorning it is veryhappy and it seems to say Up up and be happy with me I will tell you what a little girltold me about a robin that came to her windowand sung very early one morningThere came to my windowOne morning in springA sweet little robinShe came there to singAnd the tune that she sungWas prettier farThan ever I heardOn the flute or guitarShe raised her light wingsTo soar far awayThen resting a momentSeemed sweetly to say0 happy how happyThis world seems to beUp up little girlAnd be happy with me


82 HARPER S UNITED STATES SERIES PART TVLESSON XVITHE TWO FRIENDSThe two friends havegone out into the fieldSand now they are sith ting on a mossy bankin the shade of a treeWe can see by theSgrass and the shrubsgrowing near themSand the leaves on thetrees that it is summer What is it that tells us that it is summerRalph is partly lying down close to the treewith his elbow resting on the ground He has abook in his hand and he is reading from it Franklistens and seems to be much pleasedWhat do you think Ralph is reading aboutHow should we know when we can not hearBut we can see what the two friends are doingWe know that Ralph reads and that Franklistens and we can see from Frank s face thathe is pleasedHow can Frank s face show that he ig pleasedDoes his face speak when he does not open hismouth Yes it speaks by signs Is not thesmile on his face a sign that he is pleasedDo you not know that we all talk very muchby signs and that we tell people what we are


PART IV THIRD READER 83even when we do not open our lips Yes oureyes and our faces are great tell talesThey tell if we are happy they tell if we are sadThey tell if we are good they tell if we are badWe should be very careful to be pleasant andkind to others at all times for if we are peevishand fretful and cross and lazy there is something that will tell of us When there is a fretfultemper the face will show itLESSON XVIITHE IDLE WORDBut I say unto you that every idle word men shall speak they shallgive account thereof in the day of judgment MATTHEW xii 36FIRST VOICEIt passed away it passed awayThou canst not hear the sound to dayTwas water lost upon the groundOr wind that vanisheth in sound0 who shall gather it or tellHow idly from the lip it fellSECOND VOICETis written with an iron penAnd thou shalt hear it yet againA solemn thing it then shall seemTo trifle with a holy theme0 let our lightest accent beUttered as for eternitymoss y grow ing pee vish van ish ethread ing ly ing fret ful light estlist en tell tale tem per e ter ni tyL


PART FIFTHRules for the use of the Teacher onlyRULE VII For the sake of variety and harmony the lastpause but one in a sentence is usually preceded by the risinginflectionEXAMPLES 1st The minor longs to be of age then to be a man ofbusiness then to arrive at honors then to retire2d Time taxes our health our limbs our faculties our strength andour featuresNoTE The foregoing rule is sometimes departed from in the case of an emphaticsuccession of particulars ior which see Rule VIIIIn the second example above the rising inflection is given to the words health limbsfaculties and strength both because they are not attended with strong emphasis and because they are folio ved by the pause of suspension in which the mind anticipates a continuation of the sentenceRULE VIII An emphatic succession of particulars andemphatic repetition require the falling inflectionEXAMPLES st Succession Charity suffereth long and is kindcharity envieth not charity vaunteth not itself is not puffed up dothnot behave itself unseemly seeketh not her own is not easily provoked thinketh no evil2d Repetition You wrong me every way you wrong me BrutusF


PART V THIRD READER 85LESSON ITHE MANSIONOn the opposite page is a picture of a large andelegant building with pleasant lawns and grovesof trees and gardens around it It is the countryresidence of a rich man It is called The MansionDo you know what a lawn is It is a spaceof ground covered with grass and is often seen infront of or around a fine house or mansion Somelawns are called velvet lawns because the grasswhich is kept short and smooth when seen froma distance appears like velvetAfter seeing a picture of this mansion couldyou give a good description of it Let us seeCould you tell what kind of a roof or covering ithas Into how many parts do you think theroof is divided How many chimneys do yousee If you describe the house you must tellabout all these thingsBut this is not all Do you notice the peculiarshape of the chimneys and of the windows andof the whole building Do you see a long piazzaon each side of the front entrance and do you seethat the front doorway is archedDo you know what a piazza is If you do nothow can you describe the building A piazza isa covered walk supported by columns and builtagainst the side of a houseYou should always notice with care whatever is


86 HARPER S UNITED STATES SERIES PART Vworth seeing Keep your eyes open and thinkabout what you see Those who notice nothingwill know but littlepic ture col umns cov er ing sup port edbuild ing op po site di vid ed what ev ercoun try el e gant pe cul iar arch edman sion res i dence pi az za door waychim ney de scrip tion de scribe en tranceLESSON IITHE SPRING TIMEIt is now in the spring time of the year Thebirds sing the lambs skip and play on the lawnthe trees put forth their tender leaves the grasscovers the plains with verdure and all nature hasput on her robes of beautySo youth is the spring time of life the morn


PART V THIRD READER 87ing of what seems a bright and happy day Youthis gay and active and full of life and joy andhope It is the time to plant the seeds of knowledge and virtueCaroline has gone out to gather flowers Sheis plucking one now She has her apron nearlyfull of them How beautiful the flowers areDo you not love the spring time of the yearDo you not love the birds and the green grassand the flowers and the trees and the brightsun How thankful we should be that God hasfilled the world with so many things to make ushappyBut while we enjoy these things let us not forget who gave them to us God is the author andgiver of all our blessingsLESSON IIIMAN AND HIS MAKERMan is a human being He walks uprightBeasts walk with their faces toward the groundBeasts see smell feel hear and taste sodoes man Beasts have a voice but they can notspeak wordsMan can speak He makes use of words to tellhis thoughts He can think also Man has reason that is he has the power of thinking Noanimal but man has reasonThis great world was made for man It is hishome God made the world for man to dwell in


88 HARPER S UNITED STATES SERIES PART VHe made the sun to give man light by day andthe moon to give him light by nightGod spread a carpet of green over the earththat it might be a place of beauty to delight theeyes of man What is that carpet made ofDoes man want food The fields will givehim grain the air will give him birds and theseas the lakes and the rivers will give himfishDoes man want clothing The sheep bears iton her back the cotton plant will yield it orthe little silk worm will spin it for himDoes man want tools to work with Let himdig into the earth and take the iron and makethem Does he want music The birds singfor him Does he want sweet odors Let himgo to the flowers and inhale their fragranceAll things in the earth and on it and in thedeep sea the grass and the flowers of the fieldthe trees and the fruits the tame cattle andthe wild are given to manGod made them for man and gave them to himfor his use and comfort We must make a gooduse of all that God has given usGOD IS SEEN IN EVERY THINGIn the sun the moon the skyIn the mountain wide and highIn the thunder in the rainIn the winds the woods the plainIn the little birds that singGod is seen in every thing


AT V THIRD READER 89LESSON IVLAZY SLOKINS THE SCHOOL BOYOne of theseboys has a bookin his hand andyou can see that heis very busy reading it It lookslike a new bookalthough the boyd has used it a longtimeThis boy is getting his lesson in school and hewill have a good lesson and he will recite it welltoo You can see that he is not a lazy boy andthat he takes good care of his booksThe name of the other boy is Slokins Whatdo you think of him He looks like a lazy fellow IHie has a book in his hand but it is all tornin pieces He can scarcely read in it When hereads he has to stop to spell out the hard wordsSlokins does not like a book You can see thatAs this is a word of but one short syllable and the voicer ust rise to strike it it is spoken very much as though it hadthe rising inflection In the following sentence the last syllable in Johnson evidently has the falling inflection If thelast syllable were taken away John would seem to have therising inflection but it has not it is merely emphatic beginning on a high pitch but immediately taking the falling slideIf that is your opinion of Web ster what do you thinkof Johnson


90 HARPER S UNITED STATES SERIES PART Vin his face His face tells of him It tells that heis lazy Do you think if he were a good smartand active boy and one who liked to read thathis face would look soNo his face would not look so His face wouldhave a smart look for smart boys look smart Andhow do you suppose Slokins s book became sotorn and dirty It is because he did not takecare of it Is it not strange that the books of theboys who get their lessons always look very niceLESSON VLAZY SLOKINS THE YOUNG MANWhat alazymanhis is2 Don t youthink he looks lazy 2 Why don t heSget up and go toworkHe is too lazySto w ork so he sitsdown in the sunand goes to sleepWho do you think he is Why that is Slokinshimself He is a man now but he is just as lazyas everWhat a po I old hat he wears Why don t heget a better hat A better hat How can heget a hat without money and how can he getmoney if he will not work Lazy men have butlittle money


PART V THIRD READER 91Do you see one of his shoes Do you see howhis toes stick out of it Why don t he get a pairof new shoes New shoes How can he getthem without money He has a wife at homebut what do you think will become of herSometimes this man works a little while andgets a little money but he does not use it to buya hat or shoes What does he do with it Doyou ask what he does with it Look at the nextpicture and see what he does with itLESSON VILAZY SLOKINS THE DRUNKARDSure enoughButj Here he is againThis is the sameman only a littleolder It is Slokins himself Ican tell by his longnose and his sharpchin and his meanlookBut where is he now Where is he now Heis on the road to ruin Don t you see that thesign board says so But Slokins dit not stop toread it Lazy man as he is he is winetimes in ahurryWhat kind of a place do you think that is whichyou see in the picture It is a grog shop Andwhat is Slokins doing there He has gone there


92 HARPER S UNITED STATES SERIES PART Vto get a drink to get a drink of rum and to gethis bottle filled with rum Do you see the bottlein his pocketWhat hurt will it do if Slokins does drinkrum What hurt will it do If he drinks alittle it will make him feel finely if he drinks alittle more it will make him wild and crazy andif he drinks very much it will make him staggerand fall down drunk in the streetIt is not safe for a man to drink any rum forif he drinks only a little at a time he will soonlove it so that he will be apt to drink more aldmore until he becomes a drunkardLESSON VIILAZY SLOKINS THE THIEFBut what becameof that man SlokinsSwhom we read aboutin the preceding lesson Did he becomea drunkardYes he became adrunkard and thenhe stole money to buyrum with and then hewas put in prison Here you see him in prisona poor old drunkard on a bed of straw Butwhat became of his wife Turn to the 114thpage and you will seeIf you do not wish to be a drunkard do not


PAT V THIRD READER 93taste rum nor any other strong drink Do notgo where it is sold Touch not taste not handle not That is the safest wayDo you know what the Bible says about strongdrink It says Wine is a mocker strongdrink is raging Who hath woe who hathsorrow who hath contentions who hath babblings who hath wounds without cause whohath redness of eyes They that tarry long atthe wineThe Bible also says Look not upon the winewhen it is red At last it biteth like a serpentand stingeth like an adderLESSON VIIITHE ROBIN S TEMPERANCE SONGI asked a sweet robin one morning in MayS Who sung in the apple tree over the wayWhat twas she was singing so sweetly aboutFor I d tried a long time but could not find outWhy I m sure she replied you can not guess wrongDon t you know I am singing a temperance songTeetotal oh that s the first word of my layAnd then don t you see how I twitter awayTis because I ve just dipped my beak in the springAnd brushed the fair face of the lake with my wingCold water cold water yes that is my songAnd I love to keep singing it all the day longAnd now my sweet child won t you give me a crumbFor the dear little nestlings are waiting at homeAnd one thing besides since my story you ve heardI hope you ll remember the lay of the birdAnd never forget while you list to my songAll the birds to the cold water army belong


94 HARPER S UNITED STATES SERIES PART VLESSON IXTHE LOAD OF GRAINThe load of grain has just come from the fieldand now it is going through the gate There arethree persons on the load and two of them arewaving their hats and shoutingThe farmer stands near the gate with a pitchfork in his hand and he is waving his hat to thosewho are on the load What kind of grain do youthink this is It is wheatThe grain is to be taken to the barn or put intoa stack until winter Then it is to be threshedand the wheat is to be cleaned from the chaff andthe strawThe wheat will be taken to the mill and ground


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124 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERTES. [PART VI. Thus the capital of England is London, which stands on the River Thames. London is also the largest city in England. The capital of the United States is Washington; but the largest city in the United States is New York. The houses and streets in nearly all our large villages and cities are lighted with gas, which is made from coal. In some places oil lamps are still used, while in others the streets at night are quite dark, being without gas or oil lamps. The streets of our cities are paved with stones. Coaches, carts, and wagons pass along the streets; and on each side of the street is a foot-path paved with small stones, bricks, or large flat stones, on which the people walk. LESSON XI. A GOOD NAME. Children, choose it, Don't refuse it, 'Tis a precious diadem; Highly prize it, Don't despise it, You will need it when you're men. Love and cherish, Keep and nourish, Tis more precious far than gold; Watch and guard it, Don't discard it, "You will need it when you're old.



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ENGLISH CLASSICS. EDITED, WITH NOTES, BY WM. J. ROLFE, A.M. SHAKESPEARE'S PLAYS. The Merchant of Venice. King Lear. The Tempest. The Taming of the Shrew. Julius Caesar. All's Well That Ends Well. Hamlet. .Coriolanus. As You Like It. Comedy of Errors. Henry the Fifth. Cymbeline. Macbeth. Merry Wives of Windsor. Henry the Eighth. Measure for Measure. A Midsummer-Night's Dream. Two Gentlemen of Verona. Richard the Second. Love's Labour's Lost. Richard the Third. Timon of Athens. Much Ado About Nothing. Henry VI. Part I. Antony and Cleopatra. Henry VI. Part II. Romeo and Juliet. Henry VI. Part III. SOthello. Troilus and Cressida. el Night. Pericles, Prince of Tyre. T ter's Tale. The Two Noble Kinsmen, Kig n. Venus and Adonis. Henry IV. Part I. Sonnets. Henry IV. Part II. Titus Andronicus. Select Poems of Oliver Goldsmith. Select Poems of Thomas Gray. CorPIOuSL ILLUTRATn .16E.MO, CLOTH, 56 CTS. PEa VoL.; PAPER, 40 CTS PER VOL. In the preparation of this edition of the English Classics it has been the aim to adapt them for school and home reading. The chief requisites are a pure text (expnrgated, if necessary), and the notes needed for its thorough explanation and Sllustration' Each of Shakespeare's plays is complete in one volnme, and Is preceded by an introduction containing the "History of the Play," the "s onrces of the Plot, and "Critical Comments on the Play." PUBLISHED BY HARPER & BROTHERS, NEW YORK. 7fHABPiz & BROTHRS will send any of the above works by mail, postage prepaid, to any part of the United States, on receipt of the price. The Baldwin Library *:" B u mn,'v .F ida



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t6 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART I. LESSON X. AT PLAY. The boys have come out to see the men at work. Four of the boys sit on the ground, and two of them play at see-saw. One boy is up, and the other boy is down. Do you see the boy who is up hold up both of his hands'? Do you think he will fall'? Do you see any tools of the men near the boys'? Do you know what tools they are'? One is an ax, and the other is a saw. "When boys go where men are at work, they should not touch the tools. They might get hurt, or they might dull the tools. Do you see those little black specks up in the sky'? Do you know what they are'? They are birds. They are up very high. Do you see any men at work'? Yes; there are



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146 ARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART VII. 18. "It seems to me that it is hardly grand enough. How would this sound: The Partridge Nest was discovered by Harry, who sailed in the ship Grasshopper from Bumble Bee Point on the sixteenth of October, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-eight. It is well wooded, the soil is fertile, and the principal exports'6 are pitch, tar, turpentine, and lumber ? 19. They kept along close to the shore, and, turning the southern point of the promontory," came to a little gulf or arm of the lake that set back into the/land. The banks were here perpendicular and rocky, and the water full of lilies. Emma made a little sketch of the lilies, and the rocks, and the bushes about them, and when she got home she finished the drawing. Here it is. 20. They called this place the Gulf of Lilies. In the farther end was a cave made by the wearing away of the bank under. the shelf-like rocks that formed the roof. The cave was large, and high enough to take in the whole Grasshopper easily. The sunlight reflected from the water fell upon the roof and sides, making it light as day within. Harry threw the sounding-line, and found the depth half a fathom. As they sat enjoying this newly-found retreat, Emma spied some halfhidden characters18 cut in the stone on one side. Clearing away the moss, they found the figure of a cross upon a heart, and below, "Bernard, 1780."



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64 IIAPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART IV. The face is a kind of book which is printed all over with the feelings of the heart. The face is a great tell-tale. It is very important, then, that there should be nothing bad in the heart; for if there should be any thing bad there, the face will be very apt to tell of it. But is there no other reason why there should be nothing bad in the heart? LESSON II. KITTENS PLAYING. Which do you like best', a cat', or a dogo? Do you like to see kittens play', or do you like to have them keep still'? I think you like to see them play. Most young animals like to play, as well as children do. See how one of these kittens plays with a string. She will also play with a straw',



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PART I.1 THIRDI READER. 17 two men at work, but they are not so near us as the boys are. Do you know what the men are doing'? They are sawing timber. LESSON XI. EARTH, SUN, AND MOON. We live on the earth. The earth is not flat, as it seems to us to be. SIt is like a round ball. oo r Men sail round the e s earth, or the world, in ships. k The world does not het stand still, but it turns round like a top. It is said to turn on its axis. But it also goes round the sun. It turns round on its axis once each day, but it takes a year to go round the sun. The sun also is a great globe, or ball. It seems like a ball of fire. The sun gives us light and heat. We see the sun by day, but not by night. Do you know why we do not see the sun in the night'? The sun rises in the east, and it sets, or goes down, in the west. When the sun sets, then it is night. The moon and stars give light by night. The moon is a globe, or ball, but not so large as the sun or the earth. The moon goes round the



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60 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART III. LESSON XVII. THE BOOK STORE. Do you know what place this is'? It is a place where books are kept for sale. It is a store', and "we call it a book store\ Do you see the man who has his hat on'? Is he an old man', or a young man'? How can you tell'? Is he as old as the man who is on the other side of the table'? The man with a hat on hr.s come to buy a book'. He has bought one, and put it in his pocket. Do you see the book in his pocket'? You can see one end of it. He has one book open before him. Is he looking at the book now'? No'; he is looking at the other man'. Do you think he is talking to him'? What do you think he is talking about'?



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130 IARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PAT VI. LESSON XVI. A QUIET SUMMER MORNING IN THE COUNTRY. P- This is a place in the country; arnd the time when we see it is a quiet summer morning. How calm and peaceful it is there! Do you see any thing to disturb the quiet of the scene ? The man, the sheep, and the dogs are the only living things we seejust enough to give life to the picture, but not enough to disturb its calm repose. Do you see any water in this quiet scene'" Yes; on the left is a small surface of water--a little pond half shaded by the trees which hang over it. In the centre of the picture is a church



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14 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART I. Do you think it is right to catch fish'? Yes, it is right to catch fish to eat, but it is not right to catch them for sport, and then throw them away. LESSON VIII. GOING TO SCHOOL. A boy, a girl, and a dog. The boy and the girl are on their way to school. The dog goes with them. Do you see how fast the boy walks'? Could you walk so fast'? The name of the girl is Ann. She says, Henry', you walk too fast'. I can not keep up with you. Henry says, Take my arm, Ann', and I can help you. Does she take his arm'? Can she keep up now'? Do you think Henry is a good boy'? Do



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PART I.] THIRD READER. I9 LESSON XIII. THE Fox. bush'-y match rock chased es-cape/ pieces roots goose oft'-en sly'-ly be-fore' fights The fox is like a dog. It is a beast of prey. It has a broad head, a sharp snout, sharp ears, and 4 a long bushy tail. SThe fox lives in a den or hole, which he often makes near a farm-house. "He hides in this den by day, and when night comes on he leaves his den, and goes slyly to the farm-yard. He is fond of a duck, or a hen, or a goose, or a lamb. But he will also eat fruit, mice, and frogs. When he gets hold of a hen or a duck he runs home to his den. Some men keep packs of hounds or dogs to hunt and kill the fox, and they will ride a long way sometimes before they can catch him. "When the fox finds that he is chased he runs to his hole, where he lies still till some dog is sent in to drive him out. If his den is below a rock, or the roots of trees. he is safe, for the dog is no match for him there; he can not be dug out. But if he can not get to his den, he runs to the thick woods, and seeks the most thorny paths.



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48 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PAurx li1 Yes'; and I will tell you what one of the little boys did. One day he put a piece of paper in the fire to play with'. The paper set his clothes on fire, and it set the house on fire too'. Now the man can not find his house, nor his wife, nor his chilaren'. The poor man does not know what to do'. I hope he will find his wife and children. Here is a picture of the man's house, just as it lookedwhen it was on fire. Do you see the flames and the smoke coming out of the roof`, and through the windows'? We can see the timbers of the roof. They are the rafters. Do you see the ladders leaning up against the house'? How many ladders can you see'? We can see two. There are men going up the ladders. What do you think they are going up for'? There is a long ladder, and a short ladder. The men are trying to put out the fire. They try hard, but they can not put it out. The house will burn down. The people have all got out of the house. A man ran into the house, and took the baby out of the cradle when the room was full of smoke. Children should not play with fire; for if they do, they may burn themselves, and also set the house on fire, and perhaps burn other buildings also.



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PaRT VII.] THIRD READER. 145 came to a sort of bluff12 or headland. The top was covered thick with trees. The bank was steep and rocky, with little bushes growing among the rocks down to the water's edge. Here a little stream of water came pouring over the rocks, making a pretty little waterfall. Emma was so delighted with the view that she made a drawing of it on a piece of paper which Sshe took from her portfolio. 15. "I must go up on the cliff, .and get a good look at the country," Ssaid Harry. "We ought to 'call this Cape Look Out." "There is just as much reason for calling it Cape Get Out," said Emma. 16. Harry clambered" up the bank, and saw the whole of the lake from one end to the other, the house, the ridge, the mountains far in the southwest, but nothing but woods to the east, which reached all the way to the road. As he turned to go down he heard the whirr'4 of a bird near him, and, pushing the bushes aside to see whence the noise came, a whole covey"5 of partridges started up not more than ten feet from him, and whirred away into the distance. 17. "A nest of partridges," thought Harry; but he could find no other signs of it. He got into the boat, and gave an account of what he had seen. "We will call this coast the Partridge Nest," said Emma. "How does it please you?"



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INFLECTIONS. Inflections, in reading, are turns or slides of the voice, either upward or downward. There are two inflections-the Rising Inflection and the Fall, ing Inflection. These, when united in the pronunciation of the same word, are sometimes called the Circumflex, or Wave. In the Rising Inflection, the voice, beginning at the general pitch at which the preceding part of the sentence was spoken, rises upward, as in the following questions: "Did he act prudently'?" "Has he come'?" In the first, the voice continues on the general pitch until it has pronounced the first syllable of the word prudently: Thus, Did he act pru-' The proper reading of the second example may be illustrated thus: Han ,0. he 6o In the Falling Inflection, the voice usually begins above the general pitch, and suddenly descends to it, but seldom falls below it. Thus: Has 10 he gone to town toor will he go to' Here the word morrow, beginning high, erfds on the general pitch at which the preceding part of the sentence was read. The rising inflection is denoted by a downward dash from right to left ('), the falling by a downward dash from left to right ('). Those whose ears are not well trained often mistake the falling for thp rising inflection, in cases of short words of one syllable, and for thin reason. In the falling inflection, the voice usually rises suddenly abov" the general pitch to strike the word, and from that point its descendinb slide, in short words, is scarcely perceived. Thus, in the two examples, "What wilt thou do' ?" and "What art thou doing'?" the falling inflection is used in both, although the inexperienced ear might suppose the rising inflection used in the first example. The difference between the rising and the falling inflection in short words, may perhaps be more plainly perceived by using the same words as above, but in questions that require the rising inflection. Thus: "Is this what you do' ?" "Is this what you are doing' ?" We think almost any person will perceive that the inflections used in the latter two examples differ from those used in the former two. 1*



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CONTENTS. Page To the Teacher................................. .............................. 5 Inflections.... .......... ..... ... .... .......... ............. ........... ..... PART I. General Rules for the Rising Inflection.......................................... 8 Lesson Page Lesson Page I. Girl and Doll .................. 9 IX. Two Boys on a Horse........ ... 15 II. Flag and Drum ................ 10 X. At Play........................ 10 III. The Fox and the Ox............ 10 XI. Earth, Sun, and Moon ......... 17 IV. The Young Ducks.............. 11 XII. Making Hay................... 18 V. The Bird's Nest ................ 12 XIII. The Fox ....................... 19 VI. The Play-Ground.............. 12 XIV. The Snail...................... 25 VII. Going a Fishing .......... ...... 13 XV. Harvest Time ................. 22 VIU. Going to School ................ 14 PART II. General Rules for the Falling Inflection ........................................ 22 Lesson Page Lesson Pag' I. The Fishing Scene.............. 23 IX. Plants, Fishes, Birds, Beasts, and I. The Idle Boy................... 24 Men.......................... 31 II. The Idle Boy again........ ... 25 X. Seeds and Fruits ............... SS IV. Feeding the Dog ............... 26 XI. Goats and Sheep ............... 33 V. Geese Marching ................ 27 XII. Flying Kites................... 34 VI An Odd Team................. 28 XIII. The Moon is very Fair and VII. A Cluster of Grapes .......... .... 29 Bright"...................... 35 VIII. Crossing the Brook ............ 30 XIV. The Boy who stole Pears ........ 36 XV. The Gentle Sheep .............. 37 PART III. Modifications of Rule I ........................................................ 88 Lesson Page Lesson Pago I. The Barn-yard Fowls........... 39 X. Sliding down Hill............. 49 n. Fowls Going to Roost ........... 40 XI. The Boy and the Rabbits...... 51 III. Respect........................ 41 XII. Leading the Cow ............. 53 IV. Indifference.................... 42 XIII. The Lark and her Young ...... 54 V. The Young Sailor's Return...... 42 XIV. The Garden .................. 56 VI. Robert and Mary............... 44 XV. John Brown and Charlie Gray 58 VII. Birds.......................... 45 XVL The Boy and the Wolf........ 58 "VIII. John Brown and Bruno ........ 46 XVII. The Book-Store ............... 60 IX. The Ruins and the Fire ......... 47 XVIII. The Old Beggar Man .......... 61 PART IV. Contrasted Words and Clauses .................. .............................. 69 Lesson Page Lesson Page I. Reading from Books and from IX. Never Tell a Lie............... 79 Faces ....................... 63 X. The Truthfful Boy ............ 74 II. Kittens Playing............... 64 XI. A Fox Story ................... 75 III. The Good Student............. 66 XII. God is Near ................... 76 IV. The Golden Rule............... 67 XII. Making Pies................... 7T V. Child Going to Play............ 67 XIV. Lakes in the Woods............ 79 VI. The Fish ...................... 68 XV. The Robin .................... 81 VII. Going Away ................... 70 XVI. The TwoFriends .............. 82 VIIL The Sick Child................. 71 XVII. The Idle Word ............... S8



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PART VI J THIRD READER. 25 LESSON XII. MONEY. He took out a handful of money and showed it to them. They gazed at it with great interest, for it was not often that one of them had so much money in his pocket. The boy with the hat on has been away from home, and has been at work in a printing-office. He worked in a printing-office before he went away. Now he has returned, and is showing to his old friends in the office the money which he has earned. "There, boys," said he, "you see what I have earned. I earned it all by hard labor. I know how to work, and, although I have nice clothes on now, I am not ashamed to work. "I bought these clothes with the money which



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PART VII.] THIRD READER. 140 LESSON IV. APPLE PIE. 1. It was a pleasant game for the children in Mr. Moreland's family school to spell out words from little blocks that were made into the shape of the letters of the alphabet. It was not only fine sport for them, but it was useful also. The way they played was this: 2. One of the children would select the letters that'spelled a word, and then, after mixing them up together, give them to some one who was to put them down in such order that they should spell the word which the other had selected. 8. It was often amusing to see the many efforts that some of them made before they could spell



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IART .] THIRD READER. 13 Boys and girls should learn well in school', but when school is out, they may run and play. How glad they are to be out in the fresh air again I LESSON VII. GOING A FISHING. There! John has caught i a fish. It is a trout. Can he pull him out'? Take care, John. Don't let him break your line. It is a cloudy day. It Srains a little. Is a rainy day the best time to fish'? Yes. The best time to fish "is when it is cloudy, or when it rains a very little, and when it is-warm. James, too, will soon have a fish. You can see that he thinks so. Do you see his face'? A fish had hold of his hook just now. He will soon come back, and try again. If he should get hold again, James will pull him out. SHenry has a fine string of fish in his hand. Do you see him lift them up to show them'? Did Henry catch them'? No, John caught some, and James caught some. Henry has no hook and line; but John and James told him, if he would go with them, and carry the bait, he should have part of the fish, and he might take them home in his basket.



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28 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART I. LESSON VI. AN ODD TEAM. What kind of a team do you think this is'? lIs it a nice team'? Do you like to see such a team'? A horse and an ox'! What an odd team they make'! What are the horse and ox drawing' ? Can you tell'? Why not'? It must be a wagon, but we can not see it. Which way is the wagon', on your right hand', or on your left'? It is on the right., Does the man ride on the horse', or on the ox'? He is on the ox. Has he any thing for a seat on the back of the ox'? What is it'? What does the man hold in his hand'? Do you see both of his feet'? Do you see one of them'? Where is it'? What does he put the toe of his shoe in'?



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PART IV. J THIRD READER. 67 LESSON IV. THE GOLDEN RULE. To do to others, as I would That they should do to me, Will make me honest, kind, and good, As children ought to be. SWhether I am at home, or school, Or walking out abroad, 1 never should forget this rule Of Jesus Christ, our Lord. LESSON V. CHILD GOING TO PLAY. S Here is a child going out to play. Is it a boy', or a girl'P What makes you think it is a boy'? Do you think his dress is pretty'? What do you think it is made of'? I think it is made of velvet: don't you'? I think it is a very nice dress; but it is too nice to play in. Do you see the hoop in the boy's hand'? Which hand is it in'? Is it in his right hand', or his left hand'? Can you tell'? What do you think this boy is going to do'? Do you think he can roll the hoop well'?



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20 IIARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART I. He tries all sorts of plans to get out of the way of the dogs. But when he finds that he can not escape, he turns and fights till he is sometimes torn in pieces. We call a young fox a cub. LESSON XIV. TIE SNAIL. snail tor'-pid light walk grows re-pair' eggs leaves eyes bro'-ken crawls new The snail crawls on the ground; it does not walk, for it has no feet. Snails come from eggs, which are of the size of a small pea. These eggs are put into the ground, where they lie till the young ones come out. When the snail comes from the egg, it has a small shell on its back. The shell grows with the growth of the snail. The shell is light and firm, and keeps the snail from harm. When the snail fears that it shall be hurt, it draws back into its shell or house. As snails crawl along, they put out their horns. There are four of these horns, and on the top of two of them you can see two small black spots. These are the eyes of the snail. Below the other two horns is the mouth of the snail. The snail lives, for the most part, on the leaves of plants and trees. When the cold days come, the snail seeks out some hole, where it lies till the spring returns. It lies in a torpid state for five or six months.



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SPART III.] THIRD READER. 43 The two boys stopped, and looked at the ships. "Is not that a fine sight'?" said William. "Yes'," said James, "I never before saw three ships coming in at the same time. I guess Ralph Hoyt' is on board one of those ships'." S"I guess so too," said W illiam ."A nd won't his father and mother be glad to see him'?" "Yes, that they will," said James. "And won't Ralph be glad to get home too' ?" Yes, Ralph was glad to get home, and his father and mother were very glad to see him. He had been gone almost a year. He had been around the world, and had seen many strange people. He had been many days at sea, out ofsight of land, when nothing but the sea and the sky could be seen from the ship. ":The name of the ship was the "Sea Bird;" and like a bird she floated on the water. Sometimes the wind blew', and the waves ran high', and the rain fell in torrents'; but that good ship kept onward-right onward in her course'; and now she had brought all safe to land. How thankful ought Ralph to be that he has been saved from so many dangers'; for many-many that go down upon the sea in ships, never return. The sea-the deep, deep sea-has been the grave of thousands. But why do people go to sea, when it is so much more safe on the land'? They go to sea to visit distant countries, and trade with them. How many useful articles can you think of that we get from other countries'?



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PART IV.] THIRD READER. 71 LESSON VIII. THE SICK CHILD. This is a nice house in the country. Whom do you see at the door'? Is one of them a man' Do you think he rode on that horse'? What do you think he has come for'? How pleasant it looks there! There is a nice porch Sat the door of the c house, and that makes it pleasant: and there are some fine flowers on each side of the porch. There is a fine garden over the fence where the horse is tied. SIs it not a pleasant 11 place'? But those who live in the house may not be very happy now; they may be very sad. Let us go in and see. O 0 yes, I know they are sad, for they have -a poor little sick boy. Do you see the sick boy'? His father has just taken him up in his arms. What is the boy's name'? His name is Charlie. 4



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PART .L] THIRD READER. LESSON L GIRL AND DOLL. girl left would ver'-y tell doll nice like whip play The girl has a doll. Do Syou see it'? Do you see her lift it up'? Is it a nice doll'? Ann', would you like a doll'? 0 yes' I would like one very much'? Will you get one for me'? Has the boy a doll too'? No'; the boy has a whip. Can not you tell a whip from a doll' ? Do you think the boy wants a doll to play with' ? I have a little doll; I take care of her clothes; She has soft flaxen hair, And her name is Rose. She has pretty blue eyes, And a very small nose, And a sweet little mouthAnd her name is Rose. You must take good care of the doll, and good care of her clothes. Can you make a hood' or a bonnet for her', and little shoes for her feet'? Do you think she needs them to keep her warm'? Can you tell me why a doll can not be cold'?



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Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1872, by HARPER & BROTHERS, In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.



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PART SIXTH. [The rules for the use of the teacher only., RULE IX.-Expressions of tender emotion, such as grief, pity, kindness, gentle joy, a gentle reproof, gentle appeal, gentle entreaty or expostulation, etc., commonly require a gentle rising inflection. EXAMPLES.-Mary'! Mary'! do' not do so'. My mother', when I learned that thou wast dead', Say', wast thou conscious' of the tears' I shed' ? Hovered thy spirit o'er thy sorrowing son', Wretch even then', life's journey just begun'? RULE X.-Expressions of strong emotion, such as the. language of exclamation not designed as a question, authority, surprise, distress, denunciation, earnest entreaty, reproach, terror, anger, hatred, envy, revenge, etc., require the falling inflection. EXAMPLES.-What a piece of work is man'! How noble in reason'! how infinite in faculties'! In action', how like an angel'! In apprehen-, sion', how like a God'! Woe unto you, Pharisees' woe unto you, Scribes'



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PART II. I THIRD READER. 81 LESSON IX. PLANTS, FISHES, BIRDS, BEASTS, AND MEIT. Plants', and shrubs', and trees', are things that live', and grow', and die'; but they do not think', and feel', as we do'. They have roots to draw up their food from the earth', and leaves to breathe' with; but they do not move from place to place, like birds and beasts'. Fishes have fins to swim with'. A whale is a large fish that swims in the sea'; and a trout is a small fish that swims in a brook', or in a lake\ Fishes can not live out of the water. A bird has two legs', and two feet', and two wings'. Most birds can fly in the air, and some birds can swim on the water'. Beasts live on the land. They have four legs', and four feet'. What then are dogs, and cows, and bears, and wolves? Fishes, and birds, and beasts feel', but they do not think', Men walk on the earth'. They can sail on the sea in ships, and some men can swim'; but none of them can fly in the air'. God made man to think', as well as to feel', and to act'. God made the sun', the moon', the stars', the earth', the plants and trees', the fishes of the sea', the birds of the air', and the beasts of the field'. Last of all he made man'. And God gave to man dominion over the fishes of the sea', over the fowls of the air', over the cattle', and over every creeping thing'.



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150 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART VII. the right word. John Barlow, the boy whom you see laying down the letter E, has just spelled out APPLE PIE with the letters which Mary Jones gave him. 4. But John had to try many times before he could succeed. Mary told him that the letters would spell something that he loved. "Then," said Willie Brown, who was looking over John's shoulder, "I guess they will spell Mary Jones." 5. This made them all laugh; but Mary said the letters would spell the name of something that John loved to eat, and she was sure he did not want to eat her. 6. John first spelled A L E, and asked if that was not a part of the name. "Oh no," said Mary; "that is something that is bad to drink." So John tried again, and after a great many efforts he spelled out Apple Pie, which Mary said was right. 7. Then John gave Willie a word to find out. Willie asked him whether it was a single word or a compound word-that is, made up of two words, like apple-pie and ink-stand. John said it was a single word. Willie spelled it out, and found it was Bible. 8. Sometimes one would choose letters that spelled the name of some person whom they all knew, or the name of some river or mountain that was in their lesson. After they had played a while with the blocks, one of the older boys printed letters on little cards which he cut out of thick paper, and they found that they could play with them just as well as with the blocks. !!--:A



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iv CONTENTS. PART V. Rules VII. and VIII.................................. P Lesson Page Lesson Page I. The Mansion................ 85 X. Building a Pier.............. 95 II. The Spring-Time ............ 86 XI. The Gentle Cow............. 97 III. Man and his Maker........... 87 XII. UncleToby.................. 98 IV. LazySlokins the School-Boy.. 89 XIII. The Works of God............ 100 V. Lazy Slokins the Young Man.. 90 XIV. Boats on the Water.......... 1l VI. Lazy Slokins the Drunkard... 91 XV. Story of the Rail-road Thief. 102 VII. Lazy Slokins the Thief........ 92 XVI. Winter Scenes .............. 16 VIII. The Robin's Temperance Song.. 93 XVII. The Way to be Happy........ 108 IX. The Load of Grain........... 94 XVIII. What is Earth? ........... 109 PART VI. Rules IX. and X.................... ...... ...... ...... .. ........ .......... 110 Lesson Page Lesson Page I. Old Age and Youth........... 111 XI. A Good Name ............. 1-4 II. Don't' kill the Birds'.......... 112 XII. Money..................... 12 III. Don't' kill the Birds'........... 113 XIII. The Stars ........... ....... 16 IV. The Poor Woman ............ 114 XIV. Twinkle, Little Star.......... 128 V. Early Risin ...... XV. Work and Play............. X. ork. 128 VI. Childhood's Hours ............. 116 XVI. A quiet Summer Morning in VII. The Egg-Hunters............. 117 the Country ............. 130 VIII. I'll never use Tobacco.......... 120 XVII. Praise ye the Lord.......... 133 IX. The Angry Man ............... 121 XVIII. Boy and Lark.............. 134 X. Houses, Hamlets, Villages, and XIX. The Ten Commandments..... 135 Cities.... ................... 122 The World isfull of Beauty.. 185 PART VII. LESSONS ON OBJECTS. Leson Page Lesson Page I. Lines, Surfaces, and Solids.... 137 IV. Apple Pie................... 149 II. Lines,Angles,andPlaneFigures 139 V. A first Lesson on Colors..... 151 III. TheVoyage of the Grasshopper 142 Colors and their Combinations 155



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154 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART VII. 13. All this was quite new to Charles, and he began to see that to be ignorant of colors was to be ignorant of the most common things around him. And even Mary, although she knew the difference between crimson and scarlet, and had a dress that was of a maroon color, and could tell mazarine blue from lilac, found herself much more ignorant on the subject of colors than she had supposed she was. 14. So Mrs. Murray painted on a card some of the principal colors, with their names, and gave it to her children for their First Lesson on Colors." Charles and Mary then collected a great many articles, such as pebbles, shells, pieces of wood and bark, mosses, leaves, and flowers, which they called their museum; and by comparing the objects with the card they learned to describe their colors, although with occasional aid from their mother. 15. They also began to notzce things around them much more carefully than before By thus keeping their eyes open they formed the habit of observing things-a habit which was ever after a source of great pleasure and profit to them; for it added greatly to their general knowledge: it showed the world to be full of beauties which they had "never dreamed of; and it also furnished them numerous evidences of the wisdom and goodness of God in the most simple works of creation. THE END.



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TO THE TEACHER. IN explanation and defense of the system of instruction in reading adopted in the First and the Second Readers, and here continued in the Third Reader, to wit, the formation, at the very beginning of the pupil's course, of correct habits of reading, we submit to teachers the following remarks: If .he rules for correct reading which we find in our Reading Books are worth any thing, they are worth being applied when they can be made of most utility: they are worth being used by the teacher to teach correct habits in his pupils before bad habits have been formed. But instead of this, we find these rules in the more advanced Reading Books only, and there they are almost wholly ineffectual to accomplish any good, because they are brought into use after pupils have already formed bad habits of reading. In fact, the greater part of the pupils in our public schools leave school before they are sufficiently advanced to get into the classes which use the Reading Books that give any instruction in rhetorical reading; and tho3e who remain longer, and then are drilled in the Rules, make very little progress against the inveteracy of habit. So true is this, that many eminent teachers, and several distinguished compilers of Reading Books, pointedly discard, as positively injurious, the use of any formal rules in teaching reading. We have taken a different course in these Readers, and one that meets the objectors of both extremes. We begin, at the very outset, in the First Reader, to teach correct reading, by giving numerous examples, in nearly every lesson, of the various kinds of easy and natural questions and answers-thus exercising the pupils in reading, with the proper inflections, the very sentences which they are constantly speaking. We give them no rules here. Children do not speak by rule: why should they learn rules to read by, if they can read correctly by habit, just as they speak ? We continue the same system in the Second Reader; and here we introduce it also in the Third Reader. Here we first lay down a few general rules of inflection, because we think they will be of service to many teachers; and not because we think it desirable, in many cases, that the pupils should yet learn them. Let the pupils constantly practice reading aright, from the very beginning, just as Nature teaches them to speak aright, and they will need no rules to insure correctness. On the contrary, a continual recurrence to rules is a serious impediment to advancement in reading. Indeed, the only use of a rule in reading is to aid in forming a habit which shall eventually take the place of thinking what the rule is. The marks in the early Readers, denoting the inflections to be used, are therefore designed merely to aid in the formation of correct habits at a period before bad habits have been formed.



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32 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PAR'II. LESSON X. SEEDS AND FRUITS. How many kinds of fruits and seeds do you know'? Would you know peas and beans if you should see the pods in the garden'? Would you know wheat, and oats, and rye, if you should see them as they grow in the field'? All plants have seeds. Some seeds, such as the bean and the pea, are found in pods; some, such as nuts, are found in hard shells; and some, like the seeds of the plum, the apple, and the orange, are found inside of the fruit. We use sone seeds for food, such as wheat, oats, rye, peas, and beans. Some seeds are large, and some are small. Some are heavy, and fall to the ground, where they grow; and some have wings, by which they float in the air from place to place. From the seeds new plants come. The seeds are put into the ground, where the moist earth makes them swell and burst. One part then goes down, and forms the root; and one part goes up, and forms the stalk or stem. Leaves grow on the stems and branches. It is by the roots that plants are fed, and by the leaves that they breathe. If you were to cut off the roots of a tree, the tree would starve and die, or the sap would run out, so that the tree would soon bleed to death.



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PART IV.] THIRD READER. 63 former takes the rising, and the latter the falling inflection, in whatever order they occur. EXAMPLES.-I did not hear him', I saw him'. I said he was a .good soldier', not a good citizen'. NOTE.-But when, in contrasted sentences, negation is attended with deep and calm feeling, it requires the falling inflection. Example.-We are perplexed', but not in doepair'; persecuted', but not forsaken'. LESSON I. READING FROM BOOKS, AND FROM FACES. The young man whom you see in the cut, or picture, on the opposite page, has been reading from the book which he has in his hand; and he has just been telling the young woman what he has been reading about. Do you think she hears what he says'? Does she seem to pay good attention'? Yes'; you can tell by her face that she hears what he is saying. She has a very thoughtful look. We can read it in her face. Perhaps he has just read something that is very important, and she is thinking about it. Perhaps he has asked her some question, and is waiting for her reply. Do you think they are brother and sister'? Her face shows that she is not angry at what he has been saying. We can read it in her face. The face tells when we laugh', and when we cry'; when we are sad', and when we are happy'. If we are angry', the face shows it'; if we are good', and kind in our feelings', the face shows it'; and if we are bad', we may be very certain that others will read it in our face\'.



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148 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART VII. by the cable to the pier, and they wended their way home. North. rv 'lir'a I B blee e Be m C-, Ierorl Cave ilcAster Falls South, 27. A few days afterward Harry made his map of the lake. It cost him a great deal of work to measure the curves of the banks, and get their exact directions and distances, but with some assistance from his father he made a very correct map. 1 LXUNonHD, made to slide from the land 12 BLTsFP, a steep or high bank. into the water. 5 CL.M'-iBEnE, climbed with difficulty. 2 WNVAF, a landing-place. 14 W1inn, sound made by a bird's rapid 3 AWN'-INO, a covering from the sun flight. 4 EX-PE-DII"-TION, voyage. 15 i6v' EY (kavl'-y), a brood of birds. 5 IN'-CI-DENT, fact; event. 16 EX'-PsRTs, those things which are ear6 LN-EX-PLORED', not examined, ned away and sold. 7 SOUNo, measure the depth. 17 PRin'-ON-TO-RY, a high point of land ex8 NA'-I-GA-Toas, those who sail ships tending out into the lake. SeCoM-_M'-mI-ou, large and convenient. 18 flAR'-Ac-TERs, marks; letters !0 FIqT'-OM, six feet. 1i CON-JECT'-CtES, guesses; surmiseS. "i'1 6OAST'-INo, sailing along the coast. NoTE.-Teachers should encourage their pupils to make maps of sections of country with which they are familiar, such as fields and groves containing streams of water, little lakes, ponds, etc. Besides cultivating their powers of observation, and teaching them to make sketches of real objects, it will be of value in giving them correct morioan of geography, and a taste for geographical studies.



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40 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PaT I0. LESSON II. FOWLS GOING TO ROOST. "What kind of a place do you think this is'? It is just outside of the barn; and the hens are going up a ladder to the roost. How many rounds of the ladder do you see'? What is a round of a ladder'? It is a step of the ladder. On which round of the ladder is the rooster'? What do you see below the ladder'? Two ducks', and two Guinea-hens'. What do you think the ducks are eating'? Do the Guineahens look like other hens'? Here is a picture of a Guineahen. Its head is not like the head of the common hen, and all over its feathers you see small, Swhite, round spots. The Guinea" A s hen is a very noisy fowl. Our common fowls were once wild birds, and were brought from a warmer country to this. They have changed very much by being tamed. Some new kinds have recently been brought here from Asia. Fowls do not grow so large in a cold as in a warm country.



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PART V.] THIRD READER. 99 lands; he has seen a great many people; and he tells a great many funny stories. Uncle Toby is telling them now that he was once in a very cold country, where the sun did not rise for three whole months, and it was night there all that time. The people lived in houses made of snow and ice. Where do you think that country is'? Perhaps your teacher will tell you. Uncle Toby says he has seen mountains whose tops are so high and so cold that the snow never melts there. A man would freeze to death before he could climb to the top of such a mountain. "But why don't the sun melt the snow up there'?" said Mary. "Is it never summer there'?" "The summers up there," said Uncle Toby, "are colder than our coldest winters here. The higher up we go, the colder it is." "But some of the high mountains," said Uncle Toby, "have great fires in them, and smoke and fire come out of their tops, just as they come out of a chimney, when the chimney is on fire. "It would take more than ten thousand chimneys on fire," said Uncle Toby, "to make such a fire as I have seen come out of the top of a mountain." Robert and Mary thought this was a pretty big story; but it is a true story. Robert and Mary asked Uncle Toby a great many questions about these mountains on fire, and about the ships that he had sailed in, and about the strange fish and the great whales that he had seen in the sea. And Uncle Toby had seen lions, and tigers, and



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74 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PA_,T IV. If you tell lies, you will also feel badly yourself. You will know that you have done wrong; and when you are wicked you can not help feeling badly. A bad boy can not be happy. Then be a good and honest child, so that all can love you. If you have been careless', and have broken a window', or torn a nice book', or lost the door-key', or upset the ink on the table', go to your father', or mother', or teacher', and own it'. Yes, that is the best way'; that is the right way'; that is the honest way'. Would you not like to be happy'? Then be an honest child', and never, never tell a lie. Do you wish to be a child of God' ? Then speak the truth. LESSON X. THE TRUTHFUL BOY. Once there was a little boy', With curly hair and pleasant eye', A boy who always loved the truth', And never, never told a lie'. And when he started off to school', The children all about would cry', "There goes the curly-headed boy'The boy that never tells a lie'." And every body loved him so', Because he always told the truth', That often, as he older grew, 'Twas said, "There goes the honest youth." And when the people that stood near, Would turn to ask the reason why', The answer would be always this': Because he never told a lie'."



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PART VII.1 THIRD READER. 141 gles, and some are obtuse angles. Can you tell what kind of a figure a square" is, and what kind of a figure an octagon20 is'? See how well you can describe all these figures.* 8. If you will notice things around you, you will see a great many kinds of lines', and angles', and surfaces', and solids', which you may wish to talk about', and describe to others'. But how can you describe them if you do not know what to call them'? I MAR'-.IN, border; side. 13 Wiv'-INo, moving as a wave. 2 1OR-I-Z6N'-TAL, level, 14 SPTR'-AL, winding like a screw. 3 PO-Si'-TION, situation. 15 GRXCE'-FUL, elegant; agreeable in ap* MhN'-TION, name. pearance. 5 PER-PEN-DIC'-U-LAR, upright. 16 BEAO-TI-PUL (pronounced be'-ti-fu:), el6 CANE, a walking-stick. egant in form. 7 E-RU CT', upright; perpendicular, 17 OE-NA-MENT, whatever embellishes or SU-'-8U-AL-LY, generally, adorns. OB-LYQUE' (pronounced ob-like'), not per18 EX-AM'-PLE, specimen; sample. pendicular; aslant. 19 SQUARE, a figure having four equal sides to TunOUGH-ouT', in every part; from one and four right angles. extremity to the other. 20 6C'-TA-GON, a figure having eight equal II PiR'-AL-LEL, having the some direction, sides and eight equal angles. 12 CiRV'EsD, bent. A 0 0 A12 1. Square. 10. Rhomboid opposite sides only equal; 2. Pentagon-five equal sides, two obtuse and two acute angles. 3. Tlexagon-six equal sides. 11. Trapezium-opposite sides not parallel. 4. Ileptagon-seven equal sides. 12. Trapezoid-two opposite sides parallel. 5 Octagon-eight equal sides. 13. Rectangle-four right angles; opposite 6 Equilateral triangle-three equal sides. sides only equal. 7. Isosceles triangle-two equal sides. 14. Cone. 8. Scalene triangle-sides and angles un15. Circle. equal. 16. Cylinder. 9. Rhombus-all sides equal, opposite par17. Ellipse. allel; two obtuse and two acute angles. 18. Oval. NOTE.-The teacher should require his youthful pupils to draw these figures on their slates, and explain how they differ one from another-tell what figures have their opposite sides equal, what angles they have, etc. Such exercises, besides occupying the minds of the children, will do much to cultivate habits of observation, and will be much more beneficial than the learning of formal definitions.



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.'AT V.] THIRD READER. 89 LESSON IV. LAZY SLOKINS, THE SCHOOL-BOY. One of these boys has a book in his hand, and you can see that he is very busy reading it. It looks like a new book, although the boy d has used it a long "" time. This boy is getting his lesson in school; and he will have a good lesson, and he will recite it well too. You can see that he is not a lazy boy, and that he takes good care of his books. The name of the other boy is Slokins. What do you think of him'?* He looks like a lazy fellow. IHie has a book in his hand' but it is all torn in pieces'. He can scarcely read in it. When he reads, he has to stop to spell out the hard words. Slokins does not like a book. You can see that As this is a word of but one short syllable, and the voice rust rise to strike it, it is spoken very much as though it had the rising inflection. In the following sentence, the last syllable in "Johnson" evidently has the falling inflection. If the last syllable were taken away, "John" would seem to have the rising inflection, but it has not-it is merely emphatic, beginning on a high pitch, but immediately taking the falling slide "-" If that is your opinion of Web'ster', what do you think of Johnson'?"



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LOG6 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART V. LESSON XVI. WINTER ScENES. Winter has come again. The leaves have fallen from the trees, and left the branches bare; the water is frozen in the streams; and in place of the green grass, which was like a carpet of velvet under our feet, the ground is now covered with a creary mantle of snow. SIn the house we gather around the blazing fire; but out of doors it is cold and cheerless. When we go out we wear mittens, great-coats, and tippets, to keep out the cold, and shield us from the biting wind. Sometimes it is more than we can do, with all our coats and tippets, to keep warm; and our toes, our fingers, and our ears, will ache with the cold. At the top of this page is a picture of a scene in winter. How cold and cheerless it looks there I



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90 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART V. in his face. His face tells of him. It tells that he is lazy. Do you think, if he were a good, smart, and active boy, and one who liked to read, that his face would look so'? No, his face would not look so. His face would have a smart look, for smart boys look smart. And how do you suppose Slokins's book became so torn and dirty'? It is because he did not take care of it. Is it not strange that the books of the boys who get their lessons always look very nice? LESSON V. LAZY SLOKINS, THE YOUNG MAN. --What alazyman his is2 Don't you think he looks lazy'2 Why don't he Sget up and go to work'? He is too lazy Sto work; so he sits down in the sun, and goes to sleep. Who do you think he is'? Why, that is Slokins himself. He is a man now, but he is just as lazy as ever. What a po I old hat he wears'! Why don't he get a better' hat'? A better hat'! How can he get a hat without money', and how can ,he get money if he will not work"? Lazy men have but little money.



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92 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART V. to get a drink-to get a drink of rum), and to get his bottle filled with rum'. Do you see the bottle in his pocket'? What hurt will it do if Slokins does drink rum'? What hurt will it do'? If he drinks a little', it will make him feel finely'; if he drinks a little more', it will make him wild and crazy'; and if he drinks very much', it will make him stagger', and fall down drunk in the street'. It is not safe for a man to drink any rum'; for if he drinks only a little at a time, he will soon love it so that he will be apt to drink more ald more, until he becomes a drunkard'. LESSON VII. LAZY SLOKINS, THE THIEF. But what became of that man, Slokins, Swhom we read about in the preceding lesson'? Did he become a drunkard'? Yes' he became a drunkard'; and then he stole money to buy rum with, and then he was put in prison. Here you see him in prisona poor old drunkard, on a bed of straw. But what became of his wife'? Turn to the 114th page, and you will see. If you do not wish to be a drunkard', do not



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144 IARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART VII. 8. "What are you going to call the lake'?" asked Harry. "You may name that." "Lake Emma," said he, after a moment's thought. 9. "Let me see," said Emma, "how the geographers will have it. 'Where is Cowslip Bay'? Northern part of Lake Emma'. Into what lake does the Violet River run'? Emma'.' No; take some other. Yes-I don't care-let it go. It is as good a name as any." 10: For a lake as well as a lady," added Harry. "It will read first-rate in the geographies: Lake Emma is situated in Ashcroft, in the midst of' a most beautiful and fertile region, and is noted for its clearness, and its abundance of fish, especially pumpkin-seeds. At the head of the lake is Bumble Bee Point, noted for its shipwrecks.'" And Harry laughed right heartily. 11. "We ought to sound7 this bay," said Harry, "and the whole lake, and make a chart for the benefit of future navigators."8 12. He pushed the boat to the shore, and picked up a pebble, and fastened it to the end of a cord he had in his pocket, and rowed back, measuring in several places the depth of the water. 13. "Cowslip Bay," said he, "is a safe and commodious' harbor, where the largest vessels may lie at anchor easily, its depth being nowhere greater than one fathom,'0 and its bed being entirely free from dangerous shoals and reefs." 14. Coasting" along the southern shore, they



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82 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART TV LESSON XVI. THE TWO FRIENDS. The two friends have gone out into the field, Sand now they are sith .ting on a mossy bank, in the shade of a tree. We can see by the Sgrass and the shrubs growing near them, Sand the leaves on the trees, that it is summer. What is it that tells us that it is sum. mer' ? Ralph is partly lying down close to the tree, with his elbow resting on the ground. He has a book in his hand, and he is reading from it. Frank listens, and seems to be much pleased. What do you think Ralph is reading about'? How should we know', when we can not hear'? But we can see what the two friends are doing. We know that Ralph reads', and that Frank listens'; and we can see, from Frank's face, that he is pleased. How can Frank's face show that he ig pleased'? Does his face speak, when he does not open his mouth'? Yes', it speaks by signs'. Is not the smile on his face a sign that he is pleased' ? Do you not know that we all talk very much by signs', and that we tell people what we are,



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122 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART VL if he has done wrong', that is not the way to treat him'. Let him alone',t I say. Take away your hand'.t Are yo'i going to choke him', and strike him too'? Govern your own temper',f and act more like a man. Did you say that this little boy is your brother'? Then you should set him a good example\, and not get angry at him'.* If he has done wrong', speak to him about it kindly'; show him his fault'; and show him that his conduct grieves you\. Do you know that you make your brother worse by getting angry at him, and striking hi m'? That is not the way to make him better'.t That is not the right way'.1 You should be ashamed to treat him so'. It is wicked also'. LESSON X. HOUSES, HAMLETS, VILLAGES, AND CITIES. Men can not at all times live in the open air; hence they build houses in which to dwell. Most houses are made of wood, or bricks, or stone. "In some countries poor people live in huts made of clay or turf. There are also some that dwell in caves; others that live in tents; while "* Gentle reproof, or expostulation. Rule IX. f Tone of command. Rule X. I This might have had the rising inflection. With the falling inflection the sentence is merely declaratory; with the rising it would have been expostulatory.



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42 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART III LESSON IV. INDIFFERENCE. James', you told me you S| saw a boy, and an ox. Can you tell me the name of the boy'? No, sir', I do not know his name'. Did the boy drive the ox'?" No, sir'. Did he lead the ox' No, sir', he rode the ox'. "Was the ox tame and kind'? Yes, sir', I think he was'. He let the boy ride him', and he did not run\. Did the boy take hold of the horns of the ox' No, sir'; he could not reach them\. Did you ride the ox too,-John'T Yes, sir'. Did the ox go fast'? Not very fast'. Would your mother like to have you ride again'? I don't know'. LESSON V. THE YOUNG SAILOR'S RETURN. James and Wil_liam saw three ships coming in from the sea. The ships were under full sail, and they had flags flying from the tops of the masts.



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PART I. THIIRD READER. 1 LESSON XV. HARVEST TIME. Do you think this is a fine picture'? Do you see the boys', and the girls', and the donkey'? Is it winter there', or is it summer'? How can you tell'? Some of the boys swing on the gate, and some try to ride on the donkey. Do you think the boys are too large and too heavy to ride on the donkey'? Do you see the load of grain in the field'? Why does the load of grain look so small'? Is it because it is so far off'? Is the gate shut', or is it open'? Is it wide open:'? No', it is not wide open'; it is only partly Sopen'. The boys will open the gate wide to let the load of grain pass through. Take care, boys', and do not break the gate. *t



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P-'.T I.j THIRD READER. 53 LESSON XII. LEADING THE Cow. Is not that a gentle cow'? She does not hook the boy with her horns', nor try to pull away', She follows the boy, and he leads her by a rope'? That is John BPown, and he is on his way to school. Have you read about John Brown before'? But why does John take the cow with him ? Will he take the cow to school'? O no, he is leading her to the pasture, which is near the school. What time of the day, then, do you think it is' ?* But what is John reading'? John is reading "* The last word is," is so short, that it seems to have the rising inflection. But it has not. This word begins on a high pitch; but as soon as the voice begins to pronounce it, it takes the falling slide.



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PART VI. THIRD READER. 123 some dig holes in the earth, and there take up their abode. If we look at a house, we shall see that it has four walls, called the sides and the ends of the house. It has, also, a door and windows. By the door the people go in and out; and by the windows light and air enter the dwelling. The door is made of wood; but the windows are made of wood and glass. The house has a roof, which slopes in order to throw off the rain. A house may have one or more floors, or stories; and when there are more than one, there are stairs, made of wood or stone, which lead from one story to the others. In the house we find rooms, some of which are large, and some are small. They ai e called kitchens, bed-rooms, sitting-rooms, parlors, and diningrooms. To most houses in the country there are gardens, in which the people raise fruits, flowers, and herbs, and such things as potatoes, onions, peas, beans, carrots, and turnips. A garden is of great use to man. Sometimes houses are built close together. Those who dwell in those houses are neighbors. Good neighbors always live in peace with each other, and, at all times, are willing to help each other. A small number of houses forms a hamlet; a larger number a village; and a still larger number a city. A city contains a great many people. In each country one city is called the capital'.



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134 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART VI. all gods. In his hand are the deep places of the earth, the strength of the hills is his also. The sea is his, and he made it; and his hands formed the dry land. O come, let us worship, and bow down; let us kneel before the Lord our Maker. For he is our God, and we $ are the people of his pasture, and the sheep of his hand. Bless the Lord, O my "soul, and all that is within me, bless his holy name. Bless the Lord, O my soul, and forget not all his benefits. LESSON XVII1. BOY AND LARK. Who taught you to sing', My sweet pretty birds' ?



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PART V.J THIRD READER. 97 LESSON XI. THE GENTLE COW. What a fine old cow this is. How gentle she is! The boy does not fear her, for she does not hook with her horns, nor kick with her feet. The cow has a string around her neck, and she is tied to a tree. If she is a kind and gentle cow, why do they tie her to a tree'? They tie her to the tree so that they can keep her there until they have time to milk her. When she has been milked, the boy will lead her to the pasture, and then he will take off the rope, and let her go where she pleases. Do you see what the boy is doing now'? He is giving the cow some grass to eat. He is kind



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FART III.] THIRD READER. 57 times choke the good seed. Such weeds must be pulled up. Some boys talk a great deal, and tell how hard they are going to study, and how much they are going to learn, and then go away and do ncthing. They are too lazy to study. Other boys say little, and study much. Do you see what the man in the garden, in the picture, is doing'? He is pulling up the weeds. Now what are those men and boys like who talk much' and do nothing'? who have many words' ,and few deeds'? I will tell you. A man of words, and not of deeds, Is like a garden full of weeds. The mind is like a garden. It must be taken care of. Good plants and flowers will not be found in the garden unless the seed be planted. And then, when the seeds come up, the young plants must be taken care of. But weeds will spring up of themselves, without being planted; and, if they are left to grow, they will grow faster and stronger than the good plants, and choke them tadeath. You must pull up the weeds if you want the good plants to grow. It is so with the mind. The soil is good; but angry and wicked thoughts are apt to spring up there, and, if you let them grow, they will choke the good thoughts, anI kill them. If you wish to be good, and grow up good, you must pull up all the wicked thoughts, and throw them away, just as the man is pulling up the weeds in the garden.



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PART THIRD. MODIFICATIONS OF RULE I. [For the use of the Teacher only.] I. Answers that are given in a careless, or indifferent manner, or in a tone of slight disrespect, take the rising inflec. tion in all cases, whether the questions are direct or indirect, See page 42. II. Direct questions, when they have the nature of an appeal, and are spoken in an exclamatory manner, take the falling inflection. In these cases, also, the voice often falls below the general pitch, contrary to the general rule for the falling inflection. EXAMPLES.-Is not that a beautiful sight'? Willyou persist in doing it'? Is it right'? Is it just'? III. When a direct question is not understood, and is repeated, with emphasis, the repeated question takes the faling inflection. EXAMPLE.-Will you speak to him to-day'? If the question is not understood, it is repeated with the falling inflection. Will you speak to him to-day' ?



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PA.RT III. THIRD READER. 47 I hope not. What does John Brown say'? This is what he says: I will not hurt my little dog, But stroke and pat his head; I like to see him wag his tail, I like to see him fed. lie is as kind and good a dog As ever you did see: Because I take good care of him, IHe loves to follow me. LESSON IX. THE RUINS AND THE FIRE. h ... What does this man stop 'there for'? What does he look at'? What does he wish to find there'? This man went away from home a long time ago. He has come back, but he can not find his home. He can find only some of the walls of his house, for his house is all in ruins. The weeds have grown up all around the house, anrid in the garden. Do you see the weeds', and the broken gate'? Do you see how sad the man looks'? But what has become' of the man's house'? Had the man any little boys and girls when he went away'



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44 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PAL'. I, LESSON VI. ROBERT AND MARY. i -K--. Little Mary, poor child, took a severe cold last winter; and it made her so deaf that she can not hear when Robert speaks to her, unless he speaks very loud. "Mary," said Robert, "will you let me take your new book'? "What did you say'?" asked Mary. "I said, 'Will you let me take your new book' ?'" 0 yes, you may take it," said Mary; "you will find it in the book-case, in the parlor." So Robert went and got the book, and after he had read it through he told Mary that he had put it on the table, in the study-room. "Where did you say'?". asked Mary. "On the table, in the study-room'," said Robert. Robert did not get vexed, or angry, when Mary could not hear him, for he loved his sister. wintr; nd i mae Pir s dea tht sh ca n| hearwhe Robrt ~peas t her uness e sea1



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l4 HIARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART VL The little birds that fondly play', Do not disturb their sport'; But let them warble forth their songs', Till winter cuts them short'. Don't' kill the birds'-the happy birds, That cheer the field and grove'; Such harmless things to look upon', They claim our warmest love'. LESSON IV. THE POOR WOMAN. We should pity those who are poor and honest, and we should help them also. Here is a poor woman. She is sewing,* and rocking the cradle at the same time. But you can not see the cradle in the picture. SHer husband is dead, h and she lives in a very poor room in a great city. This poor woman tries to earn a little money to buy food for herself and child. How unhappy she looks'! Perhaps she has no bread in the house, and no money to buy it with. She says she does not know what she shall do. She can not let her child starve', and now she has Pronounced so-ing.



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102 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. LPART V, blows against the sails, and drives the boat on the pond, just as it makes great ships sail on the sea. Henry has a boat also. He is just putting it on the water. It has two masts. Such a boat is called a schooner. If it had three masts, it would be called a ship. All such boats are also called sailing vessels, because they have sails. The sails are made of stout cloth. That part of a ship on which men walk is called the deck. At the back part of the ship is a helm. The use of the helm is to guide the ship. LESSON XV. STORY OF THE RAIL-ROAD THIEF. One of these men has a paper, and he has beeD reading a story which he found in it. The paper which he holds in his hand is called a newspaper. You all know what a newspaper is, do you not'? I will tell you what the story is about. It is



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18 IIARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART L earth, while the earth goes round the sun. The moon has no light in herself, but she gets her light from the sun. The Bible tells us God made these great lights. He made the sun to rule the day, and the moon to rule the night. We call the sun the king of the day, and the moon the queen of the night. LESSON XII. MIAKING HAY. .._. Let us go out and see the men mow the grass. The grass will be cut today. Do you think it will rain'? No'; I do Snot think it will rain totay\ We may sit on a heap of hay, and see the men mow. How sweet the hay isl May we play on the hay'? May we toss the hay up in the air'? May our dog Tip play with us'? Yes', Tip may play with you'. See Tip run. Do you hear him bark'? Tip likes to play with us. When the men put the hay on the cart, and take it to the barn, we can ride on the load of hay. The hay is for the horse, and the cow, and the sheep to eat. Do pigs eat hay'? No'; pigs do not eat hay', but they eat grass when it is green. Pigs like to eat corn.



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PAET 11. 1 THIRD READER. 25 LESSON III. THE IDLE BoY AGAIN. Here is the idle boy again. He was told to go to school. Why does he not go to school'? Why does he play by the way'? Is it not school-time' ? Yes', school has begun, and it is time for him to be there'. Mhy does he stop here'? He stops to play with a dog, and with another idle boy' Where are his books'? He has left his books at home', and when he gets to the school he will be sent back for them' Good boys love their books, and love to go to school. They do not play by the way when it is school-time. While at school they study, and learn well, and are often at the head of the class.



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PART II.] THIRD READER. 35 as I did ?" "Because it does no good to care, and no good to try," said John. "If it will not go up, and stay up', it may come down'. I shall not try any more to make it stay up'. I don't care if my kite don't go up." Yes, John', you do care.' If you did not care, you would not get vexed about it. LESSON XIII. THE MOON IS VERY FAIR AND BRIGHT. The moon is very fair and bright, And rises very high, I think it is a pretty sight To see it in the sky. It shone upon me where I lay, And seemed almost as bright as day. The stars are very pretty too, And scattered all about; At first there seem a very few, But soon the rest come out: I'm sure I could not count them all. They are so very bright and small. The sun is brighter still than they; le blazes in the skies: I dare not turn my face that way, Unless I shut my eyes. Yet, when he shines, our hearts revive And all the trees rejoice and thrive. God made and keeps them every one By his great power and might; He is more glorious than the sun, And all the stars of night But, when we end our mortal race, The pure in heart shall see his face.



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16 HARPER'S UNITEL STATES SERIES. [PART IV. As soon as the dogs were over, the fox, quick as a flash, made a leap back over the wall, and was soon out of sight. On went the dogs; but they never saw the fox again. Was not that a cunning fox'? He knew how to cheat the dogs, and he saved his life by it. LESSON XII. GoD IS NEAR. It is God who made all things. He made the earth, and he made the sun, and the moon, and the stars also. God made the beasts that roam over the earth, the birds that fly in the air, and the fish that swim in the rivers, the lakes, and the great sea. He made man also. God makes the tender herb and the grass to grow, as well as the tall trees of the forest; and he sends the rain and the dew to water them, and the sun to warm them. He gives us all our food: for if he did not take care of the beasts, and the birds, and the fish, and the grain that we sow, and the seeds that we plant, all of them would die; and then we should die also. But God not only takes care of us, and all things around us, but he is also near us at all times. He sees us now. He sees all that we do, and he knows all our thoughts. He knows all things. We should thank God for all his goodness to us. We should pray to him often, and ask him to keep us from sin, and to bless us.



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34 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART II. of the sheep, when dressed, is used for the covers of books. A lamb is a young sheep. LESSON XII. FLYING KITES. "I like to have my kite fly high'," said Willie Brown. "Do you see it away up in the sky', as high as a bird can fly'? It is almost out of sight. But I tried six times before I could make it stay up. "I like to have mine go high too," said Charlie Gray, whose kite had just fallen into a peach-tree. "But I can not make my kite go up high, and stay' up," said Charlie. "It will come down; but I mean to try once more." "Mine will come down too'," said John Jones; "but I don't care if it does'." "Why don't you care'?" said Willie. "Why don't you keep trying,



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PAMT I.] THIRD READER. 15 you think he likes to go to school'? Do you think he goes to school to study', and to learn his lessons'? LESSON IX. Two BOYS ON A HoRSE. This must be a kind horse, for he lets two boys ride him, and he does not run nor kick. Does the horse stand still now'? Can you tell' ? How can you tell' The horse has one of his feet up, and he has just put one of his hind feet down, and this shows that he does not stand still. He walks along or trots slowly;. Do you know what the boy, who sits before, holds in his hands'? Can you see both of his hands'? No'; I can see his right hand', but I can not see his left hand'. Can you see the other boy's hands'? No'; I can not see his hands', but I can see one of his hands'. It is his right' hand', Can you ride on a horse'? Would you like a good and kind old horse to ride on'? I should not like an old horse' so well as a young' one'. But I should wish the horse to be kind' and gentle\, and not run away with me.



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70 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. j[PAT IV LESSON VI. GOING AWAY. Yes, he is going away. He is just coming down the ,-1 steps from the house. He has a basket on his arm. His sister Mary is on the steps too. He is just saying to her, "Good-by', Mary'; I shall write to you when I get there, and let you know how I get along. And then you must |' / write to me a nice long letter, for I shall be very glad to hear from you." Do you ask who they are'? They are brother and sister. They are orphans, too. Do you know what "orphans" are'? They are children whose parents are dead. When these young persons were quite small they lost both of their parents, and now they have to take care of themselves. We do not know how far the young man is going, nor how long he expects to be gone. But if he can not see his sister, he can write to her. How lonely they would be if they could not write to each other! What a fine thing it is to know how to write! You must learn to write, so that you can write letters too.



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68 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART IV. How do you like the boy's hat'?* Do you think it is a pretty hat'? Do you like the boy's face'? Do you think he is a good boy'? We can not tell very well now, for he is going out to play. When his mother calls him to come in, perhaps he will not be so pleasant. If he should not be pleasant then', he will not be a good boy\. How old do you think this boy is' Do you think he is more than five years old'? How old are you'? Do you think tnk his boy will live to be an old man'? If he should live to be old, will he like to roll a hoop then'? I hope he is a good boy, and that he will be a good man. LESSON VI. THE FISH. S -r Do you know -_whatthisis'? It _\ .is a fish'. Did you ever see a live fish'? Did you ever catch --" one'? What did "* Some may thmk this is the rising inflection; but it follows the general rule. The voice suddenly rises from "boy's" to "hat;" but as soon as it strikes the word "hat" it begins to descend. The shortness of the word "hat" renders it diffi cult to detect the downward slide; but if it were a word of two syllables-" hat-piece," for example-the downward slide would be very perceptible. Thus, "How do you like the boy's hat'-piece' ?" Be careful to notice that the voice must rise to reach the point at which the downward inflection begins. It must rise to reach the word hat."



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112 IIARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PAtT VI. LESSON II. DON'T' KILL THE BIRDS'.* IA The little birds have been away during the winter'; and now that the chilling storms of winter are over', they have come back again'. How sweetly they sing\ Little boys', don't kill the birds\. There are the swallows. The air seems to be full of them. They were here last summer', but they went away before winter came'. They went a long way to the south', where it was warm'. "* This is the language of authority, and must close with the falling inflection, in accordance with rule X. But the sentences in the last verse of Lesson II. (except questions), and nearly all the sentences in Lesson III., are supposed to be in the language of earnest entreaty, and therefore require the rising inflection, in accordance with Rule IX.



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PART IV.] THIRD READER. 69 you catch it with'? Did you have a fish-hook and line'? Did you ever catch little fish in your hands'? Fish live in the water. They can not live long out of the water. A fish swims with its fins and tail. Do you see the fins of this fish'? Do you see his tail'? He has scales all along his back, and on his sides; but they are not so large as his fins. Do you see the eye of this fish'? Do you think he has more than one eye'? Where do you think the other eye is'? Do you think the fish can see when he is away down in the water'? What makes you think he can see'? If he could not see, he might hit his head against a stone or a rock, and that might kill him. Could you see if you were down deep in the water'? No', not very well'. But the fish can see veiy well indeed. The eyes of the fish are not like ours. They are made to see with in the water; but ours are made to see with in the air. The fish is made to live in the water, and we are made to live in the air. Who made the eyes of the fish to differ from ours'? vel'-vet per-haps' bask'-et them-selves' hon'-est pleas'-ant sis'-ter ex-pect' walk'-ing fish'-hook say'-ing lone'-ly a-broad' wa'-ter a-long' thought'-ful for-get' a-way' let'-ter an'-i-mal pret'-ty in-deed' broth'-er at-ten'-tion go'-ing dif-fer or'-phan im-por'-tant moth'-er com'-ing -per'-son op'-po-site



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PART VI.] THIRD READER. 131 with a square tower. What do you think the church is built of ? Do you think it is built of brick', or of wood', or of stone'? I think it is a stone church. Do you see the tomb-stones in the church-yard'? Yes'; there the dead are buried'. Some old men lie buried there'; some who were in the middle age of life'; and some very little children'. For the young die as well as the old. All are asleep there. How quiet and peaceful it is in that old church-yard! The gate at the entrance of the church-yard is shut, and no one is now going out or coming in. It is not Sunday there now. On Sunday the gate will be open, and it will not be so still and quiet there as it is now. Do you see the small gate by the side of the great gate'? That is shut too. By the side of the small gate is a flight of steps leading over the wall, for children to go up and down, so that they can get into the church-yard when the gates are shut. On the other side is a flight of steps leading down from the top of the wall into the yard; but we can not see them. Are there any children going up or down those steps now'? No', there is no one there now. On this side of the steps is a large thatched cotStage. Do you know what thatched means'? It means covered with straw or with thatch, a kind of straw, and not with wood, or slate, or tile. That is a double cottage, and it is covered with straw.



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100 IIARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART V. a great many other wild beasts; and he told Robert and Mary a great many nice stories about them. Would not you like to have some one tell you just such true stories as Uncle Toby told'? All the stories that Uncle Toby told were true. True stories are the best stories. LESSON XIII. THE WORKS OF GOD. God made the sky that looks so blue'; He made the grass so green'; He made the flowers that smell so sweet', In pretty colors seen'. God made the sun that shines so bright', And gladdens all I see'; It comes to give us heat and light': How thankful' we should be'



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46 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART III LESSON VIII. JOHN BROWN AND BRUNO. Here comes John Brown with his dog Bruno. Do you think John is kind to Bruno'? The dog looks up into John's face, and wags his tail. Why does Bruno wag his tail'? Is he glad to see John'? Yes, he is glad to see John, and he likes to follow him. John', do you take good care of your dog'? Are you kind to him, and do you play with him, and pat his head when he does what you wish him to'? You can pat Bruno's head, and he will not bite you; but he will wag his tail, because he is glad to have you notice him. John', do you feed Bruno', and do you like to see him fed'? Do you ever whip Bruno'? 0 no,



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36 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART IL LESSON XIV. THE BOY WHO STOLE PEARS. This is a bad boy. What do you think he has in his hat'? He has some pears. The pears are not his', for he stole them. The dogs saw him as he was getting over the fence, and one of them has caught hold of him. Do you see the boy cry'? D6 you almost hear him ,scream'? The boy holds on to the fence, and the dog holds on to him. You can see the ripe pears in the boy's hat; but the boy must throw down the pears, and then perhaps the dog will let him go. It is very wicked to steal. Good boys will not take what does not belong to them. What a pity it is that boys will ever be bad NIow much better it would be if they would always be good'! If all were good, what a happy world it would be'! Much is gained by being good, while nothing is gained by being bad.



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PART VI.] THIRD READER. 115 gone out to beg' something for her child to eat'. She says she would not beg for herself'; but what woman R would not beg to keep her child from starving '? She has a basket on t her arm. If the people give her any thing to eat', she can bring it home in the basket. She is holding out her hand for some one to give her money. There are thousands of such poor people in the great cities. We should be very thankful that our lot is better than theirs; but we should not be proud on account of our own better fortune. It is God alone who has made our lot to differ from the lot of others. LESSON V. EARLY RISING. The lark is up to meet the sun, The bee is on the wing; The ant its labor has begun, The woods with music ring. Shall birds', and bees', and ants', be wise, While I my moments waste'? O let me with the morning rise', And to my duty haste'.



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120 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SELIES. [PART VI. the end, so that he can reach around the eggs with it. He must be careful, or the eggs will roll down over the edge of the rocks. When he can reach them with his hand, he will take them and put them in the bag which is tied around his waist. There are more eggs below the man, on the rocks. lie can not reach them now, but he will call to the men above, and tell them to let him down lower. See the ducks flying around himl' They do not like to have him get their eggs. They fly close up to him, and flap their wings in his face, and scream in his ears, to drive him away. He has caught four of the ducks that came too near him. Do you see the ducks which he has caught'? Where are they'? I hope the men above will draw the man up safe. Which would you like better, to hunt eggs in such a place', or to find them in the barn'? LESSON VIII. I'LL NEVER USE TOBACCO. to-bac'-co dirt'-y tav'-ern feared filth'-y smoked mon'-ey worth'-less i'-dle" be-side' moth'-er in-deed' "I'll never use tobacco', no', It is a filthy weed'; I'll never put it in my mouth'," Said little Robert Reid. "Why', there was idle Jerry Jones', As dirty as a pig', Who smoked when only ten years old\ And thought it made him big'.



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PUCT II.] THIRD READER. 27 hand does she hold it'? Do you think she has bread and milk in that bowl'? How old do you think Robert is'? Do you know what he is doing'? He is looking at Fido, to see if he will eat. He says, "Fido', you must eat'. It is good for you'." LESSON V. GEESE iARCHING. _One, two, three, four, five, six, seven geese in a row. Do you see them march'? Yes'; one goose is the leader, and the rest follow. 3 Where do you think these geese have been'? They have been down to the pond to have a nice swim. Do you see the water'? Yes', and I see some large stones in the water. I think they are on the edge of the pond, where the water runs over. Where do you suppose these geese are going now'? They are going home to the barn. Do you see the path'? Yes'; they are marching in the path, and the path leads to the bars in the hedge. The geese will get under the bars, and then go along on tle other side of the hedge. When they get on the other side of the hedge we can not see them.



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HARPER'S UNITED STATES READERS. THE THIRD READ ER OF TME UNITED STATES SERIES. BY SAUTHOR OF PRIMARY HISTORY; HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES AMERICAN HISTORY ; AND OUTLINES OF GENERAL HISTORY. IeNo porb SHARPER & BROTHERS, PUBLISHERS, 4%d TO 331 PEARL STBETn. -4 (~c" ~ p~i~i~C,"~~"~?.",njE~EiXb



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P.T II.] THIRD READER. 51 LESSON XI. THE BOY AND THE RABBITS. Here is a picture of a rabbit which has got away from a boy. gee how fast the rabbit runs. Do you see that box by the side of the boy'? That is a trap. There is a door in front of it that slides up and down. *Do you see the door"? What do you think the trap is for'? It is to catch wild rabbits in. There is a little stick under the door. When the trap is set to catch the rabbit, the door is up. The stick is placed so as to keep it up. Would you like to know how the boy caught this rabbit"? The boy set his trap with the door up, so that the rabbit might go in. Then he tied a piece of an apple to the farther end of the little stick which you see. Then he went away, and left the trap all alone. When he was gone away, this little rabbit, which



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i58 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. ] PART III. LESSON XV. JOHN BROWN AND CHARLIE GRAY, O, look at my kite, Almost out of sight;, How pretty it flies Right up to the skies. Pretty kite, pretty kite, Almost out of sight, Pray, what do you spy In the bright blue sky? John Brown flew his kite one very windy day, When a gale broke the tail, and it soon flew away. And while he sat crying, and sighing, and sad, Charlie Gray came that way-a good-natured lad. "Don't cry; wipe your eye," said he; "little Jack, Stay here, never fear, and I'11 soon bring it back." Up the tree climbed he, and brought the kite down; Many thanks, many thanks," said little John Brown. LESSON XVI. THE BOY AND THE WOLP. Never do what you know to be wrong'. Never do what you know to be evil', with the hope that good will come from it'.



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PAET IV.] THIRD READER. 7 LESSON XL A Fox STORY. Did you ever hear any one say, "as sly as a fox'" When the cat __ is very sly, we say, She is as sly as a fox." But the fox is not ") only very sly', but very cunning also'. When "any one is very cunning', we say, "he is as cunning as a fox'." I will tell you a story about the cunning of the fox. Some dogs were once in chase of a fox. They came very near him, and it seemed as though they would catch him. There was no hole, or other place, for the fox to hide in. Then what could the fox do'? This is what the fox did. There was a low stone wall not far off, and the fox ran toward it as fast as he could go. But nearer and nearer came the dogs, and when the fox had got to the wall, they were close to him. The fox made a jump, and went over; but as soon as he was on the other side he crept to the wall, and lay down as close to it as he could. The dogs, in their haste, went over both wall and fox at a jump, and ran straight on. They were going so fast that they could not stop, and they did not see where the fox had hid. ^



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140 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART VII. Sto lean over, it becomes an oblique line. When two straight lines, or two curved I \ lines, are at the same distance from each other throughout'0 their whole length, Parallel Lines. they are called parallel" lines. 5. There is a great variety of curved'2 lines. There are also waving"3 lines and spiralcl lines. Some objects are bounded by curved lines, some by straight lines, and some by both kinds of lines. Curved and waving lines are far more graceful" and beautiful16 than straight lines. Nearly all ornaments" have curved surfaces; and so have plants and animals. Curved Lines. Waving Lines. Spiral Lines. 6. When lines meet each other, they form angles, or corners, where they meet. There are three kinds of angles-a right angle, an acute agle, and an obtuse angle; and here we give an/example"1 of each. Right Angle. Acute Angle. Obtuse Angle. 7. Plane figures are surfaces which are bounded by straight lines. There is a great variety of these figures. On the next page are drawings of them, with the names of the figures; and, if you will examine them carefully, we think you will be able to describe them. Some have only three sides, and some have more; some of them have their sides equal, and some have their sides unequal. Some of the angles are right angles, some are acute an-



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26 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART IL LESSON IV. FEEDING TIE DOG. The name of this dog is Fido. It is Lucy's dog, and she is feeding him with bread and milk. What is that around Fido's neck'? That is an apron' Who put it on Fido'? Lucy's cousin Robert put it on'. Which is Lucy'? Which is Robert'? Do you think Fido loves bread and milk'? Does he like to be fixed up in that way' ? I think he does not care, for he is a good old dog. He is not cross. Do you think he looks cross'? That is Lucy's sister who sits near her. Wha do you think she holds in her hand'? In which j



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78 HARPFR'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART IV. is she holding in her left hand'? What has she in her right hand'? What is she cutting off with the knife' ? She is cutting off some of the dough which the pie-crust is made of. Is Susan a white woman'? Do you think Susan is talking now'? Does she look pleased'? What do you think she is pleased about'? I think she is pleased because Miss Mary has come down to the kitchen to show her how to make pies. Which has the biggest nose', Miss Mary', or Susan ? Which has the thickest lips'? Susan says she can make pretty good pies', but she says she thinks Miss Mary can make better pies'. Do you see the young girl'? Is she a white girl? Does she look any like Susan'? Do you suppose she thinks her curls are pretty'? What has Susan on her head'? Are her arms as white as Miss Mary's'? Is her face as white'? Are her hands black'? Yes', but they are as clean as they would be if they were white. What is the little boy doing'? IEas he any cap on his head'? What kind of hair has he' Why does he open his mouth so'? Can he see any better with his mouth open' What kind of a pie do you suppose Miss Mary is making'? It may be a peach-pie, or a mitcepie, or an apple-pie, or a currant-pie, or some other kind of pie. What kind of a pie do you love best ? What do you see on the table'? I see a bottle, with a long neck, and a cork in it; and ajar with a spoon in it. Do you think there is any thing else in the jar'



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PART VII.] THIRD READER. 147 21. After many conjectures"1 about Bernard, and the reason of his cutting his name there, they continued their voyage, calling the place Bernard's Cave. 22. They came to a small island in the lower part of the lake, near the main land. It could hardly be called an island, for the water in the channel was so shallow that the Grasshopper could not pass. Emma said the channel should be called Harry's Straits. 23. Harry cut some branches of grapes on the island, and plucked a quantity of flowers, to carry home, and, throwing them into the boat, rowed away to the north. 24. The island was thickly covered with grapevines, and ivy, and creepers, hanging like robes of flame upon the little elms and maples. It looked exceedingly beautiful as they sailed away, and Harry promised himself to come and make some walks through the shrubbery, and some seats under the vines; it would make such a fine place to visit, and play, and picnic, and pull grapes. They called it the Isle of Vines. 25. After leaving the Isle of Vines, they sailed along by the Cat-tail Shoals, but did not land again till they reached Bumble Bee Point, for the western shore of the lake was already familiar, and the sun was getting low; they, however, took the depth of the lake at different points for Harry's chart. 26. Thus happily ended the first voyage of the Grasshopper. Harry fastened the boat securely G2



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10 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART L LESSON II. FLAG AND DRU M. iere are four boys. The large boy has a drum, J hand. They are drumsticks. Do you see himn beat the drum'? Can you Shear the drum'? O no', I can not hear it'. Is it t,)o far off' Do you see the boy who has a flag'? Yes', I see him\ He has a cap on his head'. I see two boys more'. The) are all in a row. The dog is with them. LESSON III. THlE Fox AND THE OX. Did you say you saw a fox'? Are you the boy'?2 Did the fox run by the ox'? Did the ox see it'? Yes', I am the boy'. iI saw the fox'. The ox saw it too, but the ox did not run'. Did the dog see the fox too'? No', the dog did not see it'. Is a fox sly'? Yes', a fox is sly. Was it an old fox'? No' it was not old'.



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94 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART V. LESSON IX. THE LOAD OF GRAIN. The load of grain has just come from the field, and now it is going through the gate. There are three persons on the load, and two of them are waving their hats, and shouting. The farmer stands near the gate, with a pitchfork in his hand, and he is waving his hat to those who are on the load. What kind of grain do you think this is'? It is wheat. The grain is to be taken to the barn, or put into a stack until winter. Then it is to be threshed, and the wheat is to be cleaned from the chaff and the straw. The wheat will be taken to the mill and ground,



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96 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART V. the place where the boys had to stand was very muddy. So they thought they would build a pier to stand on. Do you see the boy who is on his knees'? What do you think he is doing'? Is he talking'? Yes'. He is telling the boys where to place the stones. Do you see him point with his finger'? There is a boy on the other side who tells the boys to bring some stones where he is. How many boys do you see'? There are five boys in all. One boy stands in the water. Do you think he will get his clothes wet'? No; he has rolled up his clothes above his knees. He will not go into the water deep enough to wet them. There are two boys who have hold of one stone. Why does not one boy carry it'? Because it is too large and too heavy for one boy to carryIt is almost as much as two boys can do to carry such a stone as that'. Why do the boys make the pier of stones'? Why do they not make it of wood'? Would not wood be much lighter for them to carry'? I suppose they can not find any wood there, and if they could, I am not sure that they would use it. Which do you think is the best to build it of', wood', or stone', or turf"? Which do you think would last the longest'? What do you see growing in the water near the boys'? Is it grass'? It is a very coarse grass, with some reeds, or rushes. Cattle do not like to eat the coarse grass which grows in the water.



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118 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART VI Here is a picture to show you how people get the eggs of wild ducks in such places. There are some men on the top of some high cliffs on the sea-shore. There are five of them in all. Two of them look like young men, or boys. There is a woman also. She seems to be afraid that some one will get hurt. What do you think the men are doing'? Four of the men have hold of a stout rope. A part of the rope reaches over the cliffs-as far down as you can see. The men pull as though there was something heavy on the other end of the rope. What do you suppose it can be'? One of the young men is lying on the very edge of the cliffs, and he is just now looking back, and telling the men what to do. Do you think he tells them to pull harder', or to let the rope down farther'?



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50 IARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PAu 11V. Down, down the hill how swift I go, Over the ice and over the snow; A horse or cart I do not fear, For past them both my sled I steer. Hurrah, my boy! I'm going down, While yon toil up; but never frown: The far hill-top vou soon will gain, And then, with dl your might and main, You'll dash by me; while, full of glee, I'll up again to dash by thee. So on we glide. Oh, life of joy, What pleasure has the little boy! Here we can see a part of the hill down which the boys were sliding. Howcoldand _ wintry it looks there! The boys must be careful, and not slide r across the road when that horse is going by. Willie says he does not fear a horse or cart, for he can steer past them. Perhaps he can; but some other little boy might not be so skillful, and might get hurt. It is best not to slide across the road at all. Do you know what those three persons are riding in'? It is a one-horse sleigh. Some call it a cutter. I suppose it is called a cutter because it goes. so fast, for that is the name which is given to a fast-sailing vessel.



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PART VI. THIRD READER. 119 Do the men who have hold of the rope look like stout men'? Do you see one of the arms of the man who has a hat on'? IHe looks like a stout man'. In the picture on this page we can look down over the cliff, and see what is on the other end of the rope. It is a man'! Does it make you dizzy to look down'? Do you think the man who hangs down there is dizzy'? No'. He does not seem to be either dizzy' or afraid'. He knows if the men above hold on tight, he will not fall, for the rope is tied fast around him, but if they should let go he would fall down-dbwn-into the sea, or be dashed in pieces on the rocks below him. "What do you think the man is doing'? He is just now reachj ing out his hand toward some ducks' eggs which he sees. Do i you see the eggs'? What is he doing with the stick which he has in his hand'? He uses it to draw the eggs toward him till he gets them within his reach. The stick has a crook at 6



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PART II.] THIRD READER. 33 LESSON XI. GOATS AND SHEEP. The goat is found in most Sparts of the world. It has long horns and a lonbeard. It is, for the most part, black and white, or pale brown with a black stripe down the back. Goats will climb steep rocks to find the shrubs on which they love to feed. But they can eat grass, and are fond of the bark of trees. The goat can be made tame; but, if we tease it, it will butt at us with its horns. Its flesh is good for food, and its milk is sweet, and of great use to those who are sick. We call a young goat a kid. Its flesh is nice and sweet, and of its skin we make gloves. The sheep has no beard like the goat. There are ___ some sheep which have horns, land there are some which have none. The horns of the sheep are not like those of the goat, Sheep go in flocks, and live 7 on grass or hay. They are fond of meal. From the sheep we get wool, and from the wool cloth is made. The skin



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PART I.] THIRD READER. I Did the fox get the hen'? No', it did not'. Is that all' ? Yes', that is all'. Now you may go'. LESSON IV. THE YOUNG DUCKS. -The old hen has a brood of little ducks. The ducks have gone into the pond. See how they swim about 4 in the water! It is fine 12 sport for them. The old hen thinks they will drown, and so she tries to call them back. See how the hen runs about'! What a fright she is in'! 0 do see how they dive and swim, And what a fiight the hen is in She runs about, and clucks, and clucks, To call away the little ducks. But the little ducks will not mind the old hen. Do you see how the old hen acts' ? Do you think she is afraid'? She thinks the little ducks are chickens. Chickens will not go into the, water. Here is a large full-grown duck. Does it look like a hen'? Do you see the duck's bill'? Does that look like the bill of a hen'? s A hen's bill is not so large. A duck has large and broad feet, so that it can swim well.



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30 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART IT. LESSON VIII. CROSSING THE BROOK. Here is a man who Swantedto cross abrook, e bbut he did not like to Swade across, and get his feet wet; so he got A a man to carry him across. Would you like to cross a brook in that way, or would you rath. er wade across'? Do you think both of these men are white men'? ia te Which one is black'? Do you think the white man will fall'? Does he look afraid'? If the black man should fall, the white man would fall too, and then both would get wet. The whitc man might get hurt too. Do you think the water in the brook is deep'? Do you think it is deep enough to drown the men if they should fall'? Why do you think it is not very deep'? Because, if it were very deep, the man would not try to wade across. It is a warm country where those men are. We can tell by the palm-tree which grows there. Palmtrees do not grow in this country.



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'PAT V.] THIRD READER. 93 taste rum', nor any other strong drink'. Do not go where it is sold. "Touch not', taste not', handle not'." That is the safest way. Do you know what the Bible says about strong drink'? It says, "Wine is a mocker'; strong drink is raging'. Who hath woe'? who hath sorrow'? who hath contentions'? who hath babblings'? who hath wounds without cause'? who hath redness of eyes'? They that tarry long at the wine." The Bible also says, "Look not upon the wine when it is red. At last it biteth like a serpent, and stingeth like an adder." LESSON VIII. THE ROBIN'S TEMPERANCE SONG. I asked a sweet robin, one morning in May, S Who sung in the apple-tree over the way, What 'twas she was singing so sweetly about, For I'd tried a long time, but could not find out: Why, I'm sure," she replied," you can not guess wrong'; Don't you know I am singing a temperance song'? "Teetotal-oh, that's the first word of my lay; And then, don't you see how I twitter away'? 'Tis because I've just dipped my beak in the spring, And brushed the fair face of the lake with my wing. Cold water', cold water'; yes, that is my song', And I love to keep singing it all the day long'. "And now, my sweet child, won't you give me a crumb'? For the dear little nestlings are waiting at home': And one thing besides': since my story you've heard', I hope you'll remember the lay of the bird'; And never forget, while you list to my song, All the birds to the cold-water army belong."



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PART V.] THIRD READER. 87 ing' of what seems a bright and happy day'. Youth is gay', and active', and full of life', and joy', and hope'. It is the time to plant the seeds of knowledge and virtue. Caroline has gone out to gather flowers. She is plucking one now. She has her apron nearly full of them. How beautiful the flowers are! Do you not love the spring-time of the year'? Do you not love the birds', and the green grass', and the flowers', and the trees', and the bright sun'? How thankful we should be that God has filled the world with so many things to make us happy! But, while we enjoy these things', let us not forget who gave them to us'. God is the author and giver of all our blessings. LESSON III. MAN AND HIS MAKER. Man is a human being. He walks upright. Beasts walk with their faces toward the ground. Beasts see', smell', feel', hear', and taste'; so does man\. Beasts have a voice', but they can not speak words. Man can speak. He makes use of words to tell his thoughts. He can think also. Man has reason; that is', he has the power of thinking. No animal but man has reason. This great world was made for man. It is his home. God made the world for man to dwell in.



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FART V.1 THIRD READER. 109 LESSON XVIII. WHAT IS EARTH? "What do you ask'?* What is the earth on which we live' ? It is just what we make it. Some use i: for one thing', and some for another'. If the school-boy thinks of nothing, and cares for nothing but play', then the earth is to him merely a place for play'. If a man places all his thoughts upon getting riches', and cares for nothing else', then the earth is to him merely a. place for making money'. What is earth', school-boy' ?-A place for my play'. What is earth', maiden' ?-A place to be gay'. What is earth', seamstress'?-A place where I weep. What is earth', sluggard' ?-A good place to sleep'. What is earth', soldier' ?-A place for a battle'. What is earth', herdsman' ?-A place to raise cattle'. What is earth', widow' ?-A place for true sorrow'. What is earth', tradesman' ?-I'll tell you to-morrowl What is earth', sick man' ?-'Tis nothing to me'. What is earth', sailor' ?-My home is the sea'. "What is earth', sexton' ?-A place to dig graves'. What is earth', rich man' ?-A place to work slaves'. What is earth', graybeard' ?-A place to grow old'. What is earth', miser' ?-A place to dig gold'. What is earth', statesman' ?-A place to win fame'. What is earth', author' ?-I'll write there my name'. What is earth', monarch' ?-For my realm 'tis given'. What is earth', Christian' ?-The gateway to heaven'. "* In this case the word ask" takes the rising inflection, in accordance with the Note to Rule III., page 22. Several of the Rules are very happily illustrated in this Lesson.



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56 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART III. had she and her young ones left the field very early the next morning, when the farmer and his sons came into the field, and began to cut down the corn in good earnest.. LESSON XIV. "K -THE GARDEN. "When we sow good seeds in the garden, we wish them to grow up, and make nice plants, and roots, and flowers. If we let the weeds grow they will choke the good seeds, and spoil them. We must hoe up the weeds. When boys and girls are sent to school they must learn to read and spell well, and get all their lessons. What their teachers teach them is good seed sown in their minds. When it springs up it must be taken care of. Bad thoughts, and wicked words, and wicked deeds, are the weeds that some-



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PART IL.] THIRD READER. 37 LESSON XV. THE GENTLE SHEEP. What do you want, pretty sheep'? Do you want some meal'? Do you like corn as well as you like meal'? I have no meal for you, and no corn for you. You must go and eat grass. The sheep's mouth is open. Do you know what kind of a noise the sheep makes when it talks'? The sheep bleats. That is what the sheep does when it talks. Did you ever hear a sheep bl6at'? How tame the sheep is. It has horns, but it will not hurt the little girls. They do not fear the sheep. They can go up to it, and take hold of its wool. Do you know what the sheep's wool is good I for'. It is good to spin into yarn, and to make cloth of. Do you know what kind of cloth is made of wool'? Woolen cloth is made of wool. Men shear off the wool with shears.



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PART V.] THIRD READER. 103 about a thief who stole a trunk from a car on a rail-road. Do you know what a rail-road is', and what a car is'? On the next page is a picture of a train of cars on a rail-road. The thief, whose name was Tobin, got into one of the cars before it started, and took his seat near the door. He put his carpet-bag under the seat. The cars were going to New York. Do you know where New York is' ? I will tell you how this man Tobin stole the trunk, just as the man with the hat on read it in the newspaper. A short time after the cars had started, Tobin got up and went into the car in which all the trunks were put. This is called the baggagecar. "Ah!" said he, speaking to the man who had charge of the trunks, "there is my trunk at the top of the pile. I wish to put the cover on it. I did rot have time to do it at the hotel." Tobin told a lie then, for it was not his trunk. But those who will steal will tell lies also. Tobin asked the man if he would take down the trunk for him, while he went to get the cover, which he said he had put into his carpet-bag. As the man thought it was Tobin's trunk, he took it down for him. Tobin then went to the other car, and got a cloth cover, and when he came back he put it over the trunk. The cloth cover had Tobin's name painted on it. Then Tobin went and took his seat in the other car again.



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IA T III.] TIIIRD EADER. 55 The next day the old lark went out again, and left with them the same command as before-telling them to watch for the coming of the farmer and his sons, and listen with great care to what they said. When she returned, the young larks told her that the farmer and his sons had again been there, but as none of their neighbors came to aid them, they had put off cutting the corn till the next day, when they designed to get their friends and relations to help them. "s> "Indeed'!" said the old lark, "and do they still depend upon others to help them'? Do they think their friends and relations will be any more prompt than their neighbors'? Since they still depend upon others, I think we may venture to remain. another day." So the mother went out to get food again; but before she went she gave the little larks strict charge, as before, to let her know what passed in her absence. On the return of the olft lark, the little ones told her that the farmer and his sons had a third time been to the field, and finding that neither friend nor relation had come to help them, they were resolved not to wait any longer, but to come the next morning, and cut down the corn themselves. "If that is the case,"said the old lark, "it is time for us to think of leaving; for as the farmer and his sons now depend on themselves to do their own work, it will certainly be done." What the old lark said proved true; for scarcely 3*



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PART III.] THIRD READER. 33 LESSON I. THE BARN-YARD FOWLS. What do you see in the picture on the other page'? I see one', two', three', four' fowls'. I see a house also; and a barn, or shed. Are these all that you see'? No'; I see a tree beyond the house, and a brush-broom leaning against the fence, and a basin or tub for the fowls to drink out of. Do you think there is any water in the basin' ? What is there to show that there is water in the basin'? Is the top of the basin level'? How do you know that it is not level'? 4 We can see that the water is nearer the top of the basin on one side than on the other; and as the surface of the water is level, this shows that the top of the basin is not level. Do you know what is meant by the "surface" of the water'? The surface of water is the top of the waterthe upper part of it. When you can see the surface of water, your eye is higher than the water. If a basin were full of water, could you see the water if your eye were below the surface' Did you ever see fowls drink water'? Do they drink in the same way that a cow, or a horse, drinks'? Fowls can not drink with the head down; but when they take a little water into the mouth, they hold up the head to let the water run down the throat.



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PART IV.] THIRD READER. 79 LESSON XIV. LAKES IN THE WOODS. Here is a lake in the woods. Do you see the water'? How still the water is. Do you think the wind blows there now'? Is it summer there', or is it winter'? Why do you think it is summer'? Are there any -leaves on the trees in thewinter'? Do you see any grass and weeds in this place'? Do grass and weeds grow in the winter'? Do you think there are any birds in those trees', or any fish in the lake'? We do not see any birds, nor,any fish. If there are any fish in the lake, why Scan not we see them now'? There may be -wild ducks on the water, among the weeds. Wild ducks love quiet places. Here is a picture of a lake in the woods also. Is it the same lake that we see above, at the top of the "r page'? Ycs', it is the 4*



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108 IIARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PABT V. Here you see anO other winter scene. It Sis a stack of hay in the open field. Part of the stack has been cut down and carried away. There is a large m ass of snow on the stack, and it is snowing now. Oh, see! the snow is falling now, It powders all the trees; Its flakes abound, and all around They float upon the breeze. A ladder leans against the stack, and a mag is standing near it. This man has come out to cut some more hay. His dog is standing near him. The man has been up the ladder, and has cut down as much hay as he can carry, and has tied it up in a bundle. You can see the bundle lying on the snow near him. LESSON XVII. TIE WAY TO BE HAPPY. A hermit there was, who lived in a g'ot And the way to be happy they said he had got. As 1 wanted to learn it, I went to his cell; And this answer he gave, when-I asked him to tell: "'Tis being, and doing, and having, that make All the pleasures and pains of which mortals partake; To be what God pleases, to do a man's best, And to have a good heart, is the way to be blest."



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PART V.] THIRD READER. 91 Do you see one of his shoes'? Do you see how his toes stick out of it'? Why don't he get a pair of new shoes'? New shoes'! How can he get them without money'? He has a wife at home; but what do you think will become of her'? Sometimes this man works a little while, and gets a little money; but he does not use it to buy a hat, or shoes. What does he do with it'? Do you ask what he does with it'? Look at the next picture, and see what he does with it. LESSON VI. LAZY SLOKINS, THE DRUNKARD. Sure enough' Butj Here he is again. This is the same man, only a little older. It is Slokins himself. I can tell by his long nose, and his sharp chin, and his mean look. But where is he now'? Where is he now'? He is on the "road to ruin." Don't you see that the sign-board says so'? But Slokins dit not stop to read it. Lazy man as he is, he is §winetimes in a hurry. What kind of a place do you think that is which yousee in the picture'? It is a grog-shop. And what is Slokins doing there'? He has gone there



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80 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART IV. same lake, but we do not see it in the same place. What do you see now on the lake'? How many persons do you see in the boat'? What is that in the man's hand that looks like a long stick'? Why does the man bend forward so'? Which way is the boat going', to your right hand', or to your left hand'? ,__ iDo we see the same boat in this next picture'? No, it is not the same boat, and it is not a lake that we see. This boat is on the Hudson River. Do you know where the Hudson River is'; and can you tell me oa ... yu what great city is at the mouth of it'? How many men do you think there are in this boat'? There are eight men in it. See if you can point out all of them. Do you know how the men make the boat go'? They row with their oars', and that pushes the boat along'. There are six men rowing in that boat', three on one side', and three on the other'. How many oars can you see'? Why can not you'see the other oars'? The boat which we see is called a row-boat. A boat that has sails, and is moved by the wind, is called a sail-boat. A sail-boat is not so safe as a row-boat.



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PART V.] THIRD READER. 85 LESSON I. THE MANSION. On the opposite page is a picture of a large and elegant building, with pleasant lawns, and groves of trees, and gardens around it. It is the country residence of a rich man. It is called "The Mansion." Do you know what a lawn is'? It is a space of ground covered with grass, and is often seen in front of or around a fine house or mansion. Some lawns are called velvet lawns, because the grass, which is kept short and smooth, when seen from a distance appears like velvet. After seeing a picture of this mansion, could you give a good description of it'? Let us see. Could you tell what kind of a roof, or covering, it has'? Into how many parts do you think the roof is divided'? How many chimneys do you see'? If you describe the house, you must tell about all these things. But this is not all. Do you notice the peculiar shape of the chimneys', and of the windows', and of the whole building'? Do you see a long piazza on each side of the front entrance', and do you see that the front doorway is arched'? Do you know what a piazza is'? If you do not,, how can you describe the building'? A piazza is a covered walk, supported by columns, and built against the side of a house. You should always notice with care whatever is



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PART V.] THIRD READER. 95 and the white flour that is made from it will be brought home and made into bread. There are many kinds of grain, such as wheat, rye, oats, barley, and maize. Maize is what we call corn; but Indian corn is the right name. LESSON X. BUILDING A PIER. Here are some boys building a pier. Can you spell the word pier'? Try. Do you know what a pier is'? A pier is a place built out into the water for ships to come up to and unload. Do you think these boys are building such a pier'? No'; they are building a.pier to stand on when they are fishing. This place which you see is on the shore of a pond. The boys used to go to this pond to catch fish; but the shores of the pond were low, and 5



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98 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART V. to the cow. He does not whip her, nor vex her. He takes hold of her head with one hand, and with the other he holds the grass up to her mouth. He knows that the cow will not hurt him. Has the boy a stick in his hand'? Is it in his right hand', or in his left hand'? Is it a dry stick'? No. How do you know tha' it is not a dry stick'? Because I see the leaves on it. He has just cut the stick from a tree. Do you see what the boy has on his arm'? What do you think it is' ? I think it is a hoop, and I think the boy likes to roll it. But I do not see the stick with which he rolls it. The stick which he has in his hand is too small for him to strike the hoop LESSON XII. UNCLE TOBY. Uncle Toby is telling Robert and Mary where he has been, and what he has seen. He has been all around the world; he has seen many strange



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PART IV.1 THIRD READER. 73 LESSON IX. NEVER TELL A LIE, No, do not tell a lie. Tell the truth at all times, and be kind and good to all, and then all will love you, and you will be happy. Do you know that it is wicked to tell lies'? Yes, you have often been told so. The Bible also says so; and the Bible tells the truth. It is very mean, as well as very wicked, to tell lies. If you tell lies, God will be angry with you; all good men will despise you; and all good boys and girls will shun you. Then what would you gain by telling lies'? You would not gain any thing, but you would lose much. A child that lies, no one will trust, Though he should speak the thing that's true; And he that does one wrong at first, And lies to hide it, makes it two.



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PART VII.] THIRD READER. 153 much to be learned by traveling.-: But how could a young man write home and inform his friends about the things he saw-such as old ruins-public buildings and building materials-the paintings of the great masters-the great variety of scenery )which he found in different countries-the strange plants, trees, flowers, and fruits that he met withwithout being able to describe the many colors and hues which these things presented?" 11. Charles said he had not thought of all this; but, as it was not very likely that he should ever be a great traveler, such a knowledge of colors might not be of any great use to him, after all. He said he thought a knowledge of common things was the most important', for that was N hat father always told him. 12. "But colors are common things," said his mother-"the most common things in the world; for every thing that you see has some color by which it may be described. We speak of green, red, russet, and yellow apples; blue plums; purple clusters of grapes; crimson cheeks; ruby lips; olive-colored complexion; blondes and brunettes; flowers of red, yellow, blue, rose, pink, violet, scarlet, crimson, lilac, etc.; the azure sky; auburn hair; chestnut, bay, and sorrel horses; buf, brown, and gray coats-and these are all common things, that people are every day talking about. If you should tell me that you had found something new and pretty-even although it might be so common a thing as a pebble or a shell-would not I be very apt to ask you the color of it ?" ./



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PART VII.] THIRD READER. 151 LESSON V. A FIRST LESSON ON COLORS. 1. One day Charles came running into the sitting-room, where his mother and sister were, exclaiming, "See', mother', what a nice red pocketbook father has bought me!" At the same time he held up the pocket-book for his mother and sister to see it. 2. "I declare, Charles," said Mary," if you don't call that a red pocket-book'! Mother', did you ever see any thing like it'? Charles don't know red' from crimson'." 3. "Well, now, Miss Mary'," said Charles, "I would like to know what diference there is between red' and crimson'. Is not crimson red', and is not red the same as crimson'? You girls think you know all about colors. Is not that a red hood that Aunt Jane knit for you'?" 4. There', Charles'," said Mary, "you are wrong again. That hood is scarlet. Mother', don't you think Charles ought to know colors better'?" "Yes, my dear," said Mrs. Murray; "all people should be able to distinguish the principal colors, and to call them by their right names." 5. "Why, mother'," said Charles, of what use -ould it be to me'? I suppose girls want to know colors, so that they can tell each other the color of their ribbons, and dresses, and bonnets, and such things. But I don't see that it would be of any



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PAnT I-V.] THIRD READER. 65 or a stick', or a leaf' ;* and she will play with her tail, if she can not find any other thing to play with. Round and round after it she will go like a top. Two kittens will run after each other, throv each other down, and roll over each other. They have fine sport in that way. Dogs will play so too. Did you ever see lambs', or colts', or calves' play'? Yes, I think you have seen them play; but sheep', and horses', and cows', do not often play'; nor do dogs and cats often play when they are old. Old age makes animals sober' and it makes people sober too'. The old cat likes to see her kittens play; but she does not like to have them tumble over her when they are playing. So old people like to see children play, but they do not like to be run against, or have their chairs pulled by them. I like little pussy, her coat is so warm, And if I don't hurt her, she'll do me no harm; So I'll not pull her tail, nor drive her away, Bu} pussy and I very gently will play. She shall sit by my side, and I'll give her some food, And she'll love me, because I am gentle and good. kit'-ten tum'-ble chil'-dren gen'-tly play'-ing peo'-ple a-gainst' be-cause' Hen'-ry re-cite' with-out' neigh'-bor stu'dent Read'-er knowl'-edge cit'-i-zen stud'-y sec'-ond vir'-tue hon'-or ies'-son Prim'-er pa'-rent re-spect' The falling inflection is required here, as the clause expresses a completion of the sense.



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PART VII.] THIRD READER. 139 has length, breadth, and thickness. A solid is also very different from a fluid. A hard and firm body is a solid; but water, and milk, and such things, are fluids. I STRAIGHT. direct; not crooked. 7 GUEss, suppose; judge at random. 2 EX-TNDiB', reaches. 8 IP'K -TICE, to do frequently. 3 Dis'-TANCE, space; extent. 9 IM-.X'-IN-A-EY, not real. 4 MAAS'-URE, to ascertain the extent of. t1 BOUND'-A-RY, limit; extent. 6 HEIGHT, distance upward from the ground. 11 FLU'-ID, a liquid, as opposed to a solid. 6 UN-DER-STAND', to know. LESSON II. LINES, ANGLES, AND PLANE FIGURES. 1. We have learned what a line is, what a surface is, and what a solid is. But there are many kinds of lines, many kinds of surfaces, and many kinds of solids. Would you like to know what they are'? 2. We will first show you some of the different Horizontal. kinds of lines. In the margin' you see what is called a horizontal2 line. If a straight stick should float on the surface of still water, it would be in a horizontal position.3 What things can you mention4 that are in a horizontal position'? In what position do you sleep in bed'? 3. The next is called a perpendicular5 line. "If you should put one end of a straight cane6 into the ground, so that it should stand up "erect,' the cane would be perpendicular. Do you see any thing that is perpendicular'? In what position are the walls of a house'? In what \ position do trees usually8 grow'? 4. An oblique9 line is a straight line I / which is neither perpendicular nor hori/ zontal. When a perpendicular line is made



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L16 IARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. PART VI. LESSON VI. CHILDHOOD'S HOUnS. Amid the blue and starry sky, A group of Hours, one even, Met, as they took their upward flight Into the highest heaven. And they were going up to heaven, With all that had been done By little children, good or bad, Since the last rising sun. And some had gold and purple wings, Some drooped like faded flowers, And sadly soared to tell the tale, That they were misspent Hours. Some glowed with rosy hopes and smiles, And some had many a tear; Others had some kind words and acts To carry upward there. A shining hour, with golden plumes, Was laden with a deed Of generous sacrifice, a child Had done for one in need. And one was bearing up a prayer A little child had said, All full of penitence and love, While kneeling by his bed. And thus they glided on, and gave Their records dark, and bright, To Him, who marks each passing hour Of childhood's day and night. Remember, children of the earth, Each hour is on its way, Bearing its own report to heaven "Of all you do and say. Mas. GoRDoN.



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PART VI.1 THIRD READER. 133 going along very quietly; all is still around the church and the cottage; and the whole picture presents a scene of rural repose. Do you know what is meant by rural'? A rural scene is a country scene; and this is a rural scene because it is a scene in the country. It is a country place that you see here, and not a place in a city or a village. Repose means rest, or quiet. I am sure this is a very quiet place. LESSON XVII. PRAISE YE THE LORD. Praise ye the ord. Praise him upon the harp. 0 give thanks unto the Lord, for he is good; for his mercy endureth forever. It is a good thing to give thanks unto the Lord, and to sing praises unto the name of the Most High. From the rising of the sun unto the going down of the same, the Lord's name is to be praised. Praise the Lord, all ye nations; praise him all ye people. For his merciful kindness is great toward us; and the truth of the Lord endureth forever. Praise ye the Lord. The Lord is a great God, and a great king above



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"PArr III. THIRD READER. 4i LESSON III. RESPECT. John', John', come here', John'. Did you get the book thatyouwentfor'? No, sir'. I could not find it'. Did you look on the desk'? Yes, sir', but it was not there'. Did you look for the pen'? Yes, sir'. Did you get it'? Yes, sir', and I put it on the desk, as you told me to'. Did you use the pen'? No, sir'. Have you seewn James to-day' ? Yes, sir', I saw him a short time ago'. Where was he'? He was on the play-ground'. Were any other boys there'? Yes, sir', a great many boys were there'. What were the boys doing on the play-ground'? Some were playing ball', some were flying kites', and some were playing marbles'. Well, that is all. Now you may go to your seat, and take your book'; and you may see how well you can read your lesson. [NoTE.-In these cases the falling inflection given to the answers Yes, sir," and No, sir," indicates a tone of much respect. The rising inflection would have indicated a careless or indifferent manner on the part of the pupil, although not a manner very decidedly disrespectful. Let the teacher read' the lesson, giving to all the answers, "yes, sir," and "no, sir," the rising inflection, and the difference will be apparent. In the next lesson the similar answers have the rising inflection, in accordance with Modification I.]



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LART V.] THIRD READER. 101 God made the pretty bird to fly': How sweetly has she sung'! And though she flies so very high', She won't forget her young'. God made the cow' to give Dice milk', The horse' for us to use'; "We'll treat them kindly' for his sake', Nor dare' his gifts abuse'. God made the water' for our drink'; He made the fish' to swim'; He made the tree' to bear nice fruit': Oh, how' should we love him'! LESSON XIV. BOATS ON THE WATER. Mary has put her boat on the water in the pond, that it mayhave a sail. She keeps a long string tied to it, that it may not be blown away, and get lost. Mary's boat is a sloop, for it has only one mast. Do you know which the mast is'? The wind



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PART FOURTH. [Rules for the use of the Teacher only.j When words or clauses are contrasted, they take opposite inflections. The following are the principal rules for such inflections: RULE V.-Words and clauses connected by the disjunctive or generally require the rising inflection before the disjunctive, and the falling after it. Where several words are thus connected in the same clause, the'rising inflection is given to all but the last. EXAMPLES.-Will you go', or stay' ? I will go'. Will you go in the buggy', or the carriage', or the cars', or the coach'? I will go in the cars'. These examples also follow the general rules for questions. NOT 1.-When the disjunctive or is made emphatic, with the falling inflection, as in the following example, it is followed by the rising inflection, in accordance with the Note to Rule IV. He must have traveled for health, or' pleasure'." NoTE 2.-When or is used conjunctively, as no contrast is denoted by it, it requirea the rising inflection after, as well as before it, except where the clause or sentenee expresses a completion of the sense. Example.-Did he give you money', or food', or clothIng'? No', he gave me nothing'. This also follows the general rule for questions. RULE VI.-When negation is opposed to affirmation, the



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104 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PAnT V Here is a picture of a train of cars. The forward car, from which you see the smoke coming, is the engine-car, which moves the whole train. The baggage-car is the one next to the engine, and the long cars are the cars in which the people ride. When the cars stopped at New York, Tobin went to the baggage-car and asked for his trunk. "That is my trunk," said he: "you will find my name on it." The man asked him what his name was, and when Tobin told him, the man looked and saw the name on the trunk. So he let him take the trunk, and Tobin got a cab-man to put it into a cab, and carry it away. The cab-man took the trunk to an old house which Tobin pointed out to him: but he thought it was strange that a man who had so nice a trunk should live in such a poor house. The more the cab-man thought about this, the more sure he was that Tobin had stolen the trunk. When he went back to the cars, he found a man looking for a lost trunk. This made him more sure than ever that the trunk which he had taken away for Tobin was stolen. So he told the man what he thought about it.



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PART IV.J THIRD READER. 81 LESSON XV. THE ROBIN. Did you ever hear the robins sing in " V the morning, when you were in bed'? K The robin sings very early,almost as soon as it is light. t When the robin sings so early in the morning, it is very happy; and it seems to say," Up, up, and be happy with me." I will tell you what a little girl told me about a robin that came to her window, and sung very early one morning. There came to my window, One morning in spring, A sweet little robin; She came there to sing; And the tune that she sung Was prettier far Than ever I heard On the flute or guitar. She raised her light wings To soar far away, Then resting a moment, Seemed sweetly to say, "0 happy, how happy, This world seems to be Up, up, little girl, And be happy with me."



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_ HARPER'S YOUNG PEOPLE. An Illustrated Weekly for Boys and Girls. 16 Pages. PRICE FIVE CENTS A COPY, OR $2 00 PER YEAR. Bound volumes (except Vol. I.) sent by mail, post paid, on receipt of $3 50 each. IMPORTANT FEATURES. HARPER'S YOUNG PEOPLE will continue to furnish its readers every week the usual variety of entertaining and instructive reading matter. The authors and artists who regularly contribute to its columns form a combination of talent which is without a parallel in the annals of juvenile literature. Wherever an intelligent interest is taken in the education of the young, it has won enthusiastic friends. SPRIGHTLY STORIES, STIRRING POEMS, AMUSING RHYMES, DIVERTING ANECDOTES, INGENIOUS PUZZLES, &C., will bh found in every number. Both boys and girls will find in HARPER'S YoUNG PEOPLE valuable hints as to pleasant methods of spending their leisure time in the playground, in the family circle, or in the social gathering. NUMEROUS ILLUSTRATIONS of the finest description will appear weekly in the paper, and carefully executed CoPIES OF NOTED PAINTINGS will be given from time to time. The enlargement of the POST-OFFICE Box enables that favorite department to serve more efficiently than ever the purposes for which it was instituted; and letters from subscribers requesting or conveying information, or soliciting exchanges of youthful treasures, will always be welcome.



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PART VI.J THIRD READER. 113 Now they have come back'; and again they will build their nests under the eaves of the barn. The robins have come too. The orchard seems to be full of them. They love to build their nests in the apple-trees. How sweetly they sing early in the morning', as soon as it begins to be light'! I hope n6 one will kill the birds, or frighten them away. Some wicked boys throw stones at them, and try to kill them. How would these boys like to have some wicked men throw stones at them'? There comes Henry'! He is throwing stones at the robins nowl' I believe he has hit one'. Henry', do' not kill the birds'-the pretty little birds'! Why' do you wish to kill them'? Do you not like to have them sing about the door'? Then do not shoot them with your bow and arrow'. LESSON III. DON'T' KILL THE BIRDS'. Don't' kill the birds'-the little birds'! They sing about the door, Soon as the joyous spring has come, And chilling storms are o'er'. The little birds that sweetly sing'! Oh, let them joyous live'; And do not seek to take their life, Which you can never give. Don't' kill the birds'-the pretty birds That play among the trees'; 'Twould make the earth a cheerless' place' To see no more' of these'.



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PART III.] TIIRD READER. 59 Never tell an untruth, with the hope of gaining any thing by it'. If you should gain by it, it would still be wrong'. But in the end you will not gain by it'; you will suffer'; and the time will come when you will be sorry for it'. Tell the exact truth at all times. When you are telling about what you have seen', or heard', or done', be very careful to tell nothing but the truth'. If you relate what some one told you', do not alter or invent any part to make a better story', but tell it just as you heard it'. Do not tell a lie, even in jest'. Do not say to your little sister', "Mary'! Mary'! there is a bug on you'," just to frighten her, when there is no bug there'. If you tell Mary a lie in jest', she will not believe you when you tell her the truth'. Did you ever hear the story about the boy and the wolff? The boy used to run and scream "Wolf! wolf!" when there was no wolf there. He did it to make the men think the wolf was coming, and to make them run to help him'. When they came', and found no wolf there', he would laugh at them'. In this way he often deceived them. One day the wolf came, sure enough', and the boy ran and screamed "Wolf' ziolf'!" in earnest; but, as the men thought he did it to deceive them again, they did not go to help him; and so the wolf caught him, and came very near killing him. It is an old proverb, but a true one, that "a liar Sis not believed when he speaks the truth."



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128 HARPER'S UNITEI STATES SERIES. IPART VI. had no fear of being lost. You must ask some one to show you which the North Star is. LESSON XIV. TWINKLE, LITTLE STAR. Twinkle, twinkle, little star; How I wonder what you are! Up above the world so high, Like a diamond in the sky. When the glorious sun is set, When the grass with dew is wet, Then you show your little light, Twinkle, twinkle, all the night. In the dark blue sky you keep, And often through my curtains peep; For you never shut your eye Till the sun is in the sky. Tell me, for I long to know, Who has made you sparkl6so'? It is God, the star replied, God, who hung me in the sky. He stoops to watch an infant soul With an ever gracious eye, And esteems it dearer far, More in value than a star. LESSON XV. WORK AND PLAY. It is not pleasant to work all the time, nor is it useful to play all the time; but while you are at work you should work in earnest, and then you will be the more happy when you play. Work while you pretend to work, and do not



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126 IARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART VI I earned; and I think a boy has a right to wear good clothes if he buys them with his own money. I mean to go to work again, and earn more money, and I don't mean to spend it foolishly, either." That is right. Work and earn money, and then take good care of it. But you must not be vain because you wear nice clothes, nor proud because you have a little money. That would be both foolish and wicked. But what is money good for'? It is good to buy clothes with, and to buy food with; and it is good to give to the poor, that they may buy food, and clothes, and fuel with it, to keep from starving and freezing. It is foolish to get money just to keep it, to be proud of, and to tell how rich you are. Money is a good thing when it is put to a good use, but a bad thing when it is used to do wrong with. Much good may be done with it, and much evil also. The Bible tells us that "the love of money is the root of all evil." LESSON XIII. THE STAns. "We can see the stars when it is dark, or when the light of the sun has left us; but if we go down into a pit or deep well we can see them in the daytime. Who can count the stars'? Yet some stars are larger than the earth on which we live; but they



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138 IARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART VII surface of the ground. Flies walk on the surface of the glass that is in the window. 6. A surface has length and breadth only; but a solid has something more. A solid has length, breadth, and thickness. A brick is a solid. A door is a solid also. The longest measure of the brick is its length; the next is its breadth; and the smallest is its thickness. On all the sides of the brick are its surfaces. 7. If you understand6 this lesson, you can now make foot measures, and you can measure a great many things. You can tell how much taller John is than William; how high and how wide the door is, how thick it is, and how long and how wide the table is. But before you measure any thing, you should guess' its length or width, and then see how nearly right you guessed. When you have practiced8 enough in this way, you will be able to guess almost right every time. 8. What is a line'? A line is that which has length only. As a line has no width, any number of such lines put together would not make the thickness of the smallest thread. Such lines are called imaginary9 lines. We can not touch them; we can not take hold of them. But we can make what we call real lines, such as fish-lines, and lines to measure with. 9. What is a surface'? A surface is that which has length and breadth only. The surface of any thing is only the outside, or boundary,"0 and has no thickness. 10. What is a solid'? A solid is that which



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66 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART IV. LESSON III. THE GOOD STUDENT. Is Henry a good boy in school'? Is he a good student' ? Yes, Henry is a good boy in school, and he is a good student also. Did you see him study his lesson'? No' I did not see him study it', but I heard him recite it.* What lesson did Henry recite'? Did he spell', or did he read'2? He read a lesson in his Reader, and then he spelt some of the words in the lesson. Did Henry read in the First', or the Second', or the Third', or the Fourth Reader' ? He read < in the Third Reader. He has been through the Primer, and the First and Second Readers also. I am glad to hear that Henry has done so well. I hope he will love his books, and study them, that he may grow up to be a good man. What can a man be without knowledge and virtue'? Can he be a good parent', or a good neighbor', or a good friend', or a aod citizen' ?§ Can he have the love', the honor', or the respect' of those who know him'?§ "* Here negation is opposed to affirmation. See Rule VI. t Here or is used disjunctively. See Rule V. I Here also or is used disjunctively. If it had been used conjunctively, the rising inflection would have been given to the closing word, Reader," and the sense would have been different. § Here or is used conjunctively, and the inflection is to be given in accordance with the note to Rule V. It will not fail to be observed that, in all these cases, the general rule for questions is adhered to.



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PArT VII. THIRD READER. 143 Harry, and write a history of it. What shall we call the place we sail from' ?" 6. "Names are usually given from some important event," said Emma. "We might call this Bumble Bee Point, as the most remarkable incident5 that has happened here is the sinking of that old tub of a boat of yours, the Bumble Bee. And then it will be put down in the geographies for little boys and girls to study-'Bumble Bee Point, "so called from the terrible shipwreck of the Bumble Bee, which occurred just off the coast in the year one thousand eight hundred and fifty-eight.'" 7. "This," said Emma, "is Cowslip Bay, because the discoverers, the first time they came down upon the banks, found cowslips. And the creek is the Violet River, which rises in the unexplored6 regions, runs southwest, and empties into Cowslip Bay. It was called Violet River from the immense number of violets that grew on its banks." 7



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4 HIARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART II, LESSON IL THE IDLE BOY. How old do you think this boy is' ? I think he is about ten years old' Why do you think he is an idle boy' ? He is idle ; now', because he does S. not work', nor study', Snor pla y' He might be a smart boy, if he were not an idle boy. B How much older is this boy than you are'? Where is this boy's right arm'? What does it rest on'? It rests on a post' What kind of a post do you think the boy leans upon'? I think it is a large stone post'. The boy seems to be looking at something a great way off. What do vou think he sees'? I think he sees some one coming. He seems to expect some one; and perhaps he is waiting for some other boy to come and play with him. Perhaps some other boy promised to come. I think it must be one of his schoolmates. Boys love to play; and that is right: but they should also love to go to school, and to study There is a time to play', and a time to study'. Those who are always idle when they are boys. will not grow up to be wise men.



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vi HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. If there are any teachers who think these marks useless, they may discard their suggestions, and then get along as well as they would with other Readers. These marks need not be at all in their way. It is probable, however, that some teachers, and pupils, will be benefited by them; and for the sake of such, other teachers, who may not use them, should be willing to tolerate their presence. "We presume, however, that most teachers will find these marks useful auxiliaries in elocutionary instruction, and will make use of them, as guides for themselves, at least, in the reading which they wish their pupils to imitate. Some may think it best to instruct their pupils in the rules; bult it is our opinion that this should be done to a limited extent only, if at all, at this early stage of the pupil's progress. Our motto, therefore, is, Teach pupils, at the very beginning, not I.ules, but correct HABITS of reading." We would also, here, very briefly call the reader's attention to the character of the Reading Lessons in the early numbers of the series. We would say to those who approve (as, doubtless, all do) of imparting instruction to children, and at the same time cultivating their perceptive faculties by familiar Lessons on Objects"-a system now generally introduced into our best public schools-that they will find the leading principles of this system running throughout the plan of these Primary Readers. We have also given a few separate lessons on the same general subject at the close of this Third Book. With a view to the advantages of the system embraced in these early Readers, superior Illustrative Engravings are made the subjects of probably more than half of the Reading Lessons; and the Lessons themselves abound in questions and remarks which not only give life and variety to the reading, but which also direct the attention of the pupil to the engravings, and teach him to notice their leading characteristics-of expression, figures, positions, actions, supposed sayings, etc., and suggest numerous probabilities which keep the mind of the pupil constantly on the alert. In fine, most of the Lessons in these early numbers of the series are designed to present to the mind of the pupil a moving panorama of a real, busy life, which he can comprehend, and which at the same time will suggest, and call forth, whatever of interest and instruction can be connected with the scenes that thus pass before him. We have kept in view the principle that in childhood it is through the medium of the perceptive faculties that the attention is the most readily awakened, and memory and judgment the most successfully cultivated. We trust we are not over sanguine in the belief-inspired by an experience of more than twelve years in the duties of the school-room-that the pupils who practice the system here laid down will easily and naturally (as opposed to artificially) make good readers-that they will be much interested in the character of the Reading Lessons-and that they will derive a considerable amount of instruction from them also.



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PART FIFTH. [Rules for the use of the Teacher only.] RULE VII.-For the sake of variety and harmony, the last pause but one in a sentence is usually preceded by the rising inflection. EXAMPLES.-1st. The minor longs to be of age'; then to be a man of business; then to arrive at honors'; then to retire'. 2d. Time taxes our health', our limbs', our faculties', our strength', and our features'. NoTE.-The foregoing rule is sometimes departed from, in the case of an emphatic succession of particulars, ior which, see Rule VIII. In the second example above, the rising inflection is given to the words health, limbs, faculties, and strength, both because they are not attended with strong emphasis. and be. cause they are folio ved by the pause of suspension, in which the mind anticipates a continuation of the sentence. RULE VIII.-An emphatic succession of particulars, and emphatic repetition, require the falling inflection. EXAMPLES.-st. Succession.-Charity suffereth long', and is kind'; charity envieth not'; charity vaunteth not itself'; is not puffed up'; doth not behave itself unseemly'; seeketh not her own'; is not easily provoked'; thinketh no evil'. 2d. Repetition.-You wrong' me every way: you wrong' me, Brutus'. F>



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2 IIARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART I. LESSON V. THE BIRD'S NEST. S Do you know what this is'? Yes', it is a "bird's nest'. Do you ar see the eggs in it' Yes', there are five eggs'. The eggs are Slarge, and it is the nest of a large bird'. The nest is high up in a large tree. Do you know where the old birds are' I do not know where both of them are, but I can see one of them. We must not touch the eggs. We must let them be in the nest. LESSOON VL TnE PLAY-GROUND. Do you know what house this is'? Yes', it is a schoolhouse'. Boys and girls go there to school. Do you see the boys on the play -ground'? They have just come out of school'. Some run and jump', some play ball', some fly kites', some roll the hoop', and some try the wing'.



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86 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART V. worth seeing. Keep your eyes open, and think about what you see. Those who notice nothing will know but little. pic'-ture col'-umns cov'-er-ing sup-port'-ed build'-ing op'-po-site di-vid'-ed what-ev'-er coun'-try el'-e-gant pe-cul'-iar arch'ed man'-sion res'-i-dence pi-az'-za door'-way chim'-ney de-scrip'-tion de-scribe' en'-trance LESSON II. THE SPRING-TIME. "~~* It is now in the spring-time of the year'. The birds sing', the lambs skip and play on the lawn', the trees put forth their tender leaves', the grass covers the plains with verdure', and all nature has put on her robes of beauty'. So youth' is the spring-time of life'; the morn-



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PART III.1 THIRD READER. 61 I think he is talking about the book which .is open before him. Perhaps he is asking the price of it. Perhaps he is asking the man what kind of a book it is. Perhaps he says, "If it is a good book, I will buy it." LESSON XVIII. THE OLD BEGGAR MAN. I see an old man sitting there; His wither'd limbs are almost bare: And very hoary is his hair. Old man', why are you sitting so'? For very cold the wind doth blow: Why don't you to your cottage go'? Ah! master', in the world so wide, I have no home wherein to hide, No comfortable fireside. When I, like you, was young and gay', I'll tell you what I used to say'That I would nothing do but play. And so', instead of being taught Some useful lesson', as I ought', < To play about was all I sought. And now that I am old and gray, I wander on my lonely way, And beg my bread from day to day. But oft I shake my hoary head, And many a bitter tear I shed, To think the useless life I've led.



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132 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART VT, It is an inn, or tavern, also. How do we know that'? We know it by the sign which hangs over the roof. Do you see the sign'? Can you point it out to me' There is also a little trough or rack near a door by the side of the house. Do you know what that is for ? It is to feed horses in. But there are no horses there now. It would not be so quiet if there were. Do you see the gate on this side of the inn'? It leads into the yard; but the gate is shut now. Is it a large gate', or a small gate'? Is it large enough for a wagon to go through'? There is no one going out or coming in now. How quiet it is there! But there are some living things to be seen in this country place. A man is driving a small flock of sheep. He walks slowly along, with his pack upon his back, and his hand by his side. The sheep move very slowly too. They do not run, and jump, and play. Nearer to us, in the corner of a yard, are two dogs asleep on the straw. One of them has a ring around his neck; and a chain is fastened to the ring, and also to the dog's kennel. Do you know what a kennel is'? It is a dog's house'. The other dog is also lying asleep in the sun, but he is not chained. What do you see on the ground, on this side of the dogs'? A spade and a shovel. The spade and the shovel are at rest, for no one is using them; the dogs are at rest'; the water in the little pond is at rest'; the man and the sheep are



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PART VI.] THIRD READER. 129 be a lazy boy. Lazy boys are apt to be bad boys, and bad boys are apt to grow up to be bad men. Try to be cheerful at all times. The surest way to be cheerful and happy is to be good. Bad boys can not be happy, for there is something within them that will trouble them if they are bad. Do one thing at a time, and do it well. If you have any work to do, take hold of it in earnest, and you will soon finish it. If you have a lesson to learn, don't stop to think how hard it is, but study, and do nothing else, until you have learned it. Those children who are all the day Allowed to wander out, And only waste their time in play, Or running wild about; Who do not any school attend, But trifle as they will, Are almost certain, in the end, To come to something ill. Oh no, we must not always play, And frolic days and months away; But, like the bee upon the wing, So we must gather in the spring; For summer comes, and winter too, When we shall find enough to do. Then let us learn as well as play, Still mindful of a future day. Work while you work, play while you play, That is the way to be cheerful and gay; All that you do, do with your might, Things done by halves are never done right.



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72 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PAET IV. Can you see little Charlie's feet' ? Can you see his head' ? I can see the back of his head. His face is turned the other way. Look all about the picture, and perhaps you can see his face too. Where can you see it ? Do you see the lady in the chair'? Who do you think she is'? I think it is the little sick boy's mother. Do you see ho-v sad she looks'? She loves her little boy, and she is afraid he will not get well. She feels very badly. Do you hope little Charlie will get well'? What kind care our parents take of us when we are little children. How they watch over us when we are sick, and carry us in their arms, and do all they can to have us get well. And should we not love our parents for all this? Should we not obey them, and try to please them'? Should we not be kind to them at all times' ? And how should we treat them when they become "old'? We should treat them with all the kindness in our power. We can never repay them for all they have done for us, coun'-try hap'-py per-haps' kind'-ness flow'-ers fa'-ther o-bey' pow'-er gar'-den ta'-ken be-come' re-pay'



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PART IL] THIRD READER. 23 LESSON I THE FISHING SCENE. pic'-ture fish'-ing bask'-et wood'-en a-fiaid' try-ing stand-ing bridg-es What does the picture on the other page show What do you see there'? I see a man and a boy'; and both of them stand in the water. Do you know what they are doing'? Yes'; they have caught a fish'; and a large one it is too. The man has hold of the line; but he is afraid it will break if he pulls hard. What do you think the boy has in his hands'? It is a kind of net, called a scoop-net. He has been fishing with it. He is now trying to take the fish up in it. The man has a scoop-net also. In which hand does he hold it'? What do you see at the man's side'? It is a basket, and it has a cover on it. What do you think the basket is for'? Do you think the water is very deep there'? How deep do you think it is where the man and the boy are standing'? Do you see the bridge over the stream'? What is the bridge made of'? Does it look like a new bridge', or an old one'? It does not look like a new bridge. Some bridges are made of stone', and some of iron', and some of wood'. This is a wooden bridge. The water is not deep where the man is; for if it were deep the man could not stand in it. The water is not cold, for it is summer there. 2



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PART VI.] THIRD READER. 117 LESSON VII. THE EGG-HUNTERS. Children like', very much', to hunt eggs'. They like to go to the barn', and climb up on the hay', and find the nests which the hens make'. Sometimes they find nests in the tall grass in the meadow; sometimes in the corners of the fences; and sometimes under the currant-bushes. It is very pleasant', and very easy', to get eggs in this way'. There is no trouble in finding them', and no danger in getting them'. But in some places it is not so easy to find eggs', nor so easy to get them'. Almost every one loves eggs', and they are very nice food. Did you ever see ducks' eggs'? I suppose you have seen the eggs of tame' ducks', have you not'? It is as easy to find them' as to find hens" eggs. But where do you suppose wild ducks lay their eggs'? Not around the barn', nor in the garden'. Wild ducks live most of the time on the water'; sometimes on lakes', and sometimes on the ocean near the shore'. Sometimes they lay their eggs in clefts of rocks', where it is not easy to get them. When the rocks rise up very steep', and to a great height from the water', and the ducks lay their eggs in hollow places in the rocks', how do you suppose you could get their eggs'? You could not climb up the steep rocks; and if you should try to do it', you would be very sure to fall', and be dashed in pieces. 4



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ABBOTTS' ILLUSTRATED HISTORIES. BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORIES. By JACOB ABBOTT and JOHN S. C. ABBOTT. The Volumes of this Series are printed and bound uniformly, and are embellished with numerous Engravings. 16mo, Cloth, $1 00 each. A series of volumes containing severally full accounts of the lives of the most distinguished sovereigns, in the various ages of the world, from the earliest periods to the present day. Each volume contains the life of a single individual, and constitutes a distinct and independent work. For the convenience of buyers these popular Histories have been divided into six series, as follows: (Each series inclosed in a neat Box. Volumes may be had separately.) 1. 4. Founders of Empires. Later British Kings and Queens. CYRUS. RICHARD III. DARIUS. MARY QUEEN OF SCOTS. XERXES. ELIZABETH. "ALEXANDER. CHARLES I. GENOHIS KHAN. CHARLES II. PETER THE GREAT. 5. "2.Queens and Heroines. SHeoes of Roman History. CLEOPATRA. ROMULUS. MARIA ANTOINETTE. HANNIBAL. JOSEPHINE. .PYRRHUS. HORTENSE. JULIUS CASAR. MADAME ROLAND. NERO. 6. 3. Rulers of Later Times. Earlier British Kings and Queens. KING PHILIP. ALFRED. HERNANDO CORTEZ. WILLIAM THE CONQUEROR. HENRY IV. RICHARD I. LoUIs XXIV. RIHARD II. JOSEPH BONAPARTE. MARGARET OF ANJOU. LoUIs PHILIPPE. "IBAHAx LINCOLN'S OPINION OF ABBOTTS' HISTORIES.-In a conversation-with esident just before his death, Mr. Lincoln said: "I want to thank youl. nd Ather for Abbotts' series of Histories. I have not education enoiuh to -the profound works of voluminous historians; and if I had, I have no d them. But your series of Histories gives me, in brief compass, just idge of past men and events which I need. I have read them with interest. To them I am indebted for about all the historical knowlIHED BY HARPER & BROTHERS, NEW YORK. BBOTHmCE will send any of the above works by mail, postage preSany part of the United States, on receipt of the price.



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PART IV.] THIRD READER. 77 When we rise from bed in the morning, and when we lie down at night, we should lift up our hearts to himin prayer. God will ear = / us, and if we pray to him with a right heart, he will bless us,both in this world, -and in the world to come. LESSON XIII. MAKING PIES. Miss Mary has gone to the kitchen to show Susan how to make pies. Do you know which Miss Mary is'? What is she doing now'? What



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PART V.] THIRD READER. 107 The warm glow of summer is all gone. You see an old hut in the fields, having a roof of straw, which is now covered with snow. The door is broken down, and some boys are in the hut. Can you see what these boys are doing'? They have set a net at a little distance from the hut, and are trying to catch some birds in it. It is a square net, and is set on its edge upon the snow, and held up by a stick. There is a long line, one end of which is tied to the stick, and the other end is held by one of the boys in the hut. The line lies loosely on the snow, but the boy will draw it in very slowly, until it gets almost straight. Then, if he pulls the line quickly, the stick will be pulled away, and the net will fall. The boys have put some chaff and seeds under the net, and now they are watching some snowbirds that are near it. If the birds go under the net to get the seeds, the boy will pull the string quickly, and the net will fall and catch the birds. The boys want the birds to put them in a cage. Sometimes boys catch large flocks of doves and quails in this way; but doves and quails are more shy than snow-birds, and it is not very easy to catch them. Do you see any persons besides those in the hut'? On the right, beyond the net, is a man with a bundle of sticks on his back; and on the left, but farther off, is a man with a gun on his shoulders. The figures of these men seem quite black, because the ground is so white around them.



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PART VI.1 THIRD READER. 135 Who tuned your beautiful throats' ? You make all the woods' And the valleys to ring'; You bring the first news' Of the earliest spring, With your loud and silvery notes'. It was God, said a lark, As he rose from the earth'; He gives us the good'we enjoy'; He painted our wings', He gave us our voice', He finds us our food', He bids us rejoice'Good-morning, my beautiful boy'. L. H. SiGOUxrN --hESSON XIX. STEN COMMANDMENTS. 1. See that thou have no gods but me'; 2. Before no idol bow thy knee'; 3. Take not the name of God in vain', 4. Nor dare the Sabbath-day profane'. 5. Give both thy parents honor due'; 6. Take heed that thou no murder do'. 7. Shun words', and thoughts', and deeds unclean'; 8. Steal not', though thou art poor and mean'. 9. Don't make a willful lie'; nor love it'. 10. What is thy neighbor's', do not covet'. THE WORLD IS FULL OF BEAUTY. There is beauty in the forest Where the trees are green and fair, There is beauty in the meadow Where wild flowers scent the air; There is beauty in the sunlight, And the soft, blue beams above: Oh, the world is full of beauty When the heart is full of love 1



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"ART V.] THIRD READER. 10n Then the man got an officer, and tney went to the house where Tobin nII[I i had stopped, and there they found Tobin just breaking open the trunk which he had stolen. s Tobin was then taken to jail, and the next day he was tried for stealing, and sent to prison, where he will have to stay for two long years. This is the story which the man with the hat on was reading He looks very much pleased be. cause Tobin was caught and sent to prison. The young man with the cap on looks pleased also. He says, '"I am glad they caught him that time. I hope they will give him nothing but dry bread to eat in prison, and nothing but water to .drink." The other man, who is much older, thinks that the man who had charge of the baggage ought not to have let Tobin take the trunk. "How did he kno-v," said he, "that it was Tobin's trunk'?" He thinks the man was very much to blame for let ting Tobin have the trunk. A man could not steal a trunk from the cars that way now. Now, when a man puts a trunk 'cn the cars, he takes a check, or ticket, for it; and one just like it is put on the trunk. No one then can get the trunk unless he has the right check to show for it.



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PART SEVENTH. LESSONS ON OBJECTS. NoTE.-The remaining lessons in this book are designed not only as reading exercises for pupils, but also as suggestions, to the teacher, of useful modes of imparting oral instruction upon the COMMON OBJECTS OF EVERY-DAY LIFE. In some of the best public and private schools in this country such oral exercises have been introduced with great profit. Children should receive special encouragement in all those exercises which cultivate the powers of observation and judgment. As by the eye they judge of form, size, position, motion, number, and color, let the eye be cultivated in every possible way. The teacher should construct lessons similar to the following upon a great variety of subjects, and adapt them to the various ages and capacities of his pupils. Lessons on COLORS may be made, in connection with the colored plate, both highly interesting and useful.



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PART VI.] THIRD READER. 127 are so far from us that they seem like little shining specks in the sky. When we look at the stars they do not all seem to be of the same size. There are some, too, that change their places, while others do not. Those that do not change their places are called fixed stars, while those that appear to move about among the fixed stars are called planets. The moon which gives us light by night, the earth on which we live, and which goes round the sun, are both planets. There are some who think that the fixed stars are suns, and that they have planets which go round them in the same way as the earth goes round the sun. All the planets which we can see have names, and we know the paths in which they move through the heavens. That bright red star which you sometimes see in the west, and sometimes in the east, is the planet Mars. Another planet which you can often see is called Venus. It is also called the Morning and Evening Star. Another star which you can see in the sky is the planet which is called Jupiter. Sometimes it gives as much light as a new moon. Many of the fixed stars also have names. There is a cluster of these stars which is called the Great Bear; there is one that is called the Little Bear; and another that is called the Swan. There is one star that is called the North Star. It is directly north of us in the heavens. Long ago those who went to sea in ships took this star for their guide. So long as they could see it they 6*





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88 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART V. He made the sun to give man light by day', and the moon to give him light by night'. God spread a carpet of green over the earth. that it might be a place of beauty to delight the eyes of man. What is that carpet made of'? Does man want food'? The fields will give him grain'; the air will give him birds'; and the seas', the lakes', and the rivers' will give him fish'. Does man want clothing'? The sheep bears it on her back'; the cotton-plant will yield it', or the little silk-worm will spin it for him. Does man want tools to work with'? Let him dig into the earth, and take the iron and make them. Does he want music'? The birds sing for him. Does he want sweet odors'? Let him go to the flowers, and inhale their fragrance. All things in the earth', and on it', and in the deep sea'-the grass and the flowers of the field' -the trees and the fruits'-the tame cattle and the wild', are given to man. God made them for man, and gave them to him for his use and comfort. We must make a good use of all that God has given us. GOD IS SEEN IN EVERY THING. In the sun, the moon, the sky; In the mountain wide and high; In the thunder, in the rain; In the winds, the woods, the plain; In the little birds that sing; God is seen in every thing. //



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PART FIRST. Child asleep in the Wood, and Doves watching it. GENERAL RULES FOP. THE RISING INFLECTION. [For the Use of the Teacher only.] RULE I.-Direct questions, or those that can be answered ty yes or no, generally require the rising inflection, and their answers the ftlling. EXAPLEr,.-Do you think he will come to-day'? No', I think he will not'. (See Modifications, p. 38.) RULE II.-Thee paue of suspension, denoting that the sense is unfinished, such as a succession of particulars that are not emphatic, cases of direct address, sentences implying condition, the case absolute, etc., generally requires the rising inflection. EXAaMPLES.-John', James', and William', come here'. The great', the good', the honored', the noble', the wealthy', alike pass away'. NOTE.-For cases in which emphatic succession of particulars modifies this Rule, see Rule VIII., p. 84.



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54 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART IT. his book, and getting his lesson. John is a good boy, and he loves to read. How does John carry his stick'? Does he carry it in his hand'? Look, and see if you can tell. There is something on John's back. What do you suppose it is'? That is his satchel. Do you know what a satchel is'? It is a little sack, or bag. I suppose John's mother made it for him to carry his books in. LESSON XIII. THE LARK AND HER YOUNG. Once a lark built a nest in a field of corn, which grew ripe before her young were able to fly. They were just getting their feathers, and their wings were only half grown. As the old lark was very anxious about the safety of her little ones, she told them, when she went out to get food for them, that if the fhrmer should come they must listen with great care to what he said about cutting down the corn. On her return, the young larks told her that the farmer and his sons had been there, and had agreed to send for some of their neighbors to assist them in cutting down the corn the next day. "And so they depend, it seems, upon theirneighbors to get the corn cut!" said the mother. "Very well, then. I think we need not be afraid of tomorrow, but may stay a little longer. Those who wait for others to help them, are not apt to get their work done in a hurry."



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SPaT III.] THIRD READER. 45 LESSON VII. BIRDS. This bird is a dove. S :-The bird has a bill. Some Sbills are long, and some are thick and short. With its bill the bird picks up its food. Some birds live on corn, some on seeds, and some on insects. The eyes of birds are in the sides of thehead, so that they can see on both sides of them at the same time. Birds have wings with which to fly. Some birds do not live all the time in the air. Some swim most of the time on the water. The duck, the swan, the goose, the loon, the gull, and solne others, swim on the water. "Birds have feet, with which they kill or catch their prey, or scrape the ground, or climb, or walk. The eagle makes use of his feet to seize and tear his prey. The hen scrapes the ground with her feet to find seeds, worms, and insects. The creeper, a small bird, can run up or down a tree with great ease. It runs very fast, and looks into the small holes in the bark of the tree for the food on which it lives. Most birds have four toes, three before and one behind; but the creeper has two toes before and two behind.



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17 P / d%8%* *I



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142 IIARPEE'S iNITED STATES SERIES. [PART VIL LESSON III. THE VOYAGE OF THE GRASSHOPPER. [Adapted from Harry's Summer in Asheroft.] 1. When Harry's new boat was finished, he got the coachman to help him take it to the pond. This pond was nearly a mile long, and in some places about half a mile wide. Harry's sister Emma came down to see the boat launched,' and to take a ride in it. 2. The boat was soon placed on the water, and tied by a rope to the little wharf.2 As it was in the middle of the day, and the sun was hot, Harry nailed four rods to the sides of the boat, and, taking a piece of cloth which he had brought with him, he stretched it over them for an awning.3 3. "Now," said Harry, "our boat must have a name, and you must name it." "I think," said Emma, "that it looks as much like a grasshopper sitting on the water as any thing I can think of." 4. "First-rate! Grasshopper it is, then," said Harry; and with a piece of chalk which he took from his pocket he neatly marked the word on the "side of the boat. "You will think it a grasshopper," said he, when you see it jump over the water. Let us get in now, and sail on a voyage." 5. The boat lay so steadily on the water that when Emma took her seat in it she did not feel at all afraid. "I will make a map of this expedition,"4 said



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PART VI.1 THIRD READER. 111 NoTr.-But when exclamatory sentences become questions, they require the rising inflection. EXAMPrt.-What are you saying' I Where are you going' They planted by your care' I No'; your oppressions' planted them in America'. LESSON I. OLD AGE AND YOUTH. Who is it that sits in the old arm-chair'? You can see, by her face covered with wrinkles', by her long and bony fingers', and by her dim eye', that she is nearly at the end' of the journey of life'. How feeble she is'! How old and weary she looks'! How her steps totter when she walks'! She will soon sink into the grave'! Was she not once as young as you are'? Do you see her little grand-daughter by her side'? The little girl looks up into the face of her grandmother, and says, Grandma', does that noise hurt you'? Do you want Charley to stop' ?" Yes', Charley', why' do you do so'? Do' not make such a noise'. Do' not blow that noisy thing in the house'. Do' not beat that drum here'. Charley', Charley', do' put them away'.* "* The last sentence may become sufficiently intensive, and the entreaty sufficiently earnest and commanding, to require the falling inflection. A more earnest request -in the nature of a commandwould have required the falling inflection in the preceding sentences also. Thus, "Do not make such a noise'." But this would not have been the tone of affectionate entreaty.



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PART VII. I THIRD READER. 137 LESSON I. LINES, SURFACES, AND SOLIDs. A ; .2,'B .., * ,Hlall iucll. I lucll. juches. 3 8uches. 1. At the head of this lesson is a straight' line, which extends2 from A to B. From A to 1 is one inch; from 1 to 2 is another inch; and the whole distance3 from A to B is three inches. 2. By such a line we can measure' things. Can you tell by it how long this book is'? Can you tell.how wide it is, and how thick it is also'? (ou may take a straight stick, and see if you can ]make a measure that is twelve inches long. 3. Such a measure is called a foot measure, because twelve inches make one foot. Now you can stand up with your back against the wall, and an. other boy can mark on the wall the height5 of the top of your head, and then you can take your measure, and see how tall you are. 4. When you have done all this, I think you can measure many other things. Perhaps you can tell how many feet long the school-room is, and how wide it is also. The longest measure of the floor is called its length, and the shortest is called its breadth, or width. 5. Do you know what is meant by the surface of a thing ? I will explain what it means. The surface of an apple is the outside of the apple. The surface of the floor is the upper side of the floor-that on which we walk. We walk on the



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PART SECOND. GENERAL RULES FOR THE FALLING INFLECTION. [For the use of the Teacher only.] RULE III.-Indirect questions, or those which can not he answered by yes, or no, generally require the falling inflection, and the answers the same. EXAMPLEs.-When did you see him'? Yesterday'. When will he come again'? To-morrow'. NOTE -But when the indirect question is one asking a repetition of what was not, at first, understood, it takes the rising inflection, as, What did you say'?" RULE IV.-A completion of the sense, whether at the close, or any other part of the sentence, requires the falling inflection. EXAMPLEs.--Ie that saw me', saw you also'; and he who aided me once', will aid me again'. NOTE. -But when strong emphasis, with the falling inflection, comes near the close of a sentence, the voice takes the rising inflection at the close; as, If William does not come, I think John' will be here'." If he should come, what' would you do' ?"



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FTRT 11.1 THIRD READER. 29 LESSON VII. A CLUSTER OF GRAPES. What vine is this which Swe see, and what kind of fruit is on it'? It is a grape vine, and it bears grapes. There is one bunch of grapes on it now. A bunch of grapes is called a cluster. .How fine these grapes are! Most grapes are round, but these are not. There is some other fruit lying on the ground. Now the grapes are ripe, and we may pick some, and eat them. How sweet they are! Are these all the grapes which grew on the vine'? O no; the vine bore a great many grapes, but the vine has been broken, and most of the grapes have been taken away. Are all grapes as sweet as these'? No; some grapes are sour. Most of the wild .grapes, which grow in the woods, are sour. Here are some people gathering the grapes. They P put them in baskets, and carry them away. Wine is made from grapes. The season of gathering grapes is called the vintage.



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PART III. THIRD READER. 49 LESSON X. SLIDING DOWN HILL. -Did you see me slide down the hill'? said Wil. lie Jones. Did yoT see how fast my sled went over the ice and over the snow'? When I was going down, James was going up; but now I am going up, and he is going down. That's the way we go. First one, and then the other. I can steer my sled straight now. There comes John Brown. He has no sled. Come on, John'. You may take my sled, and slide down once alone, and then you may slide with me. I like to have boys slide with me, two and three on a sled. What fine sport we have to-day! If it is cold, we can keep warm'. We can run up hill, and that will warm us.



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PART VI.J THIRD READER. 121 He'd puff along the open street', As if he had no shame'; He'd sit beside the tavern door', And there he'd do the same'. "He spent his time', and money too', And made his mother sad'; She feared a worthless man' would come From such a worthless lad'. Oh no', I'll never smoke nor chew', 'Tis very wrong, indeed'; It hurts the health', it makes bt d breath'," Said little Robert Reid. LESSON IX. TITE ANGRY MAN. I{ You are a strange man to wish to hurt a little boy'.* Do not do so'.* You are too large and too old to treat a little boy in that way'.* Even Gentle reproof, or expostulation. Rule IX.



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52 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART 1II. you see, came out of his hole under an old tree. He looked around, and tried to find something to eat. When he saw the box, he did not know what it was. He did not think it was a trap. He looked in and saw the apple, and then he crept in softly to get it; but as soon as he began to nibble it, down fell the trap, and shut him in. ",The poor rabbit could not get out, for the box was very strong, and tight. If he only knew enough to lift up the door he could get out; but he did not know enough for that. By-and-by the boy came to see if he had caught a rabbit. When he saw that the door had fallen down, he said, "Good! good! my trap is sprung." So he began to lift up the door gently, to see if the rabbit was there. He lifted it up so that he might peep in. As soon as the door was lifted up a little, the rabbit pushed his head through, and then giving a spring he crowded his whole body through, and so got away. The door fell down again as soon as the rabbit bad got through. Do you see the boy reaching out his hands'? Do you think he can catch the rabbit in his hands' ? No; the little rabbit is too quick for him. Do you think he will be caught .in that trap again? No, I think he knows too much for that. What do you think the boy wanted to do with the rabbit? He wanted to take it home and tame it. There are many kinds of tame rabbits; and they are larger than the wild rabbits.



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PART IV.] THIRD READER. 83 even when we do not open our lips'? Yes, our eyes and our faces are great tell-tales. They tell if we are happy'; they tell if we are sad'; They tell if we are good'; they tell if we are bad'. We should be very careful to be pleasant and kind to others at all times; for if we are peevish', and fretful', and cross', and lazy', there is something that will tell of us. When there is a fretful temper the face will show it. LESSON XVII. THE IDLE WORD. "But I say unto you, that every idle word men shall speak, they shall give account thereof in the day of judgment."-MATTHEW, xii., 36. FIRST VOICE. It passed away, it passed away; Thou canst not hear the sound to-day; 'Twas water lost upon the ground, Or wind that vanisheth in sound; 0! who shall gather it, or tell How idly from the lip it fell! SECOND VOICE. 'Tis written with an iron pen; And thou shalt hear it yet again! A solemn thing it then shall seem To trifle with a holy theme. 0! let our lightest accent be Uttered as for eternity. moss'-y grow'-ing pee'-vish van'-ish-eth read'-ing ly'-ing fret'-ful light'-est list'-en tell'-tale tem'-per e-ter'-ni-ty L



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152 HARPER'S UNITED STATES SERIES. [PART VII. use to me. And I don't believe Mary knows all' the colors'." 6. "Very likely," said Mrs. Murray. "But you say you don't see that it would be of any use to you to be able to distinguish them, and to call them by their right names. Can't you think of any use that it would be to you' 7. "Well, I suppose if I were to be a painter, like Mr.Van Dyke," said Charles, "that I should want to know all about colors. But I don't mean to be a painter." 8. "But you like to see paintings, don't you' said his mother. "You seem to be very fond of looking at the paintings in the picture-gallery. I have no doubt that you would like to be a good judge of paintings; but do you think you could be, a good judge if you knew little or nothing "about colors' 9. Charles admitted that it might be of some use to know all the colors, but he did not think he should like paintings any better if he did know them. "But suppose," said his mother, "that you should go to see some splendid painting, that every body talked about, and you should be asked to describe it. I am sure you would be mortified if you could not tell any thing about the coloring of the picture." 10. Charles thought it might, perhaps, be very well to know enough about colors for that. "And then, again," said his mother, "young men sometimes travel into foreign countries to 'see the world,' and improve their education; for there is