• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Front Matter
 Preface
 Wee-Wee Songs For Our Little...
 Wee-Wee Songs.
 Wee-Wee Songs.
 Ella and the Roses.
 Ida May.
 The Peacock.
 Minnie's Faithfulness.
 The Pulsifer Children.
 Morning Song and Morning Praye...
 Play-Time.
 Baby's First Steps.
 Conversation Upon Ice.
 Happy Dolly.
 Eddie in the Country.
 Bible Sold By Weight.
 Oh, Spare the Birds.
 Cross Girl.
 Trenton Falls.
 Papa's Request.
 Jane's Question
 John Mason and His Sled.
 Ride To School In Winter.
 The King Brother.
 Granite Hills In Winter.
 The Lake-Isles-Notch-White Mountains,...
 Shun the Swearer.
 The Tell-Tale.
 The Stolen Penknife.
 Cross Girl.
 The First Theft.
 Dolly's Name.
 Cooking, in Old Times.
 Succotash.
 Close of the Day.
 Wonderful Instinct of the Ant.
 Little Eddie.
 Faithful Fido.
 Little Mary and Her Wicked...
 Sally M.
 The Proud Girl.
 Willie's Fears: Part I.
 Part II
 "Create In Me A Clean Heart, O...
 The Youthful King.
 The Little Boy's Request.
 The Two Cousins.
 Precious Bible.
 The Sacrifice.
 "Remember the Sabbath Day, To Keep...
 Charlie and His Youthful Teach...
 The Sailor and the Monkeys.
 The Morning Walk.
 Strawberry Girl.
 Envy
 Remember the Poor.
 Holiday Gift.
 Nursery Children Needing Homes...
 Almira and Minnie.
 The Indian and the Planter.
 The Indian and the Basket.
 Grandmamma's Story.
 Blackberry Girl. Part II.
 Supper for the Robins.
 Breakfast for the Robins.
 The Widow of Zarephath.
 Skating.
 To My Infant Nephew.
 The Wounded Foot.
 Little Ellen's Request.
 Milking the Cows.
 Lost Child.
 God the Great Creator.
 Tibby and Her Kitten.
 Happy Cat.
 Tibby's Death.
 Spring.
 Up! Up! Away!
 The Sabbath Breaker.
 My Son, Give Me Thine Heart.
 Visit to the Country.
 Little Lydia and the Razor.
 Nature Speaks of God.
 Baby Has Got A Tooth.
 Ocean Steamers.
 Bible Stories and Hymns. Solomon's...
 Solomon's Judgment.
 Solomon's Wisdom.
 Solomon and the Queen of Sheba...
 King of Tyre.
 Christ's Love.
 On Faith.
 Be Like Jesus.
 Sabbath Hymn.
 Feed My Lambs.
 Table of Contents
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Wee wee songs for our little pets
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00026302/00001
 Material Information
Title: Wee wee songs for our little pets
Physical Description: 203, 3 p. : ill. ; 17 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Roberts, William, b. ca. 1829 ( Engraver )
Orr, Nathaniel ( Engraver )
Oakley, Mason and Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: Oakley, Mason and Co.
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: 1872, c1858
Copyright Date: 1858
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1872   ( lcsh )
Hand-colored illustrations -- 1872   ( local )
Bldn -- 1872
Genre: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Hand-colored illustrations   ( local )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Leila Lee.
General Note: Baldwin Library copy illustrations are hand-colored: probably by young owner.
General Note: Added title page, engraved; other illustrations engraved by Roberts or Orr.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00026302
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002232871
notis - ALH3268
oclc - 10831702

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Front Matter
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Frontispiece
        Page 5
    Title Page
        Page 6
    Front Matter
        Page 7
    Preface
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Wee-Wee Songs For Our Little Pets.
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Wee-Wee Songs.
        Page 13
    Wee-Wee Songs.
        Page 14
    Ella and the Roses.
        Page 15
    Ida May.
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    The Peacock.
        Page 20
    Minnie's Faithfulness.
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    The Pulsifer Children.
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Morning Song and Morning Prayer.
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Play-Time.
        Page 30
    Baby's First Steps.
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Conversation Upon Ice.
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
    Happy Dolly.
        Page 36
    Eddie in the Country.
        Page 37
        Page 38
    Bible Sold By Weight.
        Page 39
        Page 40
    Oh, Spare the Birds.
        Page 41
    Cross Girl.
        Page 42
    Trenton Falls.
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
    Papa's Request.
        Page 46
    Jane's Question
        Page 47
        Page 48
    John Mason and His Sled.
        Page 49
        Page 50
    Ride To School In Winter.
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
    The King Brother.
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
    Granite Hills In Winter.
        Page 59
        Page 60
    The Lake-Isles-Notch-White Mountains, etc.
        Page 61
    Shun the Swearer.
        Page 62
    The Tell-Tale.
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
    The Stolen Penknife.
        Page 66
        Page 67
    Cross Girl.
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
    The First Theft.
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
    Dolly's Name.
        Page 74
    Cooking, in Old Times.
        Page 75
        Page 76
    Succotash.
        Page 77
        Page 78
    Close of the Day.
        Page 79
        Page 80
    Wonderful Instinct of the Ant.
        Page 81
        Page 82
    Little Eddie.
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
    Faithful Fido.
        Page 86
    Little Mary and Her Wicked Father.
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
    Sally M.
        Page 90
        Page 91
    The Proud Girl.
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
    Willie's Fears: Part I.
        Page 96
    Part II
        Page 97
        Page 98
    "Create In Me A Clean Heart, O God!"
        Page 99
    The Youthful King.
        Page 100
        Page 101
    The Little Boy's Request.
        Page 102
        Page 103
    The Two Cousins.
        Page 104
        Page 105
    Precious Bible.
        Page 106
    The Sacrifice.
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
    "Remember the Sabbath Day, To Keep It Holy."
        Page 110
    Charlie and His Youthful Teacher.
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
    The Sailor and the Monkeys.
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
    The Morning Walk.
        Page 117
    Strawberry Girl.
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
    Envy
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
    Remember the Poor.
        Page 125
        Page 126
    Holiday Gift.
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
    Nursery Children Needing Homes.
        Page 132
        Page 133
    Almira and Minnie.
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
    The Indian and the Planter.
        Page 139
        Page 140
    The Indian and the Basket.
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
    Grandmamma's Story.
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
    Blackberry Girl. Part II.
        Page 148
        Page 149
    Supper for the Robins.
        Page 150
    Breakfast for the Robins.
        Page 151
        Page 152
    The Widow of Zarephath.
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
    Skating.
        Page 156
    To My Infant Nephew.
        Page 157
        Page 158
    The Wounded Foot.
        Page 159
        Page 160
    Little Ellen's Request.
        Page 161
    Milking the Cows.
        Page 162
    Lost Child.
        Page 163
        Page 164
    God the Great Creator.
        Page 165
        Page 166
    Tibby and Her Kitten.
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
    Happy Cat.
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
    Tibby's Death.
        Page 175
    Spring.
        Page 176
    Up! Up! Away!
        Page 177
    The Sabbath Breaker.
        Page 178
        Page 179
    My Son, Give Me Thine Heart.
        Page 180
    Visit to the Country.
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
    Little Lydia and the Razor.
        Page 184
    Nature Speaks of God.
        Page 185
        Page 186
    Baby Has Got A Tooth.
        Page 187
    Ocean Steamers.
        Page 188
    Bible Stories and Hymns. Solomon's Choice.
        Page 189
        Page 190
    Solomon's Judgment.
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
    Solomon's Wisdom.
        Page 194
    Solomon and the Queen of Sheba.
        Page 195
        Page 196
    King of Tyre.
        Page 197
        Page 198
    Christ's Love.
        Page 199
    On Faith.
        Page 200
    Be Like Jesus.
        Page 201
    Sabbath Hymn.
        Page 202
    Feed My Lambs.
        Page 203
    Table of Contents
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
    Back Cover
        Page 208
        Page 209
    Spine
        Page 210
Full Text
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Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1858, by Henry V. Degen, inthe Clerk's office of the District Court for the District of Massachusetts.


PREFACE.SHOULD an apology be needed for issuing a book ofpoetry so very simple as ,( WEE-WEE SONGS," it maybe found in the article entitled "s Mother Goose," on page7th. The desire expressed by Willie's mother," That those who love JesusWuld oftener readThe sweet words he uttered.My lambs, ye must feed."nas ever found a warm response in the heart ofLBILA.


SS~ ~SD


WEE-WEE SONGSOR OURl LITTML PFTB.MOTHER GOOSE."MAMMA," said our Sue,"You sent me to-day,Up stairs with the nurseAnd Willie to play." And I told her I thoughtIt was wicked and silly,To say things like theseTo our dear little Willy-" Oh, hi-diddle,Diddle,The cat has theFiddle,The cow has jumpedOver the moon,The little dog laughedTo see all the sport,And the dish ran awayWith the spoon.'


8 WEE-WEE SONGS." Nurse says she has foundThe book of great use,For children are pleasedTo hear Mother Goose."" Now, is it not wrongTo tell them a lie ?If not, I am sureI cannot see why.""I think you are right,"Her mother replied;" Nurse must try to amuse himWith something beside." But babies are pleasedWith the jingle of rhyme,And old Mother GooseHas been used a long time."We must find Wee-Wee Songs,That are not quite so silly,And buy them for nurse,To amuse little Willy."c We give him, each day,Fresh milk and sweet bread,And his dear little mindMust be properly fed.


WEE-WEE SONGS.- 9" T is not easy to findSweet thoughts, good and true,In nursery rhymes;I wish, my dear Sue,That those who love JesusWould oftener readThose sweet words he uttered,My lambs ye must feed! !"For this beautiful world,So joyous and bright,Has so many thingsOf which poets might write." The blue sky above us,The flowers and the trees,The warbling of birds,And the hum of the bees."These bright thoughts would giveOur darling great pleasure,If written in simple,And sweet-flowing measure.* Lovest thou me ? Feed my lambs.-JoHN xxi.


10 WEE-WEE SONGS.SLEEP, DOLLY!Do, Miss Dolly,Shut your eye;I will wake youBy and by.Wee-Wee SongsI want to read;You must goTo sleep indeed.You're my littlePet, 't is true,But I can notRead to you;For you neverSeem to hear,Tho' I read quiteLoud and clear.Little songs areNot for you;Mind, I've told youWhat to do!So, Miss DollyShut your eye;I will wake youBy and by.


WEE-WEE SONGS.WAKE, DOLLY!Wee-Wee SongsAre put away;Dolly, wake,'T is time to play!You have beenSo good to-dayI am sureYou ought to play.Dolly, nowYou must obey;Wake, I say,And come and play IDon't you hear meWhen I say,Dolly, wake,'T is time to play ?Do you dareTo disobeyWhen I call,Come out to play ?Are you deaf,My pet, to-day ?Then I '11 lead youOut to play.


12 WEE-WEE SONGS.XZ,'-'To give us some flowers, I know."E L ,. A- THE RS*WH ..-utureO mamma,Just pwTogive.u some .. Ikn


WEE-WEE SONGS. 13"The gardener 's not here," her mother replied;He asked us to see his sweet flowers;."I trust, my dear child, you would not wish tosteal,-These roses, you know, are not ours."Their beautiful fragrance you now can inhale,Their loVely, bright colors enjoy,Should you steal but one rose you 'd be happyno more,You would lose all this innocent joy.""O no! dear mamma, I should not wish tosteal,So I'll bid these sweet roses adieu!Now, Rover," said Ella, " we 're ready to play,And I will be happy with you."IDA MAY.No little girlMore bright and gay,Or happierThan Ida MayAs she ran offTo school one-day,And passed the storeOf Mr. Gray,


14 WE-WEEWE SONGS.Where, near the door,Some ripe plums lay,And Satan whispered,' Ida May-Take but one plum,Then run away;You ill not be seenBy Mr. Gray.Oh, had she thoughtOne prayer to say,She'd not have sinned,Poor Ida May!She caught one up,Then ran away,And was not seenBy Mr. Gray.Ah, sinful child,To disobeyThe Word of God-Hear, Ida May!"Thou shalt not steal!"Now hear Him say,And you have stolenFrom Mr. Gray.


WEE-WEE SONGS. 15The voice of GodWill you obey ?It whispers now,Stop! Ida May,-'T is not too late,Go back, you mayReturn the plumTo Mr. Gray.Then lift your heartTo God, and pray," Forgive the sinOf Ida May."That still, small voiceShe did obey,And ran with hasteTo Mr. Gray,And told him allWithout delay;The good man pitiedIda May.He gently wipedHer tears away;And when she left, ,Kind Mr. Gray


"16 WEE-WEE SONGS.Said to the child," One moment stay--I '11 give some plumsTo Ida May."" I could not eat'fV A plum to-day! "Said Ida, then,To Mr. Gray.She went to schoolAnd all the wayGod saw the heartOf Ida MayWas sweetly raisedTo Him, to prayThat He would washHer sins away-For Jesus' sake.And God that day,Freely forgaveDear Ida May.


WEE-WEE SONGS. 17THE PEACOCK.Is it right, Mr. Peacock, to strut about so ?Your plumage is fine 't is allowed;And had you but painted that beautiful tail,You would then,with some reason, feel proud.Many bright little flowers, as pretty as you,Are found in some shady retreat.Go learn of the rose-buds and violets, too,Their modesty renders them sweet.


18 WEE-WEE SONGS.God gave you the plumage we so much admire;God painted the butterfly's wing;God deck'd the green fields with flowers so gay,And taught the dear birds how to sing.Many things in this beautiful world He hasmadeTo look quite as pretty as you;So please, Mr. Peacock, don't feel quite soproud,As your gay, brilliant plumage we view!MINNIE'S FAITHFULNESS." BROTHER, may I unpack your trunk ? " saidlittle Minnie Bell."0 yes, my dear; how glad I am to get homesafe and well;I've been in California for more than threelong years,But I 'm safely home at last, in spite ofmother's fears."" Yes, Alfred, it has seemed, to dear mammaand me,A long, long time, and we are glad your happyface to see;


WEE-WEE SONGS. 19Morning and evening, do you know? when weknelt down to pray,Mamma has asked, that God would bless andguard you while away."c And God has kindly heard her prayer, andkept you safe and well."She worked awhile,-- at length, she said," Dear Alfred, please to tellWhere you have put your Bible? I 'veunpacked the trunk with care,And I have laid upon the bed most all theclothes you wear." I 've looked at every article, and yet I havenot seenA Bible or a Testament; brother, what can itmean ?I fear that you have been without a Bible allthe way;Is i-t in California, or have you lost it,-say ?"" You little chatter-box, do see the presents Ihave brought;This for mamma, and that for you; Why!really I had thought


20 WEE-WEE SONGS.The beautiful new dress I bought would pleasemy sister well ;How do you like this India fan, I ask you,Minnie Bell ? "" it is very beautiful! I thank you, Alfred,dear;But yet you have not told me, what most Iwish to hear.""Well, Minnie," said her brother, " if reallyyou must know,When I sailed for California my Bible did notgo."I know 'twas wrong to leave it out, fornever have I seenA Bible or a Testament in any place I 'vebeen;We did not often think of God when we weredigging gold;That is the truth; now, Minnie dear, pray do n'tbegin to scold.""f" Forgotten God for three long years! Alfred,can this be true ?Dear brother, were you not afraid of God'sforgetting you ?"


WEE-WEE SONGS. 21He took the dear child in his arms, andbursting into tears," My conduct has been wrong," he said, "howsinful it appears! "Just then his mother entered, with her heartquite full of joyAnd gratitude to God above, who had kepther darling boy;She had been alone to thank him, and offer upa prayerThat God who had preserved her son, wouldkeep him in his care."Dear mother, will you pray," said he, " andread in God's own WordThat story of the Prodigal, which I have oftenheard ;For I have wandered far away, but now desireto comeAnd love and serve that Being who hath safelybrought me home ?"Her prayer was heard; and Alfred Bell is nowa Christian man,Serving his God with faithfulness, and doingall he can


2 WEE-WEE SONGS.That those who go to distant lands, to searchfor mines of gold,May find within God's holy Word a mine ofwealth untold.THE PULSIFER CHILDREN.OH, Mother! said little Ruth Greenwood one\day,Please come to the window this moment, I pray,For two little children are here, by the door,They are weary and cold, and they look verypoor.


WEE-WEE SONGS. 23The Pulsifer children, I see, said her mother,'Tis dear little Ella, and Harry, her brotherRun, call them in quickly! their mother, I knowReturned to this village a few days ago.I sent them, this morning, a cart-load of wood,And fear that they now may be suffering forfood;We '11 fill up their baskets with bread and withmeat,And give the dear children a plenty to eat.Their mother is proud, and she cannot endureThe neighbors should know they are now verypoor;But since we've "a will," we must find out "away,"To help this poor widow we must not delay.Her father's a drunkard, her husband is dead,And she is too ill to hold up her head;The wretched old man now reels thro' thestreet,And never provides them a mouthful to eaRuth ran to the door, and called them both in;Their feet were most naked, their garmentswere thin,


24 WEE-WEE SONGS.Too thin to go out in this cold wintry weather;Here Ruth and her sister both whisperedtogether.O, yes, sister Mary, those stockings you'veknit,Just the thing, and so warm! I am sure theywill fit;We '11 make up a bundle, and stow it awayIn the baskets they've left in the entryto-day.Little Ella and Harry were grateful indeed,That God had provided such friends in theirneed;Their baskets were filled with biscuit and meat,And warm shoes and stockings to cover theirfeet.The Greenwood's oft drew from their plentifulstore,And quietly sent to the poor widow's doorSuch things as she needed. Her proud heartwas melted;She welcomed their visits, and soon was con-tented


WEE-WEE SONGS. &5To let little Harry and Ella go whereThey could hear of the Saviour, and his ten-der care,Of dear orphan children--the story, to day,You may read in a book called "A WILL ANDA WAY " *MORNING SONG AND MORNINGPRAYER.MOTHER.AWAKE, my daughter, come and seeThis Robin red-breast on the tree;Open your drowsy eyes!Spring up from bed and see her now,She 's lighting on the highest bough,Come quick, before she flies!LILLIE.Yes, dear mamma, I see the bird,And sweeter notes I never heardThan she is warbling now *I hope she will not fly away,But sit and sing the live-long day,On this, her favorite bough.SVol. iv. " Casket Library." Published by H. V. Degen, 22 Cornhill.


26 WEE-WEE SONGS.MOTHER.The birds must build their nests in Spring,They have to work as well as sing;To their Creator's praise,Since early dawn, dear Lillie, sheHas warbled out, from yonder tree,Her very sweetest lays.Now tell me, who has kindly keptMy little daughter while she slept;Who heard her evening prayer,And gently closed the weary eye,Nor suffered danger to come nigh,But kept her in his care ?LILLIE.I laid me down, mamma, and slept,Because the Lord sustained and keptHis child thro' all the night;And now I lift my heart and pray,O, God, I thank thee for this day,That I may see its light!When all my friends were fast asleep,Thou didst my soul in safety keep,And took kind care of me;


WEE-WEE SONGS.Father in Heaven, O, hear me now,As at thy feet I humbly bow,To ask a gift of thee.Give me thyspirit from above,That I may learn to know and loveMy best and dearest Friend,-The Savior, who hath died for me,That I his little lamb may be,O Lord thy spirit send!And now, be with me all the day,That whether I 'm at work or play,I may remember, then,The eye of God is still on me,Oh, help me thy dear child to be,For Jesus' sake,-Amen.PLAY-TIME.LILLIE, putYour work away,Now 't is timeTo go and play.You have beenSo good to-day,You 'll be happyWhen you play.


28 WEE-WEE SONGS.BABY'S FIRST STEPS.BABY, darling,Do not fear,Move those littleFeet, my dear;Do n't stand waitingThere so long;You are growingVery strong.Here he comes,Oh, that's the way!Nurse, I knowMamma will say,


WEE-WEE SONGS. z9; hen she comes home, Why, how you talk!s baby learning how to walk ?Try again,Little pet,You have notFallen yet;Here she comes;Look, nurse, look!All alone,Three steps she took.When papaComes home to-nighb,It will give himGreat delight;And he will say, Why, how you talk IAre you sure the child can walk'!Nurse, I love"Our baby so,I must teach herAll I know.That's not much,Papa would say,He laughs at meMost every day,3*


30 WEE-WEE SONGS.Because I 'm oldEnough to read,Oh dear! that's veryHard indeed.But, baby, we will not stop to talk,We are going out doors to teach you to walk.CONVERSATION UPON ICE.MOTHER AND DAUGHTER." COME, dear," said Mrs. Jones one day,To Jane, her little daughter," Come, look at this large block of ice,Now floating in the water!" You could not lift it from the ground,If you should try all day,And yet, like a mere feather, now,You see it float away.""Oh, yes, mamma, it does seem strange,That it should never sink,Why that large block of ice should float,I 'm sure I cannot think." How very kind it is in GodTo freeze the waters so,That on the top the ice remainsAnd cannot sink below!


WEE-WEE SONG S. 31"For, while our winters are so cold,How short a time wouldd takeTo form one solid mass of ice,In river, pond, or lake!"And thus, from year to year, mamma,Winter would ever reign,For such a mass could never melt"When summer came again."But tell me how the ice is formed,And what can make it floatUpon the surface of the lake,Just like a little boat ?""c Our Heavenly Father, Jane, has filledWith bubbles full of air,Each lump of ice-and we may seeHis goodness everywhere."The air expands within the ice,Just as its Maker pleases,And rarifies to make it light,Whene'er the water freezes."Thin cakes thus form in layers, Jane,As you may often seeOne ring within another, roundThe body of a tree,


32 WEE-WEE SONGS.", And thus 't is piled from week to week,While Jack Frost is about,Until the men with horses come,To float the treasure out."" And what a luxury, amma,These large ice blocks will beWhen summer comes, and we againSuch sultry weather see!"C Last August, I remember well,When I came home from school,How good the water used to taste,With ice to make it cool.."c And then, you know, we used to haveOur butter hard and nice,Our cake kept cool, and fish, and meat,Preserved with lumps of ice.""Yes, dearest, God is ever kind-How constant is his care!He gives not only food and drink,And clothes for us to wear,-" But happy homes with luxuries filled,And this bright world of oursIs stored with precious gifts of love,Abundant fruits and flowers,


WEE-WEE SON GS. 33" To gratify the taste of man,And fill his heart with joy;Then, should not grateful thoughts of GodEach passing hour employ ?"" Yes, dear mamma, for warbling birdsSend up their sweetest lays,To thank Him for his gifts of love,And we should offer praise"To the great God, our dearest friend,Who lives and reigns above;Will you not pray to Him, mamma,To fill my heart with love ?"HAPPY DOLLY.HAPPY at night,Happy by day;Happy at home,Happy away !Dolly darling,Never, never,Are you cross,But happy ever!~J-4


34 W EE-WEE SONGS.0-----------'"1-7EDDIE IN THE COUNTRY." I 'M sure 't is too pleasant this beautiful dayTo sit here so quietly playing,Come, Lillie, let's be off to the mountain away,And see where the sheep ure now straying!"So said little Eddie, and ran with great joy,To ask if his cousin could go;But tho' his aunt wished to oblige the dear boy,She still was compelled to say no."I have given my daughter a lesson to learn,Then follows a half hour's sewing;Should this be well done, then with pleasureshe'll earn,And I shall not object to her going.


WEE-WEE SONGS. 35"You remember, last evening, she promised papa,His handkerchief neatly to sew,I have fitted her work, when 't is done," saidmamma," And the lesson is learned, she may-go." I can work after dinner," said Lillie, " dopleaseJust for once to grant Eddie's request."" My dear," said her mother, "' t is no use toteaze,After work, not before, you may rest."Lillie took up her book, with a tear in her eye,She could scarce see a word that was in it;But Eddie declared 't was of no use to cry,And she thought so herself in a minute.Resolving to try, and do all in her power,To make of each duty a pleasure,She conquered; and said to mamma, " in an hour,Please hear me recite, if you 've leisure "Her mother looked pleased, as she said, " howis this,Papa's handkerchief hemmed and all ready ?Well done, my dear child! Now give me a kiss,Then run out and find cousin Eddie."


36 WEE-WEE SONGS.BIBLE SOLD BY WEIGHT.PLEASE put the Bible in one scale, the papersin the other;'T is mine? 't is mine! dear Willie cried, andran to tell his mother.His little heart was full of joy as he ran homeagain;How he obtained the Bible, young reader, we 'llexplain.He went to buy his mother, at noon, a pounaof tea,And, when the grocer weighed it out, thechild observed that heTurned round to tear a Bible that on thecounter lay,He had bought it for waste paper, he said thatvery day.He was almost out. of paper to wrap his parcelsin..Now the grocer could not read, and knew notwhat a sinIt was to tear this Holy Book and take eachwell-worn leafTo use for such a purpose; but when he sawthe grief


WEE-WEE SONGS. 37Of his little favorite, Willie, he kindly said,I 'm sureI'll give you the old volume if some papersyou 'll procure,As much as this great book will weigh-yousee it is not light,-Run home and see what you can find, andbring them before night.The boy was very poor, indeed, but he wasgood and kind,And when he went among his friends, it wasnot hard to findThose who approved of Willie's care of God'smost Holy Word,They gladly gave the papers when the storythey had heard.An hour had scarcely passed, when the grocersaw, with pleasure,The little boy returning to claim the promisedtreasure.He placed the Bible in one scale, the papers inthe other.Oh, thank you, sir! 'tis mine! he cried, and.ran to tell his mother.4


38. WEE-WEE SONGS.How happy was that mother; God's Word washer delightA light unto her path by day,-a guiding starat night;She raised her heart in thankfulness, that hehad learned to prizeHis precious Bible, and had gained a treasurein the skies.. ...-. -.OH SPARE THE BIRDS.SPARE the dear little birds, don't kill them Ipray!But listen, and hear their sweet song;To spoil all our music, and shoot them to-day,Oh, sportsmen, you know 't would be wrong!


WEE-WEE SONGS. 39At dawn of the day, they are warbling away,But they never have done the least harm ;The summer 's most gone, they've a short timeto stay-They will soon fly away from our farm.To the bright sunny South, they then will repair,In autumn they flock off together;Our Father in Heaven with kind, watchful care,Then guides them in search of warm weather.I 'm sure 't will displease Him, if merely forsportYou shoot these sweet songsters to-day;Remember, kind sportsmen, their life is butshort;Oh, spare them, in pity, I pray!CROSS GIRL.JANE, my dear,How can you beCross to littleEmily!When she's suchA darling child;Always gentle,Meek and mild.


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WEWE-WEE SONGS. 41TRENTON FALLS.See Frontispiece and other views of Trenton Falls.CASCADES roaringIn their might, -Waters pouringFrom the height, -Wildly boundingOn their way, -Loud resounding,Seem to say,-See us toiling,As we glide;-Hear us boiling,Far and wide.We are living,Not in vain, -We are givingBack againPlenteous rain-dropsTo the sun,As it cheers usWhile we run.Rising, leaping,Over hills, -4*


42 WEE-WEE SONGS.We are keepingYonder millsSwiftly goingRound and round;Onward flowing,We are found.Useful ever,As we go;Silent never.Do you knowWe are teachingYou to-day;Hear our preaching.Children, stay!Learn a lessonOf the river;Yield your heartsTo God, their giver.Ever raisingGrateful praise,Loving, serving,All your days.


WEE-WEE SONGS. 43PAPA'S REQUEST.WRITE very often, children, -Write papa very soon;Your letters will be dearerThan lovliest flowers in June;For papa will be absentThroughout the long, long year.Write to him very oftenWhat'he will wish to hear.That Fred. and sister BessieAre learning with their might,And little Nell and JessieAre doing what is right.Dear children, help each other,At morning, noon, and night,And then your happy motherWill find it sweet to write.Write papa very often, -Write in the early morn,Or write him just at twilight,When all the day is gone;Draw out the pretty table,Mamma will bring a light,And help the older childrenTo gather round and write.


44 WE E WE E SONG S.Write of the loving kindnessOf that dear Friend above,To whom, in papa's absence,He would lead your hearts in love.Think of Him in the morning,And think of Him at night,And of his acts of kindnessDo not forget to write.Write very often, dear ones,-Write papa very soon,Your letters will be dearerThan lovliest flowers in June.If, while papa is absent,You'd fill him with delight,Think of him very often,And do n't forget to write.JANE'S QUESTION." Mamma," said Jane, whatt will you doWhen you have read your Bible through?You read so carefully each part,I think you 'll know it all by heart."Her mother smiled and said, Why, thenI mean to read it through again;And hope my daughter soon will beAble to read God's Book with me."


WEE-WEE SONGS. 45" Yes, dear mamma, I soon shall read,I 'm learning very fast, indeed;And I should gladly leave my playFor Bible stories any day." But, then, you know, to me they're new;Now, when I've read a book twice through,I 'm tired of it, and want another,-Why do you not feel so, dear mother ?""Indeed, my love, I often doTire of some books as quick as you;I should not even read them twice,Once reading will for me suffice."But we may read, and read again,These sweet words of our Father, Jane,From youth to age, and as we comeNearer and nearer to our home"Our happy home in heaven above,This Book we more and more shall love;Sweeter than honey, and more dearThan precious gems, 't will then appear."May God his grace to you impart,And write these truths upon your heart.Now, darling, put your work away,'T is time for you to run and play, -"We'll talk of this some other day."


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WEE-WEE SONGS. 47JOHN MASON AND HIS SLED"0, HOW I wish we owned a sleigh,"Said Susie to her mother;"I want to go to school to-day,With Nellie and my brother! "Her mother sighed, anid said, " My dear,Your sister cannot go;They have not made a path, I fear,Since this great fall of snow."Here James ran in with joy, and said,"C Dear mother, come and see;John Mason's here with his new sled,He offers it to me.' To take our Nell to school to-day;I am to be the horse;Please wrap her up without delay,You 'll let her go, of course! "" And Susie, too," John Mason cried," I '11 take her on my back;Nell and the dinner, both can ride,-John, follow in my track "The mother's heart was filled with joy,She watched them from the door,A happy group And that dear boyWho thought upon the poor,


48 WEE -WEE SONGS.Think you, he was not happy, too,When he went home at night!If you would hear the story through,Read " RIGHT, AND ABOUT RIGHT."*RIDE TO SCHOOL IN WINTER." WE are ready;Let us goSwiftly overIce and snow;Nell and Susie,Side by side,You shall haveA glorious ride !See the happy children goSmoothly o'er the ice and snow!"Clasp your armsAround me tight;Hold on, Susie,That is right;-Nellie, keepThe basket stillWhen we dashDown yonder hill!"* Vol. I. "Casket Library." Published by H. V. Degen, 22 Cornhill.


WEE-WEE SONGS. 49Thus the happy children goBriskly o'er the ice and snow."Wintry weatherCannot harm us,Nor Jack FrostE'er alarm us;How exciting!Onward move,Hearts unitingThus in love."Merrily singing, on they goQuickly o'er the ice and snow." Oh, we loveThis bracing air,Though the snowIs everywhere;Fingers cold ?Never mind it.There 's a fire,We shall find it,When we reach the school, you know,Over the ice and over the snow." Now we toilUp the hill,


50 WEE-WEE SONGS.Wear-i-ly,But upward still,Soon the heightWe shall gain,Pull the sledWith might and main."Struggling, toiling, up they goWearily over the ice and snow!Then alongThe level ground,On they goWith a bound;Merry shoutsEverywhereRinging throughThe frosty air;See the happy children goSmoothly o'er the ice and snow!See! they're dashingDown the hill,Boys are calling,"N ell, be still !"Teeth are chatteringIn her head,


WEE-WEE SONGS. 51Dishes rattlingOn the sled;Girls are frightened though they goSafely o'er the ice and snow.Now they nearThe school-house door--There 's the pondAll frozen o'er;Hear the happyChildren singing,Through the airTheir voices ringing;Sliding, skating, merrily, oh!Swiftly over the ice and snow!Nell and SueHave found a seat,And have warmedTheir hands and feet;When the bellRings loud and clear,Leave your sportsChildren dear!Quickly into the school they go,Meirily leaving the ice and snow.


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WEE-WEE SONGS. 53THE KIND BROTHER.COACH is tackled;Sister, run,Put your glovesAnd bonnet on!It is aboutA week ago,We were promised,Sis, you know,Were we good,We should to-dayTake the coachAnd ride away.Cousins nowAre all at home;Glad they 'll beTo see us come.Oh, how pleasantTis to ride,All alongThe river side!Sister, come,Do not delay,Tis quite timeTo start away.5*


54 WEE-WEE SONGS.Now you're crying!Are 'nt you well?What's the matter ?Mary, tell?THE FIRST LIE.Brother, do notAsk me why!Yet, you '11 hear,-I 've told a lie!And here, shut up,I'm doomed to stay,And weep and mournThe livelong day!Dear Harry I'mAfraid that youAnd Harriet,Will hate me too.For, since I've toldThis lie, mammaDo n't speak to me,Nor does papa.Not once upon meHave they smiled,Since I was suchA wicked child.


WEE-WEE SONGS.Oh, they will hate me,I 'm afraid,And God,'who heardThe words I said,Will shut all liarsOut of heaven;Oh, can I everBe forgiven ?HARRY.Dear sister, IWill tell mammaHow bad you feel,And ask papaThis evening, whenWe kneel to pray,To ask that GodMay wash awayYour sins, and help you,Every day,To speak the truthWhate'er you say.But first, I '11 sendThe coach awayI do not wishTo ride to-day.*


56 W E E -W 1E S;N G S.GRANITE HILLS IN WINTER.THESE hills, so magnificent, lofty, and great!The boast of New Hampshire -the Old GraniteState!I have seen them, dear children, and much IadmireThese beautiful hills in their wintry attire.The Ice King has laid his cold hand on the rills,They cannot now playfully leap down the hills;Snowy mountain and valley alike are madehoary;Jack Frost reigns triumphant, alone in hisglory,


WEE-WEE SONGS. 57One sees, now and then, a lonely snow-bird,But old Robin red-breast no longer is heardWarbling out a glad song to the praise of herMaker,She has gone where the Ice King cannotovertake her.Who guides the dear birds, that they never getlostWhen seeking a home to escape from the frost-?Our Father in Heaven he guides them aright,Till away in the bright, sunny South theyalight.So long as these lofty old hills shall remain,And spring shall renew their bright verdureagain,Our loving, kind Father shall still fondly careFor the beasts of the field and the fowls of theair.Not a robin or sparrow can fall to the ground ;Not a raven may cry but he heareth the sound.Then will not "Our Father in Heaven " benigh,And bless us, dear children, when we, too, shallcry ?


58 WEE-WEE SONGS.Oh, yes! Are ye not of more value than they ?In accents most tender, we hear Jesus say;And I 'm sure, if God takes such kind care ofa bird,Our prayers, if sincere, cannot fail to be heard.THE LAKE-ISLES-NOTCH--WHITEMOUNTAINS, ETC.IF a map of the Old Granite State you willtake,Near the borders of Maine you will find thatlarge lake,The Winnipisogee, so lovely to viewEmbosoming islands most beautiful, too.In number they equal the days of the year;And when summer comes no islands appearMore lovely in verdure and beauty than these,With rich, fruitful fields, and beautiful trees--So vocal with birds, warbling out their sweetlays,As if they were chanting their Maker's praise,Could you then view the lake, dear children,the sightWould fill your young hearts with the greatestdelight.


WEE-WEE SONGS. 59Another famed spot is a narrow defile,Where the mountain seems split for more thana mile,And a picturesque landscape around you isspread,With the White Mountains hanging just overyour head.This Notch is so wonderful, travellers agree,It repays one to come a long distance to see;Amid Alpine heights such views may abound,But in our own country they seldom are found.American Switzerland! Such is the nameWe give to the Old Granite State for the fameOf its islands and lakes, its cascades andfountains,And the bold, lofty peaks of the snowy WhiteMountains.SHUN THE SWEARER.RuN home, little boy!Oh, do not stand there,To hear that bad manSo wickedly swear.


60 WEE-WEE SONGS.I-INWHAT a sightWe descryWhen the FallsMeet our eye!THE TELL-TALE.EMMA, I 'm sorry to observeA trick you have, my dear,Of listening to whatever is said,And telling all you hear.I knew a little Judith Shove,Who had this habit, too;She was an active, sprightly girl,About as old as you.


WEE-WEE SONGS. 61But what was said and done at homeShe always minded well,And, when she went abroad, the wholeShe would be sure to tell.People were cautious what they saidWhere'er she chanced to come,For well they knew that every wordWould straight be carried home.The teacher who instructed her,Had made this wholesome rule,To punish every child who toldOf what was done in school.But Judith loved to talk so well,No rule could hold her long;She could not bear to be restrained,Nor learn to hold her tongue.One day a scholar misbehaved,This made the teacher fret,And Judith told the whole affairTo every one she met.But, when the active school-dame heardHer laws were disobeyed,To find the naughty tell-tale child,A search she quickly made.6


62 WEE-WEE SON G'S.Judith well knew the fault was hers,And greatly did she fearTo take the threatened punishmentWhich she deserved to bear.So, on her little sister sheContrived the blame to lay,And said she heard her tell the taleAt home that very day.The little, frightened, trembling childWith truth the charge denied;But Judith said, before the school,That little Sallie lied.And so she bore what would have beenThe wicked Judith's due, -The punishment for telling tales,And speaking falsely, too.Weeping and sobbing she went home,Her little heart was full;And Sallie was a child of truth,So they believed the whole.Papa made Judith go to school,And there, before them all,Own how deceitful she had been;Then on her knees to fall


WEE-WEE SONGS. 63Before the dame and Sallie, too,Their pardon to obtain,.And promise she would never doSo wickedly again.But ever after, let her goAbroad where'er she would,The boys would hoot her as she passed,And call her-Tattling Jude!THE STOLEN PENKNIFE." HARRY, darling, what 's the matter;Have you hurt yourself, my boy?When I went away, this morning,That bright face was full of joy.""Oh, papa," said Harry, sobbing,"I do think it is a shame,My new knife is gone-he stole it,And I do not know his name.""Your new knife! Who stole it, Harry ?""c That big boy, papa, who broughtShavings here to sell, this morning;Oh I wish he could be caught." I was standing on the sidewalk,Whittling with my knife to-day,


64 WEE-WEE SONGS.When he came, and asked to see it,Then he turned and ran away."" Wicked boy! I think I know him;'T was a naughty thing to do;I will bring you home another,Like the one he stole from you." That poor boy has no kind parents,Nor a bright and happy home;Wicked children are his playmates,Through the streets he loves to roam" There he learns to be so sinful,Lying, stealing, every day;He has no kind friends to teach him,Morn and evening, how to pray." Should you not be thankful, darling,God has been so good to you;Given you friends so kind and loving,Taught you what you ought to do?" Learn, my son, a useful lessonFrom this wretched boy to-day,Never choose a bad companionWhen you're in the streets at play.


WEE-WEE SONGS. 65.-`MY dear Amelia, I'm ashamed) jii FzIl.To hear you quarrel so;Leave off these naughty airs, my child,Go play with Frances, go!6*:__ .'~ CQEL -Y~S~s-iZ-liCi~=~16*'~~


66 WEE-WEE SONGS.AMELIA.I can't, mamma, the little minxMay play with whom she can;And while she lives she shall not haveMy waxen doll again.With any other little girlI should be glad to play;But I do n't love our Frances, Ma,I wish she 'd go away.MOTHER.Amelia, little Betsy SmithSpends all her time alone;She had a little sister once,But now she 's dead and gone.Betsy, like you, was very cross,And when she used to playWith pretty little Emeline,She 'd quarrel every day.One time her sister said to her," Do n't, Betsy, be so cross;Indeed, I am not well to-day,And fear I shall be worse."


WEE-WEE SONGS. 67"Not well! Oh, yes, you're very sick!I do n't believe it 's true;You only want to coax MammaTo get nice things for you."But Emeline grew worse and worse,Till she could hardly speak;And when the doctor came he said,She would not live a week.And then it rushed on Betsy's mind,How wicked she had been;The cruel treatment of the childShe never felt till then.Over her sister's bed she hung,With many a bitter sigh,And laid her arms about her neck,And begged her not to die."Forgive me, Emeline, or elseI do not wish to live;Oh speak, dear sister, speak once more,And say you will forgive!The poor, dear, suffering, dying childJust raised her languid eye,And moved her lips, and tried to say,Dear Betsey, do not cry!


68 WEE-WEE SONGS.Then Betsey' s sorrowing mother triedTo take her from the bed,She cast her weeping eyes behind,And Emeline was dead.And now poor little Betsey sits,Day after day, alone;She does not wish to laugh or playSince Emeline is gone.AMELIA.Mamma, now see I am not cross;Come, Fanny, let us play!And you shall have my waxen doll,And keep it every day.THE FIRST THEFT.MOTHER.EDWARD, come here, how pale you are!What makes you look so wild?And you've been crying sadly, too!What's happened to my child ?EDWARD.You know, mamma, you sent me downTo Mr. Brightman's shop,With ninepence in my hand to buyA little humming-top.


WEE-WEE SONGS. 69"Well, Mr. Brightman handed downA dozen tops or more,That I might take my choice of one,Then stepped towards the door.And so I caught one slily up,And in my pocket hid it,No one could e'er suspect the thing,So cunningly I did it.Then I took out another top,And laid my ninepence down,Laughing to think I owned them both,But paid for only one.But, when I turned and left the shop,I felt most dreadfully;For all the while I was afraidThat he would follow me.Oh sure, thought I, he 'll find it out,The angry man will come,And I shall never see mamma,And never more go home.They 'll tie a rope about my neck,They 'll hang me up on high,And leave the little, wicked thiefTo hang there till he die.


70 WEE-WEE SONGS.Away I ran, in this sad fright,Fast down the nearest lane;And then I stopped and looked behind,Then screamed, and ran again.Trembling, at last I reached my home,And straight I went to bed,-But, oh! in such a shocking 'plightThat I was almost dead.No rest nor comfort could I take,And not a wink of sleep;All I could do was toss and turnFrom side to side and weep.But what was worst of all, mamma,I could not say my-prayers;And then I thought my heart would burst,For I was drowned in tears.For sure, I cried, God will not hearA child so wicked pray;I dare not hope he 'll let me liveTo see another day.Thus did I weep fill morning dawned,And yet found no relief)For, oh t what comfort can there beFor such a wicked thief ?


WEE-WEE SONGS.MOTHER.Go, my poor, wretched, guilty child,Go, take the top you stoleAnd give it to the man you wronged,And own to him the whole.Then, on your knees before your God,Confess how vile you've been;Beg him to pardon and forgiveThis great and dreadful sin.And never while you live, againTo such a deed consent,Lest God should take away your lifeBefore you could repent.DOLLY'S NAME.MY Dolly's name,-What shall it be ?I want a pretty one,Let's see;-There 's Bessie, Jessie,Bell, and Nell;Well, I thinkI '11 call her Bell!


Oct.-----7--17S=------=- -----eg -- ----- --- ----


WEE-WEE SONGS. iTCOOKING?' IN OLD TIMES.No little girl or boy hath guessedThe process or the artBy which the early Indians dressedAnd cut their meat apart;Since neither knife, nor spoon, nor fork,Had they to aid them in their work.A piece of flint or sharpened shell,The place of knife supplied,And answered every purpose well,To free it from the hide, -To clear the entrails, scrape the hair,And make the carcass clean and fair.Then in the earth a pit was made,To hold the fish or game,There, stones at sides and bottom laid,An oven it became;No better did their wants require,And here they lighted up a fire.From this, when gained sufficient heat,The glowing coals were dug,And here the squaw laid in her meat,With leaves encompassed snug;With heated stones 't was covered upTill time to breakfast, dine, or sup.


74 WEE-WEE SONGS.And how, without a pot to boil,Was taught by Indian wit;A stone was sought, and mighty toilA hollow made in it;And water got its warmth alone,From heated pebbles in it thrown.Then other pebbles, burning hot,Kept up the boiling heat,Arid in this strangely-fashioned potWas placed the hunter's meat;Not over nice, but then, I 'm sure,The Indian was no epicure.Fresh fish, well broiled on embers red,The Indians often saw;And shell-fish, from their rocky bed,Were eaten roast or raw.Thus the Good Spirit kindly gaveHis bounteous store to Indian brave.SUCCOTASH.THOUGH many viands Indians prized--If served to people civilized,Would cause disdainful smile;Yet one nice dish of times by-gone,The succotash, or beans and corn,When cooked in Indian style,


WEE-WEE SONGS.To some, is thought a greater treatThan all the choicest joints of meatAn epicure might choose;Poultry and game may both aboundWhere this delicious dish is found,I would all else refuse.Give me no fish, nor barbecue;Pate-de-fois, and oysters, too,Salads and sauces rich,May tempt an epicure to roam,But I had rather dine at home,On this, my favorite dish.In early days, the bell would sound,Then olive plants would gather round,As fast as they were able,As soon as beans and corn were seenWithin the goodly-sized tureen,In centre of the table.We oft recall those happy times,'Mid varied scenes, in distant climes,And memory lingers round,And brings to our enraptured viewThat blessed home the garden, too,Where beans and corn abound.


76 WEE-WEE SONGS.And beans and corn do still abound,And succotash is often foundWithin our early home;With grateful hearts to God above,We often gather there in loveToo soon again to roam." ."- =-'-, v -,n? .,. ,'Tis twilight, and the glorious sunHath left his place on high;And evening shadows have begunTo steal along the sky.


WEE-WEE SONGS. 77The swallow leaves the fields of air,The busy bee the flower;And farmers hasten home to shareThe quiet of the hour.Tho' small in size, the cricket triesHis voice so shrill and strong,And many a frog, from pond and bog,Sends forth its croaking song.Now we will call the children dearTo rest their wearied limbs,And, as the time for bed draws near,We 'll hear their evening hymns.And then, Aunt Avis must not failTo bring her stock of verse,For in sweet rhyme a pleasant taleShe can for us rehearse.And often, at the close of day,We 'll think of this kind friend,And ask for some instructive lay,Which she has sweetly penned.How pleasant it seemsTo hear mamma say,You've been very good,My darling, to-day.7.


78 WEE-WEE SONGS.WONDERFUL INSTINCT OF THE ANT.WE visit an ant-hill, dear children, to-day.Come, witness the instinct these creaturesdisplay;"Consider their ways and be wise; "Thus spoke a wise king, in the Proverbs, youknow,And though we 're no sluggards, I think if wego"We 'll find a rich feast for our eyes.One square foot of earth, though to us verysmall,To the ant is a kingdom. Each house has ahall,With chambers and passages lined;And thousands of homes in one square foot ofground,With swarms of these insects are frequentlyfound,And such a one now we will find.The ants' mode of building we first willexplain -The earth being moistened with dew or withrain,Large swarms of these insects will meet;


WEE-W-EE SONGS. 79Each one takes a grain that you scarcely couldsee,And kneads it and moulds it as nice as can be,Then pats it down smooth with its feet.These diligent builders thus work at theirtrade,Till hundreds and thousands of houses aremadeBeneath all these little mud balls;In these tiny ant-hills we see above groundSmall buildings of full twenty stories are found,Supported by pillars and walls.What wonderful instinct these creatures displayIn the care of their young on a damp rainy day,As they run from one room to another!And up stairs and down stairs they hastenagain,As each little ant, to be kept from the rain,Must be carried up stairs by its mother.When the clouds are dispersed, again theymust run,These delicate ants could not bear the hot sun;And their mothers immediately goTo move their dear children a few stories lower,


80 WEE-WEE SO-NGS.And find them a room upon the ground floor,And give them their supper below.Who teaches the ant her food to prepare,And store it in cells with such diligent care,That she all their wants may supply ?'T is God, my dear child; he provides for themall,And each little insect, though ever so small,Is still in the reach of his eye.The same tender parent who watches o'er you,Has guided the ant the whole summer through,And taught her her food to prepare;And when wintry frosts have quite covered theground,The ant with her family safely is found,Still guarded and kept by his care.LITTLE EDDIE.THE roving eye might vainly seekA fairer to behold,Than little Eddie's rosy cheek,When he was eight years old.And those who love a merry glance,No brighter eye had seen,


WEE-WEE SONGS. 81Nor lighter limb to skip and dance,In meadow or in green.But Edward's charms of better kind,With more delight I praise,For sweet and gentle was his mind,And pleasant all his ways.No angry passions, fierce and wild,No evil thought or plan,Had place in this beloved child,Throughout his little span.In health and strength he grew, till cameHis ninth revolving year,Then sickness seized his little frame,And suffering most severe.For many a month upon his bed,His feverish hands were laid,Nor could he raise his aching headWithout.his mother's aid.Yet patient lay the little boy,And no repining word,Or fretful wish for other's joy,From Edward's lip was heard.


82- WEE-WEE SONGS.Though gentle summer came and strewedFresh beauties o'er the earth,He went not to the field or woodTo share his playmates' mirth.Though winter, from the frozen north,Brought ice and snow along,Yet little Edward went not forthTo join the merry throng.The rose departed from his cheek,The brightness from his eye,And then his spirit fled to seekIts Father in the sky;Who, in his love, from pain and strifeSuch little ones doth take,And give them endless light and life,For our Redeemer's sake.His body to the earth was given,And rests beneath the sod,But Eddie's spirit went to heaven,To join in praising God.Long will his many friends approveHis manners, sweet and mild,And tell his innocence and loveTo many a listening child.


WEE-WEE SONGS. 83His mother's heart the sad, the sweetRemembrance doth employ,And full her trust in heaven to meetHer blessed little boy.AN emblem of faithfulnessHere you behold,As Fido is carefullyGuarding the gold.How eager he watchesFor danger around;So, true to your trust,May you ever be found!I fillEn!


84 WEE-WEE SONGS.LITTLE MARY AND' HER WICKEDFATHER." WHAT shall I do ? What shall I do ?" thewicked father said,As in agony of spirit he rose up from his bed,And earnestly entreated his wife to kneel andpray;Alas! dear Mary's mother had ne'er beentaught the way." I cannot pray, dear husband," the tremblingwife replied."Oh, then, what can I do?" in bitterness hecried."Perhaps," she said, "our Mary has learnedto say her prayers,She seems so good and holy." He hastenedup the stairsWhere slept that young disciple, a child ofseven years;Her father gently woke her, then, bursting intotears,He said, c"0, can you pray, my child; hasJesus taught you how ?And will you try to pray for your poor father,now ?


WEE-WEE SONGS. 85She knelt, put up her little hands, "OurFather up in heaven,"She sweetly said, "for Jesus' sake, let fatherbe forgiven;Have mercy, blessed Savior, wash all his sinsaway,And send thy Holy Spirit to teach him how topray."That father rose in penitence, sweet thoughtswithin him stirred,A yearning, warm desire to hear rov. God'sown WordThose precious truths she thus had lispedf inaccents sweet and mild;He placed the Bible in her hand; " Take thisand read my child."She read the holy Book, and, at that midnighthour,God sent his blessed Spirit to seal it homewith power;Those sweet words of the loving John, that"' all who look may live," *He heard, and said, "Dear Mary, can Jesusnow forgive ?"* John iii : 14, 15.a


86 WEE-WEE SONGS." Oh listen, father! 'God so loved,' he senthis only Son,And all who now believe on that dear, blessedOne,The Lamb of God, shall never die, shall havetheir sins forgiven,And he will take them home at last, to dwellwith him in heaven.""That is for me!" he cried; "for sinners justlike me;I will look up to Jesus now, Savior, I cometo thee;I hear those blessed words, 'Come unto meand live;'I can believe, I do believe! Dear Jesus nowforgive."Yes, look to Christ, believing one, he whispersnow you may.He heard, and went, from that glad hour,rejoicing on his way.t*,C,, I^b^^,tFpA^^^^^^^%1100I~,~z~-~ctS~,~3s~*^


WEE-WEE SONGS. 87SALLIE M--I KNEW a lass, but quite too longWas her whole name to weave in song,But, lest a change she should condemn,"We '11 only call her Sarah M---.Now, from her youth, this damsel's mindWas most industriously inclined ;No little girl could sew, or hem,Or stitch, or mend, like Sarah M--.Her father had not wealth to spare,And many children claimed his care,So little Sarah early learned,That her own living must be earned.Yet no complaining Sallie made,Tht she must work while others played,


88 WEE-WEE SONGS.But set about with right good will,The task her fingers should fulfil.Though aching head and weary sightWere sometimes hers, her heart was light,And equal was her well-earned store,For clothes to wear, and even more.Thus, while from day to day she drewHer ready needle through and through,She gained far more than worldly pelf,She learned to commune with herself.And this communion, deep and still,Soon led her heart to know its ill,And ask her Maker to impart,For. Jesus' sake, a holy heart.Now, had she spent in early days,Her time in idleness and plays,At work repining, sought her joysWith careless girls and idle boys -Her after years had never knownThe independence now her own;Perhaps those wasted hours had evenDispelled the thoughts which turned toheaven.


WEE-WEE SONGS. 89But care and industry are found,With heaven and earth's best blessingcrown'dAnd those who truly value them,Should early do like Sarah M--.THE PROUD GIRL.JANE.WHAT makes you wear that muslin dress,And such a strong, coarse leather shoe,With cotton stockings, cambric gloves,And such a coarse straw bonnet, too ?See here! my shoes are real kid;Just look at them- see how they shine;My stocking 's silk, my bonnet 's new,And only see the straw, how fine!Why, I should fret myself to death,If I were dressed as mean as you;I always cry and tease mammaFor everything I see that 's new.MARY.What! cry and tease your dear mammaFor finery ? That would not I;8*


90 WEE-WEE SONGS.I would not grieve her for the world,And she would grieve to see me cry.She gives me everything she can,And that is everything I want;And I should be a wicked child,To ask for more than she could grant.But, Jane, from what you say yourself,You're never happy, and your prideIs such, that, with this finery,You never are quite satisfied.JANE.But what if there should be a ball,And you should have a chance to go,Where every one is richly dressed,Would you appear among them so?MARY.A ball! I never went to one;I do not care for scenes so gay;But with the birds ard trees and flowers,I can be happy any day.When dear papa comes home at night,"I'm joyous as a little bird,For, after tea, he always tellsSomething amusing he has heard.


WEE-WEE SONGS. 91You ought to see our pleasant home,Dear Jennie, then you would not say,That I, from this dear, happy group,Could often wish to be away.Sometimes, he brings us home a book,Then, after supper, down we sit,He reads to us, while dear mammaTakes out her work to sew or knit.Then he will read some wondrous tale,How mighty nations rose and fell,And sometimes lay aside the book,And some amusing story tell.


92 WEE-WEE. SONGS.How some have climbed the highest hill,And yet have murmur'd all the way,While others walk along the vale,As pleasant as a summer's day."My children," he will often say," You know I cannot give you wealth;But you have riches dearer far,And these are innocence and health."While thus you live in peace and love,Contented with the blessings given,And grateful to your God, I trustHe '11 fit you for the joys of heaven."Then, ere we go to bed at night,We kneel together while he praysThat God would fill our hearts with love,And help us serve him all our days.But see! while I stand talking here,The cars are in papa has come!Now you may go and dance at balls,But I'11 enjoy myself at home.~I^H^^^^^^^-S^ ni B In nnJ^WPPI^ i g ~ I ftIJ ff9


WEE-WEE SONGS. 93WILLIE'S FEARS.PART I.WILLIE was nicely tucked in bedOne cold December night,When he began to scream " Mamma,Come quick, and bring a light!"Oh, I 'm so frightened, dear mamma;What is that noise ? Do hark!Please do not take the candle offAnd leave me in the dark,""I hear no noise," his mother said;"' What makes my boy so silly ?And what good can the candle do,My darling little Willie?" Who did you ask to care for you,When you knelt down to pray,Before I put you into bed,And took the light away?' Remember, love, you prayed to God,And all the long night through,He will keep watch around your bed,And take good care of you.


94 WEE-WEE SONGS."What could it be, my little son,That gave you such a fright?When you are safe in bed, you know,I always take the light.""I know you do, but Biddie toldA story yesterdayThat frightened me; please, dear mammaDon't take the light away."",I '11 leave the light with you to-night;Since Biddie was so silly;Now think, my dear, your Father's near,To guard his little Willie."WILLIE'S FEARS.PART II.MOTHER.COME, Willie, and tell me, my dear,What made you so foolish, last night;I am waiting this morning to hearThe cause of your terrible fright.WILLIE.Biddie said that a wolf would come outAnd catch me if I was not good;That is what I was thinking aboutWhen I screamed just as loud as I could.


WEE-WEE SONGS. 95MOTHER.And where would a wolf come from, pray;Biddy could not find one, should she try.'T was a wicked thing for her to say,--She knew she was telling a lie.Examine your chamber, my dear;Look carefully round before night,And if you can find a wolf here,I will certainly leave you a light.WILLIE.Mamma, you are laughing at me,There 's no wolf anywhere to be found;I know there is nothing to seeIf I take all the day to look round.MOTHER.Then I hope you will not be afraid;Now tell me, my son, if you 're able,Of what mamma's candles are made,You see one stand there on the table.WILLIE.Of tallow and cotton, mamma;The candles are run in a mould.I went up one day with papaTo the factory where they are sold.


96 WEE-WEE SONGS.MOTHER.Can tallow and cotton, my son,Protect you from harm thro' the night,When into a mould it is run,And made in a candle to light?WILLIE.The candle could not see or hear,And I'11 try to remember to-night,That God my kind Father is near,Then, mamma, I'll not ask for a light." CREATE IN ME A CLEAN HEART,0 GOD!"SAVIOR, keep me near thy side,Take my hand within thine own,I would be thy little child,Leave me not to walk alone."^ Suffer little ones to come,"Thou didst say, when here on earth;Let my feet no longer roam,I would know thy heavenly birth.Take my wicked heart away,Make me holy like thy Son;Leave me not from thee to stray,Leave me not to walk alone.


WEE-WEE SONGS. 97lkTHE HELEN MARIA.WITH sails all setTo catch the breeze,This noble shipNow ploughs the seas.May God in safetyKindly keepOur loved ones whileUpon the deep!THE YOUTHFUL KING.How much God's holy Book was prizedBy King Josiah in his youth!At eight years old his reign began,When no one served the Lord in truth.9


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