The parents' cabinet of amusement and instruction

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Material Information

Title:
The parents' cabinet of amusement and instruction
Physical Description:
p. 131-256, 2 leaves of plates : ill. (some col.), maps, charts ; 17 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Linton, W. J ( William James ), 1812-1897 ( Engraver )
Smith, Elder, and Co
Publisher:
Smith, Elder, & Co.
Place of Publication:
London
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Natural history -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Geography -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1872   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1872   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1872
Genre:
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London

Notes

General Note:
Volume designation taken from foot of p. 131.
General Note:
Date from inscription.
General Note:
Title page engraved by W.J. Linton and frontispiece printed in colors by publisher.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002235427
notis - ALH5872
oclc - 58525925
System ID:
UF00026278:00001

Full Text
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CONTENTS.PAGEPASSE-TOUT : OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK 133GEOGRAPHY .. 202UNCLE JOHN AT THE CAPE OF GOOD HOPE *. 211GEORGE HART 231ELECTRICAL EELS 250THE CATERPILLAR AND BUTTERFLY 256I. 5-2 131


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THE PARENTS' CABINETOFAMIUSEMENT AND INSTRUCTION,PASSE- TOUT:On,THE NEW FISHING SMACK.ONE fine morning, in the village of Dive in Nor-mandy, a large crowd of people were gathered on thesea beach round a new fishing boat. The bells ofthe village church were ringing merry peals, andmany people were still coming out at the churchdoor. It was not Sunday, but there had been ashort service this morning previous to the ceremonyof blessing the new boat, which the village priest wasabout to perform. All the people as they issuedfrom the church porch directed their steps towardsthe groups on the beach.On a bench, before the door of a poor cottagehard by, a fisherman, by name Fran9ois Grandet, wasII. 133


THE PARENTS' CABINET.seated drinking cider. He was the owner of the newsmack, round which everybody was collected waitingfor the priest. Near him was his wife Catharine,dressed in her best, and looking very nice in herclean white cap, dark blue petticoat, and colouredcotton jacket. In the doorway, almost afraid tomove, lest she should spoil her pretty new frock,was her daughter, Therence, a little girl of aboutnine years old: and inside the cottage, rolling on thetable, with his legs dangling in the air, was heryoungest son Hector, a boy of about eleven. He wasnot half so careful as his sister, and had alreadymanaged to get two or three spots of mud on hisclean blouse. He was quite tired of waiting; andnot being allowed to have his sister to play withfor fear of spoiling her frock, sat there kicking hislegs about and yawning to the utmost limits of hismouth. In Normandy these fine names, which seemso strange to us, are very common-as common asDick, Tom, Mary, or Jane are here. They were allwaiting for the priest of the village to come and nameand bless the little boat before it was launched, andHector and Therence were to be the godfatherand godmother, and to give the boat the name.The fishermen on this coast would never think ofputting to sea in a boat that had not been namedand blessed by the priest; they would expect to goto the bottom in their first voyage. In the front134


PASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK.part of the boat Therence had already nailed up alittle crucifix, in order to assure her father from allharm.Meanwhile Therence began to think the priest wasnever coming out of the church; she was very nearlyas tired of waiting as her brother. He was yawningand grumbling, for he was very anxious to see theboat really launched. The tide was now just on theturn; when it was fully in, the little boat was to belaunched for the first time, and to make its firstvoyage after herrings and mackerel." I say, Therence," said Hector, suddenly swinginghimself off the table, and coming out into the porch, toher, "Father has promised to take me out with himto-day in the new boat! Won't that be jolly Butwhat, after all, do you think we had best call her ? "" Shan't we call her after mother?" said Thdrence."C atharine? That's a woman's name; can't youthink of any other name, Therence ?" said Hector." I should like her to be called Dreadnought, orsomething like that."Therence laughed. "Nothing will satisfy you,Hector; I have proposed such a lot of names, andyou don't approve of any. For the last week youhave altered her name every day. You know wellenough what I want to call her.""What? " said Hector."c Why, Mopse, after your dear doggie."135


THE PARENTS' CABINET." Oh, that's great nonsense. What's a dog to dowith a ship ?"" Well," cried Thdrence, "here comes M. Saulesat last, so unless you are quick you will have to callher Catharine after all. But I know mother doesnot want the boat called after her. I can't see whyshe should not be called Mopse.""' Come, children," cried Frangois Grandet, gettingup from his seat, "'we must not keep M. Sauleswaiting. Come along." There was no more time nowto discuss the name; the two children were obligedto follow their mother and father, who, with all therest of the villagers, now moved down to the beach.The little godfather and godmother took up theirposition on each side of the stern of the boat, whiletheir father and mother stood at some little distance.Hector and Therence looked at one another; theywere still undecided what to call the boat. AfterM. Saules had walked all round the boat, scatteringsalt and wheat over it, and had come back againopposite the stern, he read a short Latin prayer, andthen he chanted a hymn in which all the people oneach side joined. When they had done he turned toHector and said, " What is her name to be ?"Hector, so bold on the sea and so talkative athome, now looked across at Th6rence, stammered,and grew red."' Passe-tout,' please, sir," said Therence suddenly,136


PASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK.and blushing very much. Will that do, Hector?"she whispered in his ear. "I could not think ofanything else except Catharine or Mopse, and youdid not like them."" Oh, yes; that does splendidly. That is exactlythe sort of name I wanted. I mean that it shall bebefore all."" And you commander-in-chief, of course ?" askedhis sister, mischievously." Yes, Th6rence. If father only would let me. Oh,I wish I were not a child. If I only had the strengthof a man, would not I do a number of things. I-would "But Therence had turned aside to look after theprocession of people, who were following the priestup the village, singing hymns. Dive is almost toosmall even to be called a village, being entirely com-posed of a few scattered fishers' huts, from the centreof which rises the little white spire of the church.Everything, however, looked bright and pleasant thisday, in spite of the poverty and dirt of the huts.The sky was bright and blue; and the sea so calmthat the waves seemed scarcely bigger than theripples on a pond. The voices of the people singingalso sounded very pretty, as they walked alongthrough the village, the sounds getting fainter andfainter till they died away altogether.Hector was for going along the ground to dabble137


THE PARENTS' CABINET.in the water with his dog, now that the ceremonywas over and the people gone, but Therence felt amuch stronger desire to run after the priest and thepeople, so she began to sing at the top of her voiceand ran off leaving her brother to follow if he liked.As it is not amusing to play all alone, Hector soon"went after his sister, his dog Mopse running fromside to side after stones and sticks that his masterthrew for him to pick up.Everybody said that Hector would one day bea very good sailor. He was very fond of the sea,and never seemed happy when he was away from it.When Fran9ois Grandet would not let him go outwith him to fish, which sometimes happened whenthe sea was stormy, poor Hector was always quitemiserable; even Therence could not console him.On these occasions he felt just like a dog that is tiedup to prevent it following its master.At these times, his dog Mopse was the onlyresource he had, for Therence was now alwaysoccupied making lace.He ought to have been sent to school, for he couldnot read and write, but his parents said they couldnot afford it any longer. The year before bothTherence and he had been to school. One went oneday, and one the next, so that they each had threedays schooling a week.It is the habit of the people about this place, who138


PASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK.cannot afford to pay for more than one child'sschooling at a time, to divide it through the family,sending one child one day and another the next, sothat the whole family should gain a little instruction,and at the same time only one child should be atschool at a time.This way they do not learn much. NeitherTherence nor Hector could write. Therence, whohad paid more attention than Hector, could reada little, but he could not even do that.The greatest desire he had, was to be a great sailorand fisherman. He used to dream of catching morefish than anybody on the coast, and to be called,as his father had formerly been called, " Risque tout,"which means " Dare all."As for Therence, her principal desire was to beable to earn seven pence a day making lace. Thisis the chief occupation of the women here-theyall make lace. Therence was very industrious; andsometimes now, when she worked very hard, shecould earn fourpence.This day was, of course, a grand holiday for her.Both the children had been looking forward to itfor a very long time. Meanwhile Catharine Grandet,instead of joining in the procession, had gone hometo look after the dinner; for Francois had invitedall his friends and relations to dine with him after theceremony of blessing the new boat.139


THE PARENTS' CABINET.This dinner was composed chiefly of fish and blackbread, not very nicely cooked, but which Thdrenceand Hector found delicious. The cottage was fullto overflowing and very noisy, as these poor fisherpeople, having no one to leave in charge of theiryoung children, were obliged to bring them, babiesand all, with them.Such an assembly of young folks soon made toomuch noise for the elders, and consequently- theywere all turned out to play on the beach.Poor Therence, very much embarrassed with hernew frock, and quite afraid to play lest the othersshould tear it, speedily retired, and having beenforbidden by her mother to take it off, went andsat down quietly in a corner of the room, feelingvery dull, and more inclined to cry than do any-thing, as she looked out of window and saw Hectorand her cousin playing away in high glee.Inside there was a great deal of eating and drink-ing, and laughing and talking; all seemed to beenjoying themselves thoroughly, with the exceptionof one man, who sat at the end of the table nearFrancois Grandet, looking very grand. This wasCatharine Grandet's brother, Conscience Malais.He had come that morning all the way from Honfleurwith his wife and children, on purpose to be presentat the blessing of the boat. Frangois was payinghim the greatest attention and pressing him to eat140


PASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK.and drink. But Conscience seemed to have to makean effort before he could find anything to say." Where is my nephew, dear ?" at last Consciencesaid. "I do not see him here to-day ? "" No," said Frangois, "lie was obliged to go overto Honfleur this morning to sell fish; we poor peoplecannot all afford to be idle at once, you know. It's apity, though You have not seen him for a long time.I should have liked you to see him; he has grownquite a fine young fellow. But he never will besuch a good sailor as Hector; he does not like thesea."" That's a pity, as it must be his business," repliedConscience.Leon was Francois' eldest son, a young man abouttwenty years old. He had gone to sea to help hisfather, otherwise he would have much preferred tobe a land labourer. As he grew older, he felt verymuch being obliged to give his father all his earnings.He thought he should like one day to have a home ofhis own ; but yet when he saw the distress they weresometimes in at home, he thought it was his duty todo all he could to increase the comfort of the family.All these reflections made him grow very grave,and feel sometimes a little disappointed.It was thoughts like these, also, that made Con-science Malais now sit so silent and so thoughtful.He was thinking how much all this dinner of fish141


THEI PARENTS' CABINET.and meat must have cost Fran9ois, and how ill hecould afford it. He thought Therence would havelooked much nicer in her ordinary clean Sundayfrock, than in that expensive cotton in which thepoor child was afraid to move. Why, even for thebuilding of the new fishing smack, Frangois had beenobliged to go into debt, and had borrowed nearlytwenty pounds from his brother-in-law Conscience.Conscience thought how Franqois was ever goingto pay this !When they were young, Conscience and Franqoiswere equally poor, but Conscience had always beencareful and saving, for which some of his friends hadcalled him stingy and mean, but he had managedto send all his children to school, and had eventaught himself to read and write.When he had got together a few savings he hadleft Dive and gone to Honfleur, where he was nowthe owner of two or three large smacks, while hiswife Dorothee kept a little shop.Frangois had also been industrious, and a verybrave seaman too, but he was thoughtless. He usedto say life was not worth having if you did notenjoy it. Where was the use of screwing yourselfdown like Conscience, when from one day to anotheryou might be drowned? As to his children, he saidhe had got on very well, why should they want toknow more than he did ? They would turn out all142


PASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK.right, he had no doubt, and be quite as good afterall, as their cousins, over whom such a fuss wasmade.Nevertheless he was very glad to be able toborrow 201. of Conscience, to build a new boat withwhen the old one was worn out and unseaworthy.Yet he knew the boat would some time or anotherwear out, and that, if he lived, he would wantanother. But he was growing an old man now; andnot having got while young the habit of saving,he could not now deny himself.Therence was very pretty; he liked to see her looksmart. He used to say, it was all very well for theMalais to be dressed so plainly, because they none ofthem had any good looks to boast of. And as forHector, there was not such another boy in all France.Leon was too grave and gentle by nature to bea very great favourite with his father, but Catharinewas very fond of him; indeed, it is hard to say whichof all three she loved best.When the dinner was over, the men all wentoutside to sit on benches and barrels before thedoor, to drink cider and smoke, while the womenemployed themselves in collecting their variouschildren previous to going home.Poor Therence, tired and a little peevish withdoing nothing, went to take off her weary finery,and ran out to join Hector.


THE PARENTS' CABINET.She found him in an equal state of distress.During the last hour or two the sky had becomecovered by light, windy-looking clouds, that sailorscall "mare's tails," and the morning breeze was nowquite a strong gale. Leon had come home abouthalf an hour ago, and Francois, seeing the sea waslikely to be stormy, had just said he could not takeHector out with them.Hector had set his heart on making this firstvoyage in the boat. But Francois was firm, andsaid, " he could not be bothered with a little childlike him; that if it came on to be stormy, as heexpected, Hector would only be in the way, andthat he must stay at home with his mother andTherence."The only person who rejoiced at this arrangementwas Catharine, who could not bear to think of soyoung a boy as Hector being exposed to all thedangers of the sea."But you promised me, father Oh, what ashame!" roared out the boy, with tears in his eyes,as he saw them positively preparing to shove theboat off.Leon looked as if he would willingly have re-linquished his place to his brother, but said nothing.His father, however, called out angrily:" If you don't hold your tongue, you shall nevergo out with me again."144


PASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK.Therence took her brother by the arm; her owndisappointment was now quite forgotten in that ofher brother."Come along, Hector," said she, "it can't behelped, you know; never mind, father will take youout another day. The sky does look very stormy."" What's that to me ? It's all the better fun.I say it is a great, big shame; father promised me.""But you know he never takes you out in badweather: mother does not like it."" Why does not she like it, I should like to know ?It's all very well for you women to stay at home;I 'm a man, I am."" Now, don't talk nonsense, Hector; just think ifanything happened to father what would motherdo? And suppose you all three were out at oncein a storm, only think how dreadful it would be.For, after all, it is very dangerous, you know."" I suppose you are right, Therence, but it's veryhard. You don't know how much I have beenlonging to go in 'Passe-tout' on her first voyage.And here is poor Mopse wanting to go too. Didnot you, poor old fellow?" he said, stooping downto pat and caress a large water-spaniel that camebounding up to him licking his face and hands." Poor Mopse! he wants his supper," said Therence;"and come, Hector, we ought to go help motherto put things straight."145


THE PARENTS' CABINET." Oh, wait a minute, wait till Passe-tout' is out ofsight. See how gallantly she goes before the wind!"The two children stood a few minutes lookingover the sea at the little dark speck which wasnow all that could be seen of their father's boat,and then turned silently away and walked slowlyhomewards.They were both quite tired out, although theyhad scarcely done anything all day. The unsatis-factory feeling of idleness, added to the disappoint-ments they had both had, had taken away all theirspirits.Thdrence helped her mother to put the cottage inorder, while Hector set to work to mend a heapof fishing nets. Then Catharine gave them somebroth for their supper and sent them to bed.The wind was howling, the rain beat against thewindows; it was a very wild night. Catharine her-self could not go to bed, she was too anxious afterher husband and son, out on that stormy sea. Shesat down to mend her husband's clothes, and everynow and then took a peep in to see if the childrenslept."What's the matter, mother dear?" asked The-rence, awakened by the sudden flash of light in hereyes from Catharine's candle."Nothing, dear. Have you been asleep?""That's not the wind that I hear, is it, mother ?"146


PASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK."Yes; it is, dear. It is a terrible night.""How lucky that father would not take Hector,is not it, mother ?"A violent clap of thunder at this instant seemedto break right over the cottage. Catharine sank onher knees in great terror, little Therence clingingto her with her arms around her mother's neck." Terrie dear, don't cry. We must have faith,"said Catharine, in a voice half stifled with suppressedtears. " A boat that has been so recently blessed,surely cannot go wrong. Let us pray for them."Catharine, quite worn out with fatigue and anxiety,was soothed by the presence of her two youngestchildren; and at last yielded, unknown to herself,to the influence, and fell asleep by Thdrence's sidewith the child's soft little arms round her neck.In the morning, when they awoke, the storm wasover, though the sea was still rough, and the sunshining brightly.Catharine and the twd children hurried downto the beach, where many families were alreadyassembled anxiously watching for the return of theboats.No sooner was the smallest speck discernible onthe horizon than each one began to wonder whoseboat that was." Oh, that is Jaques Pacomes'," said one; " Iknow it quite well."147


THE PAbENTS' CABINET."No; it is Pierre's. There is one I don't know.Mere Alain, whose is that boat to the eastwards ?"" Ah, it is 'Passe-tout,," cried Hector; " I am sureit is, Therence, I know her. I should know her athousand miles off."Catharine's heart beat fast, she scarcely daredhope it, her eyes were dim, she could not see.But the boat came nearer and nearer. At lastFraneois and Leon were to be seen on the deck. Onit came, before all the others, leaving a little whitetrail of foam behind it as it cut through the waves.In another instant it touched the beach. Now theyare pulling it up; and now Franiois is embracinghis wife and children once more.Very little fish had been caught that night, thestorm had been so violent. One boat had been lost,and the family that had assembled anxiously on thebeach to watch for the return of the father, nowwent away home in great distress.Everybody tried to show them some little kind-ness. One sent some fish for the children's dinner,another went to help their mother-poor Mbre Alain-for they were very poor.Little Therence begged her mother to let hertake some of the pennies she had earned makinglace to the poor people, and as Catharine consented,she ran off with her twopence, a very large presentfrom her. She felt very sad when she thought148


PASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK.how gay they had been a few hours before, and now,how changed everything was. She thought, if ithad been her father instead, that they would havebeen in an equal state of misery.These reflections made her feel very sorry forpoor Mere Alain, as she was called, and she stayedthere all day nursing the baby for her. Mere Alainhad a little baby, that could not yet walk. AsTherence was going home, she saw her brother Leonbusy cleaning the boat, and she went up to talk tohim of what her mind was now quite filled."Poor Mere Alain!" she said, "what can we do forher, Leon? Do you know, she says, she does notknow how ever she is to feed her children. Andthere is a poor little baby !"" Have you been there, Thdrence? I wouldhave gone too, but I could not, it made me feelso sad. I thought how nearly the same thing mighthave happened to us. I think Uncle Conscienceis right after all, in spite of what father says.We ought to save, and I am determined to do it."" But it is all very well for uncle," said Therence." He can afford to save, he is rich. Why, he hasthree boats of his own. How are we to save out ofso little ? ""Then, Therence, if we are too poor to save, weought not to spend as we did yesterday. Supposefather and I had been lost last night, how much149


THE PARENTS) CABINET,better it would have been for mother to have had"in her pocket all that we spent yesterday. Inthis way how are we to pay what we owe uncle ?""Mother says she thinks uncle might havegiven us that, as he is so rich," said Therence, "andI think so too !""But you must remember, Therence, uncle wasnot always so well off. Once he was as poor as weare. How is it that he is now so much better off?"" I am sure I don't know. But I should not likefather to be like uncle. He is so very close andstingy."" You do not know anything about him, Th6rence,or you would never say that. Do you call himmiserly, because he does not spend everythingdirectly he earns it, and puts by a little, so that incase of his death, my aunt would not be left utterlydestitute ?"" Why does father call him mean and stingy then?"asked Therence." Because he does not know him; and because hewill not save himself."" Father must know him much better than you do,Leon. I believe father is quite right. I do not liketo hear you speak so of him."Leon laughed, although in reality he felt vexed, andhe told Therence to go home and make lace, whichwas what she understood,15q


PASSE-TOUT: OR, TIE NEW FISHING SMACK.The sea was still so rough from the effects of thestorm that nobody dared venture on it for severaldays. The thunder-storm had quite broken up theweather. The mackerel fishing for that season wasspoiled.The constant storms in the succeeding fortnightoften altogether prevented their putting out to sea;and when they did, but few fish were to be caught.Lobster and crab fishing was quite out of thequestion, the sea was too rough to allow the lobsterbaskets to be put out; they would have been instantlywashed away.*There was no question of saving now in theGrandet family; they had barely enough to liveon. Therence had to work from morn till night ather lace, but work as hard as she would, she couldnot earn more than fourpence a day.What with cooking, washing and mending clothes,Catharine herself had but very little time for lace"* Lobsters are caughtin baskets something likethis, which are sunk outat sea by means of anumber of stones tied allround the bottom. Thelobster goes in at the holeat the top after a bait,and then cannot get outagain.151


THE PARENTS' CABINET.making. Frangois began to look very grave; all hishope now was in the herrings and whitings. If theyfailed he did not know how ever he was to pay hisdebt.The herrings of late years had been very plentifulon the coast,' but this year they proved to be exces-sively scarce. Some said it was the bad weatherthat had washed them away: some that they wereafraid to come on account of the number that hadbeen caught: everybody, however, was obliged toagree in saying, that fish of all kinds was veryscarce that year. Meanwhile winter came on,adding its cold to the many sufferings these poorpeople had to go through.With all Fran9ois' exertions he could only justearn sufficient to keep his own family.Leon thought often of the quantity of fish theyhad caught the spring before, and regretted thathis father had not then put something by, for thescarcity that must follow some time or other. For,said he to himself, it is perhaps only once in twoyears that we have such an abundance of fish aswe had then, at other times we have a scarcity,or only just enough to keep us. Surely we ought tosave out of that abundance, for the hard time thatwill come sooner or later.Hector Nwent out occasionally with his father;he had gained strength lately, and every day showed152


PASSE-TOUT: 0R, THE NEW FISHING SMACK.more courage and skill. Spring was now again closeat hand.The time had come when Conscience ought tobe repayed. In fact, it had more than come, forit was now more than seven months since #Francoishad borrowed it, and he had promised to repay itin six.They had entreated for another month. Francoishad been making great efforts to get the necessarysum of money together. Fish was still very scarce,however.Leon was sent out on fine days in the old boat,which they had managed to make pretty water-tight again, to take up the lobster baskets, whileFrancois and Hector went out to sea in Passe-tout.Meanwhile Conscience had already been over oncefor his money. He was in want of it he said. Hewanted to place his son as apprentice to a shipwrightat Havre, and could not without that 201. 12s. thatFrangois -owed him.Catharine was alone at home when he came. Shetold her brother that he was very hard. Thather husband had only borrowed 201., and that it wasvery unjust to insist on his paying all that more,when he could so ill afford it. Conscience said,that he had lent him the 201. at 5 per cent."I do not understand anything about your 5 percents.," said Catharine quite crossly; " all I know is153


THII PARENTS' CABINET.that they are very unjust, and that it is very hard ofyou, Conscience.""'Now, Catharine," said Conscience, "you knowthis is not the first time I have lent Francois money,and what difficulty I have had to get it back. If1 had kept it myself I should have employed itin boat-building, or in the wages of another seamanto help me. Either way it would have broughtme in more than what I have charged Francois forthe use of it. I cannot afford to lose it; I have stillthree children to place. I wish to be able to see mychildren happy and thriving before I die; at all eventsto be certain that they are saved from the acutesufferings of cold and hunger that their parents havehad to endure.Catharine was very angry; she thought this wasa reflection on her own family, and was quite relievedwhen her brother went away. They parted on bothsides with many angry feelings, and nearly a monthpassed before the Grandets heard anything more ofhim. Conscience, being pretty certain that theycould not pay him, did not take the trouble to comeover so far for nothing. Besides he could ill sparethe time for such an expedition.One day the sea was very stormy, although thesky was fine. Thdrence was sitting before the doormaking lace, while Catharine was preparing the soupfor dinner.154


PASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK.Hector and his father were out in the boat; andLeon, who had gone off early in the morning toHonfleur to sell some baskets of fish, had not yetreturned. Thdrence had been singing; she was verytired of working and looked rather pale, as if shewanted a little more exercise."Mother," she said, suddenly starting up and run-ning into the house, " I do believe, here comes UncleConscience; what shall we do ?"" Where?" said Catharine, coming to the doorwith her sleeves tucked over her elbows.She saw him, sure endugh, walking very rapidlyalong the road towards their cottage. She turnedinstantly to look over the sea; not a sail was to beseen.Therence's heart beat very fast. What shouldthey do if Conscience insisted on being paid? Sheknew her father had not more than a few shillings inthe cottage. She sat down again at her lace pillowtrembling all over, and began to work very fast."How do you do, Therence ?" said her Unclecoming up." Quite well, thank you," said Therence, lookingdown."CIs your father in ?"No; but mother is," answered she."He '11 be in at the turn of the tide, I suppose ?""Yes; I suppose he will," said Therence, very155


THE PATENTS' CABINET.coldly, for she guessed that her uncle had come afterhis money, and thought him very stern and cruelin insisting on being paid.Conscience went in and spoke to Catharine, andthen said he should sit down and wait for Francois,as he wanted to see him very particularly.He had determined not to say anything more toCatharine, but to wait until he could see Franqois.He therefore sat quietly down, and tried to talk toher on different subjects; but he looked so grave andsad that Catharine herself could not help asking himwhat was the matter."None of the children are ill, I hope, Conscience ?and Dorothee, she still continues better ?""6 Thank you," said Conscience " they are all quitewell--all except my poor wife; but, oh, Catharine,they have carried off Bernard, and if Francois can-not pay me, I do not know what we are to do.Dorothee is almost out of her mind."" What do you mean?" said Catharine." I mean that they have taken him to Cherbourg,and he will be sent off to the Baltic or Black Sea."" Good God!" cried Catharine, turning pale." And Leon--""They tell me men are very much wanted atCherbourg," continued poor Conscience, " I cannotget a substitute under 301. Bernard, poor fellow, issuch a good sailor."156


PASSE-TOUT: OR, T1H NEW FISHING SMACK.In France men are drawn for the army and navyby conscription, and they must go, even if they dislikeit, unless they can afford to pay some one to go in-stead. Of course for an able bodied young seaman,knowing his business well, it is more difficult to finda substitute than for an ordinary soldier.Therence, seated in the porch, had heard heruncle'swords. Frightened and puzzled, she now left offworking and leant forward, looking anxiously at hermother."Poor fellow," said Conscience, after a few minutes'silence, " he will not hear of my making any sacrificefor him; and, indeed, if Franqois cannot pay me, I donot know how I am to raise the money. The winterhas been very bad all along the coast. I have hadseveral losses besides my wife's long illness. All thisI have been able to meet without inconvenience, butwhat I can do now to save my poor son, indeed, I donot know."Catharine was quite terrified. She was very sorryfor her brother, but at the same time she was moreafraid for her own son. What if Leon should be.seized in the same manner! Involuntarily she turnedher eyes towards the road he would come, to see if hewere in sight.Thdrence scarcely understood what her unclemeant."But surely they," she said, laying great stress157


THE PARENTS' CABINET.on that mysterious they, "cannot take Bernard ifhe does not choose to go. What will they do tohim ?""It is the Government of France, Therence," saidher uncle, patting her head, "that wants men to fightthe Russians, and if he refused to go he would beshot.""And must he go if father cannot pay you, uncle?""I am afraid so.""Poor, poor Bernard; how I wish I could earnmore," said Thdrence, her eyes swimming with tears,for she knew only too well that her father had notthe ability to pay her uncle.Conscience got up, kissed Thdrence, and walkedout of the door to see if any boat was in sight. Hewas in great trouble and anxiety." Mother, what can we do?" said Thrence, as soonas her uncle was out of hearing. " Father cannotpay; can he ? "" Oh," said Catharine, not heeding her, " I shallnot be easy till Leon is home again. I wish Francoishad sent Hector instead.""' Why ? " asked Therence; "would not they takehim ?""No: he is too young."" But, mother, if we have been the cause of poorBernard's being taken away, what can we ever do foruncle ?"158


PASSE-TOUT: OR, THI1 NEW FISHING SMACK."Don't say a word about this, child, to your brotherwhen he comes home; do you hear?" said Catharine,quite sharply, without paying any attention to whatTherence was saying. "He 'll be wanting to go inBernard's place; I know he will."Therence stared at her mother in astonishment.She was quite frightened and puzzled. She satdown trembling to her lace pillow again, whileCatharine went out after her brother in muchagitation.As Therence sat there alone she began thinking ofwhat Leon had so often said, about the way theylived-how he regretted that money his father hadborrowed, how he had worked to help to repay it-all to no avail, as she knew only too well. Thenshe thought of her mother's words, " don't tell him,or he '11 want to go in Bernard's place." It wasdreadful to think that they were the cause of heruncle's distress. " Ought Leon to go ?," she asked her-self. But the thought of all the unknown dangersand hardships he would have to go through sofrightened her that she was afraid to answer thequestion. Unable to bear being left alone anylonger, she jumped up and ran out after her mother.The tide was in and the sea very rough. Severalfishing smacks were in sight, and rapidly approach-ing the shore. One of the foremost was "Passe-tout."159


TIE PARENTS' CABINET.Many people were already waiting on the beachwith baskets to help unload the boats. Passe-tout"was now so close in that Hector and his father couldeasily be distinguished. Near in-shore the breakerswere very large, and the little boat was tossed upand down with great violence.Just as they were nearing the shore, the boat gavea violent lurch, and Francois, who was lowering thesail, was suddenly pitched over the side into thewater.There was a great cry on the beach. It was amoment of breathless anxiety to Catharine. Fortu-nately Hector did not lose his presence of mind, buthe had as much as he could do to steer the boat clearof the, groins.It was impossible for him to render his father anyassistance. Francois was a good swimmer, andstruggled manfully against the waves. Two of themen on the beach made an effort to assist him, butwere both instantly knocked down by the first sea.Hector, as soon as he could, flung a rope out ofthe boat to his father. Francois caught at it; hewas quite exhausted, struggling against the forceof the waves with all his heavy clothes on.The boat was quite close in-shore and at the mercyof the breakers, which were very violent. Hectorwas at his wits' end, and evidently losing all hispresence of mind. Conscience saw there was160


PASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK.not another moment to be lost; and, stripping off hisjacket and boots, made a rush at the sea by the sideof the groin, stooped down, dived through the wave,just as it was about to break, and swam out to theboat.All this was the work of an instant. He clam-bered up the side of the boat and seized the helm,which Hector had not the force to hold, while theboy pulled in the rope his father was clinging to.In his haste and terror Hector did not see wherelie was drawing his father, who, pulled by the ropeand battered by the waves, was suddenly dashedagainst the groin.The boat at the same instant touching the shore,all hands ran forward to haul her up, while Con-science, without losing an instant, slipped down theside of the boat and seized hold of Franqois, just asa wave was about to hurl him again against the postsof the groin. Conscience struggled along the groinas well as he could, dragging Francois, who was quiteinsensible, after him.All this time Catharine and Thdrence were stand-ing motionless with terror on the beach, scarcelydaring to look at the scene of action, and yet unableto turn their eyes in another direction. The momentCatharine saw her husband fairly in Conscience'sstrong arms, she rushed down to the water's edgeto meet him, and seeing Conscience quite out ofII. 6 161


THE PARENTS' CABINET.breath, and scarcely able to support Francois anylonger, she tried to take her husband from herbrother's arms and to carry him herself."No, Catharine; you are not strong enough,"Conscience said, as soon as he could draw breath." Run home, and light the fire, and get Frangois'bed ready. He is stunned; we must put him tobed directly. Don't be frightened; he'll soon cometo."With the assistance of another man, Consciencecarried Francois up the beach to his cottage. Hectorand Therence followed after, carrying their uncle'sjacket and boots, that he had not stopped to put on.When they began to undress Frangois, Conscience,who was chafing his limbs trying to restore animation,found that the accident was more serious than hehad at first imagined, and that Francois' right armwas broken. Hector was sent off at once for thedoctor. Franqois all this time remained quiteunconscious. He had had a heavy blow on thehead.Catharine, at a loss what to do for him till thedoctor should arrive, forgot everything in her dis-tress and anxiety about her husband. Her brotherstood by, rubbing and slapping Francois' feet andhands to rouse him, in his dripping wet clothes.He was too busy to feel cold, or even wet, andCatharine never thought of offering him any162'


PASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK.dry clothes. She did not see till afterwards thathis clothes were wet, when she found a pool ofwater on the cottage floor, where he had been stand-ing. As for Therence, she had never seen any onein such a state before; she thought her father wasdead.It was only after three-quarters of an hour, thatFrangois began to recover his senses. The doctorcame and set his arm. Conscience stood by, holdingFrancois all the time, as the sight of the pain hewas suffering quite overcame poor Catharine. Whenthe operation was over, the doctor, M. Bouvier,gave him some stimulants to revive him, said hewould send him a soothing draught, and then left,desiring them to keep Francois very quiet, as hefeared it might prove very serious.Meantime the day had worn away and eveningwas now closing in. Everybody had been so muchoccupied that no one had observed how quickly thetime passed.Conscience, who had been doing all he possiblycould to assist Catharine, now began to think hemust go. His clothes had dried on him, and he feltstiff and cold.Franiois was at last quiet, they hoped asleep, andall was order again in the cottage. The childrenwere eating their supper; the others had no heartto eat anything. Catharine was sitting sadly, with6-2 163


THE PARENTS' CABINET.her head leaning on her hands, by her husband'sbedside.Conscience rose to go. After the misfortunes ofthe day, he scarcely liked to ask again for his money.He sighed heavily as he thought of his poor wife athome, and of Bernard's calm resignation." Sister," he said, at last, " it is seven o'clock. Imust be off. I have a long way to walk."Catharine got up; she looked very pale. "Good-bye, Conscience," she said. " You have saved myhusband's life to-day, and how I am ever to thank you,indeed, I do not know-or those poor childreneither.""Can Fran9ois pay me, Catharine? " said he, in alow voice.She shook her head, and burst into tears. Therewas an instant's silence, during which Catharine invain attempted to control herself: at last she said,making a violent effort, " Brother, I don't knowwhen ever we'shall be able to pay you. I will payyou a few pennies every week ; that will be the bestway. If we keep it in the house, it is sure to gosomehow; I don't know how, I'm sure! But youhave saved dear Francois' life, and we cannot, mustnot, let you lose your son through our means. Youcannot pay a substitute-take-take Leon instead !You have already paid for him," and she burst intotears, and covered her face with her apron.164


rASSE-TOUT: OR, TIE NEW FISHING SMACK.Hector, who knew nothing of what had passed,stared at his mother in great astonishment, andTherence began to cry.Conscience could not say another word, he wasso shocked and distressed. It seemed very dreadfulto him, that parents should go into debt, and beingunable to repay what they owe themselves, shouldturn to their children to pay it for them.Catharine, frightened at his silence and theexpression of his face, which was grave even tosternness, suddenly turned towards him, and takinghim by both hands, implored him, at any rate, notto turn them out of their cottage till Francois waswell. " We will sell every stock and stone then topay you, if you will but wait."" Catharine !" he replied, gravely, "what are youthinking of? I cannot accept your offer of Leon.See what a position you have placed us both in!If I insist on being paid now, I shall be the causeof Franqois's death; if I do not, I lose my onlyson-perhaps for ever." His voice faltered, but hewent on: "What has your son Leon had to dowith all this ? It is not just that he should sufferfrom his parents' thoughtlessness. Ah, had youlistened to my advice long ago, how much miserymight have been spared !"Catharine turned her head aside, his words affectedher deeply. She was in an agony of self-reproach.165


THE PARENTS' CABINET.To think that her brother, so unceasing in his kind-ness to them in spite of all they had done, to whomthey owed almost everything, even Franqois' life,should be brought into grief and misery by them !What an awful return for such kindness! Herthoughts were embittered also by the reflection,that all had not been done that might have beendone to pay off their debt. She rememberednumberless little things in which the resources ofthe family had been wasted. Franqois and she hadfirst trusted to the herrings to pay off Conscience;and when they had failed, Fran9ois had said, " Well,we must wait for the spring now; when that comeswe'll soon be all right, you'll see; besides, I knowConscience will wait; he does not want the money,you know."She closed her eyes and hid her face, that Con-science should not see her.But Conscience did not see her; his thoughts werefar away in his own desolate home, and he wasinternally bracing himself to meet this inevitablemisfortune as bravely as he could.Suddenly he felt Therence's little arms round hisneck, and the child's head sobbing on his shoulder.She had left her supper, and, unable to eat any more,had climbed up on the table."Dear uncle, can't we do anything? " she sobbedout.166


PASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK."No, nothing now, dear," he said, taking her inhis arms and kissing her, " it's too late. Don't cry,there's a good child. Go and help your mother."He wiped her eyes with his rough hand, kissed heragain, put her down on the ground, and biddingCatharine and Hector a hasty" Good-bye," he rushedout of the house. Bowed down as he was by hisown private sorrow, the sight of his sister's distresswas more than lie could bear any longer. He wouldstill, however, willingly have helped them, had itbeen possible. But how can you help people whowill not help themselves ? Advice, example, money,all was thrown away upon them. All he could donow was to pity them.Catharine scarcely noticed he had gone. To bitterrepentance for the past had succeeded the almostoverwhelming considerations of the future. Whatwas to become of them? She saw misery staringthem in the face. Who was to pay for Frangois'illness, and all the little comforts he oucght to have?To her brother, after all that had passed, and allthe misery they had brought upon him, she feltit was impossible to look for any assistance.How lonely and desolate she felt, as she sat watch-ing at the foot of Francois' bed, her head buried inher hands, the tears trickling silently down hercheeks.But she had too much to do, to be able to sit long167


THE PARiENTS' CABINET.lamenting over their hard fate. Franiois awoke;he was very feverish and restless, and she had asmuch as she could do to soothe and tend him.He was also in great pain, and although he didnot say much, she could see how he suffered fromthe expression of his face. She sat up all night withhim.As the hours of the night wore on, she beganonce more to think of Leon. He ought to havereturned at least by eight o'clock; it was now nearmidnight, and no Leon was yet to be seen." He must have been detained by something, andwill be back in time for the morning tide, I 've nodoubt," she said, half aloud, as if to convince herself.But, in reality, the fear that he had been seized andcarried off to Cherbourg was becoming every instantstronger.Towards morning, quite worn out with fatigue,she fell asleep and was awakened by Therence, whohad been out the first thing with Hector to unloadtheir father's boat, which had been forgotten in thehurry and confusion of the preceding day.Catharine, who had been dreaming of Leon, awokewith a start, and instantly exclaimed-"What's the matter? Therence, where's yourbrother ?"Therence, thinking she meant Hector, repliedquickly--168


rASSE-TOUT: OR, TIE NEW FISHING SMACK." Oh, down on the beach cleaning the boat."Catharine was quite relieved. With a more cheer-ful heart, she got up to light the fire and preparesome gruel for Frangois.Franqois was a little better; he had slept thelatter half of the night, and Catharine began to thinkall would soon be well with them again.She told Therence to tie up a few whitings, aspayment for the doctor when he came; and set towork to get the family breakfast ready. Hectorcame in shortly afterwards." Go and tell Leon to come in to breakfast,Hector," said she, as she put the saucepan of soupon the table."Very well; where is he, mother ?"" Down on the beach cleaning the boat.""No, indeed, he isn't. I have just come from hermyself," replied Hector." What did you mean by saying he was there,Thdrence ?" said her mother." I did not. I thought you meant Hector. I donot think Leon has come home yet.""Not home yet!" cried poor Catharine, turningpale. It was in vain she sat down to breakfast; shecould not touch a morsel, she was so anxious, butkept looking out of window in the direction he wouldcome."Meanwhile the tide was on the turn: the last169


TIIE PARENTS' CABINET.smack had just put off. Leon would at any rate betoo late to go out fishing to-day. What could he beabout?While she was looking out, up came M. Bouvier,the doctor. He came in, stayed a few minutes, saidFrancois was going on very well, recommendedCatharine to get him a softer mattress, to keep himwarm, and added that in a few days some winewould be very good for him, without thinkingwhether she had the means to procure them. Thenhe began talking of a subject everybody was full ofnow-the war with Russia.Fortunately for Catharine the doctor did not staylong talking. She could not hear the war mentionednow without shuddering.But the work of the day must be done: she mustbestir herself.Therence sat silently and sadly down in the door-way to work at her lace-making, while her motherwashed up, made the black bread, and attended toFranpois. Even Hector's spirits were damped. Hecame and sat down to net by his sister's side,and asked her all that had happened with his uncle.The day wore away, and no Leon appeared. Whenevening came Catharine began to be quite ill withanxiety. What would they do, thus suddenlydeprived of both the bread-winners of the family.Towards evening, came one of the fishermen, who170


PASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK.had been to Honfleur the day before. He was anold battered-looking man, who had been a very kindneighbour of theirs. He came in and sat down in theporch; and, after giving the children a few friendlypats, he said to Catharine, that he had seen Leon theday before at Honfleur; and then, putting his handinto his pocket, pulled out a dirty piece of paperon which a few words were scribbled in pencil.It was from Leon, who was the only one of thefamily who could write. It was instantly given toTherence, who after great trouble spelled out thefollowing words:"C DEAR MIOTHER,"Jaques Pacome will give you this, and tellyou all about me. Keep up your spirits and don'tfret about me. In the autumn I hope we shall allmeet again. Next week I am off to the Baltic onboard the Vigilant.'"Your affectionate son," LEON GRANDET."Old Jaques Pac6me told them that he had seenmore than half a dozen fine young men taken off theday before at Honfleur, for the " service," as he calledthe Navy.Therence had to read the letter over and overagain. Catharine, in spite of her fears, would notbelieve that her daughter read it right.171


THE PARENTS' CABINET.When the old fisherman had gone, she gave wayto all the despair she felt. How were they tolive ? The fishing season would pass without theirbeing able to make anything. The winter wouldcome.Nothing could keep them from the most abjectpoverty, and should Conscience again insist on beingpaid and turn them out of their cottage, which wasthe only way he ever could get his money, shedid not know what would become of them.She made a great effort, however, to overcomethis feeling of despair. She worked all day, scarcelyallowing herself time to sleep. Still, with her sickhusband to attend to, in addition to all the other workof the cottage, she had not much time for lace-making.Therence worked very hard, but the poor littlegirl could not earn much with all her endeavours.Hector got occasionally a few pence for helping tounload the boats when they returned. But Dive isso poor a place, that there was scarcely any one whocould give him any work.It was on Therence's earnings, then, chiefly thatthe family had to subsist. Occasional presents of fishwas all that their friends could afford to give them.Catharine had to sell many of the poor articles thecottage possessed to get food that her husband couldeat.Frangois himself, weak and depressed, did not172


PASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK.recover. For a long time the bone would not set,and they had to go to great expense to get foodand stimulants for him.Hector grew grave and sad. He often used totalk with Therence, as to what he could do!"Fish is now so plentiful. Oh, if I only had thestrength, I would catch such a lot! Mother isgetting quite ill, and we soon shall have nothingleft in the cottage. And you, Therrie, you do notknow how pale and thin you have grown, and I cando nothing-nothing. I am sure if father would letme have the boat, 1 could manage her. I am nowtwelve years old."" Do you really think you could manage the boat,Hector ?""Yes; I am quite sure of it.""Do you know, Hector, I am afraid mother hasbeen borrowing more money. Last week shepawned all her clothes but those she has on. Theday before yesterday I was getting on famously withthis piece of lace, for which I was to have sixshillings from Madame Giraud up at the Chateau;but yesterday I cut my finger, and although therewere only a few inches to do, I have not yet finishedit.""We shall have to sell the boat next," saidHector, gloomily. " Thdrence, if you are not afraid,and would come out with me, together, I am sure, we173


THE PARENTS' CABINET.should catch no end of fish. You would help me tospread the nets.""But father will never let you have the boat,I know," said Thdrence."Why should he know anything about it? iHewill be sure to forgive us, when he sees how- muchfish we bring home."It was now about a month since the accident, andFrancois, unable to do anything, was strolling aboutsadly, with his arm in a sling.The two children were sitting in the porch talkingin an under tone, which they ceased as their fatherdrew near. Therence had lost all her good looks,and was pale and thin from insufficient clothing, andstooping continually over her lace pillow.Francois stood looking at them a few minutes, andthen turned aside, sighing heavily." Should you be afraid to go ? " whispered Hector,as soon as his father had gone away."I afraid!" said Therence: "no; I was onlythinking whether it would be right.""What harm can there be? We shan't hurt theboat. We will only go if the sea is very calm.That is why I want you to make up your mindquickly. The sea is like a river to day, and it willbe high-water about half-past four or five. We canslip out after supper, nobody will miss us; and evensupposing we do not catch much, it will not be174


PASSE-TOUT : OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK.waste time, for you cannot work with that bad finger.See, it is going to gather !""What, and be out all night on the sea ?" saidThdrence, looking at her brother."Yes; there is no danger in the world. But youare afraid. You are a regular girl.""There you are out," cried Therence; "andthough I am a girl I believe I am as brave as youare, but I am not quite so strong."" Will you come, then?"" Yes. "" All right, then. I will go and make everythingready," and off ran Hector in high spirits.He waited in great impatience until the few menwho were on the beach had gone in for their after-noon meal, previous to putting out to sea, and thenhe set to work in the boat, arranging the fishingtackle, and making everything ready.Two or three times he was startled during thisoccupation, and once nearly caught by his fathercoming suddenly out of their cottage, right in frontof the boat. But Hector laid himself down flatin the bottom, and covered himself over with asail.In a few minutes Fran9ois went back again, andHector resumed his work.At four o'clock Therence came to call her brotherinto supper. She was now quite as excited as he175


THE PARIENTS' CABINET.was, and greatly afraid lest Frangois should catchthem before they were off. The sea was as smoothas a lake, with a slight breeze off shore, which wouldgreatly help them to get out.They ate their brown bread and drank their soupas fast as they could, and then, watching their oppor-tunity, slipped out. Hector had already pushedthe boat towards the water-and the tide beingnow fully in, it had but a very few feet furtherto go.In order to launch the boat Hector placedsome beams of wood lying about the beachunder the prow. This prevented the boat fromsinking into the shingle, and allowed it to moveeasily.Thdrence helped; down went the boat into thewater, and the children scrambled, regardless of wetfeet, up the side of it.In a few minutes Hector got up the sail, and awaythey glided over the sea, as smoothly and as easilyas if they had been in a boat on a pond.Then Therence and Hector looked at one another." What fun, Hector!" cried Therence."Yes; is not it jolly?" answered he, and theylaughed gaily."All by ourselves, too!" said Therence. " I wonderwhat father and mother will say ?"" I don't know; but they will be precious glad176


rASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK.when they see what a lot of fish we catch," saidHector, confidently.It.must not be supposed that this was Therence'sfirst voyage; in former days, before she had to makelace, she used very often to go out to see the lobsterbaskets brought in, and if she had had the strengthshe would have been nearly as good a sailor asHector.That evening Frangois felt very weak and ill, andhe did not stir out again after supper. Catharineput aside her other work, and sat down to finish thelittle bit of lace Therence had left unfinished. Therewas not more than half an hour's work, and whenshe had done it, she set off to the Chateau to take ithome, for she wanted the money very much.She did not miss Hector and Thdrence till shecame back, when it was quite late in the evening." Where are the children, Frangois?" she asked." I don't know " he replied. " I have not seenthem since you went out. I think they must havegone to bed.""I dare say; Thdrence looked very tired. Shewill be glad to hear that I have got seven shillingsfor that piece of lace.""She must have a holiday," said Francois."Yes!" said Catharine, "I will send her to-morrowto get some of my clothes out of pawn."Catharine was quite in spirits, such a windfall the177


THE PARIENTS' CABINET.poor family had not had for a long time, and it wasall by Therence's untiring industry.Lately she had been working from morning tonight without ceasing. Frangois said, " She is thebest girl in the world !"Catharine opened the door into the back room ofthe cottage (it had but two rooms), to take a look ather, and if she were awake to tell her the good news.What was her surprise, then, to find no one there!" Where can the children have gone to, Francois?"" Are not they there? Oh, then they are outsomewhere, having a run, poor things."Catharine went to the door and called them; butno answer.She went out on the beach and called again; allwas silent, the boats and men were all out on thesea, and their families in-doors and asleep.After wandering about for half an hour Catharinereturned, and found the dog Mopse, restless andwhining for his master. Franrois had gone to sleep.She did not like to wake him, but finding the chil-dren had not yet returned, she went out again withMopse in search of them.She now began to be really uneasy. She went toseveral cottages where she fancied they might be,but nobody had seen or heard anything of them.At last she was obliged to return home, but shewas too anxious to go to bed, and sat up all through178


PASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK.the night waiting for them. Sleep and rest were sonecessary for Frangois' recovery, that she dared notwake him.When morning dawned she went out again, andthen, for the first time, she missed the boat. Howterrified she was at this discovery! The idea oftheir having been out all night at sea by themselveswas dreadful.Several people came out to talk to her.She waited down on the beach in the greatestanxiety until the fishermen, should return. The tidewas now again in, and many sails were to be seenover the sea, coming homewards.Old Jaques Pacome's boat was the first to comein; Catharine ran up: " Have you seen anything ofour boat ? " she cried." "Hector and TIherence havegone out in her unknown to us, and been out atsea all night. At least, so we suppose, for they arenot to be found anywhere, and the boat is gone.""CNo; indeed, I have not. But are you sure theyare out? It has been a sharpish night out at sea."" Where else can they be? and who can havetaken the boat ? ""Perhaps they are coming in now, with the restof them," said old Jaques, looking over the sea."c Hector is sailor enough to know when the tide isin, and will be sure to come back."Meanwhile the other boats began to come in.179


THE PARENTS9 CABINET.Catharine asked eagerly the same question of each,and received always the same answer. She strainedher eyes to look over the sea. The boats were all innow save "Passe-tout," and not a sail was to be seeneven on the horizon.Francois came out, and was in great alarm, whenhe heard that the two children had not been seen allnight, and that the boat was gone. He had no doubt'that they were in it. What was to be done? Help-less with his broken arm, what could Francois do ?Catharine sat down on the beach, weeping bitterly.Had Francois had the use of his arm he would haveborrowed old PacBme's boat, and put out to sea ina minute to go in search of them.The fishermen were all tired with their night'swork, and besides the sky began to look very windy.The breeze of the evening before was now a strongwind off shore. Franqois felt sure that unaided,they would never be able to return.At last, old Pacome, who was very fond of Hector,volunteered to go in search of them. Everybodyran to help him to get his boat unloaded, and readyto go to sea again.Indeed there was not a minute to be lost, for thetide was already on the ebb, and nobody can leaveDive or enter it, except when the tide is fully in.Frangois, in spite of his weakness, and althoughhe could do nothing, insisted on going too.180


PASSE-TOUT: OR, TIIE NEW FISHING SMACK.In less than half an hour they were off, and poorCatharine was left all alone on the beach. It wasindeed a weary day for her; how anxiously everyhour passed; how she ran out whenever she fanciedshe saw a sail on the sea; and how bitterly dis-appointed she was, when it turned out to benothing !Twelve hours must at least pass before theycould return, but although she knew this perfectlywell, she could not help going constantly out onto the beach to look over the ocean.In the meantime, what really had become of thetwo children? They had gone off in great gleebefore a slight breeze.Hector managed to take the boat in the usualdirection his father went. When they had gone outsome way they had taken in their sail and spreadtheir nets. Fish was very plentiful; and their firstnet contained so much, that they scarcely hadstrength enough to draw it up. After a great dealof tugging apd hauling, however, they succeededin pulling it up." Oh, Hector," cried Therence, "did you ever seesuch a lot of fishes? Oh, how delighted they will be,and how surprised !""O Oh, we will catch ever so much more beforewe have done. Come and help me put these intothe baskets."181


THE PARENTS' CABINET.Therence was still quite red in the face, and out ofbreath with tugging." What a pity," said Hector, "we did not think ofsinking some lobster baskets-who knows, we mighthave caught some of them too !""cNever mind now, we can do that another- day,"said his sister. "Let's haul in another net, forit must be getting late, and we must take care thatwe do not stop out too long."" Oh, you need not be afraid. I know all aboutthat. Do you suppose I have never been out to seabefore ? "Then came another great tugging and haulingto get in the second net. Just as they were about todraw this full of fish into the boat, Thdrence, quiteexhausted, and unable to hold up such a weight anylonger, let her end go, and all the fishes fell back,and slipped away again into the water." How stupid! How provoking of you! " criedHector." Indeed, I could not help it. The net was soheavy. Next time suppose we let some of thefish go before we attempt to pull it in, then itwill not be so heavy, and I shall be able to doit."" That's a good idea," said Hector, who wasscarcely strong enough himself to pull such aload..182


PASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK.This they accordingly did; but the fish were sonumerous that they could not leave them, butcontinued pulling up draught after draught. Theyworked so hard and took so long over each draught,that neither of them took notice of how the timeslipped by.It was a fine starlight night, and by means ofa torch they could see to work very well. Theyboth thought it fine fun, particularly as their fatherand mother knew nothing about their being out.Therence once thought, perhaps her mother mightbe anxious should she miss them, but Hector thoughtthis quite impossible."How can she? You know Therence," he said,"Cshe was going out to Madame Giraud's up at theChateau this evening, and we shall be in by five inthe morning, so that she cannot have the time to missus. The very idea's quite absurd."" Oh, I am so tired, Hector," cried Therence. Icannot do any more. I am sure we ought to begoing home now; it is getting quite light."" Well, perhaps we had," said he. "I wish wehad thought of bringing some bread with us, I am sohungry."" Dear me, does not it look very black and stormyover there ? " said Therence." Where? Oh, that's nothing," said Hector;" come and help me hoist the sail."183


THE PARENTS' CABINET.Poor Therence was quite tired out. She assistedher brother as much as she could, and then sat downon the edge of a fish basket. Tired, hungry, andvery sleepy, she soon began to feel cold.Hector had been out once or twice by night before,but she never.The wind was now quite strong, and they wereobliged to tack about in order to approach the shore.Hector could not manage this very well. The sunrose when they were still out of sight of land." Oh, what shall we do ? We shall be too late,"cried poor Thdrence.Hector was a little bit frightened, though he triedto reassure her. He looked about, but no sails andno land were to be seen." Are you sure we are going right, Hector ?"" Oh, yes. See, there is the east on our left. Weare going south, as fast as we can."Therence felt a strong desire to cry. Meanwhileday dawned. Towards the east the sky becameone sheet of golden light, with little red and purpleclouds floating about in the bright, deep blue beyond.Each wave was again sparkling in the sun-light.Gradually, however, the beautiful golden light fadedaway, the last star disappeared, the sun was hiddenby a large mass of clouds, and daylight, broad day-light had come.Then poor Therence could no longer control her.184


PASSE-TOUT; OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK.self; she knew it must be past five o'clock, and yetthey could see no land. She burst into tears.Hector himself was quite tired out too."Don't cry, dear Therrie," he said, " we will beall right soon. How cold you are! Here, takemy coat. I am not a bit cold. Lie down and goto sleep. You are quite tired. I can manage theboat."For a long time Therence refused; but at last,in spite of herself, she went to sleep sitting up onthe basket, and then fell off down on to the deck.Hector wrapped her up in his coat and made heras comfortable as he could.Ah! how lonely he felt now, out at sea by himself,with his sister tired and ill. He thought he shouldnot have minded it half so much had he been byhimself. But suppose anything happened to her,what could he do ?He climbed the mast and tied his red cotton hand-kerchief up there, in the hope that somebody mightsee it and come to help them.Meanwhile the wind rose higher and higher; itwas dead off shore. He tacked about, but couldmake no way.Fortunately Therence was asleep. He did notthink that there could be any danger in her sleeping.At last, in despair, he took down the sail. He coulddo nothing more. He could not steer the boat any185


TIHE PARENTS' CABINET.longer, his hands were so numbed with cold; andthe sail therefore only impeded their movements.He was faint with hunger, and crept down closeby his sister for warmth. She was so cold whenhe touched her, that he was quite startled.He sat up and looked anxiously over the seaon all sides in search of a sail. He looked andlooked till everything seemed dim to him, and then,gradually, his head sank on his breast, and he wasquite insensible. Fatigue, hunger, terror, and coldhad completely overcome him.How long he remained like this he could notrecollect; when he opened his eyes, his father andold Jaques were leaning over him, pouring somebrandy down his throat. It was then nearly fouro'clock; they had been out almost twenty-fourhours.Jaques and Franqois had been sailing about allday in the greatest anxiety, and had at last beenable to discover them by Hector's red handker-chief.Frangois was still too frightened and uneasy tofind time to scold him, for Therence was still quiteinsensible. They wrapped her up in their greatcoats, rubbed her hands and feet, and dropped a fewspoonfuls of brandy down her throat."Well, come, Fran9ois," said old Jaques, "hereis the little chap come to! t'other will be all right186


PASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHIING SMACK.in a minute. Just wait till I give her a little morebrandy."But until they reached the shore poor littleTherrie gave no signs of life. Her mother wason the beach waiting with sickening anxiety thearrival of the boats. With what inexpressible joyshe ran to meet them. She seized Therence in herarms, and insisted on carrying her home herself.A kind neighbour came in to help her to light thefire and warm the bed for the poor little unconsciousgirl. They chafed her limbs and put hot bottles toher feet, and did everything they could think of towarm and rouse her. Poor Hector, still quite stupi-fled and giddy, stood by in the greatest distress. Hebegan to think his dear little sister was dead. "AndI persuaded her to come out," the poor boy said tohimself. "I am the cause of it all: oh! whatevershall I do ? "Presently, however, Therence gave a deep sigh andhalf opened her eyes. She stared about her vacantlyfor a minute, turned round, and closed her eyes again.But a faint colour had come back to her lips andcheeks. Hector, now that he saw his sister was safe,could hold up no longer, and went away to hide him-self and cry in a corner.They gave Thdrence a little brandy and someweak broth, after taking which the child seemedmuch revived.187


THE PARENTS' CABINET."Mother," she said, suddenly, speaking for thefirst time, as Catharine leant over her to kiss her, " wehave caught such a lot of fish!""Hush, dear; go to sleep."Therence put her arms round her mother's neck,and nestling down quite close to her, fell asleep withher head on Catharine's shoulder.When Catharine saw that Therence was reallysound asleep, she gently loosened the little girl's arm,and withdrew herself very softly from the bedside,and went to see after Hector.Francois had been speaking very severely toHector, being too angry to consider what wasHector's probable object in risking his own and hissister's life, and the loss of the boat.Catharine found Hector lying on his little bed, sob-bing bitterly. She put her hand on his head, andkissed him."1 Go to sleep, Hector," said she; and don't thinkany more about this just now; only promise me thatsuch a thing shall never happen again."" Mother," said Hector, still sobbing: "Mother,don't be angry with Therrie. Don't let father beangry with her. It is all my fault; indeed, it is. Ipersuaded her to come out with me."" Well, I'11 see," said Catharine, " but you cannotexpect your father to overlook it. Both of you haveacted very wrongly. You might have lost yourselves;188


rASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK.what do you think I should have felt then ? Andtaking your father's boat, too! I wonder you did notthink of the damage you might have done to it andthe fishing tackle-and we so poor, too! We shouldnever have been able to replace it. Why, you know,as it is, the boat is not yet paid for !""Mother, don't be angry. I am very, very sorryfor what I have done, but I could not bear to seeyou, father, and Therence, all looking paler andthinner every day, and I doing nothing, when fish wasso plentiful. The sea was so smooth, that I thoughtthere could be no danger, and I felt quite sure I couldmanage the boat. Therrie had cut her finger, andmaking lace hurt it and was making it fester. I toldher she would soon be able to do nothing too, andthen we should all starve together. Don't scold her,mother, she had nothing to do with it-it's all myfault-and-and-I know father's very angry."Catharine remained talking to him some time, untilhe was soothed and going to sleep; then she went outinto the other room, where Francois and JaquesPac6me were having their supper." How are the young ones now ?" asked thegood-natured old fisherman. "Brave little chap,that Hector !"" What does he say for himself now?" saidFranqois." Oh, Francois, you must not be angry with them189


THE PARENTS CABINET.any more. Hector has promised me never to dosuch a thing again, and, after all, poor boy, itwas all from a desire of helping us. He said hecould not bear to see us all starving and he doingnothing."Catharine stopped to wipe her eyes; she wasthinking at that instant of some of her brotherConscience's words. She felt that there were somepersons who might have been more justly punishedthan Hector.He had done a very dangerous foolish thing, to besure, but he had done it with the hope of assistingthe whole family. Why was the family in such astate? It was not only on account of Francois'broken arm or Leon's having been drawn for thenavy.Both these things had added to it, but the originalcause was their own improvidence. In abundantseasons they had eaten up all they earned, and whenscarcity came they suffered. This wastefulness hadnow nearly cost them the lives of their two remainingchildren."I tell you what, Grandet," said old Jaques toFrangois, c"if Hector is so desirous of work youshould send him to Havre. Send him off at once.I have a cousin there who might get him a placeas cabin-boy. He would earn twice as much thereas here. My cousin, the other day, was wanting a190


PASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK.nice, trustworthy cabin-boy; if he went at once hemight still be in time to get the place."" Oh, no; don't send him away so far. He is soyoung," cried Catharine."How's he to get there ? I have got no moneyto give him," said Fran9ois, gloomily."If he could get there by to-morrow evening,"continued old Jaques, "he might be able to get aplace as cabin-boy on board one of the boats thatply between Havre and Southampton. They wouldgive him half his first quarter's wages in advance,too!"" Would they ?" said Franqois." It is a pity you can't make the exertion to sendhim. Half what he earns will be enough to keephim and he can send you the rest; it is better thanstarving here."" Do you really think it would be a good thingfor him? There would be no danger?" askedCatharine."Danger no; what are you thinking of ?" saidthe old man. " If you take my advice, you'll givehim a few shillings and send him off. I am goingto Honfleur to-morrow morning, and I will takehim with me as far as that. If he gets the placehe can send you back the money instantly. It willonly be a temporary inconvenience. I must be offnow, though, for I am precious tired after all this,191


THE PARENTS' CABINET.and I must start to-morrow morning by six atlatest."Half an hour afterwards, Catharine went andwoke up Hector and asked him if he would like togo. The boy was only too glad; the idea of reallyearning his own livelihood made him almosf jumpwith joy. But he was so very drowsy that Catharinehad scarcely time to shut the room door again beforehe was asleep. She went then and packed up intoa little parcel the few clothes he possessed, andtaking the money she had just received she put itinto his pocket."I will wait to get my clothes out of pawn till hesends me back the money, and if I salt down thefish those poor children caught," said Catharine, " wecan live on them for more than a week."At five o'clock she went and called Hector, andprepared him a good breakfast of fish and soup.Poor Hector was terribly sleepy and tired, but hegot up cheerfully." Don't wake Therence," said his mother.Hector went up softly and kissed her as she slept."Good-bye, Therrie dear," he said. "I shall seeyou again in three months."Catharine was crying. " When shall we hearfrom you, Hector? Oh, how I wish you couldwrite.""And so do I," said the poor boy. He restrained192


PASSE-TOUT: 011, THE NEW FISHING SMACK.his tears as well as he could. Old Jaques, whocame in to see if he would come, gave him a greatpat on the back, and told him he was a bravelittle chap. In a few minutes more they wereoff.Catharine, although she was quite exhausted withso much trouble and anxiety, had no time nowto rest or sleep. She had to set to work instantly tosalt the fish, before it got bad. This took her all themorning. Then, unable to hold up her head anylonger, she came in, and, throwing herself downon the bed, fell into a long and heavy sleep.As for Therence she slept the whole day, andnever woke up till late in the evening. She cried agreat deal at first, when she heard her brother hadgone, but her mother consoled her with the idea thatlie would be back in a few months, and told her howjoyfully he had accepted old Jaques' offer.She comforted herself, also, with the hope ofhearing something of him from old PacBmes in twoor three days. But a whole fortnight passed withouttheir hearing anything of Hector. Poor Therencefound the time very long and dreary as she sat ather work under the porch, wondering what Hectorwas doing. Each day she got up with the hope ofhearing from him, and each night went to bed dis-appointed. At last, however, one day when oldPac6mes came back in his boat from Honfleur, heII. 7 193


THE PARENTs' CABINET.brought news of him, and also some money from himfor Francois.It was half the poor boy's first month's wages.Old Jaques had received this from a friend whomhe had met that day at Honfleur; and had heardat the same time from him, that Hector had got theplace, in which he was giving great satisfaction, andthat he was in excellent health and spirits.Little as this was, it was all they heard of Hectorfor a long time, for nearly three months, for neitherhe nor they could write, and, therefore, very littlecommunication between them was possible.Therence at home counted the days and weeks hehad been away. She worked very hard at her lace;in addition to which she tried to take care of every-thing her brother liked, so that he might findthem in good order when he came back. Shegot up very early in the morning to look afterHector's little bit of garden, so that it might bebright and pretty when he came back. She alsotook care that Mopse had his daily bath in the sea.One day, and what a day of joy it was for her,there came a letter from Hector. It was directed toher too She had never had a letter before.Hector had made friends with a good-natured old'sailor on board the same boat as himself, and thisman had been kind enough to write the letter forhim. Hector said he was very well, and was very194


\ PASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISIING SMIACK.anxious to know how they all were, particularly ifthey had heard anything of Leon. He said if hewas not much wanted at home he should stayanother month or two, as his employer still hadwork for him, and he could earn much more therethan at home. Also he was learning to write. Thesame old sailor who wrote for him now was helpinghim to learn, and he was very desirous of perfectinghimself in this art before he left. As a proof of hisprogress he signed his name at the bottom.Thdrence was sadly disappointed at this news; theflowers she had taken so much care of for him wouldbe all dead and gone before he came home, andthere would be nothing but cold winter to welcomehim home when he came.But there was no help for it; so she went andbegged fourpence of her mother, to pay the postage ofa letter to Hector, and then went up the village to theschoolmaster, to ask him to write for her, and giveHector all the news of the family since his departure.FranCois had by this time regained his strengthand was again able to work. By their united efforts,and particularly by Thdrence and Hector's industry,they were once more saved from want. Still, therewas no hope of ever repaying Conscience.Thdrence took advantage of this state of com-parative comfort to ask her mother to let her keepa penny a week out of her earnings for herself. This7-2 195


THE PARENTS' CABINET.she resolutely put by, under the hope of one daygetting enough to repay her uncle.But Conscience had quite given up all hope ofever seeing that money again; and, therefore, likea wise man, he set to work to do without it. He feltthat Frangois was now too old to learn, evenr fromso severe a lesson as he had just had, and he didnot wish to be paid out of the savings of Francois'children."I ought to have known him better than to lendit him; I have known him long enough," said he tohimself.Of poor Leon, all this time nothing had beenheard, and his mother often felt anxious and sickat hearty when she thought of him.The summer and autumn had gradually vanishedmeantime, and winter was now again close at hand.Therence began once more to look forward to herdear brother's return.As she sat at work she often used to wonderwhether he would have grown and altered much,whether he would find her much changed: she hopedhe would not, although she feared he would nowbe too big and too grand to play with her.One day while she was sitting alone at the windowworking and thinking of all these things, for theweather was now too cold to sit out under the porch,she was suddenly startled by the appearance of a1968


PASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK.great bearded man, who coolly opened the cottagedoor and walked in.For the instant she did not recognise him, he wasso weather-beaten."How d'ye do, Th4rence?" said he, coming andtaking her up in his arms. " Where is mother ?"' Leon!" she cried, "are you really come homeat last ? Oh, let me go, let me go, and tell mother,"and struggling out of his arms she rushed out ofthe door round to the back of the cottage, whereshe knew her mother was chopping wood. Mother,mother!" she cried, panting for breath, "here isLeon come home! Be quick! be quick! he hassuch a great beard."Catharine threw down the chopper and ran in,scarcely able to believe her ears. Leon caught herin his arms."Dear, dear mother! How little I thought Ishould ever see you again! How are you all?Father, Hector, where are they? Come here,Therrie, and let's have a look at you. What a greatgirl you have grown !" He kissed her affectionately.Catharine told him as quickly as she could, allthat had happened. Just then they saw Fran ois'boat coming in. Leon ran out to help him, whileCatharine and Therence stayed at home to preparesupper for them. Therrie was jumping about andsinging with delight.197


THE PARENTS' CABINET.While she was standing at the door laughing ather father's surprise and joy at suddenly recognisingLeon, up came the postman. He actually had timeto stop before she saw him, but when he put into herhand a letter directed in a large round hand to"Therence Grandet," she gave a great squeak ofdelight, and bounced with one bound right into themiddle of the room."Mother, here's a letter from Hector! Oh, whata lot of goodness at once;" and she performed adance that would have been worthy of a NorthAmerican Indian." Oh! he says he will be home in two or threedays; " and off she ran to the beach not to losean instant in giving this good news to her fatherand brother.And Hector had written all the letter himself.How proud she was of it!Before the end of the week Hector appeared incompany with his cousin Bernard, who had alsoreturned home.Hector had stopped on his way home at Honfleurto see his uncle, and had persuaded his cousin tocome on with him to see them all.He had grown strong and manly, and lookeduncommonly well." Well, Therrie! and how are you, dear, after allthis long time ?" he said. '" I was dreadfully afraid198


PASSE-TOUT: OR, TIE NEW FISHING SMACK.you would be ill, when I went away. Do youremember that night ? "She laughed. " I should think so!"" We will go out again together some day," hesaid; "I've grown stronger now, and you need notbe afraid. Look here, Therrie, what I have got!"and he put his hand into his pocket and pulledout nearly eight shillings. "I have saved all thatwhile I have been away, and uncle is going toput it into the savings' bank' for me, but I couldnot help briinging it on to show you first."Therence's eyes glistened. " What a lot you havegot, Hector! I have been saving also, but I haveonly got one shilling at present. What shall we dowith it all? "" That's what I have been asking uncle, and headvises me to put it into a savings' bank, becausethen, he says, I shall be put out of all temptation ofspending it. Hallo, Mopse !" he cried, interrupt-ing himself. "Poor old Mopse! How are you, oldboy ? Glad to see your master again, you dear olddoggie," lie added, as the dog jumped up to lick hisface and hands, wagging his tail frantically all thetime."Come to supper, children!" cried Catharine, whohad been getting everything she could that shethought the hungry young people would like.What a merry evening they had! Hector and199


THE PARENTS' CABINET.the two young men had so many stories to tell, andthe others were so willing to listen.Bernard particularly was in high spirits. He wasgoing to work with his father at Honfleur, for Con-science had been able to save enough now to paya substitute in case the war continued, and couldkeep his son at home with him.Poor Leon's joy was a little damped by the know-ledge that he must soon go away again; but ashe saw no help for it, he tried to resign him-self.The winter passed quickly and gaily away. Hec-tor of an evening gave Therence lessons in writing,and he would also read aloud to his father the oldnewspapers they sometimes got.Leon grew graver and graver, and seemed scarcelyto take pleasure in anything. Poor fellow! as thetime drew near for his departure, he could not helpshrinking from it. When March came, however,and he was really obliged to go, he went away ascalmly as if nothing was the matter.Nobody but Therence had any idea how heavypoor Leon's heart was. She did all she bould tocheer him, and promised to write to him this time,and let him know how they all were. How gladshe was now that she had saved those pennies. Theywould pay the postage of her letters, and help tocomfort poor Leon.200


PASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHING' SMACK.Francois has not been able to repay Conscience;but by his children's exertions his old age will besecured from want. They had all had a hard lesson,but they had profited by it; and Francois' childrenhave determined, whatever might be the temptation,never, like their father, to run into debt.- _201,, ,/ /,/,201


GEOGRAPHY.TIIE word " Geography" means " description of theearth," and when our young readers see that wordat the top of the page, they may expect to find adescription of something relating to the earth.Among grown-up people, the greater number seebut a small part of the earth. Their business con-fines them to one country, and frequently to asmall part of that country. Among young peoplevery few indeed ever travel many miles from home.How delightful, then, it must be to them to be madeacquainted, by means of a description, with everything relating to the earth on which they live: andwho can doubt whether the study of geography beinteresting or useful ?Size and Shlape of the Earth.The earth is a large round body, not a perfectglobe, but in shape somewhat resembling an orange.But while an orange measures about nine inchesround, the earth measures about 25,000 miles.It is upon the surface, that is, the outside of this202


GEOGRAPHY.large globe that we dwell. What the inside iscomposed of, except a few hundred feet below thesurface, we do not know-The thickness of the earth, or its diameter, isabout 8,000 miles. The diameter of a globe is astraight line supposed to be drawn from one pointon its surface to another, passing through the centreor middle.Should any one who has read of or seen any of thehigh mountains and deep valleys that are to be metwith in most countries, say that it is impossible forthe earth to be round with these large projectionsand hollows, let him reflect, that the highest moun-tain, compared with the size of the earth, is notnearly so great a projection as the very smallest grainof dust that may be seen sticking to an orange.The Sun.To us, who are accustomed to'think of such bodiesas stones and trees, hills and mountains, the size ofthe earth appears immense. But the earth, large asit appears, is a small body compared with the sun,which gives us light and heat. The sun is morethan a million times as large as the earth.Day and Night.Take a large ball, and run straight through itsmiddle a piece of pack-thread, between one and two203


TIE PARENTS' CABINET.feet long, with a knot at one end to hinder thestring slipping quite through.l If your ball be awhite one, so much the better. Holding the stringby the end at which there is no knot, raise theball to a level with the candle, at a little distancefrom the table. Having done this, you may fancy,if you choose, that the candle is the sun, and theball the earth.Look at the ball attentively, and you will observethat the light of the candle shines on one-half ofthe ball, while the other halfis in darkness. Having ob-served this, next, while youhold the string up steadilywith one hand, give the balla spin round with the other.You will then observe, that -though the light of the candlecontinues to shine, as before,on only one half of the ball, the half in the lightand the half in the dark are not, as before, alwaysthe same.Should you wish to make this appear more plainly,stick a red wafer on your ball towards that end ofthe string which you hold in your hand; and as theball spins round and round you will see the wafer"* It is strongly recommended that this part b3 not read withouthaving a real ball and candle.204


GEOGRAPHY.sometimes in the bright light, and sometimes in thedark.With every complete spin round that the ballmakes, each part of its surface will be light and darkby turns.Forget the string for a few minutes, and try tothink of your ball spinning round of itself near thecandle. You will then be able to understand how itis that the earth spins round.The earth makes one spin every twenty-fourhours, and each time that it makes the completeround we have day and night, that is, a period oflight and a period of darkness. For, like your ridwafer on the ball, at one time we are turned towardsthe sun, and at another time away from it.Your ball is only a few feet from the candle.The earth is ninety-five millions of miles from thesun.The Year.Now, again, take hold of the string as before, go alittle way from the table, give your ball a good spin,and holding it on a level with the candle, walkcompletely round the table.Once more forget the string, and that it is youwho are carrying the ball round the candle. Tryto think of your ball spinning round and round ofitself, and at the same time going round the candle.The earth moves round the sun much in this way,205


THE PARENTS' CABINET.spinning round and round all the time. It goesround the sun in about three hundred and sixty-fivedays, or a year, and makes in that time three hundredand sixty-five complete spins; so that we have threehundred and sixty-five periods of daylight, and threehundred and sixty-five periods of darkness.If you examine attentively, you will observe thatthere are two points equally distant from the candle.They are the points where the string comes through.As the ball spins round, every spot upon it, except-ing these two points, is by turns in the dark and inthe light, being as much in the one as in the other.And if the two points round which the earth spinswere equally distant from the sun, the same as thetwo points round which your ball spins are equallydistant from the candle, every spot in the earth, withthe exception of these two points, would be, duringeach complete spin, in the light and in the dark byturns, and as much in one as in the other; and thedays and nights would be equal, throughout the year,over the whole earth.The Scasons.But everybody knows that our days and nightsare not of equal length throughout the year. To-wards the end of March, and the end of September,our days and nights are equal, being each twelvehours long. Towards the end of June, our days are206


GEOGRAPHIY.more than sixteen hours long, and our nights lessthan eight hours. Towards the end of December,our days are not eight hours long, while our nightsare more than sixteen hours. From December toJune, our days are always becoming longer andlonger, and from June to December, shorter andshorter. How this happens may be very easilyexplained.Let us once more bring your ball to the candle.In this little drawing, the ball is placed in two differentpositions. In each position, however, the two pointswhere the ends of the strings come through, are nolonger in the same situation as respects the light ofthe candle. To the right of the candle, the pointnearest to the wafer is more ioithin the light of thecandle than the point furthest from the wafer. Tothe left of the candle, the point nearest the wafer207


THE PARENTS' CABINET.is less within the light of the candle than the pointfarthest from the wafer.Take hold of the string which is run through theball, as before, and hold the ball in the position inwhich it is placed in the drawing to the right ofthe candle. Suppose the ball to be spinning roundthe points where the string comes through, as itdid before; what would happen? That point whichis nearest to the wafer would be always in the light,as well as that part of the ball which immediatelysurrounds that point. That point which is farthestfrom the wafer, would be always in the dark, as wellas all that part of the ball close to it. Every spinround, those parts of the ball which are near thewafer would be more in the light than the dark,and those parts towards the other end of the stringwould be more in the dark than the light.Next, still holding the string, as before, bring theball into the position in which it is placed in thedrawing, to the left of the candle. Suppose it tospin, as before, round the two points where thestring comes through. The point nearest to thewafer would be always dark, as well as all thoseparts of the ball immediately surrounding it. Thepoint furthest from the wafer would be always light,as well as that part of the ball immediately surround-ing it. Every spin round, those parts of the ballwhich are near to the wafer would be more in the208


GEOGRAPRY.dark than the light, and those parts towards theother end of the string would be more in the lightthan the dark.Now, fancy that the candle is the sunl, and theball the earth; and that England, or that part ofthe earth on which we live, is on the wafer. Whilethe earth is making the circuit of the sun, the twopoints round which it spins are sometimes equallydistant from the sun, and then our days and nightsare equal. Sometimes the two points round whichthe earth spins are not equally distant from the sun,and then our days and nights are unequal.Towards the end of March, and the end of Sep-tember, these two points are equally distant from thesun; and the days and nights are each twelve hourslong. Towards the end of June, that point whichis nearest to England, is less distant from the sunthan the other; and then our days are the longestand our nights the shortest; while all countries nearthe other point have, at that time, their shortest daysand longest nights.Towards the end of December, that point whichis nearest to England is more distant from the sunthan the other; and then our days are the shortestand our nights the longest; while all countries nearthe other point have, at that time, their longest daysand shtortest niglhts.209


THE PARENTS' CABINET.It will require a little- attention, and more thanone reading, to understand and remember thoroughlythe description here given of the earth's motions.But will nbt your pains be well rewarded? Willit not be delightful to understand that the length ofthe year is measured by the time which the earthtakes in making the circuit of the sun-that theyear is divided into three hundred and sixty-fivedays, because, while the earth is making the circuitof the sun, it makes three hundred and sixty-fivespins or revolutions round two points on its surface-that during each revolution it is night over one halfof the earth, and day-light over the other half-thatour summer is caused by that point round whichthe earth revolves or spins, which England is nearestto, being less distant from the sun than the other-and that our winter is caused by that same pointto which England is nearest being more distant fromthe sun than the other ?210


UNCLE JOHN AT THE CAPE OFGOOD HOPE." I AM so dull to-night," said Oliver; " I have gotnothing to do, and it rains so heavily that I muststay at home. I wish it were bed-time;" and heyawned."I don't, though," replied Richard.' "Uncle Johnpromised to come and see us to-night, and I think hewill soon be here."" Oh, Richard! he will never come out in such apouring rain as this," said Oliver."Why not ?" said Richard; " I suppose he has anumbrella."Before Oliver could answer, the door opened, andin bounced little Arthur, shouting out, " Uncle John,Uncle- John !""Ay, ay, Uncle John;" cried the kind uncle,while he was rubbing his shoes on the mat. " Areye glad, boys, that he has come? "The boys answered this question by running outand shaking hands with him.211


TIE PARENTS CABINET." Oliver thought you would be afraid of the rain,"said Richard." Why so ? Does he take me for a lump of barley-sugar ?" said his uncle: " a little summer rain likethis which is now falling refreshes a man after theheat of the day. How often, when I was in Africa,did I wish for such a shower !"" Come in, uncle; come in," said the boys; " yourshoes are quite clean, and we have taken care to putyour umbrella to dry. We are so happy you havecome to see us again."" That is all right, lads," said their uncle; " butwhere is your mother ? ""Oh, she is not at home this evening," said Oliver;" she has gone to meet papa."" Well, then, we must amuse ourselves," said hisuncle: "what shall we do ? ""Cannot you tell us something amusing, uncle,sometling that has happened to you in your voyagesor travels ?" asked Richard." Uncle, I want to know what you did with your-self when you were so long away in Africa, whenmamma was so unhappy because she did not receivea letter from you."" When I was at the Cape of Good Hope ?" saidhis uncle. "Ay, I remember, I went to the farmof a Dutch settler, a great distance from Cape Town,212


UNCLE JOHN AT THE CAPE OF GOOD IOPE.up the country, and I had no means of sending aletter to England."" Yes, that is the time: tell us something aboutAfrica," said Oliver."I amused myself in visiting the farms of thedifferent English and Dutch people who had settledabout the country, near to Cape Town; and once Ispent a whole week in hunting elephants.""What, hunting for a whole week on horsebackthe whole of the time, Uncle John ? " cried Richard;"that's not possible.""We don't hunt elephants on horseback in SouthAfrica, Master Richard, as you hunt poor hares andstags in England," replied his uncle." Pray, tell us then how you do hunt them," saidOliver, "for they are such great, heavy, clumsyanimals, that I should think you would soon finish achase of one of them.""There you are a little mistaken," replied hisuncle; "for in the hunt that I joined, I found it wasnot such an easy affair. In the hills through whichthe Fish River flows, the country is thickly coveredwith bushes, and is quite uncultivated, and onlywild animals live in it. The elephants are in greatnumbers. The man whom I accompanied was aregular hunter of these animals, and he told me thathe had seen as many as three thousand elephants ina troop at a time."213


THE PARENTS' CABINET."What did he hunt elephants for?" askedArthur." For their ivory tusks," replied Uncle John."The only roads through this wild thorny countryare those made by the foot-prints of these animals.I accompanied, as I have said, a man who ivas aregular hunter of elephants. He had in his partynine dogs, three or four Hottentots, and a little boy,his son, whom he was teaching to hunt.""Pray, uncle, what are Hottentots?" said Arthur." They are the native people of this part ofAfrica," said his uncle; "but they are not kindlyused by the Dutch and English people, who havetaken possession of the country that once belongedto them. They live miserably, and are made towork for the new comers. These Hottentots carriedthe food that we should want, and the sheep-skins,on which at night we were to sleep, and they lightedthe fires round which we sat.""Fires, uncle! " cried Oliver, "why, I thoughtAfrica was a dreadfully hot country."" So it is," said his uncle, " in- the day-time; butthe dews that fall in the evening and at night arevery chilling, and make fires necessary, especiallyto those who are obliged to sleep in the open air.We 'should have had the wolves, and rhinoceroses,and all sorts of wild animals attacking us, if we hadhad no fire in the nirght."214


UNCLE JOHN AT THE CAPE OF GOOD HOPE."Did you all sleep at the same time ?" askedRichard."No; one was the fire watchman. I spent awhole week among the wild hills I have mentioned,and I can remember feeling very lonely when thenight fires burnt low, and I heard the howlingof the wolves, and the thundering tread of theelephants." The first day's search after the elephants was invain; we followed their tracks, winding over hillsand through deep ravines, and thick brushwood, ofwhich the. thorns were very sharp, until I was sotired, that I could hardly go on. The hunter wasnot at all fatigued, aud laughed at me not a little.Courage,' said he, we shall soon be among theelephants, and then you can sit down and watch themas long as you like.'" One of the Hottentots pointed out the trackwhich would be the best to follow. This foot-print,'said he, 'is last night's, that track to the right isthree days old.'"" Oh, uncle! how could he tell that?" criedOliver." Because he had been in the habit of observingthese things. He could tell at once the age of thespoor, or foot-print."" How clever!" exclaimed Arthur. "I wish Iknew how he managed to do so."215


TIE PAIENTS' CABINET." If you think it clever to judge of the age of thefoot-print, what do you think of the Hottentot fling-ing his hatchet into a bush, and without having afinger-post, or anything that we could observe tomark the spot, returning after some days, nay, evenweeks, as I have been told, and without any trouble,finding his hatchet again ?"" Why, it is very curious, indeed," said Richard,"and shows the use of looking well at the objectsthat surround us."" But the ground must have been very soft," saidArthur, "to show the foot-mark.""C Very true, my lad," said Uncle John, "but theHottentot can also judge by the wearing off of theturf, as well as by the mark on the soft ground.The foot-marks are generally to be found in the mudround the small ponds. The elephants, as well asthe other wild animals, leave their haunts at nioht,and come to drink; and round those ponds theHottentots pointed out to me the foot-marks of thevarious animals that had been down to drink.""What were those other animals, uncle ?" saidArthur.", "The buffalo, the wolf, the rhinoceros, whosehoof resembles that of three horses' hoofs joinedtogether, the baboon, and the antelope. The foot-marks of all these animals were easily to be traced.""How curious," said Oliver; " the next time I go216


UNCLE JOHN AT TIE CAPE OF GOOD HOPE.out, I will try to find out the foot-marks of theEnglish animals round the pond on the common.Go on, uncle, I want to come to the elephants.""And so did we, Master Oliver," said Uncle John," and accordingly we walked on in spite of theintense heat. The heat of the sun at mid-day mademe ready to drop with fatigue, and as we marchedon, I began to feel that I should not be able tocontinue doing so much longer. Towards eveningour search was becoming hopeless, no elephant hadbeen seen, and I told the hunter that I must stop awhile to rest. Not now,' said he, for I am surethat at this very instant I see a troop of elephantspassing over yonder hill.' I looked, but could seenothing; but the news made me agree to go on, andwe took care to ascend the hill before us with thewind in our faces."" What for ? " asked Oliver."That the animals might not smell us, which theywould have done if the wind had blown from usto them, instead of from them to us," replied hisuncle." We marched on, one after the other, along anarrow rocky path, which skirted one bank of asmall hollow, and we saw the huge beasts feedingon the opposite bank."" Now for it," cried Oliver, "present, fire, bang,they are shot."4-.,


THE PARENTS' CABINET."Not quite in such double-quick time, youngman, do you kill an elephant," said his -uncle, " asyou will learn. The hunter and the men halted;and the hunter bade me and the little boy make alight, and set fire to the bushes and grass, and then,in case the animals should rush our way, to run asfast as possible to the fire."" Oh, incle and did they rush your way ?" criedArthur."I felt rather odd, to see myself only twentyyards from such a number of these enormouscreatures, who, if they had charged forwards, musthave trampled us to death," said Uncle John." Why, you could have got out of the way," saidOliver."Pray, which way would that have been ? " askedhis uncle. " Until they begin to run, no one canknow what direction these beasts will take. Therewe saw them quietly feeding on the long grass andbushes, and flapping their large ears, and lookingvery lazy. Myself and the boy lighted a bush, andbefore it had burnt up into a flame, we heard a shotfired, and then another, and the elephants beganrunning. We saw one totter as he ran, halt a little,and then fall, rise up again, and fall again. Hisgroans were terrible. We went up to him: aball had pierced the shoulder, and reached theheart."218


UNCLE JOHN AT THE CAPE OF GOOD HOPE."Uncle," said Arthur, "I am sorry for the poorelephant. Why was he killed ? ""To get his ivory tusks," said Uncle John; "butwe did not stop to take them then; we only cut offhis tail, marked the tusks, and followed the troopdown the hill." We saw them tearing on, destroying everythingthat was in their path. Both trees and shrubs werebroken and uprooted, and their tread sounded likethunder. Being already much tired, I could not postafter them so quickly as my companions did, and soI seated myself on the ground, and told the hunterto send one of the Hottentots for me when he hadhunted enough for that night."' It is impossible,' said he; 'the night will bedark, no one will be able to find you, you must keepup with us!' I told him that I could go no further,and'that I did not wish to spoil his sport, and then Istretched myself out full length on the ground.""Oh, uncle!" cried Arthur, " suppose the ele-phants had turned back."" Yes, boy; but I was too much tired to care atthat moment about them. Were a rhinoceros tocome now,' said the hunter, 'you would soon findyour legs: come, mount the hill with us.' No; I wastoo tired, and so, after some little delay, the hunterresolved to leave his boy with me, as being betteracquainted with those hills than I was; and he told219


THE PARIENTS CABINET.us, when I should be sufficiently rested, and ableto follow them, to light fires all up the hill to markour course. The hunter and Hottentots then quittedus in pursuit of the elephants.""I don't think you were very wise to stay behind,uncle," said Richard." I don't think I was," said his uncle; "but I wastoo tired to care for anything. I had lost not onlymy fear of the wild animals, but even the morereasonable fear of losing myself in the wild places Iwas in. I threw myself on the ground, and watchedthe sun sinking, and the beautiful colours of the skyfor more than half an hour. I do not remember everto have found a bed or sofa so agreeable as the grasswas to me at that time."For half an hour I rested on the ground, andthen with the boy, who had been very impatient atmy delay, mounted the hill by the elephant track.The valley we had just left, was so thickly coveredwith high bushes and trees, that we could not seethrough them. Slowly were we climbing up the hill,and trailing our guns after us, when we heard theheavy gallop of a large animal approaching. Mylittle companion was blowing a lighted stick, in orderto set fire to the bush, as the hunter had desired."Listen I said, do you hear anything?' The boybegan to look quite alarmed, and in a moment he ranaway from the sound, while I ran up the hill, not220


UNCLfE JOHN AT THE CAPE OF GOOD HOPE.doubting but it was a rhinoceros. The heavy trampwas behind me, and the next moment a large darkanimal burst through the branches close to me, andturned into the very path I was following. I did notstop, but dashed across from the path to my littlecompanion, who with great presence of mind set fireto the bush."" Your heels were of use to you for once in yourlife, uncle," said Oliver, laughing."Yes, you rogue; and I was obliged to be activewith them. And lucky it was for me that I trustedto them rather than to my gun: for the rhinoceros isa very fierce animal, who will make even lions andtigers run from him. The boldest hunters fear him,and are glad to get out of his way. But I say it wasvery lucky that I ran away, for when I tried to fireoff my gun, it snapped three times, and would not gooff, so that had I trusted to being able to shoot therhinoceros, I should have been killed.""Did not the rhinoceros pursue you, uncle ?" saidRichard."No ; the burning bush protected me, he ran fromit with all speed.""Now, confess, dear uncle," said Oliver, " thatyou were very much frightened."" I cannot say that I felt much fear," said hisuncle. " I had no time to be frightened. I wasforced to skip out of the way as fast as I could.221


THE PARENTS' CABINET.The affair was of use to me, for I felt the advantageof always having presence of mind. If the boy hadacted as unwisely and thoughtlessly as I did, weshould have been in danger of our lives. Afterthe animal was out of sight, we lost no time inascending the hill."" Ha, ha! the hunter was right," interruptedOliver, "the rhinoceros soon made you find the useof your legs."Uncle John laughed." Pray, Oliver, be quiet," said Arthur, " I wantUncle John to go on,-I do not like him to beon those wild hills, at a distance from the hunterand the men and dogs."Uncle John stroked Arthur's hair, and said,"No, my little man, and after this visit, I did notwish to be. without their company, I assure you.I had no gun that I could use, and so the boyand myself made haste up the hill. When wereached the top of it, we saw the elephants tearingabout, their huge backs being much higher than thebushes. Presently we heard our companions fire,and all in a file the animals rushed away, chargingdirectly upon us. After the rhinoceros had gone,I had taken a lighted torch in my hand, and nowthat I saw these elephants coming, I set fire to thebushes and grass that were round us: we wereobliged to stand in a circle of flame. We listened,222


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THE PARENTS' CABINET. itself. The Indians conducted us to a stream which in the time of drought forms a basin of muddy water, surrounded by fine trees with fragrant blossoms. To catch the gymnoti with nets is very difficult, on account of the agility of the fish, which bury themselves in the mud like serpents. They. are sometimes caught by means of various roots, which, when thrown into the water, have the power to benumb or intoxicate these animals. But as this method enfeebles the gymnoti, the Indians told us they would fish with horses. We could not imagine what kind of fishing this could be, but we soon saw our guides return from the Savannah, or immense flat grassy waste, which they hr1d been scouring for wild horses and mules. They brought about thirty with them, which they forced to enter the pool. "Tlhe extraordinary noise caused by the horses' hoofs, made the fish leave the mud, and excited them to combat. These yellowish eels, resembling large aquatic serpents, swim on the surface of the water, and crowd under the bellies of the horses and mules. The Indians, provided with harpoons and long slender reeds, surround the pool closely, and some climb upon the trees, the branches of which extend over the surface of the water. By their wild cries and the length of their reeds they prevent the horses from running away and reaching the bank of the pool. The eels, startled by the noise, defend them252



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The Baldwin Library mUniv'vo. Florida



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THE PARENTS' CABINET. She found him in an equal state of distress. During the last hour or two the sky had become covered by light, windy-looking clouds, that sailors call "mare's tails," and the morning breeze was now quite a strong gale. Leon had come home about half an hour ago, and Francois, seeing the sea was likely to be stormy, had just said he could not take Hector out with them. Hector had set his heart on making this first voyage in the boat. But Francois was firm, and said, he could not be bothered with a little child like him; that if it came on to be stormy, as he expected, Hector would only be in the way, and that he must stay at home with his mother and Therence." The only person who rejoiced at this arrangement was Catharine, who could not bear to think of so young a boy as Hector being exposed to all the dangers of the sea. "But you promised me, father Oh, what a shame!" roared out the boy, with tears in his eyes, as he saw them positively preparing to shove the boat off. Leon looked as if he would willingly have relinquished his place to his brother, but said nothing. His father, however, called out angrily: If you don't hold your tongue, you shall never go out with me again." 144



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THE PARENTS' CABINET. and I must start to-morrow morning by six at latest." Half an hour afterwards, Catharine went and woke up Hector and asked him if he would like to go. The boy was only too glad; the idea of really earning his own livelihood made him almosf jump with joy. But he was so very drowsy that Catharine had scarcely time to shut the room door again before he was asleep. She went then and packed up into a little parcel the few clothes he possessed, and taking the money she had just received she put it into his pocket. "I will wait to get my clothes out of pawn till he sends me back the money, and if I salt down the fish those poor children caught," said Catharine, we can live on them for more than a week." At five o'clock she went and called Hector, and prepared him a good breakfast of fish and soup. Poor Hector was terribly sleepy and tired, but he got up cheerfully. Don't wake Therence," said his mother. Hector went up softly and kissed her as she slept. "Good-bye, Therrie dear," he said. "I shall see you again in three months." Catharine was crying. When shall we hear from you, Hector? Oh, how I wish you could write." "And so do I," said the poor boy. He restrained 192



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PASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK. Therence took her brother by the arm; her own disappointment was now quite forgotten in that of her brother. "Come along, Hector," said she, "it can't be helped, you know; never mind, father will take you out another day. The sky does look very stormy." What's that to me ? It's all the better fun. I say it is a great, big shame; father promised me." "But you know he never takes you out in bad weather: mother does not like it." Why does not she like it, I should like to know ? It's all very well for you women to stay at home; I 'm a man, I am." Now, don't talk nonsense, Hector; just think if anything happened to father what would mother do? And suppose you all three were out at once in a storm, only think how dreadful it would be. For, after all, it is very dangerous, you know." I suppose you are right, Therence, but it's very hard. You don't know how much I have been longing to go in 'Passe-tout' on her first voyage. And here is poor Mopse wanting to go too. Did not you, poor old fellow?" he said, stooping down to pat and caress a large water-spaniel that came bounding up to him licking his face and hands. Poor Mopse! he wants his supper," said Therence; "and come, Hector, we ought to go help mother to put things straight." 145



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THE PARENTS' CABINET. "Mother," she said, suddenly, speaking for the first time, as Catharine leant over her to kiss her, we have caught such a lot of fish!" "Hush, dear; go to sleep." Therence put her arms round her mother's neck, and nestling down quite close to her, fell asleep with her head on Catharine's shoulder. When Catharine saw that Therence was really sound asleep, she gently loosened the little girl's arm, and withdrew herself very softly from the bedside, and went to see after Hector. Francois had been speaking very severely to Hector, being too angry to consider what was Hector's probable object in risking his own and his sister's life, and the loss of the boat. Catharine found Hector lying on his little bed, sobbing bitterly. She put her hand on his head, and kissed him. "1 Go to sleep, Hector," said she; and don't think any more about this just now; only promise me that such a thing shall never happen again." Mother," said Hector, still sobbing: "Mother, don't be angry with Therrie. Don't let father be angry with her. It is all my fault; indeed, it is. I persuaded her to come out with me." Well, I'11 see," said Catharine, but you cannot expect your father to overlook it. Both of you have acted very wrongly. You might have lost yourselves; 188



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THEI PARENTS' CABINET. and meat must have cost Fran9ois, and how ill he could afford it. He thought Therence would have looked much nicer in her ordinary clean Sunday frock, than in that expensive cotton in which the poor child was afraid to move. Why, even for the building of the new fishing smack, Frangois had been obliged to go into debt, and had borrowed nearly twenty pounds from his brother-in-law Conscience. Conscience thought how Franqois was ever going to pay this When they were young, Conscience and Franqois were equally poor, but Conscience had always been careful and saving, for which some of his friends had called him stingy and mean, but he had managed to send all his children to school, and had even taught himself to read and write. When he had got together a few savings he had left Dive and gone to Honfleur, where he was now the owner of two or three large smacks, while his wife Dorothee kept a little shop. Frangois had also been industrious, and a very brave seaman too, but he was thoughtless. He used to say life was not worth having if you did not enjoy it. Where was the use of screwing yourself down like Conscience, when from one day to another you might be drowned? As to his children, he said he had got on very well, why should they want to know more than he did ? They would turn out all 142



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PASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK. "Yes; it is, dear. It is a terrible night." "How lucky that father would not take Hector, is not it, mother ?" A violent clap of thunder at this instant seemed to break right over the cottage. Catharine sank on her knees in great terror, little Therence clinging to her with her arms around her mother's neck. Terrie dear, don't cry. We must have faith," said Catharine, in a voice half stifled with suppressed tears. A boat that has been so recently blessed, surely cannot go wrong. Let us pray for them." Catharine, quite worn out with fatigue and anxiety, was soothed by the presence of her two youngest children; and at last yielded, unknown to herself, to the influence, and fell asleep by Thdrence's side with the child's soft little arms round her neck. In the morning, when they awoke, the storm was over, though the sea was still rough, and the sun shining brightly. Catharine and the twd children hurried down to the beach, where many families were already assembled anxiously watching for the return of the boats. No sooner was the smallest speck discernible on the horizon than each one began to wonder whose boat that was. Oh, that is Jaques Pacomes'," said one; I know it quite well." 147



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THE PARIENTS' CABINET. was, and greatly afraid lest Frangois should catch them before they were off. The sea was as smooth as a lake, with a slight breeze off shore, which would greatly help them to get out. They ate their brown bread and drank their soup as fast as they could, and then, watching their opportunity, slipped out. Hector had already pushed the boat towards the water-and the tide being now fully in, it had but a very few feet further to go. In order to launch the boat Hector placed some beams of wood lying about the beach under the prow. This prevented the boat from sinking into the shingle, and allowed it to move easily. Thdrence helped; down went the boat into the water, and the children scrambled, regardless of wet feet, up the side of it. In a few minutes Hector got up the sail, and away they glided over the sea, as smoothly and as easily as if they had been in a boat on a pond. Then Therence and Hector looked at one another. What fun, Hector!" cried Therence. "Yes; is not it jolly?" answered he, and they laughed gaily. "All by ourselves, too!" said Therence. I wonder what father and mother will say ?" I don't know; but they will be precious glad 176



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PASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK. part of the boat Therence had already nailed up a little crucifix, in order to assure her father from all harm. Meanwhile Therence began to think the priest was never coming out of the church; she was very nearly as tired of waiting as her brother. He was yawning and grumbling, for he was very anxious to see the boat really launched. The tide was now just on the turn; when it was fully in, the little boat was to be launched for the first time, and to make its first voyage after herrings and mackerel. I say, Therence," said Hector, suddenly swinging himself off the table, and coming out into the porch, to her, "Father has promised to take me out with him to-day in the new boat! Won't that be jolly But what, after all, do you think we had best call her ? " Shan't we call her after mother?" said Thdrence. "C atharine? That's a woman's name; can't you think of any other name, Therence ?" said Hector. I should like her to be called Dreadnought, or something like that." Therence laughed. "Nothing will satisfy you, Hector; I have proposed such a lot of names, and you don't approve of any. For the last week you have altered her name every day. You know well enough what I want to call her." "What? said Hector. "c Why, Mopse, after your dear doggie." 135



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CONTENTS. PAGE PASSE-TOUT : OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK 133 GEOGRAPHY ... .202 UNCLE JOHN AT THE CAPE OF GOOD HOPE *. 211 GEORGE HART .....231 ELECTRICAL EELS ....250 THE CATERPILLAR AND BUTTERFLY ...256 I. 5-2 131



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ELECTRICAL EELS. selves by repeated attacks on the intruders. During a long time they seem to prove victorious. Several horses sink beneath the violence of these invisible strokes which they receive from all sides, and, stunned by the frequency and force of the electric shocks, disappear under the water. Others panting, with mane erect and haggard eyes, raise themselves and endeavour to escape. They are driven back by the Indians into the middle of the water, so that only a few regain the shore, stumbling at every step. These stretch themselves on the sand exhausted with fatigue, and their limbs benumbed by the electric shocks of the gymnoti. The eels being four, five, or even six feet long, press themselves against the bellies of the horses, and in so doing give a shock of considerable extent; not in one point merely, as when we receive a shock from the jar of an electrifying machine. The horses are probably not killed by the gymnoti, but only stunned. They are drowned, from the impossibility of rising amid the struggle between'the other horses and the eels. We had little doubt but that the fishing would end by the death of all the animals engaged; but by degrees the fierceness of the combat diminished, and the wearied gymnoti dispersed. They require a long rest, and abundant nourishment to restore what they have lost of electrical force. The mules and horses appear less frightened, their manes are no longer 0OZQ



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PASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK. and drink. But Conscience seemed to have to make an effort before he could find anything to say. Where is my nephew, dear ?" at last Conscience said. "I do not see him here to-day ? " No," said Frangois, "lie was obliged to go over to Honfleur this morning to sell fish; we poor people cannot all afford to be idle at once, you know. It's a pity, though You have not seen him for a long time. I should have liked you to see him; he has grown quite a fine young fellow. But he never will be such a good sailor as Hector; he does not like the sea." That's a pity, as it must be his business," replied Conscience. Leon was Francois' eldest son, a young man about twenty years old. He had gone to sea to help his father, otherwise he would have much preferred to be a land labourer. As he grew older, he felt very much being obliged to give his father all his earnings. He thought he should like one day to have a home of his own ; but yet when he saw the distress they were sometimes in at home, he thought it was his duty to do all he could to increase the comfort of the family. All these reflections made him grow very grave, and feel sometimes a little disappointed. It was thoughts like these, also, that made Conscience Malais now sit so silent and so thoughtful. He was thinking how much all this dinner of fish 141



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THE PATENTS' CABINET. coldly, for she guessed that her uncle had come after his money, and thought him very stern and cruel in insisting on being paid. Conscience went in and spoke to Catharine, and then said he should sit down and wait for Francois, as he wanted to see him very particularly. He had determined not to say anything more to Catharine, but to wait until he could see Franqois. He therefore sat quietly down, and tried to talk to her on different subjects; but he looked so grave and sad that Catharine herself could not help asking him what was the matter. "None of the children are ill, I hope, Conscience ? and Dorothee, she still continues better ?" "6 Thank you," said Conscience they are all quite well--all except my poor wife; but, oh, Catharine, they have carried off Bernard, and if Francois cannot pay me, I do not know what we are to do. Dorothee is almost out of her mind." What do you mean?" said Catharine. I mean that they have taken him to Cherbourg, and he will be sent off to the Baltic or Black Sea." Good God!" cried Catharine, turning pale. And Leon--" "They tell me men are very much wanted at Cherbourg," continued poor Conscience, I cannot get a substitute under 301. Bernard, poor fellow, is such a good sailor." 156



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\ PASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISIING SMIACK. anxious to know how they all were, particularly if they had heard anything of Leon. He said if he was not much wanted at home he should stay another month or two, as his employer still had work for him, and he could earn much more there than at home. Also he was learning to write. The same old sailor who wrote for him now was helping him to learn, and he was very desirous of perfecting himself in this art before he left. As a proof of his progress he signed his name at the bottom. Thdrence was sadly disappointed at this news; the flowers she had taken so much care of for him would be all dead and gone before he came home, and there would be nothing but cold winter to welcome him home when he came. But there was no help for it; so she went and begged fourpence of her mother, to pay the postage of a letter to Hector, and then went up the village to the schoolmaster, to ask him to write for her, and give Hector all the news of the family since his departure. FranCois had by this time regained his strength and was again able to work. By their united efforts, and particularly by Thdrence and Hector's industry, they were once more saved from want. Still, there was no hope of ever repaying Conscience. Thdrence took advantage of this state of comparative comfort to ask her mother to let her keep a penny a week out of her earnings for herself. This 7-2 195



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THE PAbENTS' CABINET. "No; it is Pierre's. There is one I don't know. Mere Alain, whose is that boat to the eastwards ?" Ah, it is 'Passe-tout,," cried Hector; I am sure it is, Therence, I know her. I should know her a thousand miles off." Catharine's heart beat fast, she scarcely dared hope it, her eyes were dim, she could not see. But the boat came nearer and nearer. At last Franeois and Leon were to be seen on the deck. On it came, before all the others, leaving a little white trail of foam behind it as it cut through the waves. In another instant it touched the beach. Now they are pulling it up; and now Franiois is embracing his wife and children once more. Very little fish had been caught that night, the storm had been so violent. One boat had been lost, and the family that had assembled anxiously on the beach to watch for the return of the father, now went away home in great distress. Everybody tried to show them some little kindness. One sent some fish for the children's dinner, another went to help their mother-poor Mbre Alain -for they were very poor. Little Therence begged her mother to let her take some of the pennies she had earned making lace to the poor people, and as Catharine consented, she ran off with her twopence, a very large present from her. She felt very sad when she thought 148



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PASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK. had been to Honfleur the day before. He was an old battered-looking man, who had been a very kind neighbour of theirs. He came in and sat down in the porch; and, after giving the children a few friendly pats, he said to Catharine, that he had seen Leon the day before at Honfleur; and then, putting his hand into his pocket, pulled out a dirty piece of paper on which a few words were scribbled in pencil. It was from Leon, who was the only one of the family who could write. It was instantly given to Therence, who after great trouble spelled out the following words: "C DEAR MIOTHER, "Jaques Pacome will give you this, and tell you all about me. Keep up your spirits and don't fret about me. In the autumn I hope we shall all meet again. Next week I am off to the Baltic on board the Vigilant.' "Your affectionate son, LEON GRANDET." Old Jaques Pac6me told them that he had seen more than half a dozen fine young men taken off the day before at Honfleur, for the service," as he called the Navy. Therence had to read the letter over and over again. Catharine, in spite of her fears, would not believe that her daughter read it right. 171



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PASSE-TOUT: OR, TIE NEW FISHING SMACK. you would be ill, when I went away. Do you remember that night ? She laughed. I should think so!" We will go out again together some day," he said; "I've grown stronger now, and you need not be afraid. Look here, Therrie, what I have got!" and he put his hand into his pocket and pulled out nearly eight shillings. "I have saved all that while I have been away, and uncle is going to put it into the savings' bank' for me, but I could not help briinging it on to show you first." Therence's eyes glistened. What a lot you have got, Hector! I have been saving also, but I have only got one shilling at present. What shall we do with it all? " That's what I have been asking uncle, and he advises me to put it into a savings' bank, because then, he says, I shall be put out of all temptation of spending it. Hallo, Mopse !" he cried, interrupting himself. "Poor old Mopse! How are you, old boy ? Glad to see your master again, you dear old doggie," lie added, as the dog jumped up to lick his face and hands, wagging his tail frantically all the time. "Come to supper, children!" cried Catharine, who had been getting everything she could that she thought the hungry young people would like. What a merry evening they had! Hector and 199



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PASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK. and blushing very much. Will that do, Hector?" she whispered in his ear. "I could not think of anything else except Catharine or Mopse, and you did not like them." Oh, yes; that does splendidly. That is exactly the sort of name I wanted. I mean that it shall be before all." And you commander-in-chief, of course ?" asked his sister, mischievously. Yes, Th6rence. If father only would let me. Oh, I wish I were not a child. If I only had the strength of a man, would not I do a number of things. Iwould But Therence had turned aside to look after the procession of people, who were following the priest up the village, singing hymns. Dive is almost too small even to be called a village, being entirely composed of a few scattered fishers' huts, from the centre of which rises the little white spire of the church. Everything, however, looked bright and pleasant this day, in spite of the poverty and dirt of the huts. The sky was bright and blue; and the sea so calm that the waves seemed scarcely bigger than the ripples on a pond. The voices of the people singing also sounded very pretty, as they walked along through the village, the sounds getting fainter and fainter till they died away altogether. Hector was for going along the ground to dabble 137





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THE PARENTS' CABINET. sat on a box, sobbing and crying for some time. Presently, he thought of his aunt's kind look and words, when he told her he had broken her china vase. She had said to him, I am very sorry, George, for I liked my pretty vase, but I am glad you have told me yourself. I love an honest boy, better than twenty vases." I will go and tell them," said George. "I dare say my aunt will not like me to be in this room again; I cannot help it, but I will tell the truth." He rubbed his red eyes, and walked bravely, though sorrowfully, into his aunt's room. When he saw kind little Kate run up to kiss him, because she saw he was in trouble, he burst out crying, and could hardly speak. His aunt told him to take time, and she spoke kindly to him. The moment he sobbed out the word bird," Kate ran to the workshop to look for her dear favourite, and when she saw the empty cage, her cry was as loud as George's. Poor Kate forgot her love to George; she only thought of the loss of her bird; and when she returned to the parlour, she hid her head in her mamma's lap, as she sobbed out, Mamma, dear, I don't like George to stay here any more, he spoils all our things. I shall never see my sweet little bird again. Dear mamma, must George spoil all our things ?" How ashamed George felt, how sorry that he had done wrong. When his aunt had heard George explain how the 238



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PASSE-TOUT: OR, THI1 NEW FISHING SMACK. "Don't say a word about this, child, to your brother when he comes home; do you hear?" said Catharine, quite sharply, without paying any attention to what Therence was saying. "He 'll be wanting to go in Bernard's place; I know he will." Therence stared at her mother in astonishment. She was quite frightened and puzzled. She sat down trembling to her lace pillow again, while Catharine went out after her brother in much agitation. As Therence sat there alone she began thinking of what Leon had so often said, about the way they lived-how he regretted that money his father had borrowed, how he had worked to help to repay itall to no avail, as she knew only too well. Then she thought of her mother's words, don't tell him, or he '11 want to go in Bernard's place." It was dreadful to think that they were the cause of her uncle's distress. Ought Leon to go ?," she asked herself. But the thought of all the unknown dangers and hardships he would have to go through so frightened her that she was afraid to answer the question. Unable to bear being left alone any longer, she jumped up and ran out after her mother. The tide was in and the sea very rough. Several fishing smacks were in sight, and rapidly approaching the shore. One of the foremost was "Passetout." 159





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THE PARENTS' CABINET OF AMIUSEMENT AND INSTRUCTION, PASSETOUT: On, THE NEW FISHING SMACK. ONE fine morning, in the village of Dive in Normandy, a large crowd of people were gathered on the sea beach round a new fishing boat. The bells of the village church were ringing merry peals, and many people were still coming out at the church door. It was not Sunday, but there had been a short service this morning previous to the ceremony of blessing the new boat, which the village priest was about to perform. All the people as they issued from the church porch directed their steps towards the groups on the beach. On a bench, before the door of a poor cottage hard by, a fisherman, by name Fran9ois Grandet, was II. 133



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TIE PARENTS' CABINET. Many people were already waiting on the beach with baskets to help unload the boats. Passe-tout" was now so close in that Hector and his father could easily be distinguished. Near in-shore the breakers were very large, and the little boat was tossed up and down with great violence. Just as they were nearing the shore, the boat gave a violent lurch, and Francois, who was lowering the sail, was suddenly pitched over the side into the water. There was a great cry on the beach. It was a moment of breathless anxiety to Catharine. Fortunately Hector did not lose his presence of mind, but he had as much as he could do to steer the boat clear of the, groins. It was impossible for him to render his father any assistance. Francois was a good swimmer, and struggled manfully against the waves. Two of the men on the beach made an effort to assist him, but were both instantly knocked down by the first sea. Hector, as soon as he could, flung a rope out of the boat to his father. Francois caught at it; he was quite exhausted, struggling against the force of the waves with all his heavy clothes on. The boat was quite close in-shore and at the mercy of the breakers, which were very violent. Hector was at his wits' end, and evidently losing all his presence of mind. Conscience saw there was 160



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PASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK. nice, trustworthy cabin-boy; if he went at once he might still be in time to get the place." Oh, no; don't send him away so far. He is so young," cried Catharine. "How's he to get there ? I have got no money to give him," said Fran9ois, gloomily. "If he could get there by to-morrow evening," continued old Jaques, "he might be able to get a place as cabin-boy on board one of the boats that ply between Havre and Southampton. They would give him half his first quarter's wages in advance, too!" Would they ?" said Franqois. It is a pity you can't make the exertion to send him. Half what he earns will be enough to keep him and he can send you the rest; it is better than starving here." Do you really think it would be a good thing for him? There would be no danger?" asked Catharine. "Danger no; what are you thinking of ?" said the old man. If you take my advice, you'll give him a few shillings and send him off. I am going to Honfleur to-morrow morning, and I will take him with me as far as that. If he gets the place he can send you back the money instantly. It will only be a temporary inconvenience. I must be off now, though, for I am precious tired after all this, 191



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THE PARiENTS' CABINET. lamenting over their hard fate. Franiois awoke; he was very feverish and restless, and she had as much as she could do to soothe and tend him. He was also in great pain, and although he did not say much, she could see how he suffered from the expression of his face. She sat up all night with him. As the hours of the night wore on, she began once more to think of Leon. He ought to have returned at least by eight o'clock; it was now near midnight, and no Leon was yet to be seen. He must have been detained by something, and will be back in time for the morning tide, I 've no doubt," she said, half aloud, as if to convince herself. But, in reality, the fear that he had been seized and carried off to Cherbourg was becoming every instant stronger. Towards morning, quite worn out with fatigue, she fell asleep and was awakened by Therence, who had been out the first thing with Hector to unload their father's boat, which had been forgotten in the hurry and confusion of the preceding day. Catharine, who had been dreaming of Leon, awoke with a start, and instantly exclaimed"What's the matter? Therence, where's your brother ?" Therence, thinking she meant Hector, replied quickly-168



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UNCLE JOHN AT THE CAPE OF GOOD HOPE. is one point of difference. The other part of the animal that is different is the hide. The African has a hide perfectly smooth, while the rhinoceros of Asia has a hide full of thick folds; but the animal of both countries likes to wallow in the mud, and the sense of smell in both is very keen, and the eye very small." "What do they eat?" said Arthur. "Green boughs and bushes, and any kind of vegetable," said his uncle; "and they seem to be able to conquer every animal but the elephant. I should not have escaped so easily from the rhinoceros that rushed past me if he had had a better sight. But this animal can only see in a straight line." "Was the rhinoceros that came out upon you angry ?" asked Oliver. "I rather think not, for he did not root up the ground with his horns. I think the elephants had alarmed him, and that he was running away from them. It is a curious sight to see how easily these beasts can split open trees with their sharp horns." "How many elephants did you kill altogether in this hunt?" asked Oliver. "I did not even kill one," replied his uncle, "but the hunter and his men killed five. The last three were caught in a narrow pass between the hills, where they were quietly feeding on the bushes, and 227



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GEOGRAPHY. TIIE word Geography" means description of the earth," and when our young readers see that word at the top of the page, they may expect to find a description of something relating to the earth. Among grown-up people, the greater number see but a small part of the earth. Their business confines them to one country, and frequently to a small part of that country. Among young people very few indeed ever travel many miles from home. How delightful, then, it must be to them to be made acquainted, by means of a description, with every thing relating to the earth on which they live: and who can doubt whether the study of geography be interesting or useful ? Size and Shlape of the Earth. The earth is a large round body, not a perfect globe, but in shape somewhat resembling an orange. But while an orange measures about nine inches round, the earth measures about 25,000 miles. It is upon the surface, that is, the outside of this 202



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UNCLE JOHN AT TIE CAPE OF GOOD HOPE. out, I will try to find out the foot-marks of the English animals round the pond on the common. Go on, uncle, I want to come to the elephants." "And so did we, Master Oliver," said Uncle John, and accordingly we walked on in spite of the intense heat. The heat of the sun at mid-day made me ready to drop with fatigue, and as we marched on, I began to feel that I should not be able to continue doing so much longer. Towards evening our search was becoming hopeless, no elephant had been seen, and I told the hunter that I must stop a while to rest. Not now,' said he, for I am sure that at this very instant I see a troop of elephants passing over yonder hill.' I looked, but could see nothing; but the news made me agree to go on, and we took care to ascend the hill before us with the wind in our faces." What for ? asked Oliver. "That the animals might not smell us, which they would have done if the wind had blown from us to them, instead of from them to us," replied his uncle. We marched on, one after the other, along a narrow rocky path, which skirted one bank of a small hollow, and we saw the huge beasts feeding on the opposite bank." Now for it," cried Oliver, "present, fire, bang, they are shot." 4-.,



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TIE PARENTS' CABINET. You see he was not a cross boy. How happened it, then, that all his cousins wished him to leave them at the end of the first fortnight? I will tell you the reason. As soon as George saw a new thing, he liked to touch it and to play with it. He did not stop to ask, "May I touch this ? May I play with that ?" I am sure he did not wish to spoil his cousins' things, but he did spoil a great many. The very first day of his visit, he saw some pretty pink flowers on a small tree in Fred's garden. As George had lived in London, he knew very little about trees and flowers. He had gathered butter-cups and daisies in the Green Park in London, and he thought he should like to pick those pretty pink flowers; so he plucked them all off, and stuck one beautiful sprig in his hat: the tree was a young peach-tree. When Fred came into the garden and saw his nice peach-tree without one blossom, and a fine branch in George's hat, he felt quite vexed; the tears were in his eyes, but as he was a brave boy, he tried to stop them, Oh! George," said he, what have you done? How could you touch my beautiful blossoms? I shall not have one peach this year: all my nice juicy peaches that I thought I should give papa and mamma are gone. Why did you touch things that lid not belong to you? " I am sure I am very sorry, Fred," said George, but I did not know before that fruit-trees had 234



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,,4



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THE PARENTS' CABINET. "Not quite in such double-quick time, young man, do you kill an elephant," said his -uncle, as you will learn. The hunter and the men halted; and the hunter bade me and the little boy make a light, and set fire to the bushes and grass, and then, in case the animals should rush our way, to run as fast as possible to the fire." Oh, incle and did they rush your way ?" cried Arthur. "I felt rather odd, to see myself only twenty yards from such a number of these enormous creatures, who, if they had charged forwards, must have trampled us to death," said Uncle John. Why, you could have got out of the way," said Oliver. "Pray, which way would that have been ? asked his uncle. Until they begin to run, no one can know what direction these beasts will take. There we saw them quietly feeding on the long grass and bushes, and flapping their large ears, and looking very lazy. Myself and the boy lighted a bush, and before it had burnt up into a flame, we heard a shot fired, and then another, and the elephants began running. We saw one totter as he ran, halt a little, and then fall, rise up again, and fall again. His groans were terrible. We went up to him: a ball had pierced the shoulder, and reached the heart." 218



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THE PARIENTS CABINET. us, when I should be sufficiently rested, and able to follow them, to light fires all up the hill to mark our course. The hunter and Hottentots then quitted us in pursuit of the elephants." "I don't think you were very wise to stay behind, uncle," said Richard. I don't think I was," said his uncle; "but I was too tired to care for anything. I had lost not only my fear of the wild animals, but even the more reasonable fear of losing myself in the wild places I was in. I threw myself on the ground, and watched the sun sinking, and the beautiful colours of the sky for more than half an hour. I do not remember ever to have found a bed or sofa so agreeable as the grass was to me at that time. "For half an hour I rested on the ground, and then with the boy, who had been very impatient at my delay, mounted the hill by the elephant track. The valley we had just left, was so thickly covered with high bushes and trees, that we could not see through them. Slowly were we climbing up the hill, and trailing our guns after us, when we heard the heavy gallop of a large animal approaching. My little companion was blowing a lighted stick, in order to set fire to the bush, as the hunter had desired. "Listen I said, do you hear anything?' The boy began to look quite alarmed, and in a moment he ran away from the sound, while I ran up the hill, not 220



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THE PARENTS' CABINET. It will require a littleattention, and more than one reading, to understand and remember thoroughly the description here given of the earth's motions. But will nbt your pains be well rewarded? Will it not be delightful to understand that the length of the year is measured by the time which the earth takes in making the circuit of the sun-that the year is divided into three hundred and sixty-five days, because, while the earth is making the circuit of the sun, it makes three hundred and sixty-five spins or revolutions round two points on its surfacethat during each revolution it is night over one half of the earth, and day-light over the other half-that our summer is caused by that point round which the earth revolves or spins, which England is nearest to, being less distant from the sun than the otherand that our winter is caused by that same point to which England is nearest being more distant from the sun than the other ? 210



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ELECTRICAL EELS. "PAPA," said Richard Bourne to his father, I wish you would lend me some entertaining book. I have been looking over your large books for a long time, and I can find nothing that looks very interesting. Can you lend me a book that you think I shall like ?" "Yes; I have one that I think will amuse you exceedingly; it is written by a celebrated naturalist and traveller, Baron von Humboldt, who has explored a large part of South America, and has travelled nearly all over the world." "But shall I understand it, papa ?" "Not the whole book, nor a quarter of it; but the parts that I have marked with a slip of paper you will readily understand." "Thank you, papa. But what a number of slips of paper in one volume. 'Living electrifying machines.' What can they be ?-' Fishing with horses.' How extraordinary !--' Means of killing crocodiles, that abound in immense numbers in the 250



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TIIE PARENTS' CABINET. smack had just put off. Leon would at any rate be too late to go out fishing to-day. What could he be about? While she was looking out, up came M. Bouvier, the doctor. He came in, stayed a few minutes, said Francois was going on very well, recommended Catharine to get him a softer mattress, to keep him warm, and added that in a few days some wine would be very good for him, without thinking whether she had the means to procure them. Then he began talking of a subject everybody was full of now-the war with Russia. Fortunately for Catharine the doctor did not stay long talking. She could not hear the war mentioned now without shuddering. But the work of the day must be done: she must bestir herself. Therence sat silently and sadly down in the doorway to work at her lace-making, while her mother washed up, made the black bread, and attended to Franpois. Even Hector's spirits were damped. He came and sat down to net by his sister's side, and asked her all that had happened with his uncle. The day wore away, and no Leon appeared. When evening came Catharine began to be quite ill with anxiety. What would they do, thus suddenly deprived of both the bread-winners of the family. Towards evening, came one of the fishermen, who 170



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PASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK. how gay they had been a few hours before, and now, how changed everything was. She thought, if it had been her father instead, that they would have been in an equal state of misery. These reflections made her feel very sorry for poor Mere Alain, as she was called, and she stayed there all day nursing the baby for her. Mere Alain had a little baby, that could not yet walk. As Therence was going home, she saw her brother Leon busy cleaning the boat, and she went up to talk to him of what her mind was now quite filled. "Poor Mere Alain!" she said, "what can we do for her, Leon? Do you know, she says, she does not know how ever she is to feed her children. And there is a poor little baby !" Have you been there, Thdrence? I would have gone too, but I could not, it made me feel so sad. I thought how nearly the same thing might have happened to us. I think Uncle Conscience is right after all, in spite of what father says. We ought to save, and I am determined to do it." But it is all very well for uncle," said Therence. He can afford to save, he is rich. Why, he has three boats of his own. How are we to save out of so little ? "Then, Therence, if we are too poor to save, we ought not to spend as we did yesterday. Suppose father and I had been lost last night, how much 149



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PASSE-TOUT: OR, TIIE NEW FISHING SMACK. In less than half an hour they were off, and poor Catharine was left all alone on the beach. It was indeed a weary day for her; how anxiously every hour passed; how she ran out whenever she fancied she saw a sail on the sea; and how bitterly disappointed she was, when it turned out to be nothing Twelve hours must at least pass before they could return, but although she knew this perfectly well, she could not help going constantly out on to the beach to look over the ocean. In the meantime, what really had become of the two children? They had gone off in great glee before a slight breeze. Hector managed to take the boat in the usual direction his father went. When they had gone out some way they had taken in their sail and spread their nets. Fish was very plentiful; and their first net contained so much, that they scarcely had strength enough to draw it up. After a great deal of tugging apd hauling, however, they succeeded in pulling it up. Oh, Hector," cried Therence, "did you ever see such a lot of fishes? Oh, how delighted they will be, and how surprised !" "O Oh, we will catch ever so much more before we have done. Come and help me put these into the baskets." 181



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ELECTRICAL EELS. rivers of South America'-' Mosquitoes considered a blessing.' Oh, is that possible?-' Intelligent monkeys.'-' Tortoise fisheries.'-.' Cow-tree.'-Oh, I know about that.-' Troops of wild horses-sagacity of the mules.' Oh, papa, what a number of interesting things! Which shall I read? let me see,'Living electrifying machines,' I will begin with that." Richard then read from Humboldt's narrative of his travels in South America, the following account of the Gymnoti, or electrical eels. These singular fish, which produce a shock exactly like that obtained from an electrical machine, abotmnd in the large rivers of South America, the Oronoco, the Amazon, and the Meta, but the strength of the current, and the depth of the water, prevent their being caught by the Indians. They see these fish less frequently than they feel electrical shocks from them when swimming in the river. In the neighbourhood of Calaboya, a small town in Venezuela, the ponds of stagnant water are filled with them. -At first we wished to examine one in the house we inhabited at Calaboya, but the dread of the electrical shocks of the gymnoti is so great among the people, that during three days we could not obtain one. Impatient of waiting, we set off on the 19th of March, at a very early hour, resolved to make our experiments on the borders of the water 251



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UNCLE JOHN AT THE CAPE OF GOOD HOPE. How did you know it was approaching ? asked Oliver. Because the second howl was louder and nearer than the first, and each succeeding howl louder still," replied his uncle. But I soon made these fellows keep their distance. I stirred up the fire, or put fresh wood on it, and the brisk flame made them quickly depart. Then I heard the croaking of the night raven, who was attracted by the smell of the dead elephant-and then a noise came so near, thaw? it awoke my little companion." What noise was that ? said Arthur. "It was a strange noise, something between a chattering and a howl. The boy begged me to heap up more wood and make a large blaze, for he knew by the noise that a hyena was near. The howl of this animal was the most unpleasant noise I had heard. At last day appeared, and we arose and took our guns and some lighted sticks from the fire, and again set off in search of our party. I soon saw that our fire had preserved us from being trampled to death that night, for the ground all around was marked with the fresh foot-prints of the elephants and buffaloes, whose galloping I had heard. We soon had the pleasure of meeting our friends. They had passed the night on one of the hills, not far from us." "You did not leave the hunter again, did you, uncle ?" said Arthur. II. 8 225



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PASSE-TOUT; OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK. self; she knew it must be past five o'clock, and yet they could see no land. She burst into tears. Hector himself was quite tired out too. "Don't cry, dear Therrie," he said, we will be all right soon. How cold you are! Here, take my coat. I am not a bit cold. Lie down and go to sleep. You are quite tired. I can manage the boat." For a long time Therence refused; but at last, in spite of herself, she went to sleep sitting up on the basket, and then fell off down on to the deck. Hector wrapped her up in his coat and made her as comfortable as he could. Ah! how lonely he felt now, out at sea by himself, with his sister tired and ill. He thought he should not have minded it half so much had he been by himself. But suppose anything happened to her, what could he do ? He climbed the mast and tied his red cotton handkerchief up there, in the hope that somebody might see it and come to help them. Meanwhile the wind rose higher and higher; it was dead off shore. He tacked about, but could make no way. Fortunately Therence was asleep. He did not think that there could be any danger in her sleeping. At last, in despair, he took down the sail. He could do nothing more. He could not steer the boat any 185



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THE PARENTS' CABINET. To think that her brother, so unceasing in his kindness to them in spite of all they had done, to whom they owed almost everything, even Franqois' life, should be brought into grief and misery by them What an awful return for such kindness! Her thoughts were embittered also by the reflection, that all had not been done that might have been done to pay off their debt. She remembered numberless little things in which the resources of the family had been wasted. Franqois and she had first trusted to the herrings to pay off Conscience; and when they had failed, Fran9ois had said, Well, we must wait for the spring now; when that comes we'll soon be all right, you'll see; besides, I know Conscience will wait; he does not want the money, you know." She closed her eyes and hid her face, that Conscience should not see her. But Conscience did not see her; his thoughts were far away in his own desolate home, and he was internally bracing himself to meet this inevitable misfortune as bravely as he could. Suddenly he felt Therence's little arms round his neck, and the child's head sobbing on his shoulder. She had left her supper, and, unable to eat any more, had climbed up on the table. "Dear uncle, can't we do anything? she sobbed out. 166



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PASSE-TOUT : OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK. waste time, for you cannot work with that bad finger. See, it is going to gather !" "What, and be out all night on the sea ?" said Thdrence, looking at her brother. "Yes; there is no danger in the world. But you are afraid. You are a regular girl." "There you are out," cried Therence; "and though I am a girl I believe I am as brave as you are, but I am not quite so strong." Will you come, then?" Yes. " All right, then. I will go and make everything ready," and off ran Hector in high spirits. He waited in great impatience until the few men who were on the beach had gone in for their afternoon meal, previous to putting out to sea, and then he set to work in the boat, arranging the fishing tackle, and making everything ready. Two or three times he was startled during this occupation, and once nearly caught by his father coming suddenly out of their cottage, right in front of the boat. But Hector laid himself down flat in the bottom, and covered himself over with a sail. In a few minutes Fran9ois went back again, and Hector resumed his work. At four o'clock Therence came to call her brother into supper. She was now quite as excited as he 175



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THE PARENTS' CABINET. When the old fisherman had gone, she gave way to all the despair she felt. How were they to live ? The fishing season would pass without their being able to make anything. The winter would come. Nothing could keep them from the most abject poverty, and should Conscience again insist on being paid and turn them out of their cottage, which was the only way he ever could get his money, she did not know what would become of them. She made a great effort, however, to overcome this feeling of despair. She worked all day, scarcely allowing herself time to sleep. Still, with her sick husband to attend to, in addition to all the other work of the cottage, she had not much time for lace-making. Therence worked very hard, but the poor little girl could not earn much with all her endeavours. Hector got occasionally a few pence for helping to unload the boats when they returned. But Dive is so poor a place, that there was scarcely any one who could give him any work. It was on Therence's earnings, then, chiefly that the family had to subsist. Occasional presents of fish was all that their friends could afford to give them. Catharine had to sell many of the poor articles the cottage possessed to get food that her husband could eat. Frangois himself, weak and depressed, did not 172



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THE PARENTS' CABINET. Several days passed, and everyone observed how much more careful George had become in asking leave before he touched things which were not his own. Sometimes, just at the very moment he was going to touch a thing, he stopped and put his hand behind him. Once he was in the breakfast-room, and one of the drawers of his aunt's cabinet was partly open. He had never seen the inside of this beautiful cabinet, and he could spy, through the open drawer, coloured shells, bright sparkling stones, and something like little twigs of trees, only of a deep red colour. Oh, how George did wish to open that drawer a little wider! but he thought of the bird, and he did not touch the drawer, or anything in it. His aunt was engaged with visitors, and the time seemed very long till they left; but he waited patiently, and then ran to his aunt. "Pray, dear aunt," said George, "may I look at the curious things in your cabinet? One drawer is open, but I have not touched it." Then, I will show you what you desire, directly," said his aunt, and she took out the open drawer, and placed it on a chair for him, Oh, dear aunt, do tell me all about these things; but stop a miinute, I will fetch Kate; she will be so much pleased." He soon found Kate, and they both returned together to the breakfast-room. "Now, aunt, we are 242



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THE PARENTS' CABINET. ceeded in making outlines somewhat resembling those animals: but not until the rhinoceros that Oliver had drawn, had been rubbed out more than six times, because he could not put the two horns in the right place on the nose. 230



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THE PARENTS' CABINET. Oh, wait a minute, wait till Passe-tout' is out of sight. See how gallantly she goes before the wind!" The two children stood a few minutes looking over the sea at the little dark speck which was now all that could be seen of their father's boat, and then turned silently away and walked slowly homewards. They were both quite tired out, although they had scarcely done anything all day. The unsatisfactory feeling of idleness, added to the disappointments they had both had, had taken away all their spirits. Thdrence helped her mother to put the cottage in order, while Hector set to work to mend a heap of fishing nets. Then Catharine gave them some broth for their supper and sent them to bed. The wind was howling, the rain beat against the windows; it was a very wild night. Catharine herself could not go to bed, she was too anxious after her husband and son, out on that stormy sea. She sat down to mend her husband's clothes, and every now and then took a peep in to see if the children slept. "What's the matter, mother dear?" asked Therence, awakened by the sudden flash of light in her eyes from Catharine's candle. "Nothing, dear. Have you been asleep?" "That's not the wind that I hear, is it, mother ?" 146



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PASSE-TOUT: 0R, THE NEW FISHING SMACK. more courage and skill. Spring was now again close at hand. The time had come when Conscience ought to be repayed. In fact, it had more than come, for it was now more than seven months since #Francois had borrowed it, and he had promised to repay it in six. They had entreated for another month. Francois had been making great efforts to get the necessary sum of money together. Fish was still very scarce, however. Leon was sent out on fine days in the old boat, which they had managed to make pretty watertight again, to take up the lobster baskets, while Francois and Hector went out to sea in Passe-tout. Meanwhile Conscience had already been over once for his money. He was in want of it he said. He wanted to place his son as apprentice to a shipwright at Havre, and could not without that 201. 12s. that Frangois -owed him. Catharine was alone at home when he came. She told her brother that he was very hard. That her husband had only borrowed 201., and that it was very unjust to insist on his paying all that more, when he could so ill afford it. Conscience said, that he had lent him the 201. at 5 per cent. "I do not understand anything about your 5 per cents.," said Catharine quite crossly; all I know is 153



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PASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK. dry clothes. She did not see till afterwards that his clothes were wet, when she found a pool of water on the cottage floor, where he had been standing. As for Therence, she had never seen any one in such a state before; she thought her father was dead. It was only after three-quarters of an hour, that Frangois began to recover his senses. The doctor came and set his arm. Conscience stood by, holding Francois all the time, as the sight of the pain he was suffering quite overcame poor Catharine. When the operation was over, the doctor, M. Bouvier, gave him some stimulants to revive him, said he would send him a soothing draught, and then left, desiring them to keep Francois very quiet, as he feared it might prove very serious. Meantime the day had worn away and evening was now closing in. Everybody had been so much occupied that no one had observed how quickly the time passed. Conscience, who had been doing all he possibly could to assist Catharine, now began to think he must go. His clothes had dried on him, and he felt stiff and cold. Franiois was at last quiet, they hoped asleep, and all was order again in the cottage. The children were eating their supper; the others had no heart to eat anything. Catharine was sitting sadly, with 6-2 163



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TIE PARENTS' CABINET. feet long, with a knot at one end to hinder the string slipping quite through.l If your ball be a white one, so much the better. Holding the string by the end at which there is no knot, raise the ball to a level with the candle, at a little distance from the table. Having done this, you may fancy, if you choose, that the candle is the sun, and the ball the earth. Look at the ball attentively, and you will observe that the light of the candle shines on one-half of the ball, while the other half is in darkness. Having observed this, next, while you hold the string up steadily with one hand, give the ball a spin round with the other. You will then observe, that though the light of the candle continues to shine, as before, on only one half of the ball, the half in the light and the half in the dark are not, as before, always the same. Should you wish to make this appear more plainly, stick a red wafer on your ball towards that end of the string which you hold in your hand; and as the ball spins round and round you will see the wafer "* It is strongly recommended that this part b3 not read without having a real ball and candle. 204



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THE PARENTS' CABINET. breath, and scarcely able to support Francois any longer, she tried to take her husband from her brother's arms and to carry him herself. "No, Catharine; you are not strong enough," Conscience said, as soon as he could draw breath. Run home, and light the fire, and get Frangois' bed ready. He is stunned; we must put him to bed directly. Don't be frightened; he'll soon come to." With the assistance of another man, Conscience carried Francois up the beach to his cottage. Hector and Therence followed after, carrying their uncle's jacket and boots, that he had not stopped to put on. When they began to undress Frangois, Conscience, who was chafing his limbs trying to restore animation, found that the accident was more serious than he had at first imagined, and that Francois' right arm was broken. Hector was sent off at once for the doctor. Franqois all this time remained quite unconscious. He had had a heavy blow on the head. Catharine, at a loss what to do for him till the doctor should arrive, forgot everything in her distress and anxiety about her husband. Her brother stood by, rubbing and slapping Francois' feet and hands to rouse him, in his dripping wet clothes. He was too busy to feel cold, or even wet, and Catharine never thought of offering him any 162'



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PASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK. right, he had no doubt, and be quite as good after all, as their cousins, over whom such a fuss was made. Nevertheless he was very glad to be able to borrow 201. of Conscience, to build a new boat with when the old one was worn out and unseaworthy. Yet he knew the boat would some time or another wear out, and that, if he lived, he would want another. But he was growing an old man now; and not having got while young the habit of saving, he could not now deny himself. Therence was very pretty; he liked to see her look smart. He used to say, it was all very well for the Malais to be dressed so plainly, because they none of them had any good looks to boast of. And as for Hector, there was not such another boy in all France. Leon was too grave and gentle by nature to be a very great favourite with his father, but Catharine was very fond of him; indeed, it is hard to say which of all three she loved best. When the dinner was over, the men all went outside to sit on benches and barrels before the door, to drink cider and smoke, while the women employed themselves in collecting their various children previous to going home. Poor Therence, tired and a little peevish with doing nothing, went to take off her weary finery, and ran out to join Hector.



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THE PARENTS' CABINET. While she was standing at the door laughing at her father's surprise and joy at suddenly recognising Leon, up came the postman. He actually had time to stop before she saw him, but when he put into her hand a letter directed in a large round hand to "Therence Grandet," she gave a great squeak of delight, and bounced with one bound right into the middle of the room. "Mother, here's a letter from Hector! Oh, what a lot of goodness at once;" and she performed a dance that would have been worthy of a North American Indian. Oh! he says he will be home in two or three days; and off she ran to the beach not to lose an instant in giving this good news to her father and brother. And Hector had written all the letter himself. How proud she was of it! Before the end of the week Hector appeared in company with his cousin Bernard, who had also returned home. Hector had stopped on his way home at Honfleur to see his uncle, and had persuaded his cousin to come on with him to see them all. He had grown strong and manly, and looked uncommonly well. Well, Therrie! and how are you, dear, after all this long time ?" he said. '" I was dreadfully afraid 198



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THE PARENTS' CABINET. she resolutely put by, under the hope of one day getting enough to repay her uncle. But Conscience had quite given up all hope of ever seeing that money again; and, therefore, like a wise man, he set to work to do without it. He felt that Frangois was now too old to learn, evenr from so severe a lesson as he had just had, and he did not wish to be paid out of the savings of Francois' children. "I ought to have known him better than to lend it him; I have known him long enough," said he to himself. Of poor Leon, all this time nothing had been heard, and his mother often felt anxious and sick at hearty when she thought of him. The summer and autumn had gradually vanished meantime, and winter was now again close at hand. Therence began once more to look forward to her dear brother's return. As she sat at work she often used to wonder whether he would have grown and altered much, whether he would find her much changed: she hoped he would not, although she feared he would now be too big and too grand to play with her. One day while she was sitting alone at the window working and thinking of all these things, for the weather was now too cold to sit out under the porch, she was suddenly startled by the appearance of a 1968



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TIE PARENTS' CABINET. Come, dear George," said the kind little girl, I have got such beautiful little things to show you; don't thinkVf the bird any more: you did not mean to let hfm fly away, and indeed I do not wish you to go home now." George jumped up to kiss Kate, and away they both ran to the poultry-yard. Oh, what nice little things," said George, "I never saw young ducklings before; they are all covered with soft down instead of feathers; look, look, Kate, at that greedy one, he can hardly swallow the slug he has in his beak, and that other little fellow is trying to get it from him. Oh, they have tumbled down. How weak they are But cannot they swim? Why do they not go into the pond, instead of drinking the dirty water in the puddles ? Let us put them into the pond." No; we must not," said Kate, the cold water would kill them. Last spring we had some sweet little ducklings just like these; James and I wished very much to see them swim, and I will tell you what we did. We tried a long time to make them swim in the pond; but every time we put them in they came back again. At last James found a plank of wood, and we thought it would be good fun to set them all afloat on it: so we put the five ducklings on the plank and pushed it off. When the plank was in the middle of the pond, James, with a 240



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PASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK. great bearded man, who coolly opened the cottage door and walked in. For the instant she did not recognise him, he was so weather-beaten. "How d'ye do, Th4rence?" said he, coming and taking her up in his arms. Where is mother ?" Leon!" she cried, "are you really come home at last ? Oh, let me go, let me go, and tell mother," and struggling out of his arms she rushed out of the door round to the back of the cottage, where she knew her mother was chopping wood. Mother, mother!" she cried, panting for breath, "here is Leon come home! Be quick! be quick! he has such a great beard." Catharine threw down the chopper and ran in, scarcely able to believe her ears. Leon caught her in his arms. "Dear, dear mother! How little I thought I should ever see you again! How are you all? Father, Hector, where are they? Come here, Therrie, and let's have a look at you. What a great girl you have grown !" He kissed her affectionately. Catharine told him as quickly as she could, all that had happened. Just then they saw Fran ois' boat coming in. Leon ran out to help him, while Catharine and Therence stayed at home to prepare supper for them. Therrie was jumping about and singing with delight. 197





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TIE PARENTS' CABINET. the hunters fired so skilfully upon them that they fell dead in a few minutes." "What did you do with them when they were killed ?" asked Arthur. We took the ivory tusks, and then we cut out such parts of the animals as we wanted for food," said his uncle. "Food," cried Oliver; "what! eat elephantmeat? I never heard of such a thing in my life." "Very likely," said Uncle John; and yet I have eaten elephant-meat-and let me tell you, that it is very good meat, especially when a man is hungry." Aye, but it is not so good as beef and mutton," said Oliver. "I thought differently when I ate it, young man," said his uncle. "I found it very relishing. We took from one of the elephants the trunk and one foot, and then opened the body -and took out the heart, part of which we also meant to eat. We tied up the whole lot with a strip cut from his huge flappy ear, and we left the rest of the body as food for the vultures, hyenas, and wolves." "Pray, uncle, tell me one thing," said Arthur. "Did you eat the elephant's flesh raw?" "No, my dear; I don't think I could eat even beef or mutton in that state. We made a fire, and 228



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THE PARENTS' CABINET. should catch no end of fish. You would help me to spread the nets." "But father will never let you have the boat, I know," said Thdrence. "Why should he know anything about it? iHe will be sure to forgive us, when he sees howmuch fish we bring home." It was now about a month since the accident, and Francois, unable to do anything, was strolling about sadly, with his arm in a sling. The two children were sitting in the porch talking in an under tone, which they ceased as their father drew near. Therence had lost all her good looks, and was pale and thin from insufficient clothing, and stooping continually over her lace pillow. Francois stood looking at them a few minutes, and then turned aside, sighing heavily. Should you be afraid to go ? whispered Hector, as soon as his father had gone away. "I afraid!" said Therence: "no; I was only thinking whether it would be right." "What harm can there be? We shan't hurt the boat. We will only go if the sea is very calm. That is why I want you to make up your mind quickly. The sea is like a river to day, and it will be high-water about half-past four or five. We can slip out after supper, nobody will miss us; and even supposing we do not catch much, it will not be 174



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THE PARENTS' CABINET. her head leaning on her hands, by her husband's bedside. Conscience rose to go. After the misfortunes of the day, he scarcely liked to ask again for his money. He sighed heavily as he thought of his poor wife at home, and of Bernard's calm resignation. Sister," he said, at last, it is seven o'clock. I must be off. I have a long way to walk." Catharine got up; she looked very pale. "Goodbye, Conscience," she said. You have saved my husband's life to-day, and how I am ever to thank you, indeed, I do not know-or those poor children either." "Can Fran9ois pay me, Catharine? said he, in a low voice. She shook her head, and burst into tears. There was an instant's silence, during which Catharine in vain attempted to control herself: at last she said, making a violent effort, Brother, I don't know when ever we'shall be able to pay you. I will pay you a few pennies every week ; that will be the best way. If we keep it in the house, it is sure to go somehow; I don't know how, I'm sure! But you have saved dear Francois' life, and we cannot, must not, let you lose your son through our means. You cannot pay a substitute-take-take Leon instead You have already paid for him," and she burst into tears, and covered her face with her apron. 164



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GEORGE HART. ready," said George. His aunt showed him a mothero'-pearl shell, a pod of the cotton-tree, a hummingbird's nest, a piece of a sugar-cane, a fire-fly, a stone that is used in some countries instead of glass, and many other curious things. She explained where all these things came from, and told them many entertaining facts they had never heard before. "I like to look at these things so much," said George, "do not you, Kate ?" Yes, that I do," said Kate; "and I am very glad you fetched me, I like to look at new things with you." When the children had seen all the curiosities in two drawers, Kate's mamma told them she had not time to explain anything more that day; but if she were not busy the next day, she would show them some more. Then she placed the drawers in the cabinet, and Kate and George went into the garden. When the weather was fine, George could easily amuse himself in the garden or poultry-yard, while his cousins were at school; but it was very dull in wet weather to walk about the house, and see the workshop open, and know he must not go in. He might play with his bricks, or his dissected maps, or paint pictures in the parlour; but he did not always wish to play with his bricks, and he could not paint or put his maps together without Kate's 243 4



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THE PARENTS' CABINET. When Kate said this, George ran to his aunt, and hugging her round the neck, he said, May I do whatever I like with my squirrel? " Yes, my dear, you may," replied his aunt. "Then, Kate, dear, you shall have it," said George, "for I have nothing else to give you, and I like you to have it." While he said this, the tears were in his eyes, for he thought the squirrel so very pretty that he could hardly part with it. No, no," said little Kate, "I am very much obliged to you, George, but I do not wish to have the squirrel. Do not think of my bird any more; I shall be very happy to feed and clean your pretty squirrel with you." Kate's mamma kissed them both, and said, My dear children, you will always be happy whilst you are so kind and good-natured to one another. You may take the squirrel to the workshop, George; I can now trust you alone, and when, my dear boy, you wish to touch things that do not belong to you, think how much pleasure you have lost the last month, and how happy you now are." How pleased George was to hear his aunt say, she could trust him again. He ran to the workshop with his dear squirrel, and his aunt showed him a shelf on which he could place the cage. He was very glad when Fred and James came home, for he had been wishing to show them his squirrel, and to 248



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PASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK. Hector and his father were out in the boat; and Leon, who had gone off early in the morning to Honfleur to sell some baskets of fish, had not yet returned. Thdrence had been singing; she was very tired of working and looked rather pale, as if she wanted a little more exercise. "Mother," she said, suddenly starting up and running into the house, I do believe, here comes Uncle Conscience; what shall we do ?" Where?" said Catharine, coming to the door with her sleeves tucked over her elbows. She saw him, sure endugh, walking very rapidly along the road towards their cottage. She turned instantly to look over the sea; not a sail was to be seen. Therence's heart beat very fast. What should they do if Conscience insisted on being paid? She knew her father had not more than a few shillings in the cottage. She sat down again at her lace pillow trembling all over, and began to work very fast. "How do you do, Therence ?" said her Uncle coming up. Quite well, thank you," said Therence, looking down. "CIs your father in ? "No; but mother is," answered she. "He '11 be in at the turn of the tide, I suppose ?" "Yes; I suppose he will," said Therence, very 155



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o *1MUSEM NT & i ,4 • .i { | W,]LtPT



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PASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK. the night waiting for them. Sleep and rest were so necessary for Frangois' recovery, that she dared not wake him. When morning dawned she went out again, and then, for the first time, she missed the boat. How terrified she was at this discovery! The idea of their having been out all night at sea by themselves was dreadful. Several people came out to talk to her. She waited down on the beach in the greatest anxiety until the fishermen, should return. The tide was now again in, and many sails were to be seen over the sea, coming homewards. Old Jaques Pacome's boat was the first to come in; Catharine ran up: Have you seen anything of our boat ? she cried." "Hector and TIherence have gone out in her unknown to us, and been out at sea all night. At least, so we suppose, for they are not to be found anywhere, and the boat is gone." "CNo; indeed, I have not. But are you sure they are out? It has been a sharpish night out at sea." Where else can they be? and who can have taken the boat ? "Perhaps they are coming in now, with the rest of them," said old Jaques, looking over the sea. "c Hector is sailor enough to know when the tide is in, and will be sure to come back." Meanwhile the other boats began to come in. 179



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TIHE PARENTS' CABINET. longer, his hands were so numbed with cold; and the sail therefore only impeded their movements. He was faint with hunger, and crept down close by his sister for warmth. She was so cold when he touched her, that he was quite startled. He sat up and looked anxiously over the sea on all sides in search of a sail. He looked and looked till everything seemed dim to him, and then, gradually, his head sank on his breast, and he was quite insensible. Fatigue, hunger, terror, and cold had completely overcome him. How long he remained like this he could not recollect; when he opened his eyes, his father and old Jaques were leaning over him, pouring some brandy down his throat. It was then nearly four o'clock; they had been out almost twenty-four hours. Jaques and Franqois had been sailing about all day in the greatest anxiety, and had at last been able to discover them by Hector's red handkerchief. Frangois was still too frightened and uneasy to find time to scold him, for Therence was still quite insensible. They wrapped her up in their great coats, rubbed her hands and feet, and dropped a few spoonfuls of brandy down her throat. "Well, come, Fran9ois," said old Jaques, "here is the little chap come to! t'other will be all right 186



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GEOGRAPHY. large globe that we dwell. What the inside is composed of, except a few hundred feet below the surface, we do not knowThe thickness of the earth, or its diameter, is about 8,000 miles. The diameter of a globe is a straight line supposed to be drawn from one point on its surface to another, passing through the centre or middle. Should any one who has read of or seen any of the high mountains and deep valleys that are to be met with in most countries, say that it is impossible for the earth to be round with these large projections and hollows, let him reflect, that the highest mountain, compared with the size of the earth, is not nearly so great a projection as the very smallest grain of dust that may be seen sticking to an orange. The Sun. To us, who are accustomed to'think of such bodies as stones and trees, hills and mountains, the size of the earth appears immense. But the earth, large as it appears, is a small body compared with the sun, which gives us light and heat. The sun is more than a million times as large as the earth. Day and Night. Take a large ball, and run straight through its middle a piece of pack-thread, between one and two 203





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THII PARENTS' CABINET. that they are very unjust, and that it is very hard of you, Conscience." "'Now, Catharine," said Conscience, "you know this is not the first time I have lent Francois money, and what difficulty I have had to get it back. If 1 had kept it myself I should have employed it in boat-building, or in the wages of another seaman to help me. Either way it would have brought me in more than what I have charged Francois for the use of it. I cannot afford to lose it; I have still three children to place. I wish to be able to see my children happy and thriving before I die; at all events to be certain that they are saved from the acute sufferings of cold and hunger that their parents have had to endure. Catharine was very angry; she thought this was a reflection on her own family, and was quite relieved when her brother went away. They parted on both sides with many angry feelings, and nearly a month passed before the Grandets heard anything more of him. Conscience, being pretty certain that they could not pay him, did not take the trouble to come over so far for nothing. Besides he could ill spare the time for such an expedition. One day the sea was very stormy, although the sky was fine. Thdrence was sitting before the door making lace, while Catharine was preparing the soup for dinner. 154



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THE PARENTS' CABINET. spinning round and round all the time. It goes round the sun in about three hundred and sixty-five days, or a year, and makes in that time three hundred and sixty-five complete spins; so that we have three hundred and sixty-five periods of daylight, and three hundred and sixty-five periods of darkness. If you examine attentively, you will observe that there are two points equally distant from the candle. They are the points where the string comes through. As the ball spins round, every spot upon it, excepting these two points, is by turns in the dark and in the light, being as much in the one as in the other. And if the two points round which the earth spins were equally distant from the sun, the same as the two points round which your ball spins are equally distant from the candle, every spot in the earth, with the exception of these two points, would be, during each complete spin, in the light and in the dark by turns, and as much in one as in the other; and the days and nights would be equal, throughout the year, over the whole earth. The Scasons. But everybody knows that our days and nights are not of equal length throughout the year. Towards the end of March, and the end of September, our days and nights are equal, being each twelve hours long. Towards the end of June, our days are 206



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THE PARENTS' CABINET. in the water with his dog, now that the ceremony was over and the people gone, but Therence felt a much stronger desire to run after the priest and the people, so she began to sing at the top of her voice and ran off leaving her brother to follow if he liked. As it is not amusing to play all alone, Hector soon "went after his sister, his dog Mopse running from side to side after stones and sticks that his master threw for him to pick up. Everybody said that Hector would one day be a very good sailor. He was very fond of the sea, and never seemed happy when he was away from it. When Fran9ois Grandet would not let him go out with him to fish, which sometimes happened when the sea was stormy, poor Hector was always quite miserable; even Therence could not console him. On these occasions he felt just like a dog that is tied up to prevent it following its master. At these times, his dog Mopse was the only resource he had, for Therence was now always occupied making lace. He ought to have been sent to school, for he could not read and write, but his parents said they could not afford it any longer. The year before both Therence and he had been to school. One went one day, and one the next, so that they each had three days schooling a week. It is the habit of the people about this place, who 138



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THE PARENTS' CABINET. The affair was of use to me, for I felt the advantage of always having presence of mind. If the boy had acted as unwisely and thoughtlessly as I did, we should have been in danger of our lives. After the animal was out of sight, we lost no time in ascending the hill." Ha, ha! the hunter was right," interrupted Oliver, "the rhinoceros soon made you find the use of your legs." Uncle John laughed. Pray, Oliver, be quiet," said Arthur, I want Uncle John to go on,-I do not like him to be on those wild hills, at a distance from the hunter and the men and dogs." Uncle John stroked Arthur's hair, and said, "No, my little man, and after this visit, I did not wish to be. without their company, I assure you. I had no gun that I could use, and so the boy and myself made haste up the hill. When we reached the top of it, we saw the elephants tearing about, their huge backs being much higher than the bushes. Presently we heard our companions fire, and all in a file the animals rushed away, charging directly upon us. After the rhinoceros had gone, I had taken a lighted torch in my hand, and now that I saw these elephants coming, I set fire to the bushes and grass that were round us: we were obliged to stand in a circle of flame. We listened, 222



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THE PARENTS' CABINET. "Ah, you should have gone on with him as he advised," said Oliver. "Dark night now came on," continued his uncle, "and with it came on the heavy dew, that prevents the bush and grass from burning. The boy's courage, which had hitherto been so steady, now fell-he halloed and he begged me to do so also-and he began to talk about being destroyed by the surrounding elephants and other wild animals." "Was your halloo answered?" asked Arthur. "No; neither halloo nor gun did we hear. I felt sorry for the boy-tried to laugh him out of his fears, and persuaded him, while the bushes would still burn, to collect sticks and wood for our night fire, for I saw clearly that we should have to pass the night where we were. With his help I soon made a cheerful blazing pile of wood, and then, spreading our sheepskins, I bade him lie down to sleep, and promised to keep watch till daybreak. The little fellow soon snored upon his sheepskin." "Did you sleep, uncle ? asked Arthur. "c No; I kept watch for five hours, and did not feel at all inclined to sleep. I was too anxious about our safety. I heard so many noises all around mefirst, a hollow tramping, which made me think that hundreds of elephants were crossing the hills close to us-and, whenever my fire burnt dim, I heard the short howl of the wolf approaching us." 224



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THE PARENTS' CABINET. something alive inside, I can hear it move quite quickly, and make a great rustling." Presently he found the paper was not quite closed, and he could see wires at one corner. I wish I knew what it is," said George; I can undo this string in a minute." George was just going to pull the string, when he thought of the bird. "No, no," said he; I will not touch that funny parcel, I will go first and ask my aunt if I may open it." George found his aunt, with Kate reading beside her. Pray, dear aunt, do come and see what this strange parcel can be. I have not touched it, but there is something inside that moves." "You may bring it here, George," said his aunt. Oh, thank you," and off he ran, and Kate after him, to fetch it. They found the parcel rather heavy, but they brought it carefully into the room, and put it on a chair. "I think it is a rabbit, mamma," said Kate. "Or a guinea-pig," said George. "Pray, aunt, let me untie the string; I like untying parcels." "f Yes, my dear, you may untie the string; and take off the paper," answered his aunt. The string and paper were soon off. "c Oh, it is a squirrel, a beautiful squirrel! said 246



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THE PARIENTS' CABINET. poor family had not had for a long time, and it was all by Therence's untiring industry. Lately she had been working from morning to night without ceasing. Frangois said, She is the best girl in the world !" Catharine opened the door into the back room of the cottage (it had but two rooms), to take a look at her, and if she were awake to tell her the good news. What was her surprise, then, to find no one there! Where can the children have gone to, Francois?" Are not they there? Oh, then they are out somewhere, having a run, poor things." Catharine went to the door and called them; but no answer. She went out on the beach and called again; all was silent, the boats and men were all out on the sea, and their families in-doors and asleep. After wandering about for half an hour Catharine returned, and found the dog Mopse, restless and whining for his master. Franrois had gone to sleep. She did not like to wake him, but finding the children had not yet returned, she went out again with Mopse in search of them. She now began to be really uneasy. She went to several cottages where she fancied they might be, but nobody had seen or heard anything of them. At last she was obliged to return home, but she was too anxious to go to bed, and sat up all through 178



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GEORGE HAfT. Kate; "look at his little bright eyes, and pretty paws." "And his long bushy tail," said George; see how he runs after it like your kitten, Kate; may we give him something to eat, aunt ? What does he like ?" "He likes acorns and bread, and nuts, George; and you may feed him." I am glad he likes nuts, for I have some in my pocket that James gave me this morning, Here, Kate, is one for you to give him, and one for me. Come, poor fellow, here is a nice nut for you; look, aunt, how he cracks it, and picks out the kernel; he is not afraid of us at all." "I am very glad you like him so much," said his aunt, "for I have bought him for you to keep, because you have not, during the last month, once touched anything that was not your own, without leave." My own squirrel! to keep always, and to feed and clean him when I like Oh, dear aunt, thank you, thank you; how glad I am I did not touch it in theother room!" So am I," said his aunt; "for if you had, I could not have given it to you." George's face was quite red with pleasure. "C How happy we shall be together, George, playing with your pretty squirrel. I like it quite as much as the bird, do not you, mamma?



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PASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK. not another moment to be lost; and, stripping off his jacket and boots, made a rush at the sea by the side of the groin, stooped down, dived through the wave, just as it was about to break, and swam out to the boat. All this was the work of an instant. He clambered up the side of the boat and seized the helm, which Hector had not the force to hold, while the boy pulled in the rope his father was clinging to. In his haste and terror Hector did not see where lie was drawing his father, who, pulled by the rope and battered by the waves, was suddenly dashed against the groin. The boat at the same instant touching the shore, all hands ran forward to haul her up, while Conscience, without losing an instant, slipped down the side of the boat and seized hold of Franqois, just as a wave was about to hurl him again against the posts of the groin. Conscience struggled along the groin as well as he could, dragging Francois, who was quite insensible, after him. All this time Catharine and Thdrence were standing motionless with terror on the beach, scarcely daring to look at the scene of action, and yet unable to turn their eyes in another direction. The moment Catharine saw her husband fairly in Conscience's strong arms, she rushed down to the water's edge to meet him, and seeing Conscience quite out of II. 6 161



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PASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK. cannot afford to pay for more than one child's schooling at a time, to divide it through the family, sending one child one day and another the next, so that the whole family should gain a little instruction, and at the same time only one child should be at school at a time. This way they do not learn much. Neither Therence nor Hector could write. Therence, who had paid more attention than Hector, could read a little, but he could not even do that. The greatest desire he had, was to be a great sailor and fisherman. He used to dream of catching more fish than anybody on the coast, and to be called, as his father had formerly been called, Risque tout," which means Dare all." As for Therence, her principal desire was to be able to earn seven pence a day making lace. This is the chief occupation of the women here-they all make lace. Therence was very industrious; and sometimes now, when she worked very hard, she could earn fourpence. This day was, of course, a grand holiday for her. Both the children had been looking forward to it for a very long time. Meanwhile Catharine Grandet, instead of joining in the procession, had gone home to look after the dinner; for Francois had invited all his friends and relations to dine with him after the ceremony of blessing the new boat. 139



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THE PARENTS' CABINET. on that mysterious they, "cannot take Bernard if he does not choose to go. What will they do to him ?" "It is the Government of France, Therence," said her uncle, patting her head, "that wants men to fight the Russians, and if he refused to go he would be shot." "And must he go if father cannot pay you, uncle?" "I am afraid so." "Poor, poor Bernard; how I wish I could earn more," said Thdrence, her eyes swimming with tears, for she knew only too well that her father had not the ability to pay her uncle. Conscience got up, kissed Thdrence, and walked out of the door to see if any boat was in sight. He was in great trouble and anxiety. Mother, what can we do?" said Thrence, as soon as her uncle was out of hearing. Father cannot pay; can he ? " Oh," said Catharine, not heeding her, I shall not be easy till Leon is home again. I wish Francois had sent Hector instead." "' Why ? asked Therence; "would not they take him ?" "No: he is too young." But, mother, if we have been the cause of poor Bernard's being taken away, what can we ever do for uncle ?" 158



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UNCLfE JOHN AT THE CAPE OF GOOD HOPE. doubting but it was a rhinoceros. The heavy tramp was behind me, and the next moment a large dark animal burst through the branches close to me, and turned into the very path I was following. I did not stop, but dashed across from the path to my little companion, who with great presence of mind set fire to the bush." Your heels were of use to you for once in your life, uncle," said Oliver, laughing. "Yes, you rogue; and I was obliged to be active with them. And lucky it was for me that I trusted to them rather than to my gun: for the rhinoceros is a very fierce animal, who will make even lions and tigers run from him. The boldest hunters fear him, and are glad to get out of his way. But I say it was very lucky that I ran away, for when I tried to fire off my gun, it snapped three times, and would not go off, so that had I trusted to being able to shoot the rhinoceros, I should have been killed." "Did not the rhinoceros pursue you, uncle ?" said Richard. "No ; the burning bush protected me, he ran from it with all speed." "Now, confess, dear uncle," said Oliver, that you were very much frightened." I cannot say that I felt much fear," said his uncle. I had no time to be frightened. I was forced to skip out of the way as fast as I could. 221



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UNCLE JOHN AT THE CAPE OF GOOD HOPE. "Did you all sleep at the same time ?" asked Richard. "No; one was the fire watchman. I spent a whole week among the wild hills I have mentioned, and I can remember feeling very lonely when the night fires burnt low, and I heard the howling of the wolves, and the thundering tread of the elephants. The first day's search after the elephants was in vain; we followed their tracks, winding over hills and through deep ravines, and thick brushwood, of which the. thorns were very sharp, until I was so tired, that I could hardly go on. The hunter was not at all fatigued, aud laughed at me not a little. Courage,' said he, we shall soon be among the elephants, and then you can sit down and watch them as long as you like.' One of the Hottentots pointed out the track which would be the best to follow. This foot-print,' said he, 'is last night's, that track to the right is three days old.'" Oh, uncle! how could he tell that?" cried Oliver. Because he had been in the habit of observing these things. He could tell at once the age of the spoor, or foot-print." How clever!" exclaimed Arthur. "I wish I knew how he managed to do so." 215





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GEORGE IART. he took the cage from the hook and placed it on the table. George forgot that it was not his bird, and how many things he had spoiled by taking them without leave. George then took out the drawer, cleaned it, strewed fresh sand on it, and placed it in the cage again; then he filled the seed-trough. All this time the bird flew about in great fear. George then took out the water-bottle to change the water; he did not observe that, in taking the water-bottle away, he uncovered the hole through which the bird put his head to drink. When Kate changed the water for her bird, she was careful to place a piece of wood before the hole till she had put back the bottle; but George was too young to think of such a precaution. He was filling the bottle at the other end of the workshop, when he heard a strange loud noise, flutter, flutter, flutter; he looked up, and there was the bird flying round the room in a great fright, and beating himself against the window. The lower part of the window was open, and before George could run to shut it, the bird had flown away. George stood for one moment looking at the bird, as he flew over garden and field, far, far away, and then burst into a loud cry, Oh, what shall I do, what shall I do? What will poor Kate-what will my aunt say? I cannot go and tell them; they will be so vexed. I shall not like to see any one." He 237



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THE PARENTS' CABINET. Poor Therence was quite tired out. She assisted her brother as much as she could, and then sat down on the edge of a fish basket. Tired, hungry, and very sleepy, she soon began to feel cold. Hector had been out once or twice by night before, but she never. The wind was now quite strong, and they were obliged to tack about in order to approach the shore. Hector could not manage this very well. The sun rose when they were still out of sight of land. Oh, what shall we do ? We shall be too late," cried poor Thdrence. Hector was a little bit frightened, though he tried to reassure her. He looked about, but no sails and no land were to be seen. Are you sure we are going right, Hector ?" Oh, yes. See, there is the east on our left. We are going south, as fast as we can." Therence felt a strong desire to cry. Meanwhile day dawned. Towards the east the sky became one sheet of golden light, with little red and purple clouds floating about in the bright, deep blue beyond. Each wave was again sparkling in the sun-light. Gradually, however, the beautiful golden light faded away, the last star disappeared, the sun was hidden by a large mass of clouds, and daylight, broad daylight had come. Then poor Therence could no longer control her. 184



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rASSE-TOUT: OR, TIE NEW FISHING SMACK. Hector, who knew nothing of what had passed, stared at his mother in great astonishment, and Therence began to cry. Conscience could not say another word, he was so shocked and distressed. It seemed very dreadful to him, that parents should go into debt, and being unable to repay what they owe themselves, should turn to their children to pay it for them. Catharine, frightened at his silence and the expression of his face, which was grave even to sternness, suddenly turned towards him, and taking him by both hands, implored him, at any rate, not to turn them out of their cottage till Francois was well. We will sell every stock and stone then to pay you, if you will but wait." Catharine !" he replied, gravely, "what are you thinking of? I cannot accept your offer of Leon. See what a position you have placed us both in! If I insist on being paid now, I shall be the cause of Franqois's death; if I do not, I lose my only son-perhaps for ever." His voice faltered, but he went on: "What has your son Leon had to do with all this ? It is not just that he should suffer from his parents' thoughtlessness. Ah, had you listened to my advice long ago, how much misery might have been spared !" Catharine turned her head aside, his words affected her deeply. She was in an agony of self-reproach. 165



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GEORGE HART. GEonaE HART was five years old when he went to stay some months at his uncle's house, He was very glad to be with his cousins, for he liked good rough games of play, and he did not cry at a knock or a fall. At home he had no one to play with him but his sister Mary, and she was quite a little thing, and if he had played roughly with her it would have hurt her. George was a good-natured boy, and he did not wish to hurt any one. When he got to his uncle's, he thought he should never be tired of all the nice toys and useful things that his cousins were so kind as to show to him. In the house there was a long room called the workshop, in one part of which was a large bench with saws, hammers, nails, and all kinds of tools. His two cousins, Fred and James, had been taught by their father the use of these tools, and they could make a great many things, such as neat railings for their garden, boxes and-small bedsteads, stools and tables 231 4



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PASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK. This they accordingly did; but the fish were so numerous that they could not leave them, but continued pulling up draught after draught. They worked so hard and took so long over each draught, that neither of them took notice of how the time slipped by. It was a fine starlight night, and by means of a torch they could see to work very well. They both thought it fine fun, particularly as their father and mother knew nothing about their being out. Therence once thought, perhaps her mother might be anxious should she miss them, but Hector thought this quite impossible. "How can she? You know Therence," he said, "Cshe was going out to Madame Giraud's up at the Chateau this evening, and we shall be in by five in the morning, so that she cannot have the time to miss us. The very idea's quite absurd." Oh, I am so tired, Hector," cried Therence. I cannot do any more. I am sure we ought to be going home now; it is getting quite light." Well, perhaps we had," said he. "I wish we had thought of bringing some bread with us, I am so hungry." Dear me, does not it look very black and stormy over there ? said Therence. Where? Oh, that's nothing," said Hector; come and help me hoist the sail." 183



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PASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK. "No, nothing now, dear," he said, taking her in his arms and kissing her, it's too late. Don't cry, there's a good child. Go and help your mother." He wiped her eyes with his rough hand, kissed her again, put her down on the ground, and bidding Catharine and Hector a hasty" Good-bye," he rushed out of the house. Bowed down as he was by his own private sorrow, the sight of his sister's distress was more than lie could bear any longer. He would still, however, willingly have helped them, had it been possible. But how can you help people who will not help themselves ? Advice, example, money, all was thrown away upon them. All he could do now was to pity them. Catharine scarcely noticed he had gone. To bitter repentance for the past had succeeded the almost overwhelming considerations of the future. What was to become of them? She saw misery staring them in the face. Who was to pay for Frangois' illness, and all the little comforts he oucght to have? To her brother, after all that had passed, and all the misery they had brought upon him, she felt it was impossible to look for any assistance. How lonely and desolate she felt, as she sat watching at the foot of Francois' bed, her head buried in her hands, the tears trickling silently down her cheeks. But she had too much to do, to be able to sit long 167



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GEOGRAPHIY. more than sixteen hours long, and our nights less than eight hours. Towards the end of December, our days are not eight hours long, while our nights are more than sixteen hours. From December to June, our days are always becoming longer and longer, and from June to December, shorter and shorter. How this happens may be very easily explained. Let us once more bring your ball to the candle. In this little drawing, the ball is placed in two different positions. In each position, however, the two points where the ends of the strings come through, are no longer in the same situation as respects the light of the candle. To the right of the candle, the point nearest to the wafer is more ioithin the light of the candle than the point furthest from the wafer. To the left of the candle, the point nearest the wafer 207



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THE PARENTS' CABINET. spoiled their tools, tore their kites or balloons, broke their toys, or did some other mischief, they begged their mamma to send him home. What a pity that George did not wait to ask his cousins' leave, before he touched things that they had not lent him. He might play as much as he liked with the cart, the box of bricks, the crane, the hoop, the whip, the horn, the hammer, the gardening tools, and battle-door and shuttle-cock, for his cousins had lent him all these things; and having plenty of toys to amuse him while they were all at school, he had no excuse for meddling with what did not belong to him. One day, while Fred and James were at school, and Kate with her mamma, George was sawing by himself in the workshop. The moment he sawed, Kate's canary began to sing; and when he left off sawing, the canary became quiet. George thought this very droll, and he jumped on a stool to look at the bird more nearly. What a nice little fellow you are," thought George; I wish you would eat out of my hand as you do from Kate's: I'll try." So he held a piece of sugar to the bars, but the bird did not know George; and he would not peck from his hand, but kept flying from one side of his cage to the other, and beating his wings against the bars. "How I should 'like to clean the cage," said George to himself; "that cannot hurt the bird." Then 236



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UNCLE JOHN AT THE CAPE OF GOOD HOPE. "Uncle," said Arthur, "I am sorry for the poor elephant. Why was he killed ? "To get his ivory tusks," said Uncle John; "but we did not stop to take them then; we only cut off his tail, marked the tusks, and followed the troop down the hill. We saw them tearing on, destroying everything that was in their path. Both trees and shrubs were broken and uprooted, and their tread sounded like thunder. Being already much tired, I could not post after them so quickly as my companions did, and so I seated myself on the ground, and told the hunter to send one of the Hottentots for me when he had hunted enough for that night. "' It is impossible,' said he; 'the night will be dark, no one will be able to find you, you must keep up with us!' I told him that I could go no further, and'that I did not wish to spoil his sport, and then I stretched myself out full length on the ground." "Oh, uncle!" cried Arthur, suppose the elephants had turned back." Yes, boy; but I was too much tired to care at that moment about them. Were a rhinoceros to come now,' said the hunter, 'you would soon find your legs: come, mount the hill with us.' No; I was too tired, and so, after some little delay, the hunter resolved to leave his boy with me, as being better acquainted with those hills than I was; and he told 219



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THE PARENTS' CABINET. is less within the light of the candle than the point farthest from the wafer. Take hold of the string which is run through the ball, as before, and hold the ball in the position in which it is placed in the drawing to the right of the candle. Suppose the ball to be spinning round the points where the string comes through, as it did before; what would happen? That point which is nearest to the wafer would be always in the light, as well as that part of the ball which immediately surrounds that point. That point which is farthest from the wafer, would be always in the dark, as well as all that part of the ball close to it. Every spin round, those parts of the ball which are near the wafer would be more in the light than the dark, and those parts towards the other end of the string would be more in the dark than the light. Next, still holding the string, as before, bring the ball into the position in which it is placed in the drawing, to the left of the candle. Suppose it to spin, as before, round the two points where the string comes through. The point nearest to the wafer would be always dark, as well as all those parts of the ball immediately surrounding it. The point furthest from the wafer would be always light, as well as that part of the ball immediately surrounding it. Every spin round, those parts of the ball which are near to the wafer would be more in the 208



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UNCLE JOHN AT THE CAPE OF GOOD IOPE. up the country, and I had no means of sending a letter to England." Yes, that is the time: tell us something about Africa," said Oliver. "I amused myself in visiting the farms of the different English and Dutch people who had settled about the country, near to Cape Town; and once I spent a whole week in hunting elephants." "What, hunting for a whole week on horseback the whole of the time, Uncle John ? cried Richard; "that's not possible." "We don't hunt elephants on horseback in South Africa, Master Richard, as you hunt poor hares and stags in England," replied his uncle. Pray, tell us then how you do hunt them," said Oliver, "for they are such great, heavy, clumsy animals, that I should think you would soon finish a chase of one of them." "There you are a little mistaken," replied his uncle; "for in the hunt that I joined, I found it was not such an easy affair. In the hills through which the Fish River flows, the country is thickly covered with bushes, and is quite uncultivated, and only wild animals live in it. The elephants are in great numbers. The man whom I accompanied was a regular hunter of these animals, and he told me that he had seen as many as three thousand elephants in a troop at a time." 213



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UNCLE JOHN AT THE CAPE OF GOOD HOPE. but the burning of the wood made such a noise as it cracked and split, and the flames roared so, that we could hear nothing else. Here we waited till the fire had burnt sufficiently low to let us pass through it; we then went on, and the boy lighted every bush in our track, so that we might proceed in safety." That was well done," said Richard. "c Yes; it was prudent, for the fire at once checks the elephant as well as other wild animals. We came soon to the place where the elephants had been shot at; on the ground lay one, heaving her sides in agony,-poor thing! she had ten balls in her body. A young elephant was with her, and was walking round and round her. I felt quite sorry to see the young animal covered with the blood of its dying mother, and still clinging to her in death." "Poor elephant !" said all the boys. "We passed on," continued Uncle John, "and now became anxious to join our party. We wanted both their company, and some water to refresh us, for we were quite parched with thirst. I had sucked, through my closed teeth, water out of a pool which the elephants had trodden into a muddy puddleand so thirsty was I, that I thought it delicious. I fired off the boy's gun, but no shot was fired in return, and we both became uneasy that the hunter did not meet us." 223



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THE PARENTS' CABINET. "No, my lad. When we told him of our escape from the rhinoceros, he said we were lucky that my gun had not fired, for if the rhinoceros is shot at, and wounded, he turns against his enemy, and then the sight of the flames of the burning bush has no effect upon him." "c What sort of an animal is the rhinoceros? asked Richard. "It is in shape more like an enormous hog than any other animal, and is very nearly as large as the elephant-but with a hide so tough and thick, that leaden musket-balls will not pierce it. The rhinoceros of Africa "Uncle, the rhinoceros inhabits parts of Asia," interrupted Richard. "Yes, yes; I know, my dear," said his uncle, "but the rhinoceros of Africa is different in two things from the rhinoceros of Asia. The African rhinoceros has two sharp-pointed horns growing from his nose, while that of Asia has only one-this 226



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PASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHING' SMACK. Francois has not been able to repay Conscience; but by his children's exertions his old age will be secured from want. They had all had a hard lesson, but they had profited by it; and Francois' children have determined, whatever might be the temptation, never, like their father, to run into debt. -_ _201 ,, ,/ /,/, 201



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PASSE-TOUT: 011, THE NEW FISHING SMACK. his tears as well as he could. Old Jaques, who came in to see if he would come, gave him a great pat on the back, and told him he was a brave little chap. In a few minutes more they were off. Catharine, although she was quite exhausted with so much trouble and anxiety, had no time now to rest or sleep. She had to set to work instantly to salt the fish, before it got bad. This took her all the morning. Then, unable to hold up her head any longer, she came in, and, throwing herself down on the bed, fell into a long and heavy sleep. As for Therence she slept the whole day, and never woke up till late in the evening. She cried a great deal at first, when she heard her brother had gone, but her mother consoled her with the idea that lie would be back in a few months, and told her how joyfully he had accepted old Jaques' offer. She comforted herself, also, with the hope of hearing something of him from old PacBmes in two or three days. But a whole fortnight passed without their hearing anything of Hector. Poor Therence found the time very long and dreary as she sat at her work under the porch, wondering what Hector was doing. Each day she got up with the hope of hearing from him, and each night went to bed disappointed. At last, however, one day when old Pac6mes came back in his boat from Honfleur, he II. 7 193



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THE PARENTS' CABINET. help. In that nice workshop he could saw, hammer, drive his coach, blow his horn, load and draw his waggon, and play at battledore and shuttlecock. As he stood looking in, and wishing he might play there, ho remembered his aunt's words, "that as soon as she could trust him alone, he should play there again." CI know," he said to himself, that my aunt will keep her promise, because she always tells the truth, and I think I shall soon play there, for I do not spoil their things now." One wet morning, just a month after George had let the bird fly away, he was in the parlour with his aunt, while Kate was writing her copy and ciphering by herself. He was tired of playing by himself, and he longed for the rain to leave off, that he might go into the garden. After watching the rain for some time as it pattered against the windows, he said in a sorrowful tone, I don't know what to do, aunt. I must not go into the workshop, Kate cannot play with me, and I have nothing to do here. Oh, poor me! what shall I do? I do not like the rain at all, aunt, do you ?" I do not think the rain looks pleasant," said his aunt, and yet I am glad to see it; it will water the garden nicely, and make the gooseberries, strawberries, and currants grow quicker and ripen sooner. I think, George, you will be glad too, when you 244



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rASSE-TOUT: OR, TIE NEW FISHING SMACK. Oh, down on the beach cleaning the boat." Catharine was quite relieved. With a more cheerful heart, she got up to light the fire and prepare some gruel for Frangois. Franqois was a little better; he had slept the latter half of the night, and Catharine began to think all would soon be well with them again. She told Therence to tie up a few whitings, as payment for the doctor when he came; and set to work to get the family breakfast ready. Hector came in shortly afterwards. Go and tell Leon to come in to breakfast, Hector," said she, as she put the saucepan of soup on the table. "Very well; where is he, mother ?" Down on the beach cleaning the boat." "No, indeed, he isn't. I have just come from her myself," replied Hector. What did you mean by saying he was there, Thdrence ?" said her mother. I did not. I thought you meant Hector. I do not think Leon has come home yet." "Not home yet!" cried poor Catharine, turning pale. It was in vain she sat down to breakfast; she could not touch a morsel, she was so anxious, but kept looking out of window in the direction he would come. "Meanwhile the tide was on the turn: the last 169



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UNCLE JOHN AT TilE CAPE OF GOOD HOPE. ,then we cut the meat into small pieces, which we thrust upon a sharp long stick. Then we peppered and salted it, and broiled the meat on the fire. As we had no dishes nor plates, nor table, in that wild place, we stuck the stick firmly into the ground, when the meat was enough cooked, and then we all sat down in a circle around it, and each man with his knife cut off from the stick as much meat as he wanted." "Ha, ha, ha!" said Oliver, laughing; "I should like to have seen you all-I would gladly have eaten some with you. How funny it must have been !" Funny enough," replied his uncle, "but I think it much pleasanter to have a clean plate, and a table and a knife and fork, than to cut off lumps of meat from an upright stick. But hungry men in the wilds of Africa are grateful even for such a meal as this. I did not remain much longer with the hunting-party, but took one of the Hottentots to guide me back to Cape Town, where I remained until a vessel was sailing for England." The boys all thanked their uncle; and, as their mother had not yet come home, they sat down to the table, and began to try to draw the different animals that their uncle had mentioned. Oliver and Richard tried to draw a rhinoceros, and Arthur an elephant; and at last, with the help of Uncle John, they suc229



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THE PARENTS CABINET. any more. Hector has promised me never to do such a thing again, and, after all, poor boy, it was all from a desire of helping us. He said he could not bear to see us all starving and he doing nothing." Catharine stopped to wipe her eyes; she was thinking at that instant of some of her brother Conscience's words. She felt that there were some persons who might have been more justly punished than Hector. He had done a very dangerous foolish thing, to be sure, but he had done it with the hope of assisting the whole family. Why was the family in such a state? It was not only on account of Francois' broken arm or Leon's having been drawn for the navy. Both these things had added to it, but the original cause was their own improvidence. In abundant seasons they had eaten up all they earned, and when scarcity came they suffered. This wastefulness had now nearly cost them the lives of their two remaining children. "I tell you what, Grandet," said old Jaques to Frangois, c"if Hector is so desirous of work you should send him to Havre. Send him off at once. I have a cousin there who might get him a place as cabin-boy. He would earn twice as much there as here. My cousin, the other day, was wanting a 190



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THE PARENTS' CABINET. for their sister Kate's baby-house. Fred was ten years old; he could handle a plane and turn at the lathe. James was eight years old; and he was not quite so clever with the tools as his brother. On shelves round the workshop were kites, bows and arrows, bats, balls, boxes of bricks and of paints, a crane, whips, tops, books, pictures, and a great many other'things. Whenever the boys had been playing, their papa liked them to put their toys on the shelf, and not to leave them about on the floor to be trodden on and spoiled. Fred and James went to school for some hours every morning and afternoon. Kate was engaged two hours every morning with her mamma, who taught her to read and write and cipher, and to draw a little. Kate was only seven years old. George's aunt was kind enough to teach him also, but as he was so much younger than Kate, his lessons were very short and soon over. Long before Kate had finished her lessons, George was left to play by himself. During George's visit to his cousins, his uncle was absent from home, but his aunt gave him a small saw; and Fred showed him how to place the wood that he wished to saw, in the large vice that was fixed to the bench. For some time, George thought sawing was the best play in the world; saw, saw, saw, and the sawdust fell in little heaps on the 232



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GEOGRAPRY. dark than the light, and those parts towards the other end of the string would be more in the light than the dark. Now, fancy that the candle is the sunl, and the ball the earth; and that England, or that part of the earth on which we live, is on the wafer. While the earth is making the circuit of the sun, the two points round which it spins are sometimes equally distant from the sun, and then our days and nights are equal. Sometimes the two points round which the earth spins are not equally distant from the sun, and then our days and nights are unequal. Towards the end of March, and the end of September, these two points are equally distant from the sun; and the days and nights are each twelve hours long. Towards the end of June, that point which is nearest to England, is less distant from the sun than the other; and then our days are the longest and our nights the shortest; while all countries near the other point have, at that time, their shortest days and longest nights. Towards the end of December, that point which is nearest to England is more distant from the sun than the other; and then our days are the shortest and our nights the longest; while all countries near the other point have, at that time, their longest days and shtortest niglhts. 209



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GEORGE HART. good long stick, pressed it under the water, and then, you know, the little things were obliged to swim. We were quite delighted to watc them swimming about, and bobbing their tiny heads under the water; and every time they came to the edge of the pond to try to get out, we drove them back again. But, oh, George, we were so sorry afterwards; for the next day, when we came to see our pretty young ducklings, they were all dead. Papa said, the water was far too cold for their tender bodies, and that we had killed them!" "Poor little things," said George, I am sure I should be very sorry to kill these, so we will not touch them." The gardener told George and Kate they might throw the ducklings some crumbs of bread, and they stood a long time in the poultry-yard watching and feeding them. George felt ashamed to see Fred and James at dinner, but they were too kind to speak to him about the bird; for they had heard from their mamma how sorry he was for the mischief he had done. Although Fred and James said nothing to George, they were vexed to lose the bird they all liked so much, and they pitied their sister Kate. They were very fond of their little sister, because she was not only kind and obliging, but she took great care not to spoil their things. 241



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PASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHIING SMACK. in a minute. Just wait till I give her a little more brandy." But until they reached the shore poor little Therrie gave no signs of life. Her mother was on the beach waiting with sickening anxiety the arrival of the boats. With what inexpressible joy she ran to meet them. She seized Therence in her arms, and insisted on carrying her home herself. A kind neighbour came in to help her to light the fire and warm the bed for the poor little unconscious girl. They chafed her limbs and put hot bottles to her feet, and did everything they could think of to warm and rouse her. Poor Hector, still quite stupifled and giddy, stood by in the greatest distress. He began to think his dear little sister was dead. "And I persuaded her to come out," the poor boy said to himself. "I am the cause of it all: oh! whatever shall I do ? Presently, however, Therence gave a deep sigh and half opened her eyes. She stared about her vacantly for a minute, turned round, and closed her eyes again. But a faint colour had come back to her lips and cheeks. Hector, now that he saw his sister was safe, could hold up no longer, and went away to hide himself and cry in a corner. They gave Thdrence a little brandy and some weak broth, after taking which the child seemed much revived. 187



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THE CATERPILLAR AND BUTTERFLY. WHEN first their leaves of tender green The budding trees display, The caterpillar tribe is seen, Like them in green array: Crawling on their little feet, All day long they bask and eat! Come again: their meal is done! They 've gained their proper size; And each a slender web has spun, In which he sleeping lies, Feeling neither joy nor pain: Will he ever move again ? Come once more: the web is torn, The sleeper soars on high Through air on downy wings upborne, Behold the butterfly! He does not make the leaves his prey, Butgaily flutters all the day. EO in: Printed by SaITH, ELDER and Co., Little Green Arbour-court. 256



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THE PARENTS' CABINET. bristled, and their eyes express less dread. The gymnoti approach timidly the edge of the pond, where they are taken by means of small harpoons fastened to long cords. In a few minutes we had five large ones, which were but slightly wounded. It would be rash to expose ourselves to the first shock of a very large gymnotus when irritated. If by chance you receive a stroke before the fish is wounded or wearied by a long pursuit, the pain and numbness are so violent, that it is impossible to describe the feeling they excite. At times you may touch a gymnotus and receive no shock whatever, as the animal can either exercise its power or not, as it chooses: it can also direct the shock to any part it pleases, and from any part of its body, so that small fishes are often killed before they are aware of its presence, the gymnotus not even moving from its position, but darting its electrical stroke from a distance. "A gymnotus was brought to me at Calaboya, which had been taken in a net, and, consequently having no wound; it ate meat, and it terribly frightened the little tortoises and frogs, which, not knowing the danger, placed themselves with confidence on its back: when the frogs recovered, they jumped out of the tub; and when replaced, were frightened at the sight of the eel only. These electric eels kill many more fish than they devour, and the 254



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THE PARENTs' CABINET. brought news of him, and also some money from him for Francois. It was half the poor boy's first month's wages. Old Jaques had received this from a friend whom he had met that day at Honfleur; and had heard at the same time from him, that Hector had got the place, in which he was giving great satisfaction, and that he was in excellent health and spirits. Little as this was, it was all they heard of Hector for a long time, for nearly three months, for neither he nor they could write, and, therefore, very little communication between them was possible. Therence at home counted the days and weeks he had been away. She worked very hard at her lace; in addition to which she tried to take care of everything her brother liked, so that he might find them in good order when he came back. She got up very early in the morning to look after Hector's little bit of garden, so that it might be bright and pretty when he came back. She also took care that Mopse had his daily bath in the sea. One day, and what a day of joy it was for her, there came a letter from Hector. It was directed to her too She had never had a letter before. Hector had made friends with a good-natured old' sailor on board the same boat as himself, and this man had been kind enough to write the letter for him. Hector said he was very well, and was very 194



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THE PARENTS' CABINET. making. Frangois began to look very grave; all his hope now was in the herrings and whitings. If they failed he did not know how ever he was to pay his debt. The herrings of late years had been very plentiful on the coast,' but this year they proved to be excessively scarce. Some said it was the bad weather that had washed them away: some that they were afraid to come on account of the number that had been caught: everybody, however, was obliged to agree in saying, that fish of all kinds was very scarce that year. Meanwhile winter came on, adding its cold to the many sufferings these poor people had to go through. With all Fran9ois' exertions he could only just earn sufficient to keep his own family. Leon thought often of the quantity of fish they had caught the spring before, and regretted that his father had not then put something by, for the scarcity that must follow some time or other. For, said he to himself, it is perhaps only once in two years that we have such an abundance of fish as we had then, at other times we have a scarcity, or only just enough to keep us. Surely we ought to save out of that abundance, for the hard time that will come sooner or later. Hector Nwent out occasionally with his father; he had gained strength lately, and every day showed 152



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THE PARENTS' CABINET. seated drinking cider. He was the owner of the new smack, round which everybody was collected waiting for the priest. Near him was his wife Catharine, dressed in her best, and looking very nice in her clean white cap, dark blue petticoat, and coloured cotton jacket. In the doorway, almost afraid to move, lest she should spoil her pretty new frock, was her daughter, Therence, a little girl of about nine years old: and inside the cottage, rolling on the table, with his legs dangling in the air, was her youngest son Hector, a boy of about eleven. He was not half so careful as his sister, and had already managed to get two or three spots of mud on his clean blouse. He was quite tired of waiting; and not being allowed to have his sister to play with for fear of spoiling her frock, sat there kicking his legs about and yawning to the utmost limits of his mouth. In Normandy these fine names, which seem so strange to us, are very common-as common as Dick, Tom, Mary, or Jane are here. They were all waiting for the priest of the village to come and name and bless the little boat before it was launched, and Hector and Therence were to be the godfather and godmother, and to give the boat the name. The fishermen on this coast would never think of putting to sea in a boat that had not been named and blessed by the priest; they would expect to go to the bottom in their first voyage. In the front 134



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TIE PARENTS CABINET. Oliver thought you would be afraid of the rain," said Richard. Why so ? Does he take me for a lump of barleysugar ?" said his uncle: a little summer rain like this which is now falling refreshes a man after the heat of the day. How often, when I was in Africa, did I wish for such a shower !" Come in, uncle; come in," said the boys; your shoes are quite clean, and we have taken care to put your umbrella to dry. We are so happy you have come to see us again." That is all right, lads," said their uncle; but where is your mother ? "Oh, she is not at home this evening," said Oliver; she has gone to meet papa." Well, then, we must amuse ourselves," said his uncle: "what shall we do ? "Cannot you tell us something amusing, uncle, sometling that has happened to you in your voyages or travels ?" asked Richard. Uncle, I want to know what you did with yourself when you were so long away in Africa, when mamma was so unhappy because she did not receive a letter from you." When I was at the Cape of Good Hope ?" said his uncle. "Ay, I remember, I went to the farm of a Dutch settler, a great distance from Cape Town, 212



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THE PARENTS' CABINET. This dinner was composed chiefly of fish and black bread, not very nicely cooked, but which Thdrence and Hector found delicious. The cottage was full to overflowing and very noisy, as these poor fisher people, having no one to leave in charge of their young children, were obliged to bring them, babies and all, with them. Such an assembly of young folks soon made too much noise for the elders, and consequentlythey were all turned out to play on the beach. Poor Therence, very much embarrassed with her new frock, and quite afraid to play lest the others should tear it, speedily retired, and having been forbidden by her mother to take it off, went and sat down quietly in a corner of the room, feeling very dull, and more inclined to cry than do anything, as she looked out of window and saw Hector and her cousin playing away in high glee. Inside there was a great deal of eating and drinking, and laughing and talking; all seemed to be enjoying themselves thoroughly, with the exception of one man, who sat at the end of the table near Francois Grandet, looking very grand. This was Catharine Grandet's brother, Conscience Malais. He had come that morning all the way from Honfleur with his wife and children, on purpose to be present at the blessing of the boat. Frangois was paying him the greatest attention and pressing him to eat 140



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THE PARENTS' CABINET. "What did he hunt elephants for?" asked Arthur. For their ivory tusks," replied Uncle John. "The only roads through this wild thorny country are those made by the foot-prints of these animals. I accompanied, as I have said, a man who ivas a regular hunter of elephants. He had in his party nine dogs, three or four Hottentots, and a little boy, his son, whom he was teaching to hunt." "Pray, uncle, what are Hottentots?" said Arthur. They are the native people of this part of Africa," said his uncle; "but they are not kindly used by the Dutch and English people, who have taken possession of the country that once belonged to them. They live miserably, and are made to work for the new comers. These Hottentots carried the food that we should want, and the sheep-skins, on which at night we were to sleep, and they lighted the fires round which we sat." "Fires, uncle! cried Oliver, "why, I thought Africa was a dreadfully hot country." So it is," said his uncle, inthe day-time; but the dews that fall in the evening and at night are very chilling, and make fires necessary, especially to those who are obliged to sleep in the open air. We 'should have had the wolves, and rhinoceroses, and all sorts of wild animals attacking us, if we had had no fire in the nirght." 214



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rASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK. what do you think I should have felt then ? And taking your father's boat, too! I wonder you did not think of the damage you might have done to it and the fishing tackle-and we so poor, too! We should never have been able to replace it. Why, you know, as it is, the boat is not yet paid for !" "Mother, don't be angry. I am very, very sorry for what I have done, but I could not bear to see you, father, and Therence, all looking paler and thinner every day, and I doing nothing, when fish was so plentiful. The sea was so smooth, that I thought there could be no danger, and I felt quite sure I could manage the boat. Therrie had cut her finger, and making lace hurt it and was making it fester. I told her she would soon be able to do nothing too, and then we should all starve together. Don't scold her, mother, she had nothing to do with it-it's all my fault-and-and-I know father's very angry." Catharine remained talking to him some time, until he was soothed and going to sleep; then she went out into the other room, where Francois and Jaques Pac6me were having their supper. How are the young ones now ?" asked the good-natured old fisherman. "Brave little chap, that Hector !" What does he say for himself now?" said Franqois. Oh, Francois, you must not be angry with them 189



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THE PARENTS' CABINET. the two young men had so many stories to tell, and the others were so willing to listen. Bernard particularly was in high spirits. He was going to work with his father at Honfleur, for Conscience had been able to save enough now to pay a substitute in case the war continued, and could keep his son at home with him. Poor Leon's joy was a little damped by the knowledge that he must soon go away again; but as he saw no help for it, he tried to resign himself. The winter passed quickly and gaily away. Hector of an evening gave Therence lessons in writing, and he would also read aloud to his father the old newspapers they sometimes got. Leon grew graver and graver, and seemed scarcely to take pleasure in anything. Poor fellow! as the time drew near for his departure, he could not help shrinking from it. When March came, however, and he was really obliged to go, he went away as calmly as if nothing was the matter. Nobody but Therence had any idea how heavy poor Leon's heart was. She did all she bould to cheer him, and promised to write to him this time, and let him know how they all were. How glad she was now that she had saved those pennies. They would pay the postage of her letters, and help to comfort poor Leon. 200



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PASSE-TOUT: OR, TIE NEW FISHING SMACK. The sea was still so rough from the effects of the storm that nobody dared venture on it for several days. The thunder-storm had quite broken up the weather. The mackerel fishing for that season was spoiled. The constant storms in the succeeding fortnight often altogether prevented their putting out to sea; and when they did, but few fish were to be caught. Lobster and crab fishing was quite out of the question, the sea was too rough to allow the lobster baskets to be put out; they would have been instantly washed away.* There was no question of saving now in the Grandet family; they had barely enough to live on. Therence had to work from morn till night at her lace, but work as hard as she would, she could not earn more than fourpence a day. What with cooking, washing and mending clothes, Catharine herself had but very little time for lace "* Lobsters are caught in baskets something like this, which are sunk out at sea by means of a number of stones tied all round the bottom. The lobster goes in at the hole at the top after a bait, and then cannot get out again. 151



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GEORGE HART. go into the garden and see your mustard and cress grown, and your radishes peeping above the ground." Oh, yes; I shall like that," replied George; "but what shall I do now? I should like to do something for Kate." His aunt said she intended to give both Kate and him some seeds for their garden, and that if he liked, he could put the seeds in little paper packets like the gardener's packets. George thought he should like that kind of work, and his aunt placed on the table, six little saucers of seeds. Half of the seeds in each saucer was for Kate, and half for George. Then his aunt gave George some slips of paper and an ivory knife, and showed him how to make a neat packet. George folded the paper very smoothly, and then pressed the ivory knife along the edge. When each little packet was filled with seeds, he folded the ends, and made the letter K" on Kate's packets. All this took him a long time, and while he was busy, he forgot that it was a rainy day. Just as he had finished the last packet, his aunt was called out of the room. While he was alone in the parlour, the servant brought in a large parcel, and placed it on the table. It was covered with brown paper, and tied with string. George looked at the parcel, and wished he knew what was in it. "What can it be?" said George; "there is 245



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GEOGRAPHY. • sometimes in the bright light, and sometimes in the dark. With every complete spin round that the ball makes, each part of its surface will be light and dark by turns. Forget the string for a few minutes, and try to think of your ball spinning round of itself near the candle. You will then be able to understand how it is that the earth spins round. The earth makes one spin every twenty-four hours, and each time that it makes the complete round we have day and night, that is, a period of light and a period of darkness. For, like your rid wafer on the ball, at one time we are turned towards the sun, and at another time away from it. Your ball is only a few feet from the candle. The earth is ninety-five millions of miles from the sun. The Year. Now, again, take hold of the string as before, go a little way from the table, give your ball a good spin, and holding it on a level with the candle, walk completely round the table. Once more forget the string, and that it is you who are carrying the ball round the candle. Try to think of your ball spinning round and round of itself, and at the same time going round the candle. The earth moves round the sun much in this way, 205



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GEORGE HART. flowers; I will never touch the flowers in the garden again, unless you give me leave." George kept his word, and he was glad to pick up the stones in Fred's garden, or to do anything he could to help him; he felt so sorry for the mischief he had done. But George forgot that he ought not to touch other things as well as flowers, without leave; and a day or two afterwards, spying James's new cricket-ball on a shelf, he took it into the garden to see how it would bounce. It bounded so nicely along the gravel walk, that he was quite delighted. Soon he began to throw it up as high as he could; it went up far higher than the garden wall, but it fell into a deep pond on the other side of the wall, and the famous ball that James liked so much was lost in the mud. Another day he took up Kate's doll, and began to wash its face, to see if the colour would come off. Down went the doll on the floor, and the face was broken. Kate did not speak one cross word to him, but she was very sorry to see her nice doll spoilt. George had seen Fred clean the silk-worms' boxes in the garden when he gave the silk-worms fresh leaves, and George thought he should like to feed them also; so he took them. into the garden for that purpose, but as he left the young silk-worms in the hot sun for more than an hour, they all died. When the boys found that day after day George 235 4



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GEOIGE HART. ground. He liked to make a great deal of sawdust, so that when Kate came from her mamma, they might fill little bags together. Kate could work, and she sewed a number of black bags and a number of white ones. Thus they were able to help one another; one made sawdust, the other made bags; and then they both loaded their cart with them. The black bags looked just like coal-sacks, and the white bags like sacks of flour. Sometimes they made sawdust pies, and they were happy at their play. Fred, James, and Kate,were very kind to George, and his visit seemed to give them much pleasure. He was so merry and quick at play, that he learnt all the games they taught him, trap-bat and ball, hare and hounds, touch-he, and foot-ball. George made a fine little pony, for he ran very quickly, and if by chance he got a lash with the whip, he did not cry and call out, That's not fair, I will not play," but he shouted out, "Never mind, it's nothing, I don't mind that." He liked to be the guard with the horn to the large garden cart, which the boys called their mail-coach, and while his cousins were drawing it along at a famous rate, he blew the horn with all his might. George was always ready to help his cousins in their games with one another; he ran for their ball, set up their nine-pins, and was a useful handy boy. 233



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ELECTRICAL EELS. Indians both dread and hate them. When young alligators and gymnoti are taken together in a very strong net, the latter never display the least appearance of a wound, because they disable the alligators before they are attacked by them. All the inhabitants of the water dread the gymnoti. Lizards, tortoises, and frogs seek the pools where they are secure from their action, It became necessary to change the direction of a road near Uritucu, because these electrical eels were so numerous in one river, that they every year killed a great number of mules of burden, as they forded the water." I like real descriptions of travels," said Richard, as he finished reading the above account. "How interesting this book is!" -255 A '.._ 255



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TIE PAIENTS' CABINET. If you think it clever to judge of the age of the foot-print, what do you think of the Hottentot flinging his hatchet into a bush, and without having a finger-post, or anything that we could observe to mark the spot, returning after some days, nay, even weeks, as I have been told, and without any trouble, finding his hatchet again ?" Why, it is very curious, indeed," said Richard, "and shows the use of looking well at the objects that surround us." But the ground must have been very soft," said Arthur, "to show the foot-mark." "C Very true, my lad," said Uncle John, "but the Hottentot can also judge by the wearing off of the turf, as well as by the mark on the soft ground. The foot-marks are generally to be found in the mud round the small ponds. The elephants, as well as the other wild animals, leave their haunts at nioht, and come to drink; and round those ponds the Hottentots pointed out to me the foot-marks of the various animals that had been down to drink." "What were those other animals, uncle ?" said Arthur. ", "The buffalo, the wolf, the rhinoceros, whose hoof resembles that of three horses' hoofs joined together, the baboon, and the antelope. The footmarks of all these animals were easily to be traced." "How curious," said Oliver; the next time I go 216



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THE PARENTS' CABINET. Oh, that's great nonsense. What's a dog to do with a ship ?" Well," cried Thdrence, "here comes M. Saules at last, so unless you are quick you will have to call her Catharine after all. But I know mother does not want the boat called after her. I can't see why she should not be called Mopse." "' Come, children," cried Frangois Grandet, getting up from his seat, "'we must not keep M. Saules waiting. Come along." There was no more time now to discuss the name; the two children were obliged to follow their mother and father, who, with all the rest of the villagers, now moved down to the beach. The little godfather and godmother took up their position on each side of the stern of the boat, while their father and mother stood at some little distance. Hector and Therence looked at one another; they were still undecided what to call the boat. After M. Saules had walked all round the boat, scattering salt and wheat over it, and had come back again opposite the stern, he read a short Latin prayer, and then he chanted a hymn in which all the people on each side joined. When they had done he turned to Hector and said, What is her name to be ?" Hector, so bold on the sea and so talkative at home, now looked across at Th6rence, stammered, and grew red. "' Passe-tout,' please, sir," said Therence suddenly, 136



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THE PARENTS' CABINET. Therence was still quite red in the face, and out of breath with tugging. What a pity," said Hector, "we did not think of sinking some lobster baskets-who knows, we might have caught some of them too !" "cNever mind now, we can do that anotherday," said his sister. "Let's haul in another net, for it must be getting late, and we must take care that we do not stop out too long." Oh, you need not be afraid. I know all about that. Do you suppose I have never been out to sea before ? Then came another great tugging and hauling to get in the second net. Just as they were about to draw this full of fish into the boat, Thdrence, quite exhausted, and unable to hold up such a weight any longer, let her end go, and all the fishes fell back, and slipped away again into the water. How stupid! How provoking of you! cried Hector. Indeed, I could not help it. The net was so heavy. Next time suppose we let some of the fish go before we attempt to pull it in, then it will not be so heavy, and I shall be able to do it." That's a good idea," said Hector, who was scarcely strong enough himself to pull such a load.. 182



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PASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK. recover. For a long time the bone would not set, and they had to go to great expense to get food and stimulants for him. Hector grew grave and sad. He often used to talk with Therence, as to what he could do! "Fish is now so plentiful. Oh, if I only had the strength, I would catch such a lot! Mother is getting quite ill, and we soon shall have nothing left in the cottage. And you, Therrie, you do not know how pale and thin you have grown, and I can do nothing-nothing. I am sure if father would let me have the boat, 1 could manage her. I am now twelve years old." Do you really think you could manage the boat, Hector ?" "Yes; I am quite sure of it." "Do you know, Hector, I am afraid mother has been borrowing more money. Last week she pawned all her clothes but those she has on. The day before yesterday I was getting on famously with this piece of lace, for which I was to have six shillings from Madame Giraud up at the Chateau; but yesterday I cut my finger, and although there were only a few inches to do, I have not yet finished it." "We shall have to sell the boat next," said Hector, gloomily. Thdrence, if you are not afraid, and would come out with me, together, I am sure, we 173



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r -r /^ iI 4,



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EORtGE HART. bird was lost, she said, Do not you see, George, by all this trouble, that children must not touch things that do not belong to them without leave. There are so many things that children do not understand, that they are almost certain to do some harm when they touch things that they are not used to. I cannot allow you to play in the workshop alone for some time to come; you must wait till your cousins come home from school, or till Kate is ready to play there; you know, George, it is not just, that while they are absent their things should be spoiled. When I see you careful not to touch anything that is not your own, without leave, I shall be glad to trust you again by yourself, and your cousins will not then wish you to be at home. Now, my dear children, dry up your tears, crying will not bring the bird back, and you had better go and play in the garden." Kate did not feel inclined to play, but she did as her mamma advised her; she went into the garden and tied up some, flowers, and cut some parsley for the cook, and fed the chickens. George sat in the arbour alone, emptying some mould out of one flower-pot into another, but he did not feel cheerful. By the time that Kate had fed her chickens, she had almost forgotten her trouble, and as soon as she saw that seven little ducklings had been hatched, she ran to tell George. 239



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THE PARENTS) CABINET, better it would have been for mother to have had "in her pocket all that we spent yesterday. In this way how are we to pay what we owe uncle ?" "Mother says she thinks uncle might have given us that, as he is so rich," said Therence, "and I think so too !" "But you must remember, Therence, uncle was not always so well off. Once he was as poor as we are. How is it that he is now so much better off?" I am sure I don't know. But I should not like father to be like uncle. He is so very close and stingy." You do not know anything about him, Th6rence, or you would never say that. Do you call him miserly, because he does not spend everything directly he earns it, and puts by a little, so that in case of his death, my aunt would not be left utterly destitute ?" Why does father call him mean and stingy then?" asked Therence. Because he does not know him; and because he will not save himself." Father must know him much better than you do, Leon. I believe father is quite right. I do not like to hear you speak so of him." Leon laughed, although in reality he felt vexed, and he told Therence to go home and make lace, which was what she understood, 15q



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PASSE-TOUT: OR, T1H NEW FISHING SMACK. In France men are drawn for the army and navy by conscription, and they must go, even if they dislike it, unless they can afford to pay some one to go instead. Of course for an able bodied young seaman, knowing his business well, it is more difficult to find a substitute than for an ordinary soldier. Therence, seated in the porch, had heard heruncle's words. Frightened and puzzled, she now left off working and leant forward, looking anxiously at her mother. "Poor fellow," said Conscience, after a few minutes' silence, he will not hear of my making any sacrifice for him; and, indeed, if Franqois cannot pay me, I do not know how I am to raise the money. The winter has been very bad all along the coast. I have had several losses besides my wife's long illness. All this I have been able to meet without inconvenience, but what I can do now to save my poor son, indeed, I do not know." Catharine was quite terrified. She was very sorry for her brother, but at the same time she was more afraid for her own son. What if Leon should be .seized in the same manner! Involuntarily she turned her eyes towards the road he would come, to see if he were in sight. Thdrence scarcely understood what her uncle meant. "But surely they," she said, laying great stress 157



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rASSE-TOUT: OR, THE NEW FISHING SMACK. when they see what a lot of fish we catch," said Hector, confidently. It.must not be supposed that this was Therence's first voyage; in former days, before she had to make lace, she used very often to go out to see the lobster baskets brought in, and if she had had the strength she would have been nearly as good a sailor as Hector. That evening Frangois felt very weak and ill, and he did not stir out again after supper. Catharine put aside her other work, and sat down to finish the little bit of lace Therence had left unfinished. There was not more than half an hour's work, and when she had done it, she set off to the Chateau to take it home, for she wanted the money very much. She did not miss Hector and Thdrence till she came back, when it was quite late in the evening. Where are the children, Frangois?" she asked. I don't know he replied. I have not seen them since you went out. I think they must have gone to bed." "I dare say; Thdrence looked very tired. She will be glad to hear that I have got seven shillings for that piece of lace." "She must have a holiday," said Francois. "Yes!" said Catharine, "I will send her to-morrow to get some of my clothes out of pawn." Catharine was quite in spirits, such a windfall the 177



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GEORGE HART. tell them why his aunt had given it to him. The boys thought it a very pretty fellow, and they told George many amusing stories about squirrels; how they sleep for two or three months together in the cold winter time; and how the squirrels in very cold countries change their hair in the winter time from a brown colour to a whitish grey, and are hunted for their skins, which are used for muffs and tippets. Oh, do tell me some more," said George; I should like to know every thing about squirrels. Will my little squirrel go to sleep all the winter ?" No," said James; "I believe not, because it is the cold which makes them sleep, when they live in the holes of trees in the woods. The inside of a house is much warmer than the woods. But here, George, is a book about animals, and you can read the account of the squirrel yourself." I cannot read it by myself," said George, "for I do not know all the words. I wish I could read well. I will ask my aunt to let me read it to her this afternoon, because she will help me." George stayed two months more with his cousins, and he was so obliging, and took such great care not to injure his cousins' toys, that they were all sorry when he went home, and they begged their mamma to let him come and stay with them again. 249



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THE PARENTS9 CABINET. Catharine asked eagerly the same question of each, and received always the same answer. She strained her eyes to look over the sea. The boats were all in now save "Passe-tout," and not a sail was to be seen even on the horizon. Francois came out, and was in great alarm, when he heard that the two children had not been seen all night, and that the boat was gone. He had no doubt' that they were in it. What was to be done? Helpless with his broken arm, what could Francois do ? Catharine sat down on the beach, weeping bitterly. Had Francois had the use of his arm he would have borrowed old PacBme's boat, and put out to sea in a minute to go in search of them. The fishermen were all tired with their night's work, and besides the sky began to look very windy. The breeze of the evening before was now a strong wind off shore. Franqois felt sure that unaided, they would never be able to return. At last, old Pacome, who was very fond of Hector, volunteered to go in search of them. Everybody ran to help him to get his boat unloaded, and ready to go to sea again. Indeed there was not a minute to be lost, for the tide was already on the ebb, and nobody can leave Dive or enter it, except when the tide is fully in. Frangois, in spite of his weakness, and although he could do nothing, insisted on going too. 180



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UNCLE JOHN AT THE CAPE OF GOOD HOPE. I AM so dull to-night," said Oliver; I have got nothing to do, and it rains so heavily that I must stay at home. I wish it were bed-time;" and he yawned. "I don't, though," replied Richard.' "Uncle John promised to come and see us to-night, and I think he will soon be here." Oh, Richard! he will never come out in such a pouring rain as this," said Oliver. "Why not ?" said Richard; I suppose he has an umbrella." Before Oliver could answer, the door opened, and in bounced little Arthur, shouting out, Uncle John, UncleJohn !" "Ay, ay, Uncle John;" cried the kind uncle, while he was rubbing his shoes on the mat. Are ye glad, boys, that he has come? The boys answered this question by running out and shaking hands with him. 211