• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Cover
 Index
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Front Matter
 Half Title
 Copyright
 Table of Contents
 Chapter I: Plans formed
 Chapter II: Instructions
 Chapter III: The journey
 Chapter IV: The arrival
 Chapter V: Johnny
 Chapter VI: Up the valley
 Chapter VII: Deacon Justin's
 Chapter VIII: Gaining informat...
 Chapter IX: Plan of study
 Chapter X: Correspondence
 Chapter XI: Going to housekeep...
 Chapter XII: The art of adding
 Chapter XIII: Glad of an excus...
 Chapter XIV: Study hours
 Chapter XV: Getting settled
 Chapter XVI: Memory failing
 Chapter XVII: Going into the...
 Chapter XVIII: The camp
 Chapter XIX: Frying maple sugar...
 Chapter XX: Fan's composition
 Chapter XXI:Two silly fellows
 Chapter XXII: Conclusion
 Advertising
 Back Matter
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: August stories ;, v. 4
Title: Granville Valley
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00026251/00001
 Material Information
Title: Granville Valley
Series Title: August stories
Physical Description: 346, 38 p., 2 leaves of plates : ill. ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Abbott, Jacob, 1803-1879
Dodd & Mead ( Publisher )
Publisher: Dodd & Mead
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: 1872
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Clergy -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Country life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Camping -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1872   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1872
Genre: Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Jacob Abbott.
General Note: Added series t.p.
General Note: Publisher's catalogue follows text.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00026251
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002220747
notis - ALG0950
oclc - 02601410
lccn - 42047442

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover
    Front Cover
        Cover
    Index
        Index
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Title
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Half Title
        Title
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Table of Contents
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Chapter I: Plans formed
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Chapter II: Instructions
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Chapter III: The journey
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
    Chapter IV: The arrival
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
    Chapter V: Johnny
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
    Chapter VI: Up the valley
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
    Chapter VII: Deacon Justin's
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
    Chapter VIII: Gaining information
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
    Chapter IX: Plan of study
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
    Chapter X: Correspondence
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
    Chapter XI: Going to housekeeping
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
    Chapter XII: The art of adding
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
    Chapter XIII: Glad of an excuse
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 211
    Chapter XIV: Study hours
        Page 212
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
        Page 216
        Page 217
        Page 218
        Page 219
        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
        Page 223
    Chapter XV: Getting settled
        Page 224
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
        Page 228
        Page 229
        Page 230
        Page 231
        Page 232
        Page 233
        Page 234
        Page 235
    Chapter XVI: Memory failing
        Page 236
        Page 237
        Page 238
        Page 239
        Page 240
        Page 241
        Page 242
        Page 243
        Page 244
        Page 245
        Page 246
        Page 247
        Page 248
        Page 249
        Page 250
        Page 251
        Page 252
    Chapter XVII: Going into the woods
        Page 253
        Page 254
        Page 255
        Page 256
        Page 257
        Page 258
        Page 259
        Page 260
        Page 261
        Page 262
        Page 263
        Page 264
        Page 265
        Page 266
        Page 267
    Chapter XVIII: The camp
        Page 268
        Page 269
        Page 270
        Page 271
        Page 272
        Unnumbered ( 276 )
        Unnumbered ( 277 )
        Page 273
        Page 274
        Page 275
        Page 276
        Page 277
        Page 278
        Page 279
        Page 280
        Page 281
        Page 282
        Page 283
        Page 284
        Page 285
        Page 286
        Page 287
        Page 288
        Page 289
    Chapter XIX: Frying maple sugar cakes
        Page 290
        Page 291
        Page 292
        Page 293
        Page 294
        Page 295
        Page 296
        Page 297
        Page 298
        Page 299
        Page 300
        Page 301
        Page 302
        Page 303
        Page 304
        Page 305
        Page 306
        Page 307
    Chapter XX: Fan's composition
        Page 308
        Page 309
        Page 310
        Unnumbered ( 316 )
        Unnumbered ( 317 )
        Page 311
        Page 312
        Page 313
        Page 314
        Page 315
    Chapter XXI:Two silly fellows
        Page 316
        Page 317
        Page 318
        Page 319
        Page 320
        Page 321
        Page 322
        Page 323
        Page 324
        Page 325
        Page 326
        Page 327
        Page 328
        Page 329
        Page 330
        Page 331
    Chapter XXII: Conclusion
        Page 332
        Page 333
        Page 334
        Page 335
        Page 336
        Page 337
        Page 338
        Page 339
        Page 340
        Page 341
        Page 342
        Page 343
        Page 344
        Page 345
        Page 346
    Advertising
        Advertising 1
        Advertising 2
        Advertising 3
        Advertising 4
        Advertising 5
        Advertising 6
        Advertising 7
        Advertising 8
        Advertising 9
        Advertising 10
        Advertising 11
        Advertising 12
        Advertising 13
        Advertising 14
        Advertising 15
        Advertising 16
        Advertising 17
        Advertising 18
        Advertising 19
        Advertising 20
        Advertising 21
        Advertising 22
        Advertising 23
        Advertising 24
        Advertising 25
        Advertising 26
        Advertising 27
        Advertising 28
        Advertising 29
        Advertising 30
        Advertising 31
        Page 378
        Page 379
        Page 380
        Advertising 35
        Advertising 36
        Advertising 37
        Advertising 38
    Back Matter
        Back Matter 1
        Back Matter 2
        Back Matter 3
        Back Matter 4
        Back Matter 5
    Back Cover
        Cover
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text
i -- I I -, I I v I ,', I : 11 I -11 -11. 11 I I I I I I -1 I
-- ,
-
I - I I - "" 7
- '! I I I I i" :,-., '. -, I I I I I I I I I- ., 11 .
- -
N I -1 , -- I I 1. I I
I I I -, I I :'- Ii- I I z -1 '-' 1. I- I : I I I --
- I I I I I 11, I I I - - ,
,- I I ,, I --- I I I .1 I
- -, ,- 1 : -- -, -- --, -, - ,-,, -, ,,. 1. 1,
I - - - I I ,,, - .
I I i : : I I I I I -
I I I I 11 I Z I I I I I I .. .1 I ,- -- 1,
= I- I I I I I I --- -- -- -, 11 I ,-. -- I .1
11 I I I -, I- I - !: -' ': ,- -,
I -, I I - - -", I -, I I I t
I I : i-, -,-, -- I I -
-- I I I -, ': -- -- -- -"' :, I I ,
-, '- I -1 ,,, -1 I 1, I
ii :-, -."A-7% I I I -, - -,
I- I I --l-
I -A I I ,- -- -,- .- : ,
i -. ii % 0 I I ---, I-
- -- I I -.--*S-,- I I I I I ---I- 11 --- -1 -- .- I I I I -
,-.= I : r 11 I- I ., -- - -.
I- I - -- -, -, -,-- -- - : -
I -- 7 -, -, -- ..... -'-':- - .- -
I I 7-7-11 '- -,- 1- 11- 1- 1. 11 I
.- i I.- -- ,,-- ---, I I - -_-,-, ,- -1 I., I I -
I --- i -.- .--l 1, "" ,- I ---- -- ': -1: :. -, -, ,- -,- I ,- I ,
11 I -1. I -- - .- -,- "-"- --I'- 11 I I -11, 1-1 ': :.,- ,--- --- -,- -- 1, -, I I -- '_ ', I -
-- I- I -, I ', - -- -" ,,, I ,
I I I I - I I -.- I ,- ,, .- _,,.,_ '. -, --
j I -- -, I I -
-- -,- I -- ,-., --, -- -1 -: 1; --; -, --" ,
-- I I I -,. -, ." ",- i, -, -.--,-- : I ,-, -, -, I- -.1 I - I I -- L 1, : I- I- --
,:-, -, 1. I- I I- -_ -1 -1 ', -. -,.,- - i, ,
1, ,1-, - ',- 11 I---,. - I - -- 1-1 1, ---
-1.1 I -- I I I I =',.--: -, -, ': -, -.---- -,-:i -1 -', ", ,_. -- ... ''."-- -, I I - I ,,, I I ,-- - ,-, A 10- - ,-- --, 11 I .
I ,-- I -- I AM W z
-111 -1 ,-- ----, ,- ,,-
I., "'
: L -, "I ,- $ 1-11 .1-111--': 1,
-- - I- I.L I I n -, I -- -
-
I I I I I I I'-,, I -- -,- I -.,, -, ie-,--.,,- I .
--- I I - I I I -1- 1. ;- 1- -- - -, -
I I I "i, - -, ", I ,-l. ,-, .... r, -
I I I I I -- -,-- -- -, _j ,.,- ,-- -
,--, -, -, -1 I I
I : -, -1 .- 11-- 1. -1
-- -:- I -I-I I I- .- -, -- -"' -- -1 I
-'7 - .,- ,,- -.- z I .- -, -- -1.,-". .,-- ,'-- -
I ., .- -- : I 7i :,,
I z I I I --- ,' I -,- I - -- -,
i, I - -- In : : -,-
I
I I -1 ,- ll---- --l-.-----
-1 I -,-, I ., ,' I '.
7' 11 ;l ,, '- -' -'-,--,- -, -, -- .- ,
I ,--, I 1- ,l I
I I I _- '- I i ,- - ,,_- ", I ,-," "I I; "Z ,- 11 -. -- I I ,,,, "I -1 I I
I- 1. 1. I I I --l -, -- -- ,,, jl -1 ----1.--"-_.-,_'-
I -- -,-11 -, I I li- 11 I i- L --- I k- I -- -- ,,- r -, -1 - -, -
-- -1- I -, - ,--- I- I - I i
,- -. I '.: I I --,-'---l,- -1-
I I :: ,
--- I --- I -, r: -, -.- -, ,-. -.-- I
I - I I '7 1 1 -- .1
-, ,. - -- 1. -- --- I - -, ;, -- 1, .- -1 ,
- -,- 11 -.., 11 -I.- I- I I I- -1
-- - 7 ? -.- -
I .1 --- -,,- .' I -, -. 7- 1, -- "ll- 1-1 -," ,
- --- .7 -- : li ? I' I '' .1-7 1- "- - -, ,--- -
I ,7 '- "I - ---- ,- I -_ "-,-,- I ", - ,- '-,'- ,:-, -, "
-'- I I- ,I ,- I I
1- I -, -, I- = I -, I ----,, I -,- 1-1 ,., -1
11 I I I I - Z, I :_-, -.--,,- -1. ,_,_ -, :-- -, ,,_-'--;, '-- -i -,
-- % I I 2 ,- -, -- !- -, -, t, -1- I, i- I I 1, ", --- L _-, -
- _- -- ', -- --- -1. I ,-i. ,,, -.1. -- ;r' I
--Z -- -- 2 I --- --,-I- -- ,-, ,,-
i, ; --- I i "I 7 11
,,, i -- "- I I .- .1 -- T -1 I -1 ---,--,- -, %-, .1
7 I- - ,- -- I "' I I I -- -1 ., I -, -i ,-- - ,
- I I ,r ,, I - -, .1 -, I r, -
: I --
- -
I I -1 ,- 11 rz ,
-_, , I I -i-, - -- '" -, -1 I -1 I I I -
I I ", I 1, I -- :l ': ". -
-- 11 -, I -- I I -.- -,
-- I I --- rr -, -- -, -,
11 ,_ - -, '. r rl
I : I
I r - I I I i ;- --- -A -- I .. 7- -i-,-- -- r_ ,,_, ,_ _
I I : I r ,-, I I -
I -, -, Z % -- .- r I -1 I r-, --- ,:: -, .1 - ,- r -
I -, -I-- I I - '- ,
I I -- ,-- ,- ,!- I I I -V -- I I ,
: 7 -Z :- I - 1. ,- i I ,- '. i ; I -1 - -- -, I I r., .- - I
I ", ,
r I 11 -', j x It ,.- -- r ,:-,: -:,' 7 -: ,'- -- -7 -- -'l-r,%.- -
-1 I - 1. 14 - ,,- ', ,i r -- -.-", --___
I r -
-- ll---, ,:: ,---,- I -11 '-'--
,
I t L -, I 7 - --
- I ; I r - -1 I : -- ", -, : _- I r : :_ r ,- r. I r-
"7r ,, I ,; i-- 7 "--- ,,- -,_ _, - i i" '- -,
7, ; I -1 -- I ,-, = I I -, -
lll I- r 6 *- __ -- -- -- --- -- r :"
- r I I -, I I .- 'r ,- ,
q T -, A ', I -- 'r, '-','-r""' _, r '. i' '- I - I -, in ,,,, 11 rl -1 1,1_ ,- I -r -1 I I -, I I
11 ; ,- ., ;i
-, -- ,- ,r_ I., ,- I -- I
,- -, ,,- --' ,
, i -1 _, : ,
-- ., r ,- _-, 7:
-- I ; 11 '- r '- I -
f I I I I I I m 1 1, 1 1: - -- -,
I I
-1 - r, ,r '- 1 ; -, 6,,rr r I I I I 1, -- I I ."! -- -
I I I -7 -, 11
-, I I ii I I -! -,
I I I I -- I I ,I r I I ., -, -- I I ,- _d I I ,
!, I r Ir I -1
7 i I % ` J* I I r I , I -, .-, ,-, t, '- '- 1,
I I I I r ., I I r .
I r I
I I I I I I I I 1. -- L I L : r .' m I -1 'i ,_, :1 :' I I -, ,, -
-1 I z ,- i I I I I 11 4 -_ : I :,
I r iz I I I I I -1 -- I -,i I L -- 7 .,, - - r- .
I I I -L r Ir L ,__ r. _, L - -, '_ r ,- I I w -
I I I _
: i I I 11 L L I -, -, ,- ,-: -- : r -_ I ; L -- '- !: i ... j
/ 'r ; 'r ,- L - r
r ,
Ll 4 'i ` ,- L L _, : ,r -1 i I r '-, r I I 4 1 -,! it
I 4 : A : m I r I I -1 r L' I I .
I I I I I I : I i I r -r i I I -' : r 1, -
- : r I 4 I : -r I I L -, I .
; I I I r L I -
, L I I -t L I L I I I Ili I I I -
-, t I 7 1 I -, - r I I i'- I
L A I L F : 7 :7 I I I J L : I ,
r I r I I I I I
-- -- r i; I r, -. :- L I r, I I : : r- i
:, -- i I I -1
r- 4 -, -2i r I I L r I -i '. 7 1. L ,
i I r '- 4 ;J 'r I I -i I -i I I mi i z I
I : I L 'Z I I -. :, I -
-. I -, I t ; r I I L i r I L I r I
I I I I - L, L L I -- -, I r, !, 2 ,- I -* I I ,- , r I I
I I
I i; r I
I I r -4 1 ; I - I I r L I L I I 4L I ,, r ' .
I r -* 4 L -, 'r. I I I I I -- 'r I I I I I i .
I ': r l r
-1 ', -- 4 I r , L I - L -r : I
I I - I I i
m i i ;, I 'i 11 - r ,r ", I 'r. I 77, r .1 iL --r' ' J, r rL ,
; -* I I L L
L I $ r r I .'
I I L L I I I i I r I r
- I -- : I I I I I I I I
r 'L I I- -1 il 'I ,, I , I r __ L "'
I I I i 4 1 i I L I I I i
I I -1 L : i I I .- ,- 'r 1 I r I L T I I I 'r ', r' I I I I I I : 'I'-
!rl. L 1 4 r I I I -'. 1 1 I -i; l
, 'r ,- I I ,-
. I I I I it r 'r I 4 I r -,
t I r I r -' L -1 -1
-, I : i -, -, -i W. I I I I r- ; ; `i L' L I .
I r I 1j L I r I I -, ,
'. _' 1 -T r L 'r I I-r
r Ir I I I i -rl I Ll L r I I
I : ,,, I' i I r -, I L I I : r Z' I I I I r I .
: r I 1 7 I 11 I -r 2 1 r i 1 I I r "i
. L : -1 -
I I I i I I r : 1 I r I r I r' rL L r ] -- L
I I
I I L ,r : I I I I I L r ; I L 'L .
rL LZ
1
: I r -g L "- : : ;, : I l -
: I I I I I ; z -:
L i I r - -- .1
1, 1, ,, : I I r I I r .
I I L i 7 1 : r r r I : ,- -
I ,, I I I I -1 r
1, r I I : $ I 1, '. I r ,
I I I r' I L -, -- ,
-. 1 t : : 11 I -, Zi
r I I I I I I -1 : I
-, -, ,L I I -, ,' I L .L I -1 L I
I I I L .: I I
r ,
I I I I I I ? ,, Ll I I
I I -, I i I I r I I I I I r I L ,
: L I I : I r I L I r I I I I L I : I I L L i r v I i ,
T I I I I I -
I I r ; I tv 1 2 .. : I I ,
I L ir I ,- -1 i I I r 1. I I I r I I L I .
I I i r '. L L .A l'7 I I I L r I 1;
r -. L I I ;w I I ; I I r I I : _, 7 : I I
I r : I I L r I I r -, r, -
r f L I r ,
I I I
I r i 11 I f" 1 L ; ; I : I ,- -
I I I I I r I I .i'- I I I I I I I I I .
. I L r ,r I I 9, I I I I L 1 7 r I i
I I -, I I I r r ", '_ ; J I I ::
4-12-I- I I I I L I I ..,
-, I r I ,
I r : I I .:
.: I I L "I I '- I r .
I I i I I r -
I I I I j r L 4 1, I I I r I I -, I I '"
I I I I I ,i t I ,
-1 I r 11 I : I I I 1 4 : I r I 4
r r .
I I i 4 : I I -1 L" I r 11 I r I I
- I I r I I I ,' L I I I I ; r, I I L: I I .4
1 1 1 : I I I I I r I I -
I I I I I r r I I I I j I I I I .
I I I L
r L I I r I I I -
L 4 I I I I r I : r il I
I I I I : I I I L I I : I I r r : ,
.- I I I I I I 1 :
w I I I I -, I I I I I "
I I I I I r I I I L I r I L L r L I I I I 11 L r I I L I r I I I
r I I I I I I I r I I I I I L I
I I I I I ,
i I I I I L i I I I I IL
r I I L I : I r I I I I r L L
!- r I I r L I I I I I I I I , -, I I ,
r I I i I I I I r I ,I I
I r -, I r I I i 4 i -r- I L L I : : I I L r r ; I : L I

i r -, -- *- I r
I- : r ; r I I r I I r I I I I I .- I i I I ; 'i I 1, : I
-1 , I r- I I I -, ,- r -1 I
I r I I I I I r r I r Lr ,
, r I -l I I I
I I r- -, ., -1 -, -, 1
r I r I I I , I I I ; -
,. I : : I I j I I -, L' r. I w 1, I "T I I ,4 -, , '41,
I r I I I I r ., I '. i I ". I *f
j I I- .; I I I r, I , L ,
I L I 1, I 7 : I -- r -1 I I L I
- i ': r I ., r ,, ' I I : t
I r r I - I I I 11 I
-1 , I 11 I I L I I I i I r, L I ,-
I 1 I L ; ,: - I i ,,, : I I
I I i r ; I I -,, r : j ,,
7" % I I I I I r I r_ I : i I I r :
. :1 r I I I , L , I L I r I r V I r : I I wir 1- r 11
I r' r I I L I .-Y
-' i I I 1, 11 r : ._, r I "ll -1 -. 1 .,
I r I Z I I I -
' : r -, I I r -, ,_, r ;, .r 11 I I
. r r- I I i : I I I I .1 : ; : _r, _r I ,, ., I r ,
_, F ,
-
I I I : I I- :1 I -: r -, -' -, ,- 4 L -
.. r ', I I L 4 I : rl ; -
.- I I I I I L ; 0 1 r-' a L I -
I , L' .1
'; L
I r I ; I ,_ -- -, -, l i ,
I r ,
_ r I r I I I , I L i ., .1 .
, I I r I I I I I I :
I I I I -, I I I 1. -1 .1 7 : '' r r L
., .,
-1 I-
L -, L, "
-- 1. I I I i I 'r-
r f .. 4 : 'r - '' ' '7
I I t I r r I I L I j I
r. e I i, I I I r -1 ;" 1, - r I I
r 4 1 1 -r r L_
, r : I I : : L I I I : i 'r L 1, 1, '# : ,, _'. ' I
, ': I , -. I L j '
I I r I I I I i I I I
I I I -
-_ I t I - - r i" r _' r ,, "L: -' :
I "' '- -' '.
I I I r I I L I I I I I : I L - -, -, r
r r 1 -e ,o
L L I I L -' -, r LV r, ' I 4i I -, ,L. ,
I - ., I I L I 7, L r -r T -f r ,_ ,_ L I 4 ,
I -r r I L - k ', 'L : _
!10! I I I 1 I I -1 i ,+- j _r I I 1 ,i r !:,
l L i r r 'L : I I r I L I 'r I 11
I ; : r r '- , ,' I I r L L' , I I I I L r, ;
I 7 , , 7 -
I , - 1: ,I r I -, ; r i "
:1" I r I I _;, n I I I r L I
: I :, I I -,
r I I , I I
A- I I % - I I j -t I- I
I -, I I -- I I , ,,, I 1, I ,, 6 1 , I -t
r I "i
-- , i I I ,- I I I r + i I I I I r I .1,
.. I I I r 7 I -, r : : r r I I I I I I I : ,
I I I r ,:, , T, r r I r I 11
r r : r : I I I : 1 r-. ,.' ' : "i ' L L I : I -1 ': L, I' '- .
r, I 1, ,
-; ", I -,
I t I I I I I -, I ; , 4 I I i_ r : r r -_j ' r ,
I ,, r. r
-' r r r I ,- .r L _+ r, L
I I I I I I L r I I ; ,. ,; -f r - r -- r ,- ,, -, ; I T -1 I I
I I I I E, ., I I I r L I r 1 - I I I 1, ,- _, -_ I ., ` I .- .- ,- r -, , I -
I :_ I I r-, , I I I 1, I I -, : r. ,_ I 'L- r. ,, L I ,
,
, I I i ,-': .- ,
- ; 1 - i, I : r I ,
I r , : r ', L, L r ., :' r ,
r. r
% L, , -, I I '- I I ,,, ,,, 7 ;
I -, -, 4. f ,i r-; 1 I I
, r r -1 I "' -L r, L _-" ; ,' T I I 1 I- I .- I I I ." ., ., 1. r .
I . I ej- r, -.- ,* ,_
r r .; I i, I I 1, r r
T I 'r :. :,
I I -,4 r, I L I I I ,- I I I I -1 r : -- I : Z! -- -
i I I I I I I I r ; ,_ 11 ,: .. ,-. :, -; % L : '.
, r ,
r I ,
r .r : I --,, L I i t r I I I -, ,. I I , r -' i .- r. ,e ', I ,.,
r, 1 I I I __r r, 1, i I - I I I 1 I I I I I .4 ,
" -: : I I I I I I : I I .d I ,,i ,I I I L : 'j -- r- r L' ,j, -, -, I 1,
: -, I I - 1 I r L 'L -- L '- -1 I I .
I- I ,:' -l", 7r ,: I,--,-
-, r - I : r , r' I-, -,r -" -L r' -
L I I -
I -- - I I ., z '- I : I I I I I .- : :-- -,: ,:" r", )
". r "' %- -2 4 ,., I ,
- I -1 '.4, -, -- 1 I TI '. I D,- ,, ,i I r -1, , L I I I I 1 1. r
. 'i I I 7. '- r, -' 11 ,' I- -
r., I., 1, .4, ,,-, !,
-, I -, I : 1, I -1, I '.
__
I I .:'- r I I ,:, r -- '7' ;-' ,Ll I I 11 ,-- -,- r -,- -
,i __ ... I I
I I 1 ,r I _I
1, ,r: ,, _. ,_, _,, -'. r r 7 .'
"' ': .- ', ,`, ", .r. '_ 't ,-r
:- I j, ,, r r ", 'i7::- r -' '.-$ -."- ,' -'- r, 1- 1. I -1
'r L I -11 '
. I I 7 r _
-- 41 1 1 -- I ,- ., e -,, --' ; '' '- -: '. -- ,:, I ,
: .- r-, ,,,, '- -1 1 -41
f 1-1, , r '-' - "', - ,
I I I r I _r I r ,, r, r i- .", -. _4 - ., --, -, -,
-_:, I 4 r ', __ I : I ll I -i - L I ., I - -,.r' '- -' ., - "' r :N
'r I ,%, 1 s -1 O -r :, -,- rl 'r -- :,
, '- T ,.r __ r :, ,_ r _- L ;, -
I r, i :-- , ", -, t .* p r I I r I
I I I I ,- Z, : : r.
. I I I I I I I r I I I , r _, :_ r_ : r -- ;
I 11 I r r r I 1. I I I- -:: ; -, r --, -r ; , r L I ,. ,r r r r, ; L -- L rr -, -,r .-, 11
I I r '- r L I -
-,7,- a ,,, I
: I , I -
L -, r I I L I -r' I r r 1,
-, -, '
: -, I I ,:.-
I 1, -- - 4 -' L r : - ., I I L -' , I L -
r I I I ' -' :, .":, .; r' -1 'I, :; '- 'r I 'C' k - ; -, -,- j -- 'i" I ,- r.0 ;7% I 11 I ----r, ,i- I I I -
-, : 11, 'Iq" , -, l I -' '.' I
I ,, I - ', I- '. 'I" L -- "' ." L r '" 'I "' Ll '- L ",, I I i- I "
I -, ,
I : L I I I '- "' '- L r ,. -- .-.-I- r
' ' -' ' : "" L -, ,- I T f :j L -, ', '. r I t ,
- I I _ , -
I I I I ,f
L L -i -, r ', _ _
r r _ _, _.
:, I I r I -1 -- I I I I I I ,
- ' -' ,-'r I - :;,6, L:7, 4 +- -- '. ,- I I .
1. I I I I I $1 L, I I
I ,,- *'-4, ,' I r-.,. .. A' L r -1 & ; ",
.., I r I ,' 7 L' t , I r I
I -- z r ,: ,, -- __ r !, -, L' ',
- I I r I r : - L -- '- -- ; : r 1- 1. I- :L, I __ I .
I I -- ". ,, :7, -,*,, r' r, : -, I '
-- rl r I I I I I I r -, I I r r ,_ L ,r ,_, r. .1 -, r r' r I L I
11 i r -, -- .r .r r, -- .-
r4''-. : L r r I -, -- r'
I L I I I- - I ". 1, ." ; '. W'---- L
'; - -' r r I I I I I I 4 !'. : :L i. 'j I -- : : -- ', 1 -- I I I ,
d- ;- : I 'I, 'j, ._, :. ; _j :_ _,; 11 .'Il 1 -i , ,"r "" L - I .
- I.. I I I I I L 1 -' -- "t --- -' L : I r I I :
I r. r I I -, r L - r I L I ,
:- I I I r I L I - I I r r ,, ,, ,- I !. "IL 'A-, r ,-, I I I .,
.1 L I r L I I I r -1 L, L, :: 'n I rr i "' ` ` ., 'I L I ': I I L -1
__ r -9
-'
I

























































































































































































t



4




































r^










THE


AUGUST


STORIES.


Oreer of fte eio~mes.

st -AUGUST AND ELVIE.
Ist. AUGUST AND ELVIE.


2d. HUNTER AND TOM.


3d. THE SCHOONER MARY ANN.
4th. GRANVILLE VALLEY.












































~2PAN''

x Nil
.iUZI



~\\~.Ml










THE


UGUST STORIES.


BY

JACOB ABBOTT.


VOLUME fOUPITH.


lantille
( m


j~a I1Q


NEW YORK:


DODD


&


MEAD,


762


SR A DW AY.


I'
.5


-J1


I -








THE


A UGUST STORIES.


GRANVILLE


BY


ACOB


ABBOTT,


LUTHO1, OF THE


"1UJUNO


STOUIE I


T THE ROLLO BOOKSI ETO.


NEW


YORK


DODD


& MEAD,


No. 762,


BROADWAY.


1 872.


VALLEY


N'


I















f









Entered according to Act of Congress in the year 1872, by
JACOB ABBOTT,
In the Office of the Librarian of Congress at Washington.











CONTENT


PLANS FORMED. ......a..


a. Saoesealwomefte*


. .. o .


II.


INSTRUCTIONS...........


so .5- 0 0 5 S U *5U*


III.


THE JOURNEY. ........


THE ARRIVAL ..........


JOHNNY*. *


r r r cI I rI C r, +, I I 9


IV.


a a mea 000060000,


VI.


UP THE VALLEY. .......


0 a 0a 0 0 a0 0*a* 0 a 0 00 au0s*as


VII.


DEACON JUSTIN'S.-.......


S 5 S S U S S S 55 C 55 5 5 U ~ 5 5 5 0 U


GAINING INFORMATION....


VIII.

. u mu u u


a a s0aa ..aaa .a0a 119


IX.


PLAN* OF STUDY....a....


urn su... un s as uuemss..- 135


X.


CORRESPONDENCE ......... 154
s m Q e o 8 a D s i e o


S.


PA6H


22


34



,~51


64


83


104/1


*'-N





CONTENTS.


.XL


GOING TO HOUSEKEEPING.


f a a a a 0


m O ose0s so me** "am*& i171-


XII4


STHE ART OF ADDING..


a 0a 0a 0


SO O~O* WOOS SOOSeSO 162


XIII.


GLAD OF AN EXCUSE ....


5 5~ 0 5 0~ 0 ar a ar S S S 0 5O S 0 5


XIV.


'STUDY HOURS.. ......


a sf0 0 t 00 0 0 0000 5 0now*S. U U 0 a


XV.


GETTING SETTLED ......


S~ ~ 4 0 6 O \0& &S a o 0 0 a 5a5a 5a5a


XVI.


MEMORY FAILING.. ....


a5, / aa 0 a a aa a A


00 0 i


*5 5 0u '0 5


XVII.


GOING INTO THE WOODS..


a a . a a0a0a a a w 46 'j, 0 a a a a a a f


XVIII.


,HE CA~ntePi .e .a mi'sSonw


' .


MO O 500 5 5 0 500 00 0 U 0soma S 00.,


XIX.


FRYING MAPLE SUGAR CAKES. ... .... -- -

.XX.


FAN'S COMPOSITION .:...


a 0 5 0 05 0 5 05a 0 a a OSS0


- XXI.


Two SILLY FELLOWS. ...


. l 5 0 ..


* ... .....or 316


CONCLUSION ... -.....
". 1 > ,


332
++rr$xn.+~rr,$+*


196


212


224


236


253


268


290


308


a .












G RANVILLE


V


ALLEY.


CHAPTER


Plans


Formed.


THE


place


Granville


Mountains in


which,
Valley


Vermont,


in this book


is


among


though


it is not


:, is called
the Green


knowvn


there


by


that


name.


The


way


in which


happened that Elvie went with August to spend


a large


part of the


winter there yvas


as follows.


lie had


been


in early


life quite


slender


form,


and somewhat feeble


in constitution,


he had improved so much in health and strength


since he had, been under August's care, and
(9)


I.


it


in


but


his




10


VALLEY.


thinking and

developed by


reasoning powers


had been so


far


August's management, and by the


influence which


he exerted


over him in


various


ways, that his father began


to think it was time


for him


to


prepare


for his going to school


commencing the regular study of books.


So he consulted the


physician on the subject.
/


The physician


after


a careful


examination of


the case said that he should prefer to wait a few


months


longer


before


putting


the boy


regular routine


of school


duties,


but if


some


arrangement could

employ one or two


be made


by which


hours each day in


he could

studying


from


books,


and


devote


the rest


of the


outdoor exercise


of


some


kind


that.


was con-


nected with amusement,


he thought.it would be


a very safe and advantageous arrangement.


"The truth is," said he,


"that six


hourS'


finement a day, which

school-with lessons t,


is the ordinary usage at

o6, perhaps, to learn -ia


GRANVILLE


and


to


the


time


to


con-




PLANS FORMED.


the evening besides-is too much in my opinion


for children,


powers


while they


and faculties ar


are growing, and their
Consequently in the


process- of development and formation.


" I don't


think,"


he added,


"that they ought


to study more than half that time, and not even


much


as that,


unless


they


are specially


interested in the studies and like the work."


"Does


that


make


much difference ?"


asked


Mr. Grant.


"Oh yes," said the physician, "a great deal of


difference.


they
they


If children are interested


are doing,


make,


and pleased


the effort


does


in what


with the progress


not bring,


by


means, so great a strain upon the brain' and


any
the


nervous system, as when

them, and they are held


the work is irksome


to it


to


by some sense of


obligation.


"The
terested


children
in their


often
school,


become


extremely


am told,"


in-


said Mr.


I\I-





GRAN1VILLE


VALLEY.


Grant,-" at least'so some of


my friends inform


me-and yet


this


does


not always


prevent


injury to their.health.


Indeed one of my friends


found


that his daughter was


becoming pale and


and could


not sleep well at


attributed it to the extreme


'her lessons,


night; and he
k


interest


and the solicitude -and


she, felt

anxiety


mind it brought with it."


Exactly,"

was probably


said


not


selves, or pleasure


but


-the- physician.


interest


in


solicitude about


in the


making pi

the marks


" But


studies


progress in
or prizes


that


them-
them,
to be


earned, or ambition in respect -to her standing in'


the class, or something of that


kind.


A girl


be. urged


to exqrt


herself


beyond,


strength


in performing irksome and:


injurious


brain-work from fear of losing her


place in her


class, as well


as from


fear of


any other


kind of


punishment or privation.


And


so she


allured to go.on in doing what she is too tired to


thin,


in
of


may


her


may


be


12




PLANS


FORMED.


pleasure, and what


is


really


injuring


by


hope


as she might


of advancement or


be induced


of a prize,-


to continue


such


work by the promise of a ride or a new dress, or


any


other reward.


from interest


All this


in the studies


is very different


themselves,


and


Pleasure


in


the pursuit


of them.


So long


children are not urged on by extraneous induce-


ments of any kind,


but are governed simply


the interest


they


and the pleasure


it,
4 Jf


feel


they


we are pretty


in what


they


derive from


safe in allowing


are doing,


the doing of


them


to


go on.


"I should think


therefore,"


said the doctor in


conclusion,


"that


it would


be better


for this


winter if you could make some arrangement.by


which Elvie could go on


with


studies


for an


hour


or ,two


every


day,


under


some


guidance as that of this


young


August,


who I


understand from your account-of him seems to


do


with


her,

just


13


as


by


such


lis




GRANVILLE VALLEY.


have the knack


of interesting


him in the work


itself."


said Mr.


Grant.


"The


boy


seems


really to have that


knack."


"It will be


tolerably


safe,"


said the doctor,


" for Elvie to do all that he really


likes to do, on


its own account; and then perhaps next spring or


summer


he can try


going to


school


regularly,


and having some pressure of obligation put upon

him."

Mr. Grant asked the doctor, moreover, whether


he would


recommend


his sending


Elvie


warmer climate during the winter, provided that

he could make an arrangement for August to go


with him.


But the doctor replied


that in


some


cases a warmer climate was desirable,


but it was


not necessary


in Elvie's


case.


All -that


required was plenty of air and outdoor exercise,


plain.


and wholesome


food,


and agreeable,


mental


occupation.


14


/


"Yes,"


to


he




PLANS


FORMED.


"He would


like to go


into Vermont or New


LHampshire," said


excursion in


Mr. /Grant.


those regions


"He


made


during this last


an


sum-


and would like to go there again, especially


in the


winter,


on account


of the coasting


skating.


And besides,-he takes a


special fancy


to the mountains."
"There could not be a


better place for him,"


said the doctor.


"There are no more


healthy


countries in the world than New Hampshire and


Vermont.

would be


And


a great


besides the


deal "to


ice and snow there


interest


him in the


winter occupations of


the people


on the


grass


farms


of that


region,-the


care of the animals,


the getting


in of the winter


wood-the sleigh


rides,


and singing


schools,


and other


rural


employment


and pleasures.


So Mr.

if possible


rrant at once

make some


decided


that he would


arrangement


to have


Elvie spend the winter, after


Christmas, among


I5


mer,


and




GRANVILLE


the Green


Mountains


of Vermont,


in case


could find a suitable place, and


also make some


arrangement


of him.

As to


with


August


August Mr. Grant


to


go


and take. care


did not think of him


simply in reference to Elvie's good.


He wished


to make


such


arrangements as


would


most


conducive


to August's


good,


and -best


adapted


to promote


his future


welfare.


was he entirely unselfish


in this; for he thought


that sc

a very


promising a


excellent


boy


and


would


successful


probably

man;


y make

and he


hoped


that by


his education he


such


a position


favoring


could


in


August's


help


society


him


that he


prOgress

to attain


and Elvie


might


be useful


friends


to each


other in


future.


Accordingly,


one afternoon,


at the close


business

train to


hdurs,


Mr.


Tarrytown,


Grant

where


took


an


his sister,


express
Elvie's


aunt


Elphinstone,


lived,--having


previously


he


also


be


Nor


in

to


of


VALLEY.




PLANS


FORMED.


written to August to meet him at five o'clock at


Mrs. Elphinstone's house.


August was punctual


to the minute,


and there


he and


Mr. Grant


a conversation


of half an hour


on August's


plans of life.


August said that the employment


that he would most like when he became a man


would be that of an architect, or an engineer,


a constructor -of


machinery,


or something


that kind that


would


give


employment


to his


mechanical taste and predilections.


August did


not usethese


desire,


words


it is


true,


but that was the jdea.


in expressing his


Mr. Grant said he


thought it was a very judicious idea.


"And


foundation

Mr. Grant,


in order to


for


success


"the study


lay a broad


in those


and deep


pursuits;"


that is most


said


important


for ;ou to pursue is mathematics."


" Mathematics !"


repeated August.


" Yes,"


said Mr. Grant.


" Mathematics is the


science of calculation.


Now in all great works


2"


I7


had


or

of




GRANVILLE


VALLEY.


of construction,


such as laying out


and making


railroads,


erecting


public


edifices,


bridges


large


establishments


of all


kinds,


and


-m-anud o


facturing


engines


and machinery, there


set of men that make


the calculations and form


plans,


and other


sets. who


do the work by


carrying and laying the stone, casting or forging


the iron,


and performing


all the other mere


mechanical


labors,


under


the-


guidafice


direction of the men who plan them.


" Now


suppose,"


continued


Mr. Grant,


"that

direct


you wish to qualify


such


executing


works,


them


yourself to plan


and not merely


under


and


to aid in


the direction of others."


August


said that would


be his wisji,


if he


thought he could ever fit himself to do it.


fit yourself


no doubt,"


said Mr.


Grant, "and one of the first things to be done is


to study


mathematics.


In planning


all great


constructions there is a vast amount of calcula-


18


and


the


is


one


and


"You


can




FORMED.


tion required.


Indeed the success of such works


,often depends entirely upon the accuracy


calculations.


of the


Now mathematics is the science of


calculation.

numbers, G


Arithmetic


is the calculation


geometry that of forms,


of


and Algebra


that of quantities.


Those are the three founda-


tion stones on which the power and the success


of all


great


engineers and


constructors repose."


As Mr. Grant


said this August


felt a


strong


desire


to


engage


at


once


section of those studies,


in the vigorous


but he was


silent,


wishing


to interrupt


Mr. Grant


in the


com-


munication that he was making to him.


. So Mr.


Grant


went


on to explain


to August


that he was desirous of sending


Elvie, after the


SChristmas


holidays,


to


some


place in


New


England


where


he could


live upon


a farm


have a great deal


of out-of-door amusement and


occupation


in


connection


with


the farm,


yet spend an hour or two every


day in


some


19


pro-

not


and


and


PLANS




GRANVILLE


VALLEY.


kind of study or mental improvement.;


and that


he had conceived the idea of finding a place


himi near some


academy or


other school,


where


August could attend to his studies regularly.


August said that


he should


like such a


very much.


" Well if you


would


like it," said


Mr. Grant,


"that is one point gained.


You


must ask


your


father and'we will see what he says about it.


your father approves the plan


in general,


then I


will make some

training whether


inquiries with a view to ascer-


any place


can be


found


which


combines the


advantages


that we


require---that


is whether we can


find a farm which will be the


right place for Elvie, and is also near enough to


some institution


of leading


which


will afford


you the advantages that you will require.


You


can propose the plan to your father, and if he is


inclined

inquiries


to approve it then


in Newv


York,


will make


and if I


some


succeed in


'I -


for


plan


If


20




PLANS FORMED.


finding


a place


I will


write


to


you making


definite proposal."


August was


much


pleased


with


the


prospect


which this conversation


said that he


would


opened


consult


before him,


his father that


and ,

very


evening.


"And -you


can write to


me what


he says


by to-morrow's mail," said Mr. Grant.


So saying


he bade


August


good-bye,


after taking

he returned


tea with his sister,


that


same


evening


Mrs. Elphinstone,


to New York,


and


2I
.0),












CHAPTER


TI.


In structio is.


HE plan


formed


ner described


by


Mr. Grant in


in the last chapter


the man-

was suc-


cessfully


carried


into effect.


August's


father


was well pleased with the arrangement so far as


his son was concerned,


and August himself was


more


than


pleased


with


it.


It opened


to him-


an opportunity

commencing


such


as he had


a course of


study


long desired, of


somewhat


in


earnest; and then moreover he had become quite


attached to


Elvie,


and the idea of-spending the


winter and spring with him in some valley among

the Green Mountains where there was an acade-


near, in which


he could


have instruction in


(22)


my




INSTRUCTIONS.


mathematics,


formed


for him


a very


attractive


picture.


Some


of the boys


who may


read


this story


will perhaps
1%


be curious to know how Mr.


went to work to find a


place


Grant


in Vermont


or


New Hampshire fulfilling these conditions.


thought


at once that the


best means of obtain-


ing


some


the requisite


information


of the Vermont


merchants


would


or New


who might come


to New


be through

Hampshire


York


to


purchase goods.


Now no such country merchants


came to


him,


for he was an


importer, -and the


business of an importer is to bring in goods from


Europe in


large


quantities-sometimes by


cargo-and to sell them chiefly to the wholesale
dealers in New York who keep an assortment of


the different


kinds,


and supply


the country


merchants as they are required.


dealers are called


that they


might


These wholesale


jobbers, though it would seem
find a more elegant name for


them.


He


the


23




GRANVILLE


Now Mr. Grant went to one of these men who


She knew did a great deal


of business with


England antl asked him if he had many custom-


ers from


Vermont.


" Yes, plenty of them," said his friend.


" There


are some of them in here almost every day."
So Mr. Grant asked the merchant if he would


have


the goodness,


the next time one of his


customers came in who seemed to be a man of


intelligence and


general


information,, and


was also an upright-and trustworthy man, to send
*


word

store,-


to him at hWs

-and aso to


could spare


the time


store-that


is Mr. Grant's


ask the gentleman


to wait


if he


a few minutes


until Mr. Grant should have time to come and see

him.

In consequence of this arrangement Mr. Grant

received a message the next day that there was

a Vermont gentleman at his friend's store wait-


ing to see him.


He went there immediately, and


New


who


24


VALLEYF ~T




INSTRUCTIONS.


obtained


from


the


stranger


a good


deal of


valuable information in


regard to


the subject


his inquiries:

In a similar way he made the acquaintance


or three other


men from


different


parts


of

of


the mountain


country


in New England,


obtained


all the information necessary


enable


him to come to


a decision.


He finally


decided


upon


the region


of Granville


where


there was a small village with an


acadeniy


-the teacher of which he learned was very much


liked. by the


scholars-and


near


it a green


fertile


valley


where there were many


pleasant


and thriving


farms,


carried on by


prosperous


farmers.


He came finally to the conclusion that


if on visiting

the academy


the place


August should


find that


was such an institution as would


answer his purposes,


farm


up the valley


and if he


where


could
Elvie


also find a
would be


contented and happy,


and if he could moreover


of


two


thus


and


to


in it


and


25




GRANVILLE


VALLEY.


make


some


arrangement


by


which


he could


secure the employment of Elvie in


some kind of


study


for an- hour or two every day,


without


interfering with his


own duties


at the


academy,


it would be all right.


Mr. Grant


learned only two


things


about the


-academy

attention

scientific


at Granville.

was paid in


than


One


was that more


it to mathematical


to classical


studies,


which


what


he desired.


There


is


a difference


different institutions in'this respect, owing partly

to the taste and inclination of the teachers

respectively, partly to the prevailing wish or

intended destination of the class of pupils resort-


ing to the different institutions.


This is all very


well, as in


consequence


of this


diversity


parents oi each pupil can choose for

the school that is best adapted to the


their


the

son


particular


plans of life which they have formed for him.


Thus the fact that at


the Granville academy


26


just


and

was


in




INSTRUCTIONS.


the studies most


directly connected


practical


affairs


of life were prominent, seemed


to adapt it very well to August's plans.


The other thing that Mr.


Grant learned about


the school, was that the boys


attending


it liked


their teacher very -much indeed :


that the fact of the


and he thought


scholars liking their teacher,


and liking the school, was very good-presumptive


proof that the


teacher was a good


teacher,


the school


a good


school.


Indeed


the. proof


would seem to be not merely presumptive,


but


pretty positive; for inasmuch as there can be no


possible
scholars


way


by


which a teacher can make his


like the school except


by giving


them


pleasant employment when they are in


it;


and


as there is no conceivable way of finding pleasant


employment for forty or fifty


kept still day


boys shut up and


after day in a school-room except


by employing them in the successful prosecution


of some


kind


of study,


the fact that


a teacher


with


the


and


27




28 GRANVILLE VALLEY.

makes his scholars like their school is pretty good

proof that the school is a good one.

Mr. Grant therefore-decided to send the boys,


in the first

accordingly


instance at least,


gave


August
I


to Granville.


instructions


He


to that


effect.


He provided him with a sufficient supply


of money, and


with


two letters of introduction


One of these letters was written by his


minister.


and was addressed to the minister of Granville.


The other was from


the president


of a well


known bank, and was addressed


to the principal
\


merchant


in the village.


of course the hi
respect not only


ghest


They


opinion


both

)>f Mr.


expressed


Grant,


in


to his pecuniary responsibility,


to his entire


trustworthiness
a


both


as a


business, man and a christian.

Mr. Grant also gave August very definite and

precise instructions as to his course of procedure.


These


instructions


were written out in


full and


were substantially as follows.


but




INSTRUCTIONS.


That


August


was to proceed


by


the Con-


necticut


River


Railroad,


and by


stage,


directly


to Granville.

best tavern


the


necessary


There


he


in the village


inquiries


vas to put up at the

until he could make


and


arrangements.


As


as convenient


after


his arrival


he


was to


deliver his two letters-one to


the minister and


the other to the


merchant-and


to ask


each- of


them


their opinion


in respect


to the


advantages


of the academy


practical,


for affording


to


scientific instruction which


August


the


he desired..


If their


then


opinion


he was


farmers living


to ask


on this point


them


within


was favorable,


for the names of any


a mile


or two of the


academy,


at whose houses


he and Elvie could


probably find a pleasant home as boarders.


was tc

gather

which


obtain the

in respect t(

the merchant


afterward,


lists of these


) them


farmers,


He

and


all the information


or the minister could


in consultation


give,


with Elvie, comr-


soon


and


- 29,


I I





GRANVILLE


pare their reports.


Then, as soon afterward as


convenient, he was to take some kind of carriage


the tavern and


go


and call


upon,


those


farmers, or such of them as he and Elvie should


judge from


the reports which


they had received


it was most desirable for them to see, and select


from among the


places


the


one which


should find best adapted to their purpose.


Mr. Grant


also instructed


August


to Elvie twenty-five cents every week as his


allowance of spending money,-this


said allow-


to be entirely


at Elvie's


discretion


to be


spent as he should wish,


without any exception;


but subject


that if


Elvie


however to


should


this condition,


buy


anything


namely,

with his


money which

to be hurtful,


in August's


judgment was likely


dangerous or annoying,


either


himself or to others, he was to be bound to give


up to August,


on August's reimbursing him


for the amount that


he had


paid


for it,


from


they


to


pay


ance


it


to


and


VALLEY,-I~


% 30




INSTRUCTIONS.


August was


carefully to preserve whatever, he


thus reclaim, to take with


should


York to Mr.
the spring.


him to New


further,


that while


August


was to be


restricted


to twenty-five


cents


per week


respect to the amount that he was to pay

Elvie for spending money, he was himself to


under -no


amount


restriction at all


that he


might


expend


in respect


for him


to the

in any-


thing that he should judge,important to promote

h's health or comfort, or his progress in study.


" Of course,"


said Mr.


Grant, in these instruc-


tions,-" I do not wish any money to be wasted,-


or to be expended


foolishly-but


anything


whatever that you think


or any


it desirable to


buy


for


arrangement of adny kind that you


deem it advisable


to make


that will


conduce to.


his substantial comfort-you can make freely,

whatever the expense may be."


31


Grant at the time of their return in


And


in


to"

be


him,




GRANVILLE


was also


a part


of the instructions


Given

every


to


August,


Saturday


that he was


night


a letter


to mail


regularly


to Mr. Grant-


giving him a distinct though


brief report of the


progress


made


since


the last letter,


and of the


situation of affairs at the time of writing,


and to


telegraph in

Elvie should


immediately

meet with


if either

any serio


he himself


or


accident, or


be seriously sick.
I ,


Mr. Grant,


when he handed


August these


instructions, put into his hands fifteen ten-dollar


bills, and directed

all his expenditure


him to keep

a and to sen


a full account

i the account


him at the end of every month.


"I shall see,"


said Mr. Grant,


"by the


balance


you have in hand at each report

I must send you more money."


you make, when


Provided


with


supply of funds,


these


and. also


instructions


and


this


with two trunks-one


ior each oi them-containing what was necessary


It


thus


his


of

to


32


VALLEY,




INSTRUCTIONS.


in the


way


of clothing


and other such


things,


not forgetting
the two boys s


two pairs


of excellent skates,-


;et out on their journey one


bitter


cold morning


in January.


33











CHAPTER IlI.


T e


YoUrn ey.


it is so cold," said Elvie.


"Why ?" asked August.


"Because


the ice will be all the


harder and


stronger


on the ponds


or rivers


where


we are


going," said Elvie.


"It is rather


tough


for us


however-on


be warm enough in the cars.


August.


stoves in the cars."


" That's right,"


replied


August.


"I am


see that


you are disposed


to look


bright


side.


There


a bright


side


to almost


everything, it we only have sense enough to see
(34)


" I


am glad


/


journey," said


the


"Oh, that's no matter," said Elvie.


" We shall


They always have


to


glad


on


the




THE JOURNEY.


it. Some


boys would


have


been


fretting


grumbling about the


cold on such a morning


this, instead


of thinking


of the good


which


might be the means of bringing us."
"But do you suppose there are any ponds or


rivers where we are going ?"


asked Elvie.


' I don't suppose there can be any large rivers


there,"


said August,


"and


do not know


there are any natural


ponds,-but


feel


pretty


sure there must be some mill ponds."

What makes you think so ?" asked Elvie.


" Because it is a valley, and


it is a valley


some consequence,


and of course


there


stream running through it."


" Of course ?"


" Almost


repeated


of course,"


I Elvie.

said August-" for


the rain


which


falls in a valley must flow


into the bed of it,-either


through


the


ground,


by


or by


soaking

forming


down

down

little


streamlets and


brooks over the surface;


35


and


as


that


of


is


all


and


so





GRANVILLE VALLEY.


must in the end produce a stream to flow along


whole length of the valley at the


stream

extent


bottom.


is larger or smaller according


of the surface.


which


gathers the


This

.to the


rain.


Now


suppose that Granville valley is of con-


siderable extent, and of


course


it must


produce


a considerable stream."

"But there may not be any mill ponds on the

stream," said Elvie.
*


"It is tolerably certain that there will


be,"


said August,


"for the


New England


people


pretty apt to set all such streams at work.


the only way that they can set them


at work is
*


to dam them up here and there to form ponds,


and then


draw off the water as they


want it to


drive their mills and


machinery.


" Of course I am not, certain that it will be so


in the Granyille valley," continued August,


there are very few valleys


"but


in New England with


a stream oi water flowing through them without
*'.-


36


are


And


y


I




JOURNEY.


37


there being dams and mill ponds here and there


along the,


course


of


them.


Some


streams show a constant succession


of these

of dams


ponds


through


the whole


extent


of the


valley."


The


cidents


boys

and


met with


adventures


the


usual


variety


on their journey.


of in-


The


car in which


they took seats was made very com-


portable


by


a good


stove,


but


they


could


very little of the scenery of the country through

which they passed on account of the frost on the

windows; which was caused by the action of the


without,


in chilling


the glass,


and the


dampness,


chiefly


resulting


from


the breath


the passengers, within.

warm air that contains


For wherever there


a great


deal of


is


moisture


within


any room or enclosed


comes in contact with


cold by wintry


glass that


air on the outside,


space, and


that


is made very

the moisture


is condensed


upon


it


in the


form


of frost.


,and


see


cold


of


In


THI E




38 GRANVILLE VALLEY.

Summer, when the outside air is not so cold, the


moisture which


the form of dew.
A dew upon a


is condensed in


glass


this way,


is composed


takes


of liquid


water in very fine drops.


Frost on the windows,


on the other


hand,


is frozen


water, that


is ice,


which however exists in the


form of very minute


crystals.


The train which the boys

York was an express train.


took in leaving New-

It was on'the New


Haven

menced.


Railroad

From


that the


New


Haven


journey


their


was com-


course


led


them


to Hartford


and Springfield,


and so far


_they were on the


main


express


line to Boston.


At Springfield, however, they


left this


line and


what


is called -the


Connecticut


Valley


Railroad, which,


ascends along


the bank of the


Connecticut river for a long distance ; and as the


river Connecticut in the


upper part of its course


flows along the boundary--or rather forms the


took




JOURNEY.


boundary-between


New


Hampshire and


month,

region


this road


took. them


directly


into the


of country where they wished to go.


As has already


been said, Elvie could see very


little of .the


scenery


of the


country


through


which they were passing.


Nor would


there


have-


-been much to see if the


view


had beeif open


him,


for the


covered


-in places


with


trees


were


snow-and


where


bare,

even


the flow of the


the ground


the river,


water


was


except


was very


rapid,


had the appearance of a succession of level


.fields- as


white


and solid


as the adjoining land.


Elvie.


now-


obtained


and then


a glimpse


as the


train


of the

passed


landscape


along,


by


rubbing


off the frost


in


a little


spot upon


pane' opposite


soon


became


to his


clouded


eye;

over


but the


again,


clear


and the


spot

view


was very

the river


unsatisfactory


could


scarcely


while it


continued,


be distinguished


for


from


the level fields that bounded it.


39


Ver-


to


the


THE




GRIANVILLE


At length


at the station


late in the afternoon


they


where they were to


arrived


leave


the


railroad and take the stage which was to.convey


them to Granville, in the interior.


On stepping


out upon


the platform


secure their trunks,


the first


and then


thing


to inquire


was to

for the


Granville stage.


I


" Here


it is,


-said


the


man


of whom


asked the question.


The man whom


they asked


was enveloped


a shaggy great coat which was made of a


skin.


He had also


whip in his


hand.


buffalo.


a fur cap on his head and a

The stage which he pointed


to was a covered sleigh.


"Good!" said


Elvie.


"Now we are


going to


have a sleigh ride."


"Shall


we take


it to-night or wait


morrow ?" asked August.


August


had learned that


the stage would


on that night, and that it was about three hours'


they


in


till


to-


go


AO'


VALLEYif




THE JOURNEY.


to Granville.


So he told


Elvie


that they-


could

where


finish


go on that


they

their


night or


were, at some


journey the


remain in the village


hotel or


next


day.


tavern,


and


But Elvie


was impatient


to


see what


sort of


a place


Granville was and accordingly desired to go on.


any rate,"


said August,


" we


must


into the stage to go to the hotel here.


I suppose


the driver will stop a few minutes at the hotel to

take in his other passengers."


In the mean time the


driver had obtained the


trunks-for


the boys


had


given


him the


checks when he pointed out the stage to them-


was now strapping


them


upon


the rack


behind.

curtains


The


sides


formed


of


of the

some


stage

heavy


consisted


of


blanket-like


stuff, with button-holes


in tags of leather


at the


corners and


along the sides, -by means of which


the curtains


could


be buttoned


down


to the


border of the sleigh.


ride


41


"At


get


two


and




GRANVILLE


These


curtains


were


already


buttoned down


upon
other,


one side,


and Augus't


but they


were


open


upon


the


in. The


sleigh wa

extending


bottom


is quite

across


of it,


up


large,-having


it from


side


to the level


three


to side,

of the s4


seats


and the


eats,


was


filled


with


fresh clean straw.


The


seats


them-


selves were covered with buffalo


robes,


as they


are called-that is buffalo skins with the hair on,


and the leather


soft and pliant.


Besides those


that were spread


upon


the seats,


there were


several loose


robes lying upon the


straw, which


were to be used to envelope the feet, and


cover


the knees of the passengers.

August and Elvie clambered over to the back

seat and established themselves there, burying

their- feet in the straw, and spreading one-of the


loose


buffalo robes over their laps-taking care


to tuck it in well at the sides.


" There!"


said .Elvie


speaking


in


a tone


and Elvie climbed


of


VALLEY,


42




THE

great satisfaction.


JOURNEY.. 43

'We are, as snug as mice in


a nest!"


"Snugger,


in fact,"


he added,


" for


the mice


don't have any fur


blankets


like these-o cover


:themselves up with."


rejoined August,


growing right out of their


" they

bodies.


have fur


robes


That's some-


what


always


danger


better


than


our plan,


handy; and

of the little


then


mice-


for they

besides


getting


have

there


their


them

is no


bed


clothes off at night."


While


Elvie .was musing


over


the question


whether or not it would be. really better for him


-to have a

and limbs,


natural


fur covering upon his


the driver mounted


upon


body


'the box


outside


and the horses


set off


on a brisk


away-from the station and into the village.


The sun


was just


setting


when


the stage


drove up to the hotel door.


The driver jumped


down-from his seat and called out at the door of


'( Yes,"


trot




GRANVILLE


the hotel


Elvie


" Stage 4is


if he would


ready !"


not prefer


August

stopping


asked

at the


hotel that

morning.
4


night,


and


so go


on the next


("You see,"


said he, "it will soon be dark now


-only there will be a moon.


But it will be very


cold."


"No," said Elvie,

comfortably settled.


"f let's go on

Besides I


now we are so

should like a


sleigh, ride by moonlight."


"It is


pretty


coli


to-night,


isn t it,


driver ?"


said August addressing the driver.


"A little chilly,"


said


the


driver ;


"but


is still.


We never call it cold when it is still."


Vermont


driver, so


call anything


long as


cold that


it is still, does


is less


than thirty


below zero.


If there is a fierce


wind blowing in


his face that makes it a different thing.


In a few minutes two
... . :


men came out from the


hotel


and


entering the stage took


their


places


44


A

not


VALLEYV


' -' v


I




STHEJ

upon the forward seat.


[OURNEY.


45.


They were talking with


each


other


seated they

laps in an


all the time,


drew


the


unconcerned


and when


buffalo robe

manner, as


they


were


over their

if they did


not think at all of the cold.


They had not far


the first stopping


to


place


go, however,


of- the


stage,


for at

which


was about four miles from where it started, they


out; so


that for the rest of the


journey the


two boys had ;he whole interior of the vehicle to

themselves.


As the


driver unbuttoned


the curtain


on one


side to open


the


way


for his


two passengers


get out, the moonlight came in. It came in on the


opposite side of the


stage to that on which the


beams of the sun had shone at its setting.


was a matter of


course,


for the moon,
-y


to be full,


must be


the whole


where we


can see the


of the side which


whole or

is made


nearly

bright


the sun's


shining


upon


it, that


is, it must


got


to


This


by




GRANVILLE


VALLEY.


be opposite


to


sequently must


the sun in the sky,


and


con-


be rising or near its rising in the


east when


the sun is going


down,


or has just


gone down, in the west.


When Elvie saw these


-beams he proposed


to August that


they


should


have the curtain rolled up, so as to let the moon

shine in.


" We -can


try


it,"


said August,


whether


it will


be


too cold."


So while


the driver


was attending


to his


horses,

fastened


August

it with


rolled up

two straps


the curtain,


provided


and


for the


purpose.


Very soon after'this the driver mounted


upon


his seat,
w.- 'I


They


and

went


the horses trotted


very


fast;


on.


for the road


excellent


condition,


the


load was light,


and the


horses


had-


Sof motiv-e

shape of a


been


power,


good


provided


with


as August


supper of oats


a fresh


expressed


and hay


supply


it,


in


which


46


" and


see


was


in




THE


they


stable


had


of


taken in

the hotel.


before


they


started,


at the


Thus


everything


being


favorable,


night


air being


fresh,


and the horses


being


excellent spirits,


the driver


thought


that it was


a good


time,


as he expressed it


to himself,


"put them through."

Accordingly the horses went on at great'speed


up hill


and down


dale without any


slackening


of their pace, as if they liked very much the idea


of being


"put through !"


The road


was wide,


-and was worn so smooth and


the multitude


of sleds


made


and sleighs


so hard by
which had


passed over it, that it was almost


like a road


ice.


upon


The moon shone in,

the straw and the


beautiful though


buffalo


robes


cold,.


in the


interior


of the


stage.


The forest


trees, as they


-seemed to glide swiftly by, shewed their branches,


and sometimes


their


tops


where


the tops


visible,


bent


down


by the


load oi snow which


47


and


the


in


to


of


were


JOURNEY.




GRANVILLE


VALLEY.


had lodged upon them-and the coat collars and

mufflers of August and Elvie were soon whitened


the frost


work produced


by the


conden-


station of their breaths.


They were so wrapped


up however
provided fo


with

r the


the garments


occasion,. and


which


their


they had
feet and


hands were so


enveloped


in


the


straw


covered


with


buffalo


robes,


warm as if they had been in


that

bed.


they


were


"It must be a


"I pity the


pretty cold


poor people that


night," said


have to


Elvie.


work out


all day such weather as this."


" You


had better pity


the rich people


stay at home and have comfortable fires,"


replied


August.

"Why so ?" asked Elvie.


" Because


there is


grumbling about the


usually


cold,


more


fretting


ten times over,"


and

said


August, "among people who live in comfortable

houses, and have nothing to do but take care of


48


with


and


as


that




JOURNEY.


themselves, than there is among those who


have


to go out and face it"
.. .. 11.


"( Then


it


is because


they: are


fretful


impatient,"' said Elvie--- and so


it is their own


fault, and they don't deserve to be pitied."


" They


account," '

More
seemed s<


are all the


more to


said August.

-to be pitied !"


somewhat


be pitied- on


repeated


surprised to


Elvie.


hear of the


that-


He

pos-


session of a fretful


and impatient


spirit making


a person an object of pity rather than of blame.


"Yes,"


replied August.


"I think/they are to


be pitied,


for the


cause


of it


must


have been


either


something in


their natural


disposition, or


else, something


in


the way. they


brought up-or else partly from one and partly


from the other.


And in whichever way it comes,


it is a great misfortune."

August and Elvie however being in a content-


ed frame of mind, and not disposed


to find


49A


and


have


been


any


11 THE:





GRANVILLE


complaint

hardships,


at


any


unavoidable


privations


and


but rather to think of and enjoy what


there was that was enjoyable within their reach,


found


their night


ride


a, very


comfortable


even pleasant one, and


at about eight o'clock in


Sthe evening the


stage that was


conveying


them


drove up

Granville.


rapidly


to, the


door


of the tavern


and


in


V ALLEY,,


5,0-


.I












CHAPTER


IV*


T he Arrival.


N stepping


out from


the stage


the


boys


were conducted


into the sitting-room


the tavern, where


they


found


great


blazing


wood fire ready to welcome them. Their trunks


were taken off from


the rack


behind the stage


and put into the entry.

themselves a little they


After they had warmed


went out into what


was


called


the "bar-room,"


to enter their names


the book, and engage rooms for the night.


They


found


in the bar-room a small space


partitioned


corner,


and


open a large


off by

upon 1

: book,


a kind

the count


which


of counter,


there


seemed to


was


in the


lying


be full
(51)


of


of


in





GAANVILLE VALLEY.


names.


This


book


was the register


in which


travellers


arrival.


were


There was


to center their names on


an inkstand


with


their


a pen


in


it'by the

pen and

the book


Side of the
j ,' ,,


entered


his


Sbook. A


Lugust


own and Elvie's


and then asked


a. young


took

name


man


the

s in

who


stood behind the counter, if they could have two

rooms opening fnto each ether, and a fire in one
r.s/ ecea a:ie n


of. them.


"I i A.. i .1


SExactly," replied the young man.


is a nice open stove, and


" There


a fire all ready to be


lighted" V'


So saying he went out into the entry to takq


the trunks into' the rooms. August and


Elvie


followed him .


He took


up one of th tr tunks


and throwing iit upon his :shoulder i he led


the


way up stairs. He went first into the largest of


the two rooms, and


upon


there after setting the lamp


the table he said he would light the fire


and then would bring up the other trunk.


52


S-'


: ""
,.i.
: .:.,


_\ ,


.`- t,
i : .. :! ."




THE ARRIVAL.


53


NVo," said Elvie, ".let me light the-fire.'
S"Very well," said the young man-- there are

some lamp-lighters on the mantel-piece.'

SThe stove was a large iron one, open in front


a fire-place,-only


there were


doors.


which the opening might be closed.

SSo Elvie took a lamp-lighter from the mantel-


piece,; touched the end

the young-man held in

it lighted the kindling

placed under the fire.


of it to: t

his hand,


lamp which


and then


materials--that


l.He


with


had been


stood a moment to


watch the smoke


and flame making


their


up through the wood.
'' As soon as you see that it is going to burn


said the ,young


man,


"you


can shut


the


stove


doors, and


then


the


room


will.be all warm for


you by the time


you have had your suppers;-


and -I


will go


down- and


bring


up the
**


other


trunk."'


Accordingly as'hon
56


as Elvie


found that


like


by


way


the




GRANVILLE


VALLEY.


was making its


way freely


up through


wood, he shut the doors of the stove, and he and

August went down-stairs to supper, meeting the


young man


on the way


bringing


up


the other


trunk.


The supper' table was set


in a back room


where


a great


wood


fir6


was burning,


which,


together

burning


with


on the


two


table,


or three


gave


lamps


that


a very cheerful


were

and


even brilliant aspect to the scene.

There was quite a little .party


table, consisting of


at the supper


persons who boarded at


the


hotel, and

and Elvie.


one or


two travelers besides


August


The :table -was most abundantly


supplied with


beef-steaks,


fried chicken,


baked


and fried


potatoes,


and also with


mince


apple, and pumpkin pies, and plates of cakes and


doughnuts.

delighted t


Elvie,


o see


as he entered


this display,


the room, was


for the long


ride


had given him an excellentappetite. The other


54


fire


the


and




THE ARRIVAL.


people

that he


came into


the


room


and August entered


at the


it,


same


for the


time


bell had


just been rung.

The warmth


of the'


room


too


was very


agreeable to the two travelers in coming from the


wintry night air; though they had


enveloped


in


straw


been


and in buffalo robes


so well

in the


sleigh that they had not suffered at all


4
N.


from the


cold during


come


in,


their


however,


ride.


Now


the fire was


that they


had


very agreeable,


and one of the


girls


that attended at the


table


gave them seats pretty near it.

After supper they both went up to their rooms


again.


They


found


the large


room


quite com-


fortably warm from the fire in the stove, and


the "chill -was


taken


off,"


as August


expressed


it, from the smaller room.

Elvie, however, at once put


some more wood


upon


the fire in 'the stove,


taking


it


from an


amply filled wood box, near.


55


all




GRANVILLE


"And now,"


feel


said August, j I hope you don't


sleepy."


"No," said


" Because"


Elvite,


"not a bit."


continued, August,


"it will be


better for us to sit up an hour or so, after eating

such a hearty supper."


SSoqsaying August with


Elvie's


help moved


out a :large


table


into the middle of


the


room,


and then the


two boys


opening


their


trunks


out books and portfolios
/ Port 61io


and writing


materials, and arranging


these


upon


the table


gave


the place


a very sociable and


attractive look,. August recommended that Elvie

Should take out a sheet of note paper and begin


a letter to his either.
like writing a letter


Elvie said he did not feel


-that


rather do it the next day,

But I don't ask you


night.


he said.

to write


-He would


it to-night,"


said August, but

and'just begin it.


only to get everything ready


It is very


little work to take-


took


they


soon


VAL[JLETo




THE ARRIVAL.


out your paper and date


it,


57


and write Dear


Father,


and perhaps


an opening sentence,


also; to stamp and address an envelope; and

when you, have done that you will feel that the

work is half done. The work of actually writing


the letter to-morrow morning, after


all these


preparations are made, will seem very light.
Elvie concluded to follow August's advice,


he thought it would not be much trouble to take


out his


paper, and get


ready to write,


and also


to prepare an envelope;


but he found when


had done so much, and had written one sentence,


'he was inclined to go on, and


after


a silence of


about fifteen minutes he laid down his pen,
said in a tone of great satisfaction :


"There-!


My letter is finished."


" I am very glad of it," said August.


"II was


in hopes

beginning


that when


you


would


you


go


had once


on and


'mAde


finish


it,-


though if you


had not done so,


your having


and


as


and





GRANVILLE


made a beginning would have been a great help


for you to-morrow.


The best


thing we can


when


we have


a work


before us


that


do


we have


not, energy enough to resolve to do, is to resolve


to begin


it,


at any rate.


Then


when


we have


once made a beginning it is easier to go on with


it than we supposed.


It is a way of inveigling


ourselves to doing our duty."

"Inveigling?" repeated Elvie.


"Yes,"


said August;


" enticing


ourselves-


drawing ourselves along artfully."


am glad


my letter


is done


at any rate,"


said Elvie.


"-I have


told


my


father that


have got here safely, and how pleasant it is."


So saying


Elvie handed August


the letter to


read, and August added a postscript to it.


"' Your father will be very glad,"


said August,


"that


you had


the resolution


to sit


down


once and write him a


arrival


letter so


I'll go down with


soon


after your


the letter and see if


"I


; 1


we


at


'VALLEY,




THE ARRIVAL.


there


is any way


by


which


can mail it


night,-so that it


will go


out to-morrow morn-


ing, and thus

to-morrow.


August

street,. to


perhaps


found


meet the


that he had to


the post-office, to


first down train


go


deposit


across 'the

his letter


in the post-office


box,


going by the morning mail.


he found


Elvie sitting in a


in order to insure


its


When he returned

comfortable rocking


chair by the fireside, looking into the fire. There

was a' sofa there too, and August, drawing it up a


little nearer to the fire,


established himself upon


it in a very comfortable manner. *


"IAnd now to-morrow,"


must go to work to

form our plans."


said August,.


make. our inquiries,


" we


and


" And


what plans are you going


to form for


my studies ?"


asked Elvie.


* Frontispiece.


59

to-


to


Z~ I
__ ___~ 1 I




GRANVILLE VALLEY.


" That's what puzzles me," replied August.

-" How does it puzzle you ?" asked Elvie.


" Why


you


see the


difficulty


is this,"


August.


" Your father wished to have me go ori


with my studies
TV A^,.L* ~~~' *J JV .JiL\lA fJ


regularly at the


academy, and


for you to study about two hours every day. Now


Cannot go on very


well and keep up


classes unless I am at school during the whole
4


of school hours, even if


the


teacher


should


willing that


time-


should be


And I don't think


absent a -part of


the


you could do anything


to advantage


for


two hours:


in going to

in a day,-


any kind


even if


of a school


you


could be


admitted to


any


school on those


conditions.


The difficulty is to find what time I am going to

have to attend to you."


" Could


not I


have my


studies


in the


even-


ing ?


suggested Elvie ..


- ; I-don't think that-plan would work verywell,"


said August


" The evening is not a good time


60


said


with


my


be




S- /


6r~


for young persons to study, especially if their


constitutions are not well established.

get tired, or at least I hope you will


You will


get:


tired,


every

about


day before night

the farm, if we fin


comes7

id one, "o


with driving

r with sliding


and skating, or other exercise."


S:Then how would


me to


get up early


it do,"

in the


asked Elvie,

morning for


study ?: -
I don't think that would do very well either,


said Augusta


":A boy when he is growing


needs his full leep. ;And besides I don't believe


that we could


have


any good conveniences for


study early in the morning, at

house such as We shall be likely 1


any farmer's

to find up the


valley."

"Then what shall we do ?" asked Elvie.


" I don't


readily


see," replied


August.


shall have, to think a little.


puzzle oul r :heads any
6


But


more about


we will not

it to-night,


;THE ARRIVAL.


"for

my


"I


S a


'''"




GRANVILLE


VALLEY.


but will


go to


bed.


You' shall


have this room,


and I will take the-little one adjoining."


So saying,


August rose


from his seat, and he


and Elvie began to make


preparations for going


to bed.

upon the


August


put


fire, and then


large


rock-maple


log


shut the stove-doors,


the log


should


be kept


slowly


burning


all night.


He then


went into the


small adjoin-


ing room'himself,


the fire was, to


came


leaving


Elvie.


in again,


the larger


When Elvie wa!


and


tucked


one, where


s in bed
up very


him


snugly.


Elvie said he was


in a warmer


better nest than he had in


the stage.


August s6on afterward


put out the


lamp, and


then Elvie's attention was attracted
.j


to a flicker-


of light


upon


the wall,


produced


radiation from


the flames


in the


stove


passing


out through


the crevices over the stove-doors.


He watched" this


flickering and the glow


which


accompanied it for a few minutes, and then said


62


that


be


and


ing


by


the




THE ARRIVAL.


his prayers with


a heart full of devout thank-


fulness to God for all His goodness to him.
After this, and before he even knew that he was


sleepy, he


was fast asleep.


63













CHAPTER V.


johnny.


HE next morning it was bright and pleasant.


Sleigh


bells


were


jingling


merrily


in the


street, and the snow in the fields around glittered


with millions


of spangles.
S-*-


The smoke from


chinmeys,


or
f


rather the columns of steam,-for


most


of what rises,


from the


chimney


in cold


winter mornings, n' untryvillages,


is steam,-


rose straight into thsair,


"The first thing


we have to -do to-day,"


August,


as he and Elvie


were


seated


breakfast


table,


"is. to deliver our two


letters of


introduction,


and


see what,


we


can find


about a place for us to board, up the valley."'
(64)


the


said


at


the


-out


-' t




JOHNNY. 65

"We have brought two letters of introduction,"


he continued.


"One is for a merchant, and one


is for a


minister.


-We


will go


to the


minister's


first."


Elvie readily agreed to


this arrangement,


as the merchant's and the minister's houses were

both probably in the village, they determined to


go to them


on foot, and then


afterward, if they


heard


of


any good place


for them


among


farmers up the valley, they would take a horse

and sleigh and go on an exploring tour.

"But how shall we find out where the minister


lives ?"


asked August.


"Oh,


" Anybody


anybody


can tell us that,"


will know


where


said Elvie.


the minister lives.


I'll go and ask at the bar."


It was one of August's


plans


in his


manage-


ment of Elvie to refer to him as,often as possible

in disposing of the various questions which were

continually arising, and to devolve upon him the


and


the




GRANVILLE VALLEY.


duty


of doing


everything


which


he supposed


Elvie


would like to do.


He considered


very important means of cultivating the thinking


and reasoning powers,

ment of such a boy.


and maturing


the judg-


"If I


wish


to teach


him to take,


care of


himself,"


he used


to


say,


"I must


some practice

thing for him."


in such


duties, and


not do


every


Elvie went off at once


to
I


procure the desired


information.


In


a few minutes


he returned


saying,


"I have found


out.


I'll show


way. -
So August put himself under Elvie's guidance,


and the two boys,


after


making


the necessary


preparations, set off together.


August made no


inquiries


of Elvie,


but walked along


by his side


as if he placed entire confidence in his capability


to act as guide.


They walked for some distance
N


along a brick side-walk which formed the margin


66


this


give


him


you


the




JOHNNY.


of the village

stores on each


street.


There were shops


side, and Elvie pointed


and


to a sign


over one of the stores which contained the name


of the merchant to whom

introduction was addressed.


one of the letters


"We


will go there,"


he said,


" after


we have


been at the minister's."


Presently they


came to


a church which stood


on a corner near the middle of the village.


"This is the


said Elvie,


" where


minister preaches.


His house is up this way."


August followed without asking any question,


in the direction


which


Elvie


indicated


presently came to a small one-story but


and

very


neat and pretty-looking house, on the right hand,


steps


in front


leading


of the


from the side-walk up


house.


'There were


'evergreen trees around the margin


," This


must


be the


house," said


of the

Elvie.


to


some

yard.

" He


said that it was the first house on the right, and


67


of


the


with

yard


church,")




GRANVILLE


VALLEY.


.that there was a yard


and


some


evergreens


front."


Elvie


led the way up the


steps


and opened a


little


gate at the top of them


which


admitted


them into the. yard.


As they entered the yard


Elvie's eyes fell upon a small boy-perhaps three

or four years old-who was coming up a sliding,


place which, he


had made,


or which


had been


made for him by his father, down a little descent


before


the door.


He came up


dragging


him a broken sled.


The sled was very


small,


Being


just


of the right


size for such


a boy,


was formed in a rude manner by means of narrow


boards


made


into the shape


of


runners,


board


for


to the other./


a seat nailed


across from one runner


But the nails,


it seems, had not


been large enough, for the


boy


in sliding down


had somehow or other allowed his sled to slue'
I


as the boys


say,


and


one of the runners had


given


way


under the strain


which had


been
/


68


in


after


and


and




JOHNNY.


brought-upon


it, and had


been torn off from its


fastenings.


The poor boy seemed to have borne


the misfortune as patiently as could have


expected, for he did not cry,


but was staggering


up the hill as well as he could, bringing the broken

runner under his arm and dragging the remaining

portion of the sled after him by means of its string.


August


and


Elvie


stopped


a moment to look


at him, August holding the letter of introduction


in his hand.


The boy


gazed


intently at the,


strangers too as he advanced toward the step of


the door.


Although


it had


been so


cold. the


night


before, the sun was now shining-making


it quite

the door


warm and pleasant


itself was


open.


at the door,


The boy,


and


as soon as


he came near the step, called out to his mother.


" Well,


Johnny,"


answered


a pleasant


voice


from within, what is it ?"
"My sled is all brokened,"


said Johnny, "and


here are two big boys with a letter."


69


been




GRANVILLE


On hearing this Johnny's mother came at once


to the door.


Seeing


August


and Elvie,


asked them to come in.


at


She told Johnny


that he

broken.


had better


come in too, as his sled was


I want it mended,"


said Johnny.


" I'll help you mend it," said August.


a sled-mender ?"


asked


Johnny


looking up curiously into August's face.


said August.


" I've


mended


a good


many sleds in my day.


So saying


August gave Johnny his


they all went into the house.


sled in


after him, holding


Johnny


the broken


hand, and

pulled his.

runner all


the time under his arm.

As soon as they had entered the house, August


handed the


letter to the lady, who, as it proved,


was the


minister's


wife.


The letter,


as usual


with letters of introduction, was not sealed, and
*


the lady opened and read


it.


Then she looked


once


she


"But


" Are


you


70


~VALLEY,~T


*&I, es),




JOHNNY.


at August


and Elvie with


of countenance,


a pleased expression


as if the' contents


of the letter


had been such as to make a favorable impression


in respect to them.


She told them


that Mr.


Rosler, her husband, had gone to


but that he would


be at' home in


and asked them to 'sit by the fire

Mrs. Rosier then returned to


back


side of the room, where


the post-office,

a few minutes,

and wait.

a table at the

she had been


ironing


when


the boys came to


the door,


resumed her work,-continuing her conversation,

in the meantime, with August.


Elvie took


Johnny


to the other


side of the


fire, and began to examine the broken sled.


"Is your name


" Yes,'


Johnny ?" said he.


said Johnny.


" My name is something like that," said Elvie.


"They call me Elvie,


and don't you


think that


sounds something like Johnny."

I don't know," said Johnny.


.7


and


("




GRANVILLE


Elvie


looked


at the sled,


and was mechanic-


enough


to see that all that was required


some larger and stouter nails.


was


The wood of the


runner' was not split;


the difficulty


was that


the nails

It seems


had been


broken


that Johnny's


off and pulled out.


father,


who had made


the sled for his boy,


not having any


gimlet at


hand


to bore


with,


and being


afraid that if he


put in large nails without boringthere would be
put in large nails 'without boring-there would be


danger of splitting


the wood,


used


small


instead, and they proved insufficient.


" If you can


go out and get


me a hammer


and some big


nails,"


said Elvie,


" I


can mend


your sled for you.


" Well,"


said Johnny in a tone of great satis-


faction.

And so

or rather


simple


saying


he went


into the back


and unpretendiiig


out into the kitchen,


kitchen,-for


style


of living


in the

which


many


country ministers are


obliged


to adopt,


f


nails


72


VALLEYEU




JOHNNY.


one room often


has


to serve,


especially


in cold


weather, for parlor, sitting-room and kitchen all


In this case,


in fact,


Mrs. Rosler was


doing her ironing in the family sitting-room.


It must not be supposed,


family life in


however, that, the


these homes is any the less happy


on account of these snug modes of living.


contrary such homes are often


the most


happy ; and


many


people have found


that by


enlarging their house and their accommodations


in the hope


have

cares.


of increasing


in fact only


their


happiness,


multiplied their .troubles


they


and


Johnny


soon


came


back


lugging


in


a box


which contained a hammer and some tools.


"Why,


Johnny !"


said his mother


turning


round from her ironing.


"What are you doing ?"


" He is only-bringing -in some


nails


for me to


mend his sled with," said Elvie.

Mrs. Rosier looked at him a moment with an


V


73


in


one.


the


On




74


air of pleased


GRANVILLE


curiosity,


VALLEY.

and then


said,


"You


must not


be troublesome, Johnny."


mother,"


replied


Johnny.


" I'm


troublesome.


He wants to mend my sled."


Elvie


selected


some


large


nails,


of the kind


called board nails, to replace the small and weak


shingle nails which had been used before.


Then


he took out of his pocket a little tool-handle full


of tools,


which he


often


carried


his journeys,


so as to hatve


the tools


ready


/


hand to


which


either


do


any


he might

for himself


little


have


job


of mechanical


,occasion


or for others-and


on

at


work


to undertake;


especially


-for others.


For he had learned, partly from the


influence and instructions of August, and partly


from


his


own experience


and observation,


the true object ol


lihe is to do to others


as well


as to


ourselves,


he found


many


all the good


occasions


in our power,


and


in which he could do


somebody a


favor by having his tools with him.


"No,


not


with


him


that


/




JOHNNY.


These tools were enclosed


in a little handle,


of which could


be unscrewed


so as to


take the tools out.


They


consisted of bradawls


of different sizes, a small screw-driver, two or

three pretty little chisels, a small gouge, saw, file


and the like.


There were twenty or more of


these


tools


in all,


including


a little wrench, by


means of


which


any one of


them could


fastened


into the socket
I


at the end of the


handle


for


use,


and .released


again,


when


tools were to be put away.


Such a set


of tools


as this


can be bought at almost any hardware


store, and- probably most of the readers


of this


book have seen the article.
There was a double advantage


session of a


in the


pocket companion like this in such


a case as that of Johnny's, for it not only enables
a good-natured and kind-hearted boy like Elvie


to mend


what


is broken,


but it


also greatly


interests and amuses the child to see the handle
and the tools, and to watch the operation.


the


top


75


be


the


pos-




GRANVILLE


VALLEY.


Johnny stood with his hands behind him,-for


Elvie


had expressly enjoined it upon


him "not'


t9 touch "-and looked on with intense curiosity


and interest


depicted


in his countenance, while


Elvie unscrewed the top of the handle, and then

poured out all the tools into his open hand.


a bradawl


of the


proper


and the little wrench,


and gave them to


Johnny to hold while he put back the.rest of the


tools into


the interior


of the handle.


Then he


bored
--for


the holes for


the nails-four in each side


he wished to strengthen the side that was


still whole, as well as to mend


the one


that was


broken.


After.


he had bored


the holes


he


selected nails for them and inserted the nails, as
far as they would go, into the holes.


"And


now,"


said he after


having


done this,


" we will go out on the


step and. drive the.


nails in.


said Johnny.


" I


want


you


to drive


.them in here, where it is warm."


76


He


then


took


size,


out


" No)"




JOHNNY.


"Ah! but," said Elvie,


you


must


let


"if I'm going to mend


me do it


in


my


own


He seemed


to think that


this was a good


opportunity


mission to


to give


Johnny


a lesson


the will of his superiors.


in sub-

At any


without


paying


any heed


to his desire to


the driving


in of the nails


done


in the


house; which he knew would disturb


his mother


and August who were talking


there, he


took up


the sled, and giving Johnny the hammer to carry,


partly

from


for the

the refu


purpose of diverting his

sal of his request to


thoughts


have


the


mending


of the sled finished


at the fireside-


went together out


to the great stone step,


before the door,


where Elvie


drove in the


nails,


and the


sled


was then


stronger and betterthan


ever.


After two or three


slides with the sled,


Elvie


and Johnny went back into the house,
'70


and very


sled


your

way.'


77


rate,


have


they




GRANVILLE


VALLEY.


afterward


Mr. Rosier


came


home.


After


reading the letter of introduction, he gave August


and Elvi

to take


e a very

a great


cordial

interest


reception,

in their


and seemed


plans.


He


made


marny


inquiries,


and consulted


several times about the principal farmers up the


valley.

farmer


On the whole he-recommended a certain


whom


he called


Deacon


Justin.


place he thought would be on the whole the best


for them,


provided


Mrs.


Justin


had a room for


them that she could spare.


" He'll


have


a kind


of companion


and


play-


mate there in Quimbo,"


said Mr. Rosier.


said Mrs.


Rosier,


"only there


little play in


Quimbo.',


"Well,


there's


Fan.


There's play enough


in


Fan," rejoined Mr. Rosier.


Elvie's

allusions


time


curiosity w

to Quimbo


to make


ras much <

and- Fan,


any inquiries,


excited


by


but he ha


fi,


August


these

d no

had.


78


soon


his


wife


His


" es,"


is


very




JOHNNY.


risen to


take


his


leave.


Mr. Rosier gave them


a-very cordial


invitation to come and


him again,


they


found


and especially


that he


to


call


upon


could -in any way be


him if

of any


farther assistance to them in their


plans.


Rosier

stood


joined


by


in this invitation,


and looking


up wistfully


hhile Johnny

into Elvie's


face, said earnestly,


"Don't go away.


After leaving the minister's the two


boys went-


to the merchant's where they were also very cor-


dially received.


The merchant-whose name was


Mr. Woodman-read the


letter


of introduction


which

hands


was addressed


with August


to him, and


and Elvie


then shook


with


a special


of kindness


in his face, and said he


should


be very

power.


happy


to do


anyL-i1ng


for


-m in his


The boys


remained


in the merchant's


count-


ing-room-which


was a small room in the rear


of the store-for some


time,


talking


both


79


see


Mrs.


look


/


with


Mr.




GRANVILLE VALLEY.


Woodman


about


-their


plans,


and about


different people.that


lived up the valley.


They


obtained in


this way


a great deal of additional


information in respect to the


inhabitants of the


valley,


and the situation


but all that


Elvie


heard


of the

made


different, farms,

him more and


more


inclined


was the place


to believe

for them.


that


Deacon


The truth


Justin's


was that


what

what


chiefly


interested


he had heard


him in this plan was


about


Quimbo


little as it was. Indeed boys of his age


generally


require very little


foundation of fact


for


very


grand superstructures of imagination.


Mr. Woodman, when the boys


left him, gave


them


a few -lines


of introduction


to Deacon


Justin,


saying


that the boys came to him with


the highest recommendations,


that they


wished


to make arrangements for board


and residence


for some weeks somewhere


that the father of


in the


one of them


valley,


was able


8o


the


and


Fan,


and

and




JOHNNY.


willing

secure

desire ;

depend


to


pay whatever\ might


such


accommodations


and that


upon


he,


the full


Deacon


be required


as they

Justin,


to


might

might


and faithful fulfilment


of


whatever conditions

oldest of the boys.


might be


agreed


to by the


- Mr. Woodman


said moreover that


the-letter


which he gave


them


would


serve for any of the


other farmers that they


might call upon,_in case


should


not find such


accommodations


they required at Deacon Justin's.


The boys,


taking,the letter, bade Mr.


Wood-


man good-bye, and went away.


"I think Deacon


Justin's will be the place for


said Elvie--" unless


the deacon


is


cross.


Are deacons generally cross ?"


".Oh no," said


August.


" At least not that I


know


of.


We


can tell, however, something


his looks when we come to see him. We cannot


decide till we go


up the valley and we' see the


they


as


us,


by




GRANVILLE VALLEY.


places


where the people


live.


And


now, how


shall we contrive


to get


a. horse


and sleigh,


our ride up the valley?"


"I don't know,"


replied Elvie.


"Perhaps there


is a livery stable somewhere about here."

"Perhaps there is," said August.

Or perhaps we can get a horse and sleigh at

the tavern," added Elvie.


"Can you


go


out to the stable


to inquire ?"


asked August.


"Yes
do' it.


said Elvie


You go


eagerly.


in and wait in


"I should like to
the sitting-room


while I go and


see.


And


if I find


one I will


engage
door."


it, if you say so, and come round to the


The boys


versation
the hotel.


reached


just at


this point in their


con-


the time when they arrived at


So August went into the hotel, while


Elvie went alone into the yard, on his


the stable, to see if he


could obtain a horse and


sleigh.


for


way


to


82















CHAPTER


VIa


the Valley.


IN about

around


twenty


minutes


to the front


door


Elvie


came


driving


of the tavern in a


sleigh.


The sleigh


and was well furnished


was quite


a handsome
/


with buffalo robes.


horse

thing


too looked


about


strong


the turn-out


,nd fleet, and

appeared ex


every-

tremely


satisfactory.


Elvie waited


a moment as he drove up to


door, thinking that


the noise


of the bells would


attract


August's


attention,


and bring


He was right in this anticipation, for almost im-

mediately August appeared.
(83)


Up


one,

The


the


him


out.




GRANVILLE


VALLEY.


"Well,


Elvie,"


said August,


" you have suc-


needed


I see; and you've got a very nice sleigh."


" Yes," said


Elvie.


" I ought to have a nice


one, for


I had


my


choice


out of four that were


standing there in


the yard.


-And


you must sit


over on the


other


side,


for I'm going to


drive."


So saying he made room for August to pass


then


both


the boys took their seats.


Elvie


drew


up the


reins,


and the horse, under-


standing the movement as an indication that his


party were ready, set off at


once,


and


was soon


trotting swiftly down the road.

They drove through the village


to the church,


and turned at the


church


to


go up


the road


upon which


Mr. Rosler's house was situated.


" We


shall


go by Mr.


Rosler's


house,"


Elvie,


"and


if


we


see Johnny


out sliding


might ask him to go with us."


It was very kind


in Elvie to think of Johnny,


and to wish to


give him


too the benefit


84


him,


and


said


we


and




VALLEY.


pleasure of a ride,


but August


thought


it would


not be best to do it.

"We don't know


how long we shall be gone,"


said August, "nor what sort of a boy-Johnny is."


seemed


to be


a pretty good


sort of


boy," said Elvie.
\.*


"Yes," replied August, that is true.


But we


don't


*know


how he would


act in different


situations and circumstances, so we had


give him a ride

By this time


although

pleasant,

although


better


some other day."


they had


the morning

and the air


Elvie


looked


reached the house,


was vgry


bright


was quite mild,


earnestly


among


firtrees

Johnny


in Mr. Rosler's

was nowhere t


yard

o be s


as he passed,


;een,


and


so


the


horse


went


by


at full speed.


They


soon


found


that


they


were


entering


valley, and before long at a short distance before


them there appeared a small


hamlet, or cluster


" He


but

and

and

the


'UP THE





GRANVILLE


VALLEY.


of buildings,


in the centre


of which


were


some


mills


standing


at the end of


a dam


which


been built to intercept the waters of a considerable


stream


boys had


which


flowed through


not observed


the valley.


this stream


The


before-the


road


by


the valley

of it; and


which


at


then


they


some


had


little


besides


come


distance


in all


having


from


places


entered

the -bed


where


the


flow of the


water


was not rapid,


and


was not


broken


by rocks and


shoals


it was


covered with


ice and snow so as to be scarcely distinguishable


from the land forming its banks.


But now they


saw the water


margin


plainly


of the dam,


where


and tossed


it fell


over


the


and tumbled


among the rocks


below.


There


were


two mills


near


the dam,


both


carried


by


the water


that was held back


and there were several houses


near.


There was


also a small


fact the whole


store and a


scene


blacksmith's


presented


the


shop.


In


appearance


86


had


by


it,




UP THE VALLEY.


of quite a pleasant little village.


It appeared to


be a somewhat lively place too, as several sleighs


and sleds were


to be seen moving to


and fro, or


standing at the entrance to the mills.


"' This


is


a pleasant


place,"


said Elvie.


"Perhaps


there


is


some


house


here where


Could


stay."


" Let


us stop and


look about


a little,"


August.


So saying


August


drove


up


to


a post


the roadside,


fastened


the


near

horse


the little


to


it.


store,


and Elvie


They then walked


about for some time, first going down to see the


dam, and the mill


last


was half choked


wheels, and the flume, which


up at the entrance


great cakes of ice.


" This


must


" They told

upper mill.


be the lower mills,"


us that


said Elvie.


Deacon Justin lived


at the


But this would be a very nice place,


and some of these houses look very pleasant."


87


we


said


by


with




GRANVILLE


VALLEY.


The houses


did indeed


present quite


an at-


tractive


lanes,


appearance,


at


the main


pretty


little


various


being


elevations


road-each


yard


situated

above tl


adorned


and garden,


on little


ie level


with its

although


of


own


there


was at this


season


of the


year


nothing


but the


fences,


the


rows


of shrubbery,


and the


gates,


rising, above the snow, to indicate the enclosures

and the cultivation.


The boys


looked


at these


houses


4nd


liked


the


appearance


but August


of several


,thought


of them


that they


very


much;


probably- were


occupied


chiefly,


by


persons


more


or less


nected with the mills, and that it would be better


for their purpose to have more


of a farm for their


home.


So they


determined


to return


to the


sleigh and go on.


The valley


seemed


to


grow


somewhat


wider


and more cultivated as they went forward up the


road,


though it was bordered on each side, at the


88


con-




UP THE VALLEY.


89


distance of a mile or more, by irregularly-shaped


hills which were nearly all covered


to their summits.


with forests,


Here and there among these


hills, ravines and valleys were seen opening, and

some of these formed very pretty-looking ravines,


which


Elvie


thought


he should like


very


much


to explore in the summer.


" You


can


explore


them


much more


easily


when


spring,"

walking


the


snow


gets


said August,

everywhere.


or four feet deep,


hardened toward



"for then


there is


When the snow is


as it almost


always


the

fine


three

is in


the woods


in this


region,


in


March,


and has


become


hardened


all the holesand
all the holes-and


by


freezing


stumps


after


and rock


thaws, then

s, and lttle


brooks and. wet places

walk over everything

and hard as a floor."


" Then I hope we


are covered, and you can


on a surface


shall stay


as smooth


here till March,"


said
1\


El~vie,91




GRANVILLE VALLEY.


" Yes,"


said August,"


I hope so.


Besides, that


will be maple sugar

some maple sugar pe


time, and

rhaps, and


we can make

take home with


us to


New


York."


The boys were talking in this way together as


came


down one of the


place where they


was tied to a


lanes


had left the horse


post


a little


way


toward


tied.


out of the


road just above the


mill.


There were


several


sleds and sleighs standing also on one side,/ but


near

clear.


the mill,-leaving the


middle


of the road


As they were thus returning their atten-


tion was attracted by


a sleigh


coming


along in


the middle of the road up the valley in the same


direction in which they had come.


In the sleigh


there was

and a girl


a boy


about ten


or twelve


years old,


by his side, apparently not more than


four or five.


The boy was


driving,


having the


reins in one hand and the whip in the other, and

the horse though on the trot was advancing at a


they


the

He


go




UP THE'


VALLEY.,


moderate pace, as the road


ning to ascend.


91


there- was begin-


It continued to ascend, winding


its way along the bank of the stream and among


the trees, until it


was lost to view at a turn


above.


But just


at this instant August


darted


Elvie's


side,


rushed


down into the road,


jumped into the sleigh, seized the reins from the

boy with one hand, and snatched the whip from

him with the other, and instantly gave the horse


a severe cut across the back
t


with it, pulling


the same time hard


with one of the


reins.


horse


sprang


forward


out of the


road


into the


loose snow, and one of the runners went up over


a big


log which


was lying


there so as


nearly to


/


upset the sleigh.

Elvie had just time to see all this, and to hear

the little scream of terror which the girl uttered at


being


attention


thus dealt


with


was caught


by a

again


stranger,


by


when


the sight


his


of a


pair of runaway horses attached to


an empty


from


at


The




02


wood sled that was coming down the road upon

the run, dangling straps and buckles about them,


from


the harness,


and scattering


loose


boards


and stakes upon
bounded along.


the snow, from the sled, as they,


August had


just got the sleigh


which contained the two children well out of the


way,


when


the


runaway


team


swept


a tornado.


They


all instinctively followed


it with


their


a moment,


when


they


saw a


young


man who had seen it coming, as he stood at the


door of the mill, rush out as if he


try to


intercept


the flying


horses.


were going to

But instead


of going out into the goad, as


Elvie had expect-


to see


him do, and there brandish


his arms


before the horses


he stood


quietly


in the


attempt to stop


on one side as if to let


them,

them


pass.


" Stop them!

The man, hc


Stop them !"


cried out Elvie.


)wever, made no effort


to stop


by


like


eyes


for


ed


GRANVILLE


VALLEY,~r




UP THE VALLEY.


the horses.


He seemed rather to keep on one


a little,


as if he-wished


to leave


the way


perfectly


unobstructed


and free to them.


the instant that their heads had passed the place


where he was standing,


he sprang


forward,


grasping


a stake which still


remained


in its


place at the-end


of the sled, he leaped up on the


bar or cross-piece which


formed


the end,


clung on desperately.


,For a moment it seemed


uncertain whether he would


succeed


in making


good his foothold, but he


held on and gradually


recovered an


upright and


secure


position,


when


the whole

peared an


group, horses,

long the trees


sled


at


and


man disap-


a turn in the-road'


down the valley.

He'll stop them,


" said a man who was stand-


ing:-at


the door


of the


mill


in the midst


group that


had come hastily


to the


door to see


what was the matter.

In the meantime


August,


finding that


side


93


But


and


and


of a


the




94 GRANVILLE VALLEY.

danger was past, turned the horse which he had


driven


out of the road-way


back toward


again,-letting


down


the


runner


that. had


been raised upon the log as carefully as possible


to its right level.


The girl had started up


from


her seat, apparently a good deal frightened, and


quite


anxious


lest


the


sleigh


should


be


upset.


As soon as the runners came fairly into the road,


she settled


herself


back


again


into her


saying in a tone of great satisfaction.--

"There !"


The boy sat still as if stupefied


with astonish-


ment.


August
6


passed the reins and the


whip


back into his hands.


He received them without


speaking a


the boy's


wotd.


business


August,

to speak


who thought


if he


it


was


had anything


in thanks


for his having


been


saved,


through August's presence of mind and prompt-


ness of action,


from being run over and


having


his sleigh perhaps dashed to pieces, said nothing


road


the


seat,


to


say




UP THE VALLEY.


95


either, but stepping out of the sleigh, returned to


Elvie.


He and


Elvie


then


went to


their


sleigh.


August stepped


into it and took his


seat,


leav-


ing'Elvie to unfasten the horse and drive on.


" You are driver,"'


said he to


Elvie, "and so I


don't meddle with the horse."


"That's right," sa

pleased with having

to his management.


id Elvie. I

everything


EIvie wa

left in


is indeed

this way


As they


turned


into


the road


to trot along at a gentle pace up the


and began,

long ascent


down which the runaway team had come so furi-


ously, they saw the sleigh which


August


apparently. saved


from


destruction,


at


a short


distance before them,


and they


soon


observed


that the boy who was driving it, hearing the sound


of the


bells


behind him,


turned


his head to see


who-or what was coming. A moment afterward


they saw the


little girl who


was sitting


had


by


his




GRANVILLE


VALLEY.


turning


so


round


that by


and climbing


kneeling


upon it


up upon the


and taking


hold of the upper part of the back


of the sleigh


she could


look back


down


the


road


and see


August and


Elvie coming.


Elvie


was standing


up at


this time


in the


forward part of the sleigh.


He often drove while


standing


up,-supporting


himself in part


leaning


against


the dash


board.


He liked


very


much


Weather


to do this,


was sunny


especially


and pleasant.


when


Besides


other advantages of this position, he obtained a


better view of the


road


before


him, as


he could


see over the horse's back,-and if he was only a

very little taller, he said, he could even see over


the horse's head.


Besides


by his


standing up in


this way,


all


August had


to himself,


it if he chose,


the seat in the sleigh


and he could take tt

and ride there quite


left


ie middle of

at his ease


like a gentleman at large.


96


side,

seat,


thus


by


the

the


FP





VALLEY.


- -


course


the girl


in the


forward


sleigh,


looking


back,


could


see Elvie


in his standing


position very easily.


She seemed quite excited


at seeing him,


seat-so


far


and danced u

as the motion


ip and


down on the


of springing


from


the knees can be called dancing-to express her

gladness and joy.


Elvie re

and being


,turned


her salutation


somewhat


encouraged
6


with

I by


a smile,

this she


soon called out-

"Thank you !"


Elvie


not knowing


exactly


what


reply,


and yet wishing


to acknowledge


thanks in some way,


it in the air.


This


took off his cap and waved


was in fact the


very


best


thin
0Z


he could


have


done.


The child


waved


her hand in the air in reply.


" Thank


you," said the child


again,


moment's


pause,


"thank you


for not


letting


get run over."


Of


97


to


say


in


h~r


after


us


UfP THE


z'




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs