Child's play

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Material Information

Title:
Child's play
Physical Description:
104 p. : ill. ; 20 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
E. V. B ( Eleanor Vere Boyle ), 1825-1916
Sampson Low, Marston, Searle, & Rivington ( Publisher )
R. Clay, Sons and Taylor ( Printer )
Publisher:
Sampson Low, Marston, Searle, & Rivington
Place of Publication:
London
Manufacturer:
R. Clay, Sons, and Taylor
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Nursery rhymes -- 1881   ( rbgenr )
Juvenile literature -- 1881   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1881
Genre:
Nursery rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Juvenile literature   ( rbgenr )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by E.V.B.
General Note:
Half title: Child's play, old and new.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001624274
oclc - 25660808
notis - AHP8933
System ID:
UF00026246:00001

Full Text
This page contains no text.


The Baldwin LibraryIUn iverityRm Flof


CHILD'S PLAY,OLD AND NEW.BY E. V. 13.


LITTLE POLLY.


j AiLONDON:SAMPSON LOW, MARSTON, SEARLE, & RIVINGTON.1881.


(r /// "Z 1 rcsr Z,',I : ;. CLAVY SONW, AND TAYVIO;lIrf i'. I FTREI T H. I, i,C


SOME of the pictures in this little book weredrawn many years ago, and published underthe title of CIILD'S PLAY. Others were drainabout three years since, and called NEW CiiiiPLAY.By a wonderful process of clectrutyping, theyhave all been reduced to a much smaller size, and1 am glad to see them in their new form.I have added a few little drawings from my skctchbooks to fill up odd corners, and hope the work willplease the present generation of little ones.E V. BIIIUNTIERCOMIIL,Octoer, iSSrc.


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CHILD'S PLAY.A BUTTERFLY flew to some grass,Near a snail who was out of his cell;Said the butterfly, "Pray let me pass,"Said the snail, " Pray walk over my shell."A CAT came fiddling out of a barn,With a pair of bagpipes under her arm;She could sing nothing but Fiddle de dee,The mouse has married the humble bee..


Child's Play,A DILLAR a dollar,A ten o'clock scholar,What makes you come so soon ?You used to come at ten o'clock,But now you come at noon.I l t 'IHE TEN O CLOCK SCHOLAR.A DUCK and a drake,A nice barley cake,With a penny to pay the old baker,A dog and a gun,A nice plummy bun,Take the old woman and shake her.


Old and New.A LITTLE boy and a little girlLived in an alley.Said the little boy to the little girl,Shall I ? oh, shall I ?Said the little girl to the little boy,What will you do?Said the little boy to the little girl,I will kiss you.A LONG-TAIL'D pig,Or a short-tail'd pig,Or a pig without a tail ?A sow-pig, or a boar-pig,Or a pig with a curly tail?A PIE sate on a pear-tree,A pie sate on a pear-tree,A pie sate on a pear-tree,Heigh O! heigh 0 heiigh 0Once so merrily hopp'd she,Twice so merrily hopp'd she,Thrice so merrily hopp'd she,Heigh 0! heigh 0! heigh 0


Io Child's Play,ANNIE and Minnie and SamHad for breakfast nice strawberry jam:Each a thick slice of breadAnd on it was spreadA spoonful of strawberry jam.Said Annie, " What beautiful jam !"Said Minnie, " What lov-e-ly jam !Said Sammy, " Oh, mammy, dear mammy,Some more of dis bootiful jam!"AS I was going to sell my eggs,I met a man with bandy legs,Bandy legs and crooked toes,I tripp'd up his heels, and he fell on his nose.AS I was going up Pippen Hill,Pippen Hill was dirty,There I met a pretty miss,And she dropp'd me a curtsey.Little miss, pretty miss!Blessings light upon you !If I had half-a-crown a-day,I'd spend it all upon you.


Old and New. i Ii fc--f- -_ .-.... | :Annie and Minnie and SamHlad for Lreal fast nice straw 1erry jami


12 Child 's Play,BAHI, bah, black sheep,Have you any woolYes, marry, have I,Three bags full:One for my master,And one for my dame,And one for the little boyWho lives in the lane.UI3TTERFlLIES are pretty things,Prettier than you or I.See the colour on his wings,'VWho would hurt a butterfly?Softly, softly, girls and boys,H Ic'll come near us by and by,Here he is, don't make a noise,We'll not hurt you, butterf,-.Not to hurt a living thingLet all little children try;See again he's on the wing,Good-bye, pretty butterfly.BLESS you, bless you, bonnic beeSay, when will your wedding be ?If it be to-morrow day,Take your wings and fly away.


Old and cNw."UZZ, buzz, buzz,Says the great buzzing bee," Go away, butterfly,This flower is for me."


14 Child's Play," Why, why, why? "Says the little butterfly;"If you may sit on this flower,Why mayn't I ?"COLD and raw the north wind doth blow,Bleak in the morning early;All the hills are cover'd with snow,And winter's now come fairly.- "- ""- o "-TIHE RAT AND THE LIZARD,CLOSE by a murmuring brookA lizard basked out in the sun,Where a rat, with a comical look,Sang songs of the nuts he had won.


Old and New.COME, my children, come away!For the sun shines bright to-day.Little children come with me,Birds, and brooks, and posies see;Get your hats and come away,For it is a pleasant day.Everything is laughing, singing,All the pretty flowers are springing.See the kitten full of funSporting with the rays of sunChildren too may sport and play,For it is a pleasant day.Bring the hoop and bring the ball,Come with happy faces all.Let us make a merry ring,Talk and laugh, and dance, and sing,Quickly, quickly, come awayFor it is a pleasant day.COME here, my little lambkin, come,And lick my hand, now do!How silly to be so afraid!Indeed I won't hurt you.


16 Child's PI.iy,"COME, let's to bed," says Sleepy-head" Let's stay a while," says Slow:"IPut on the pot," says Greedy-sot," We'll sup before we go."CROSS patch, draw the latch,Sit by the fire and spin;Take a cup, and drink it up,Then call your neighbours in." (CROAK," said the Frog-"I'm hungry, I think;To-day I've had nothing"To cat or drink."" You cold little thing,I've got nothing to-day,Oh please don't come near me,Oh pray go away.""I'll jump to a garden,And leap through the pales,And there I'll dine nicelyOn lovely young snailsl"


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IS Child's Play,COCKS are crowing,Cows are lowing,Ducks arc quacking,Dogs are barking,The Ass is braying,The Horse is neighing,Was there ever such a noise?Birds are singing,Bells a-ringing,Pigs are squeaking,Barn doors creaking,The brook is babbling,The geese are gabbling,Mercy on us! What a noise!CUCKOO makes no nest at all,But thro' the woods she strays,Until she finds one snug and warm,And there her eggs she lays.CUCKOO! cuckoo! cherry tree,Catch a bird and give it me,Let the tree be high or low,Let it hail, or rain, or snow.


Old andl New. 3 1She put out her hornsLike a little Kyloc cow:Run, tailors, run,Or she'll kill you all e'en now.FOUR little mice sat down to spin,Pussy pass'd by and she peep'd in;" What are you at, my fine little men ?" Making coats for gentlemen."" Shall I come in, and cut off your threads ""No! no! Miss Pussy, you'll bite off our headg'GIRLS and boys, come out to play,The moon is shining bright as day;Leave your supper, and leave your sleep,A*d come with your playfellows into the street;Come with a whoop, and come with a call,Come with a good will, or come not at all.Up the ladder and down the wall,-A halfpenny roll will serve us all:You find milk and I'll find flour,And we'll have a pudding in half-an-hour.


32 Child's Play,GOOD-BYE little ship, good-bye,You are going away so far;If I were a bird in the sky,Or if I were a little star,Then I would watch you, and keep you in sightAll the long day and all the long night,Over the water so wide and bright.S\ .GREEN gravel, green gravel,The grass is so green,The fairest young maiden that ever was seen.Oh Mary, oh Mary, your true love is dead,He sent you a green boughTo tie round your head.


I.. ., -|THE AIRES:T YOUNG MAlDEN.c


4 C/hild's Play.(GOOSEY goosey gander,Whither dost thou wander ?Up stairs, down stairs,In my lady's chamber:There I met an old manWho would not say his prayers;I took him by the left leg,And threw him down the stairsH-ANDY-SPANDY,Jack-a-DandyLoves plum-cake and sugar-candy;H le bought some at a grocer's shop,And pleased, away went, hop, hop, hop.HARK I hark !The watch dogs bark,Beggars are coming to town,Some in jags,And some in rags,And some in velvet gown.


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36 Child's Play.H ERE primroses, cowslips, are out,And the fields are with daisies all gay:While butterflies, flitting about,Are glad in the sunshine to play.11ERE stands a s4 &s,Who set it there ?A better man than you,Touch him if you dare!11 ERE we are on Tom Tickler's ground,Picking up gold and silver!Buttercups, daisies, and rare little lilies,Butterflies, tulips, and daffy-down-dillies.HERE we go up, up, up,And here we go down, down, downy,And here we go backwards and forwards,And here we go round, round, roundy.


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38 Child's Play.HERE stands little Toby,With a reed for his spear,IHe's his mother's own boy,A sweet little dear./lcHERE we come a piping.First in Spring, and then in May;The Queen she sits upon the sand,Fair as a lily, white as a wand;King John has sent you letters three,And begs you'll read them unto me!


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40 Cil/d's Play,HEY diddle diddle,The cat and the fiddle,The cow jumnp'd over the moon;The little dog laugh'dTo see such craft,t,-And tile dish ran way witly tlhe spoonIIICCORY, diccory, dock,The mouse ran up the clock;"Tlie clock struck one,"T'he mIouse ran (dowvn,iHiccory, diccory, dock.IIIGII diddle doubt, my candle's out,And my little dame's not at home:So saddle my hog, and bridle my dog,And fetch mny little dame home.I LOW\ many days has my baby to playSaturday, Sunday, Monday,Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday.Saturday, Sunday, Monday.


Old and Nezv. 41Y i k0-MY KITTEN.I EY, my kitten, my kitten,And hey, my kitten, my dear,Sure such a sweet pet as thisWas never seen far nor near.


42 C/ild's Play.HUMPTY DUMPTY sat on a wall,I-umpty Dumpty had a great fall,Not all the king's horses, nor all the king's men,Could set Humpty Dumpty up again.HIUSH-A-BYE, baby,Daddy is near,Mammy's a lady,And that's very clear.HIUSH-A-BYE, babby,Lie still with thy daddy,Thy mammy is gone to the millTo get some wheat,To make some meat,So pray, my dear babby, lie still.HUSH-A-BYE baby, on the tree-top,When the wind blows the cradle will rock,When the bough breaks, the cradle will fall,Down will come baby, and cradle, and all.


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44 Child's Play.I HAD a little pony,His name wasDapple Gray,I lent him to a lady,To ride a mile away.She whipp'd him,She lash'd him,She rode him"Tlhrough the mire:I would not lendMy pony nowFor all the lady's hire.I HAD a little wife, the prettiest ever seen,She wash'd all the dishes and kept the house clean;She went to the mill to fetch me some flour,She brought it home safe in less than half an hourShe baked me my bread, she brew'd me my ale,She sat by the fire and told a fine tale.I HAD a little castle upon the sea-side,One half was water, the other was land:I opened my castle-door, and, guess what I foundI found a fair lady with a cup in her hand."The cup was all gold, filled with wine.Drink, fair lady, and thou shalt be mine.


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46 C.ild's Play.I HAD a little husband, no bigger than my thumb,I put him in a pint-pot, and there I bid him drum;I bought a little handkerchief to wipe his little nose,And a pair of little garters, to tic his little hose.I HAD a little nut tree;Nothing would it bear,But a silver nutmegAnd a golden pear;The King of Spain's daughter came to visit me,And all because of my little nut tree.1 SAY, little goat, with your shaggy coat,If I your beauty praise,Will you have your harness buckled on,And be fastened to my little chaise ?I LOVE little Pussy, her coat is so warm,And if I don't hurt her, she'll do me no harm;So I'll ne'er pull her tail, nor drive her away,But pussy and I together will play;She shall sit by my side, and I'll give her some food,And she'll love me because I am gentle and good.


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48 Child's Plary.IF all the world was apple-pie,And all the sea was ink,And all the trees were bread and cheese,What should we have for drink ?It's enough to make an old manScratch his head and think.I'LL tell you a storyAbout Jack-a-Nory,And now my story's begun;I'll tell yoi another,About Jack and his brother,And now my story's done.I1 HIAID two pigeons bright and gay,They flew from me the other day;What was the reason they did goI cannot tell, for I do not know.IN the barn the truant cockClose to Partlet perched on high,Briskly crows, the shepherd's clock!Jocund that the morning's nigh.


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50 Child's Play.I'LL sing you a song,It's not very long:The woodcock and the sparrow,The little dog has burnt his tail,And he shall be hang'd to-morrow.I WENT up the high hill,There I saw a climbing goat;I went down by the running rill,There I saw a ragged sheep;I went out to the roaring sea,There I saw a tossing boat;I went under the green tree,There I saw two doves asleep.I HAVE a little sister,They call her Peep-peep,She wades through the waters,Deep, deep, deep.She climbs up the mountains,High, high, high,This poor little creatureShe has but one eye.[4 Star


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52 Child's Play.I SAW three ships come sailing by,Come sailing by, come sailing by,I saw three ships come sailing by,New Year's Day in the morning.And what do you think were in them,Were in them, were in them,And what do you think were in them,New Year's Day in the morning?Three pretty maids were in them,Were in them, were in them,Three pretty maids were in them,New Year's Day in the morning.JACK and JillWent up the hillTo fetch aPail of water;Jack fell downAdri crackedHis crown,And Jill cameTumbling after.JACK SPRAT would eat no fat,His wife would eat no lean;Now was not this a pretty trickTo mnake the platter clean ?


rI_- ----1r aizfl Ca.- Si' c;.- -& P MTHREE PRETTY MAIDS.


54 C/ild's Play.LADY-BIRD! lady-bird! fly away home,The field-mouse has gone to her nest;The daisies have shut up their sleepy red eyes,And the bees and the birds are at rest.Lady-bird lady-bird! fly away home,The glow-worm is lighting his lamp;The dew's falling fast, and your fine speckled wingsWill be wet with the close-clinging damp.Lady-bird! lady-bird! fly away home,The fairy-bells tingle afar;Make haste, or they'll catch you, and harness youfast,With a cobweb to Oberon's car.LADY-COW! lady-cow!Fly away home,Thy house is on fire,Thy children are flown.LADY-COW! lady-cow!Fly away home,Hark how the bells are a-ringing!Lady-cow! lady-cow!Fly away home,Hark how the birds are a-singing!


FA I \RY f BELS/ ^Jw'c/,, i, {( tau.//w-K _- ....yAlRY BELLS.


56 Child's PlayLADY-BIRD, lady-bird, why dost thou roamSo far from thy children, so far from thy home ?Why dost thou, who can revel all day in the air,And the sweets of the grove and garden can share ?1. LET us go to the wood, says this pig;2. What to do there ? says that pig;3. To look for my mother, says this pig;4. What to do with her ? says that pig;5. To kiss her and love her, says this pig.** This is said to each finger.LITTLE boy blue,Come, blow me your horn,The sheep's in the meadow,The cow's in the corn.Where is the little boyMinding the sheep?Under the hay-cockFast asleep!LITTLE Jack Jingle,He used to live single:But when he got tired of this kind of life,IHe left off being single, and got him a wife.


X-p c~, n RL L --B B ULITTLE BOY BLUE.


58 Child's Play.LITTLE Jack HornerSat in a corner,Eating a Christmas pie;He put in his thumbAnd pull'd out a plum,And said, "What a brave boy am I "LITTLE Harry had a garden,With all sorts of posies:There were honeysuckle sweet,And marigolds and roses.-*LITTLE lamb, little lamb, kneel you down,Forget not your mistress, deary!Like the king's son, who his sweetheart leftUnder the linden dreary.LITTLE Nan Etticoat,In a white petticoat,And a red nose;The longer she standsThe shorter she grows.[A candle burning.


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60 Child's Play.LITTLE Miss MuffetShe sat on a tuffetEating of curds and whey,There came a little spider,And sat down beside her,And frightened Miss Muffet away.LITTILE Miss Nanny Goat,With your long petticoat,You must be warm, I'm afraid;W\.en the weather is hot,Little Miss Nanny Goat,You must go into the shade.LITTLE Robin Red-breast sat upon a tree,Up went Pussy-cat, and down went he;Down came Pussy-cat, and away Robin ran:Says little Robin Red-breast, " Catch me if you can"Little Robin Red-breast hopped upon a wall,Pussy-cat jump'd after him, and almost got a fall.Robin chirp'd and sang, and what did Pussy say?Pussy-cat said, "Mew," and Robin flew away.


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62 Child's Play.LITTLE Tom TuckerSings for his supper:What shall he eat?White bread and butter.How shall he cut itWithout e'er a knife ?How will he be marriedWithout e'er a wife?MARY, Mary,Quite contrary,How does your garden grow?Silver bells,And cockle-shells,And pretty maids all of a row.MOTHER, you have told us oftHIow still the dormouse liesWhen winter turns the pleasant rainTo snowdrops in the skies;As still as dormouse in the tree,So mute your little birds will be.


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64 Chilfs Play.MIY feet are cauld, my shoon are thin,Gie me my cakes, and let me rin.[A New Year's Day cy;MY Mary was good,The weather was fair,She went with her NurseyTo taste the fresh air.The birds were all singing,Mary chatted away;And she was as happyAnd merry as they.NEEDLES and pins,Needles and pins,When a man marriesHis trouble begins.OH, Mrs. Fish,You are carrying your dish;And what will you have for your dinner?The leg of a fly,And a water-spider's eye,And the tail of a fat little minnow.


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66 Czild's Play.OH that I were where I would be!Then should I be where I am not;But where I am, there I must be,And where I would be I can not.Oi look at the moon!She is thinking up there.Oh, mother, she looksLike a lamp in the air.Last week she was smaller,And shaped like a bow,But now she's grown bigger,And round as an O.ONCE I saw a little bird come hop, hop, hop,So I cried, Little bird, will you stop, stop, stop,And was going to the window, to say, how do you do ?But he shook his little tail, and far away he flew.ONE, two, three, four, five,I caught a hare alive;Six, seven, eight, nine, ten,I let it go again.


SAliTHE MDENS WWII.,IE 2TII .MAIDNEN'S \\ISf.


68 Child's Play.ONE, two, buckle my shoe;Three, four, shut the door;Five, six, pick up sticks;Seven, eight, lay them straight;Nine, ten, a good fat hen;Eleven, twelve, who will delve?Thirteen, fourteen, draw the curtain;Fifteen, sixteen, the maid's in the kitchenSeventeen, eighteen, she's a-waiting;Nineteen, twenty,.my plate's empty;Please, mamma, give me some meat,And then some apple-pudding sweet.ONCE on a time, in rainy weather,A dog and a cat,A duck and a rat,All met in a barn together.The dog, he barked,The duck, she quacked,The cat, she set up her back,The rat, he squeaked,And then he sneaked,And hid in a black old crack.OUR roses bloom and fade away,Our Infant Lord abides alway.May we be blest His face to see,And ever little children be.


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70 Child's Play,PAT a cake, pat a cake, baker's man,So I will, master, as fast as I can;Pat it, and prick it, and mark it with 13,And toss it in the oven for baby and me." PRETTY little bunnies,Tell me what you eat."" Cabbage leaves and thistles,And carrots are our meat;And, sometimes, bread and milkThey give us for a treat."PRETTY maid, pretty maid, where have you been ?Gathering a posie to give to the Queen.Pretty maid, pretty maid, what gave she youShe gave me a diamond as big as my shoe.


Old and New. 71PEASE PUDDING hot,Pease-pudding cold,Pease-pudding in the pot,Nine days old.Some like it hot,Some like it cold,Some like it in the pot,Nine days old.22_ -----,POOR little boy!How sad is your fate!To be squeezed by a grasshopper's head.I'll soon have some fun,Foi I'll get a pop-gun,And shoot the green grasshopper dead.


72 Child's Play.PUSSY-CAT, pussy-cat, where have you been?I've been to London to see the Queen.Pussy-cat, pussy-cat, what did you there?I frightened a little mouse under the chair.f77PUSSY-CAT, pussy cat, with a white foot,When is your wedding ? for I'll come to it.The beer's to brew, the bread's to bake,So pussy cat, pussy cat, don't be too late.PUSSY-CAT mcew jump'd over a coal,And in her best petticoat burnt a great hole;Pussy-cat mew shall have no more milk,Till her best petticoat's mended with silk.


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74 Child's Play,RAIN, rain,Go away,Come againAnother day,Little HarryWants to play.REMEMBER, remember,The fifth of November,Gunpowder treason and plot;I see no reasonWhy gunpowder treasonShould ever be forgot.HIurrah IRIDE a cock-horse to Banbury Cross,To see an old woman ride on a white horse,With rings on her fingers and bells on her toes,And she shall have music wherever she goes.ROBIN and Richard were two pretty men,They lay a-bed till the clock struck ten;Then up starts Robin and looks at the sky,"Oh! oh! brother Richard, the sun's very high;You go before with bottle and bag,And I'll follow after on little Jack Nag."


Old and New. 75ROCK-A-BYE, baby, thy cradle is green;Father's a nobleman, mother's a queen;And Betty's a lady, and wears a gold ring;And Harry's a drummer, and drums for the King.~r i,She shall have music whatever may hap.She shall have sweeties, and she shall have cakes,And she shall have custards that Margery makes.


76 Child's Play,SEE-SAW, Margery-daw,Harry shall have a new master;And he shall have but a penny a-day,Because he won't work any faster.SEE-SAW, sacaradown,Which is the way to London town ?One foot up, the other foot down,That is the way to London town.SHE bears no fruits but buds and flowers,She seeks no roof, but moss-clad bowers,She lifts her rosy arms;-Oh! what a flood of glorious things,Above, beneath, around she flings,To steep the world in charms.[SpringSHOE the horse, shoe the colt,Shoe the wild mare;Here a nail, there a nail,Yet she goes bare.


Old and New. 77SING! sing! what shall I sing?The cat's run away with the pudding-bag string."/ / ''/ // ....~ ,"Sing sing! what shall I sing,The snail won't give the boy anything ?


78 Child's Play,SNAIL! snail! come out of thy hole,Or else I will beat thee as black as a coal.Snail! snail! come out and seeI have some nice bread and butter for thee."- 4 -" :SPRING-TIME.SPRING, the sweet spring,Is the year's pleasant king,-Then blooms each thing,Then maids dance in a ring,-Cold doth sting, the pretty birds do sing,Cuckoo, jugge jugge-pawce, to witta a vhoo.


Old and New. 79TAFFY was a Welshman,Taffy was a thief,Taffy came to my house,And stole a piece of beef.I went to Taffy's house,Taffy wasn't at home,Taffy came to my house,And stole a marrow-bone.I went to Taffy's house,Taffy was in bed,I took the marrow-bone,And beat about his head.TIHANK you, pretty cow, that givesPleasant milk to soak my bread,Ev'ry day, and ev'ry night,Warm, and fresh, and sweet, and white.Do not chew the hemlock rank,Growing on the weedy bank;But the freshest grasses eat,They will make it very sweet.Where the purple violet grows,Where the bubbling water flows,Where the grass is fresh and fine,Pretty cow, go there and dine.


80 Child's Play.THE craws killed the pussy 0,The craws killed the pussy 0,The mickle cat sat down and gratIn Willie's wee bit housie 0;The craws killed the pussy 0,And aye and aye the kitten cried,0 wha'll bring me a mousie 0.IfTHE poor old storkStands on one legFor whole days long together.On the roof of the houseHle catches a mouse,And flies away in cold weather.


F ( I. V( CRUEL. CRAW.( 1 (


82 Child's Play.THE girl in the lane,That couldn't speak plain,Cried gobble, gobble,Gobble :The man on the hill,That couldn't stand still,Went .hobble, hobble,Hobble."1 HE north wind doth blow,And we shall have snow,And what will poor robin do then ?Poor thingHe'll sit in a barn,And keep himself warm,And hide his head under his wing.Poor thing!"Tlii1 little boy in the barnLay down on some hay.The owl camne out and flew about,And the littlec boy ran away.1rHE little dormouse is tawny red:He makes, against winter, a nice snug bed;He makes his bed in a mossy bank,Where the plants in summer grow tall and rank.


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84 Ch ild's P/ay,"TIIIE turkey's in the field,The duck is in the pond,The cock is on the paling,"The hen has gone beyond;The horse is in the stable,The cow is in the house,And in the old trapIs a little brown mouse."1 HE twenty-ninth oif AiyIs oak-apple day.Ring-a-ting-ting:God save the King"I HERE was a man of our town,And he was wondrous wise:lie jump'd into a bramble-bush,And scratch'd out both his eyes;And when he saw his eyes were out,With all his might and mainiHe jump'd into another bush,And scratch'd them in again.


OLi and New. 8THE man in the wilderness asked meHow many strawberries grew in the sea?I answered him, as I thought good,As many red herrings as grew in the wood.TIMOTHY TOTT."TIMOTHY TOTT came home from schoolAnd laid his head down on his stool,And dreamed about an apple-pie.Oh! He shall have it by and by,Because he said his lessons wellAnd is always kind to sister Nell.


86 Child's Play."1HE little brown owl sits up in the tree,And if you look well his big eyes you may see.He says whit-a-whoo when the night grows dark,And he hears the dogs howl,And the little fox bark."TELL tale, tit!Your tongue shall be slit,And all the dogs in the townShall have a little bitTHE man in the moonCame down too soon,And ask'd his way to Norwich;Hie went by the south,And burnt his mouthWith eating cold plum-porridge.T HE swallow is come!The swallow is come IOh, fair are the seasons and lightAre the days that she brings,With her dusky wings,And her bosom so snowy and white:


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88 Child's Play," HIERE was an old woman, and what do you think ?She lived upon nothing but victuals and drink;Victuals and drink were the chief of her diet,Yet this grumbling old woman could never be quiet.T1HERE were three crows sat on a stone,Fal la, la la lal de.Two flew away, and then there was one,Fal la, la la lal de.The other crow finding himself alone,Fal la, la la lal de.lie flew away, and then there was none,Fal la, la la lal de.TIIHERE was a piper who had a cow,But he had no hay to give her;So he took his pipes and played a tune,Consider, old cow, consider!r. I HIS little pig went to market;2. This little pig stayed at home;3. This little pig had roast meat;4. Th;s little pig had none;5. This little pig said, "Wee, wee, wee,I can't find my way home ""* Addr essed to the five toes.


Old and New. S9iHERE was an old man,And he had a calf;And that's half:He took him out of the stall,And put him on the wall;And that's all.ONE OF TIHE OLD WOMAN'S CHILDI)FN.THERE was an old womanWho lived in a shoe,She had so many childrenShe didn't know what to do;She gave them some brothWithout any bread,She whipp'd them all soundlyAnd sent them to bed.


go Child's Play,THERE was a little man,And he had a little gun,And his bullets were made of lead, lead, lead;He went to the brook,And saw a little duck,A.ld he shot it through the head, head, head.Hle carried it homeTo his old wife Joan,And bid her a fire for to make, make, make,To roast the little duckIHe had shot in the brook,And he'd go and fetch her the drake, drake, drake."1 HtERE was an old woman went up in a basket,Seventy times as high as the moon;What she did there I could not but ask it,For in her hand she carried a broom."Old woman, old woman, old woman," said I,"Whither, oh whither, oh whither so high ?"" To sweep the cobwebs from the sky,And I shall be back again by and by."


Old and New. 9'TO market, to market, to buy a plum bun,Home again, home again, market is done."1 hedgerows and meadows to gather fine flowers,Home again, home again, 'cause of the showers."1OM, Tom, the piper's son,Stole a pig and away he ran.The pig was ate, and Tom was beat,And Tom ran crying down the street.


92 Child's Play.TRA, ri, ro!The summer comes once mo'-We'll to the garden hie us,And watch there till he come by us;Yo, yo, yoThe summer comes once mo'.Tra, ri, ro IThe summer comes once mo'!A golden table for the master, we wish,At every corner a silver fish,And cans-full threeOf wine, fair to see,That he therewith may jocund be-Yo! yo! yo!The summer comes once mo'!THE wind one morning sprang up from sleep,Saying, Now for a frolic, now for a leap!Now for a mad-cap galloping chase!I'll make a commotion in every place!TRIP and go, heave and hoe,Up and down, to and fro,From the town, to the grove,So merrily trip and go.


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94 C/ild's Play.TWINKLE, twinkle, little star,How I wonder what you areUp above the world so high,Like a diamond in the sky.When the blazing sun is gone,When he nothing shines upon,Then you show your little light,Twinkle, twinkle, all the night.Then the traveller in the darkThanks you for your tiny spark:He could not see which way to go,If you did not twinkle so.In the dark blue sky you keep,And often through my curtains peep,For you never shut your eye,Till the sun is in the sky.As your bright and tiny sparkLights the traveller in the dark,Though I know not what you are,Twinkle, twinkle, little star.


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96 Child's Play,"IWO little blackbirds sat upon a hill,One named Jack, the other named Jill;Fly away, Jack; fly away, Jill;Come again, Jack; come again, Jill.1WO little dogs were basking in the cinders;Two little cats were playing in the windows;When two little mice popped out of a hol<,And up to a fine piece of cheese they stole.The two little dogs cried, " Cheese is nice;'But the two little cats jumped down in a trice,And cracked the bones of the two little mice."I WO little dogs sat by the fireOver a fender of coal dust.Said one little dog to the other little dog,If you don't talk, why I must.\WE are a very lowly pair,As poor as drops, of water;And yonder beam that dances there,Is sunlight's golden daughter.[ lTwo Icices.


O/ld and New. 97UNDER the tree tops is quiet now;In all the woodlands hearest thouNot a sound.The little birds are asleep in the trees.Wait wait! and soon like theseSleepest thou!4UNDER THE STARS.UNDER the stars that shine so brightOh! what a beautiful heavenly light!GUP i th sly o a ummr ngh G


98 Child's Play,WILILY! see the snow!Hear the winter wind blowMake the fire burn bright,Shut the doors up tight;Let it storm, let it storm,My Willy shall be warm.Dear mother, let me goAnd frolic in the snow,'Tis so soft and so light,So beautiful and white,'Twill not hurt me I know,Let me go, let me go!I don't mind the cold,I am three years old;Look at little Rover,He is polwdered allbver ;Let me go, let me goAnd frolic in the snow !I can do what Rover can,1, am your little man;ALet it storm, let it storm,I don't want to be warm;Dear mother, let me goAnd frolic in the snow.


Old and New. 99WiHY here is papa,With Edward and Jane,Come to see good old NurseyWho lives in the lane.She's the best of all Nurseys,And Edward and JaneLove dearly good NurseyVWho lives in the lane." Iere's the hen and her chickens,"Says Edward to Jane,"And here's Nursey's pussyThat lives in the lane."Nurse gave a good hug"To Edward and Jane,And told them a storyAs long as the lane;Then gave them some milk,And a nice currant cake,And a sweet apple tartOf Nursey's own bake.They said, "Good bye, Nursey,"She said, " Come again,To see poor old NurseyWho lives in the lane."


ioo C/hild's PlayWHEN I was a bachelor,I lived by myself,And all the bread and cheese I gotI put it upon the shelf.The rats and the mice they made such a strife,I was forced to go to London to buy me a wife:The roads were so bad, and the lanes were so narrow,I was forced to bring my wife home in a wheelbarrow.The wheelbarrow broke, and my wife had a fall,Down came wheelbarrow, wife, and all.WHERE do you live, Jack Frost ?In the wind when the trees are tost,In the ice when the river is crost,In the snow when the sheep are lost,And in your little cold nose.WEE WILLIE WINKIERuns through the town,Up stairs and down stairs,In his night gown:Tapping at the window,Crying at the lock,"Are the babes in their beds,For it's now ten o'clock!"


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I02 Child' s P'ay,THE THREE LITTLE KITTENS."THIREE little kittens lost their mittens;And they began to cry,0/! " motiter dear,W11e very mnuch fJar7Talt we havee lost our mittens.Lost your mittens!You naughty kittens!Then you shall have no pie.J fe-oui, i(ee-ow, imce-ow.No, you shall have no pie.Acec-ow, ncc-ow, m7e-oar.The three little kittens found their mittens,And they began to cry,0 miotlier dear,See ierc, see /erc /etc, we have found our mittens.Put on your mittens,You silly kittens,And you may have some pie,0/1 -r, ft rr-r, pu rr-r,Ok i! let us have the pie !1lu'mtr-i', pit rr-r, pittrr-r


Old and New. 03The three Eittle kittens put on their mittcns,And soon ate up the pie;O/i / mot/her dear,Wie greatly far,That wue /are soiled our mittens.Soiled your mittens!You naughty kittens!"Then they began to sigh,JMi-ow, mi-ow, mni-ozu.Then they began to sigh,M/i-ow, ini-ow, niii-ow.The three little kittens washed their mittensAnd hung them out to dry0/ /motic' dciaw,Do not jyoum hcar,That we have I asicd our 0 iitenlcs ?Washed your mittens:OhI you're good kittens.But I smell a rat close by,Hush hush! mee-ow, mce-ow.I've sImell a rat close b 0y,/ce-or, iieeC-ocr, nimcc-ow.


104 Child's Play, Old and AVezv., /' t 1 -"THE END.R, CLAY, SONS, AND TAYLO, IIR AUTD S HIL..


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52 Child's Play.
I SAW three ships come sailing by,
Come sailing by, come sailing by,
I saw three ships come sailing by,
New Year's Day in the morning.
And what do you think were in them,
Were in them, were in them,
And what do you think were in them,
New Year's Day in the morning?
Three pretty maids were in them,
Were in them, were in them,
Three pretty maids were in them,
New Year's Day in the morning.
JACK and Jill
Went up the hill
To fetch a
Pail of water;
Jack fell down
Adri cracked
His crown,
And Jill came
Tumbling after.
JACK SPRAT would eat no fat,
His wife would eat no lean;
Now was not this a pretty trick
To mnake the platter clean ?


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94 C/ild's Play.
TWINKLE, twinkle, little star,
How I wonder what you are
Up above the world so high,
Like a diamond in the sky.
When the blazing sun is gone,
When he nothing shines upon,
Then you show your little light,
Twinkle, twinkle, all the night.
Then the traveller in the dark
Thanks you for your tiny spark:
He could not see which way to go,
If you did not twinkle so.
In the dark blue sky you keep,
And often through my curtains peep,
For you never shut your eye,
Till the sun is in the sky.
As your bright and tiny spark
Lights the traveller in the dark,
Though I know not what you are,
Twinkle, twinkle, little star.


Full Text

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The Baldwin Library IUn iverity Rm Flof



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IS Child's Play, COCKS are crowing, Cows are lowing, Ducks arc quacking, Dogs are barking, The Ass is braying, The Horse is neighing, Was there ever such a noise? Birds are singing, Bells a-ringing, Pigs are squeaking, Barn doors creaking, The brook is babbling, The geese are gabbling, Mercy on us! What a noise! CUCKOO makes no nest at all, But thro' the woods she strays, Until she finds one snug and warm, And there her eggs she lays. CUCKOO! cuckoo! cherry tree, Catch a bird and give it me, Let the tree be high or low, Let it hail, or rain, or snow.



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Old and New. 77 SING! sing! what shall I sing? The cat's run away with the pudding-bag string. "/ / -''/ // ....~ "Sing sing! what shall I sing, The snail won't give the boy anything ?



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Old andl New. 3 1 She put out her horns Like a little Kyloc cow: Run, tailors, run, Or she'll kill you all e'en now. FOUR little mice sat down to spin, Pussy pass'd by and she peep'd in; What are you at, my fine little men ? Making coats for gentlemen." Shall I come in, and cut off your threads "No! no! Miss Pussy, you'll bite off our headg' GIRLS and boys, come out to play, The moon is shining bright as day; Leave your supper, and leave your sleep, A*d come with your playfellows into the street; Come with a whoop, and come with a call, Come with a good will, or come not at all. Up the ladder and down the wall, -A halfpenny roll will serve us all: You find milk and I'll find flour, And we'll have a pudding in half-an-hour.



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,,~~ I9 i-i! Si < '..' s'ii, i ra ! 7/:~ I 1U W .I IIS C1A .. SI' / L~ CiA EW/. ____ __ __ "~:



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16 Child's PI.iy, "COME, let's to bed," says Sleepy-head Let's stay a while," says Slow: "IPut on the pot," says Greedy-sot, We'll sup before we go." CROSS patch, draw the latch, Sit by the fire and spin; Take a cup, and drink it up, Then call your neighbours in. (CROAK," said the Frog"I'm hungry, I think; To-day I've had nothing "To cat or drink." You cold little thing, I've got nothing to-day, Oh please don't come near me, Oh pray go away." "I'll jump to a garden, And leap through the pales, And there I'll dine nicely On lovely young snailsl"



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I.. ...., |THE AIRES:T YOUNG MAlDEN. c



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62 Child's Play. LITTLE Tom Tucker Sings for his supper: What shall he eat? White bread and butter. How shall he cut it Without e'er a knife ? How will he be married Without e'er a wife? MARY, Mary, Quite contrary, How does your garden grow? Silver bells, And cockle-shells, And pretty maids all of a row. MOTHER, you have told us oft HIow still the dormouse lies When winter turns the pleasant rain To snowdrops in the skies; As still as dormouse in the tree, So mute your little birds will be.



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Old and New. A LITTLE boy and a little girl Lived in an alley. Said the little boy to the little girl, Shall I ? oh, shall I ? Said the little girl to the little boy, What will you do? Said the little boy to the little girl, I will kiss you. A LONG-TAIL'D pig, Or a short-tail'd pig, Or a pig without a tail ? A sow-pig, or a boar-pig, Or a pig with a curly tail? A PIE sate on a pear-tree, A pie sate on a pear-tree, A pie sate on a pear-tree, Heigh O! heigh 0 heiigh 0 Once so merrily hopp'd she, Twice so merrily hopp'd she, Thrice so merrily hopp'd she, Heigh 0! heigh 0! heigh 0



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SOME of the pictures in this little book were drawn many years ago, and published under the title of CIILD'S PLAY. Others were drain about three years since, and called NEW Ciiii PLAY. By a wonderful process of clectrutyping, they have all been reduced to a much smaller size, and 1 am glad to see them in their new form. I have added a few little drawings from my skctch books to fill up odd corners, and hope the work will please the present generation of little ones. E V. BI IIUNTIERCOMIIL, Octoer, iSSrc.



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Old and New. COME, my children, come away! For the sun shines bright to-day. Little children come with me, Birds, and brooks, and posies see; Get your hats and come away, For it is a pleasant day. Everything is laughing, singing, All the pretty flowers are springing. See the kitten full of fun Sporting with the rays of sun Children too may sport and play, For it is a pleasant day. Bring the hoop and bring the ball, Come with happy faces all. Let us make a merry ring, Talk and laugh, and dance, and sing, Quickly, quickly, come away For it is a pleasant day. COME here, my little lambkin, come, And lick my hand, now do! How silly to be so afraid! Indeed I won't hurt you.



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42 C/ild's Play. HUMPTY DUMPTY sat on a wall, I-umpty Dumpty had a great fall, Not all the king's horses, nor all the king's men, Could set Humpty Dumpty up again. HIUSH-A-BYE, baby, Daddy is near, Mammy's a lady, And that's very clear. HIUSH-A-BYE, babby, Lie still with thy daddy, Thy mammy is gone to the mill To get some wheat, To make some meat, So pray, my dear babby, lie still. HUSH-A-BYE baby, on the tree-top, When the wind blows the cradle will rock, When the bough breaks, the cradle will fall, Down will come baby, and cradle, and all.



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80 Child's Play. THE craws killed the pussy 0, The craws killed the pussy 0, The mickle cat sat down and grat In Willie's wee bit housie 0; The craws killed the pussy 0, And aye and aye the kitten cried, 0 wha'll bring me a mousie 0. If THE poor old stork Stands on one leg For whole days long together. On the roof of the house Hle catches a mouse, And flies away in cold weather.



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4 C/hild's Play. (GOOSEY goosey gander, Whither dost thou wander ? Up stairs, down stairs, In my lady's chamber: There I met an old man Who would not say his prayers; I took him by the left leg, And threw him down the stairs H-ANDY-SPANDY, Jack-a-Dandy Loves plum-cake and sugar-candy; H le bought some at a grocer's shop, And pleased, away went, hop, hop, hop. HARK I hark The watch dogs bark, Beggars are coming to town, Some in jags, And some in rags, And some in velvet gown.



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X-p c~, n R L L --B B U LITTLE BOY BLUE.



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84 Ch ild's P/ay, "TIIIE turkey's in the field, The duck is in the pond, The cock is on the paling, "The hen has gone beyond; The horse is in the stable, The cow is in the house, And in the old trap Is a little brown mouse. "1 HE twenty-ninth oif Aiy Is oak-apple day. Ring-a-ting-ting: God save the King "I HERE was a man of our town, And he was wondrous wise: lie jump'd into a bramble-bush, And scratch'd out both his eyes; And when he saw his eyes were out, With all his might and main iHe jump'd into another bush, And scratch'd them in again.



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Old and New. i I i fc --f-_ ..-.... -| : Annie and Minnie and Sam Hlad for Lreal fast nice straw 1erry jami



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(r /// "Z 1 rcsr Z,', I : ;. CLAVY SONW, AND TAYVIO; lIrf i'. I FTREI T H. I, i,C



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J bi D. i2(. k-ji /. / Hi k i-i I 0I 'I 1 1 i, I j ,-----Yi .. .. :" S A Sf'AI) CAS I'LE.



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-iil, 8t-I \;C if.



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CHILD'S PLAY. A BUTTERFLY flew to some grass, Near a snail who was out of his cell; Said the butterfly, "Pray let me pass," Said the snail, Pray walk over my shell." A CAT came fiddling out of a barn, With a pair of bagpipes under her arm; She could sing nothing but Fiddle de dee, The mouse has married the humble bee. ..



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46 C.ild's Play. I HAD a little husband, no bigger than my thumb, I put him in a pint-pot, and there I bid him drum; I bought a little handkerchief to wipe his little nose, And a pair of little garters, to tic his little hose. I HAD a little nut tree; Nothing would it bear, But a silver nutmeg And a golden pear; The King of Spain's daughter came to visit me, And all because of my little nut tree. 1 SAY, little goat, with your shaggy coat, If I your beauty praise, Will you have your harness buckled on, And be fastened to my little chaise ? I LOVE little Pussy, her coat is so warm, And if I don't hurt her, she'll do me no harm; So I'll ne'er pull her tail, nor drive her away, But pussy and I together will play; She shall sit by my side, and I'll give her some food, And she'll love me because I am gentle and good.



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76 Child's Play, SEE-SAW, Margery-daw, Harry shall have a new master; And he shall have but a penny a-day, Because he won't work any faster. SEE-SAW, sacaradown, Which is the way to London town ? One foot up, the other foot down, That is the way to London town. SHE bears no fruits but buds and flowers, She seeks no roof, but moss-clad bowers, She lifts her rosy arms;Oh! what a flood of glorious things, Above, beneath, around she flings, To steep the world in charms. [Spring SHOE the horse, shoe the colt, Shoe the wild mare; Here a nail, there a nail, Yet she goes bare.



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54 C/ild's Play. LADY-BIRD! lady-bird! fly away home, The field-mouse has gone to her nest; The daisies have shut up their sleepy red eyes, And the bees and the birds are at rest. Lady-bird lady-bird! fly away home, The glow-worm is lighting his lamp; The dew's falling fast, and your fine speckled wings Will be wet with the close-clinging damp. Lady-bird! lady-bird! fly away home, The fairy-bells tingle afar; Make haste, or they'll catch you, and harness you fast, With a cobweb to Oberon's car. LADY-COW! lady-cow! Fly away home, Thy house is on fire, Thy children are flown. LADY-COW! lady-cow! Fly away home, Hark how the bells are a-ringing! Lady-cow! lady-cow! Fly away home, Hark how the birds are a-singing!



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I02 Child' s P'ay, THE THREE LITTLE KITTENS. "THIREE little kittens lost their mittens; And they began to cry, 0/! motiter dear, W11e very mnuch fJar 7Talt we havee lost our mittens. Lost your mittens! You naughty kittens! Then you shall have no pie. Jfe-oui, i(ee-ow, imce-ow. No, you shall have no pie. Acec-ow, ncc-ow, m7e-oar. The three little kittens found their mittens, And they began to cry, 0 miotlier dear, See ierc, see /erc / etc, we have found our mittens. Put on your mittens, You silly kittens, And you may have some pie, 0/1 -r, ft rr-r, pu rr-r, Ok i! let us have the pie 1lu'mtr-i', pit rr-r, pittrr-r



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Old and New. 03 The three Eittle kittens put on their mittcns, And soon ate up the pie; O/i / mot/her dear, Wie greatly far, That wue /are soiled our mittens. Soiled your mittens! You naughty kittens! "Then they began to sigh, JMi-ow, mi-ow, mni-ozu. Then they began to sigh, M/i-ow, ini-ow, niii-ow. The three little kittens washed their mittens And hung them out to dry 0/ /motic' dciaw, Do not jyoum hcar, That we have Iasicd our 0 iitenlcs ? Washed your mittens: OhI you're good kittens. But I smell a rat close by, Hush hush! mee-ow, mce-ow. I've sImell a rat close b 0y, /ce-or, iieeC-ocr, nimcc-ow.



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56 Child's Play LADY-BIRD, lady-bird, why dost thou roam So far from thy children, so far from thy home ? Why dost thou, who can revel all day in the air, And the sweets of the grove and garden can share ? 1. LET us go to the wood, says this pig; 2. What to do there ? says that pig; 3. To look for my mother, says this pig; 4. What to do with her ? says that pig; 5. To kiss her and love her, says this pig. ** This is said to each finger. LITTLE boy blue, Come, blow me your horn, The sheep's in the meadow, The cow's in the corn. Where is the little boy Minding the sheep? Under the hay-cock Fast asleep! LITTLE Jack Jingle, He used to live single: But when he got tired of this kind of life, IHe left off being single, and got him a wife.



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:' A ;^w a^ a^,:^ // 4,^ / -"-' [ SWATCH-DOGS. 6;C 2 WATCH-DO ,S C 2



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66 Czild's Play. OH that I were where I would be! Then should I be where I am not; But where I am, there I must be, And where I would be I can not. Oi look at the moon! She is thinking up there. Oh, mother, she looks Like a lamp in the air. Last week she was smaller, And shaped like a bow, But now she's grown bigger, And round as an O. ONCE I saw a little bird come hop, hop, hop, So I cried, Little bird, will you stop, stop, stop, And was going to the window, to say, how do you do ? But he shook his little tail, and far away he flew. ONE, two, three, four, five, I caught a hare alive; Six, seven, eight, nine, ten, I let it go again.



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70 Child's Play, PAT a cake, pat a cake, baker's man, So I will, master, as fast as I can; Pat it, and prick it, and mark it with 13, And toss it in the oven for baby and me. PRETTY little bunnies, Tell me what you eat." Cabbage leaves and thistles, And carrots are our meat; And, sometimes, bread and milk They give us for a treat." PRETTY maid, pretty maid, where have you been ? Gathering a posie to give to the Queen. Pretty maid, pretty maid, what gave she you She gave me a diamond as big as my shoe.



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52 Child's Play. I SAW three ships come sailing by, Come sailing by, come sailing by, I saw three ships come sailing by, New Year's Day in the morning. And what do you think were in them, Were in them, were in them, And what do you think were in them, New Year's Day in the morning? Three pretty maids were in them, Were in them, were in them, Three pretty maids were in them, New Year's Day in the morning. JACK and Jill Went up the hill To fetch a Pail of water; Jack fell down Adri cracked His crown, And Jill came Tumbling after. JACK SPRAT would eat no fat, His wife would eat no lean; Now was not this a pretty trick To mnake the platter clean ?



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:. 'I^^~~~~--U-''^r-^ ^^^Uu -a ^^^.dJhe ^JL ^^f a i'r ^ 1 ^^ ^X^^ THE TIMI .. I % -' 1 v > -1r V,i jL


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58 Child's Play. LITTLE Jack Horner Sat in a corner, Eating a Christmas pie; He put in his thumb And pull'd out a plum, And said, "What a brave boy am I LITTLE Harry had a garden, With all sorts of posies: There were honeysuckle sweet, And marigolds and roses. -* LITTLE lamb, little lamb, kneel you down, Forget not your mistress, deary! Like the king's son, who his sweetheart left Under the linden dreary. LITTLE Nan Etticoat, In a white petticoat, And a red nose; The longer she stands The shorter she grows. [A candle burning.



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32 Child's Play, GOOD-BYE little ship, good-bye, You are going away so far; If I were a bird in the sky, Or if I were a little star, Then I would watch you, and keep you in sight All the long day and all the long night, Over the water so wide and bright. S\ GREEN gravel, green gravel, The grass is so green, The fairest young maiden that ever was seen. Oh Mary, oh Mary, your true love is dead, He sent you a green bough To tie round your head.



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, -........ -.......... ( *~ii ,.x^ .;.^r^ ^ ^^ .. .-. i / i5I-/~Y A~)Y A r (t>j -* \ -'-./II r,, C'7 s lsJJt t kL /^ ., "..^-a;! ftl' >'.:^L-ti ./;l;U /1. [ i i' ",' iavi aci. ll LL~i''., IIA iv LL'cQ~i cL.; ;.:* 'Lr cii't,^irl ^ I ( Lu tiT; i ) 1' I Cl U &7t 6jj -"AZ



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/,j> /7 2 i_ __ 1 7 p--nŽ3 --l i 0 / I ^rU~Ll^O; ^^.wK/ j^or *n' V^TM^^ LOST PfGl'ONS. 1)



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Old and New. S9 iHERE was an old man, And he had a calf; And that's half: He took him out of the stall, And put him on the wall; And that's all. ONE OF TIHE OLD WOMAN'S CHILDI)FN. THERE was an old woman Who lived in a shoe, She had so many children She didn't know what to do; She gave them some broth Without any bread, She whipp'd them all soundly And sent them to bed.



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48 Child's Plary. IF all the world was apple-pie, And all the sea was ink, And all the trees were bread and cheese, What should we have for drink ? It's enough to make an old man Scratch his head and think. I'LL tell you a story About Jack-a-Nory, And now my story's begun; I'll tell yoi another, About Jack and his brother, And now my story's done. I1 HIAID two pigeons bright and gay, They flew from me the other day; What was the reason they did go I cannot tell, for I do not know. IN the barn the truant cock Close to Partlet perched on high, Briskly crows, the shepherd's clock! Jocund that the morning's nigh.



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Od and NAez, 1 7 "o, .s '-rcC o..... ....C ,1 4 77 /( .-..-.. .... THE HUNGRY FROG. 9', HEH GRY RG i i ;IB



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IT X ,y 73n. T A\; o f ~lf/ ~ ~", /0tL cd 1 E' I~:fI ~~~~s r~ii/ ----K V. ~--: --



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F ( I. V ( CRUEL. CRAW. ( 1 (



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82 Child's Play. THE girl in the lane, That couldn't speak plain, Cried gobble, gobble, Gobble : The man on the hill, That couldn't stand still, Went .hobble, hobble, Hobble. "1 HE north wind doth blow, And we shall have snow, And what will poor robin do then ? Poor thing He'll sit in a barn, And keep himself warm, And hide his head under his wing. Poor thing! "Tlii1 little boy in the barn Lay down on some hay. The owl camne out and flew about, And the littlec boy ran away. 1rHE little dormouse is tawny red: He makes, against winter, a nice snug bed; He makes his bed in a mossy bank, Where the plants in summer grow tall and rank.



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60 Child's Play. LITTLE Miss Muffet She sat on a tuffet Eating of curds and whey, There came a little spider, And sat down beside her, And frightened Miss Muffet away. LITTILE Miss Nanny Goat, With your long petticoat, You must be warm, I'm afraid; W\.en the weather is hot, Little Miss Nanny Goat, You must go into the shade. LITTLE Robin Red-breast sat upon a tree, Up went Pussy-cat, and down went he; Down came Pussy-cat, and away Robin ran: Says little Robin Red-breast, Catch me if you can" Little Robin Red-breast hopped upon a wall, Pussy-cat jump'd after him, and almost got a fall. Robin chirp'd and sang, and what did Pussy say? Pussy-cat said, "Mew," and Robin flew away.



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50 Child's Play. I'LL sing you a song, It's not very long: The woodcock and the sparrow, The little dog has burnt his tail, And he shall be hang'd to-morrow. I WENT up the high hill, There I saw a climbing goat; I went down by the running rill, There I saw a ragged sheep; I went out to the roaring sea, There I saw a tossing boat; I went under the green tree, There I saw two doves asleep. I HAVE a little sister, They call her Peep-peep, She wades through the waters, Deep, deep, deep. She climbs up the mountains, High, high, high, This poor little creature She has but one eye. [4 Star



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Old and Nezv. 41 Y i k 0MY KITTEN. I EY, my kitten, my kitten, And hey, my kitten, my dear, Sure such a sweet pet as this Was never seen far nor near.



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j Ai LONDON: SAMPSON LOW, MARSTON, SEARLE, & RIVINGTON. 1881.



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64 Chilfs Play. MIY feet are cauld, my shoon are thin, Gie me my cakes, and let me rin. [A New Year's Day cy; MY Mary was good, The weather was fair, She went with her Nursey To taste the fresh air. The birds were all singing, Mary chatted away; And she was as happy And merry as they. NEEDLES and pins, Needles and pins, When a man marries His trouble begins. OH, Mrs. Fish, You are carrying your dish; And what will you have for your dinner? The leg of a fly, And a water-spider's eye, And the tail of a fat little minnow.



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Old and New. 71 PEASE PUDDING hot, Pease-pudding cold, Pease-pudding in the pot, Nine days old. Some like it hot, Some like it cold, Some like it in the pot, Nine days old. 22_ -----, POOR little boy! How sad is your fate! To be squeezed by a grasshopper's head. I'll soon have some fun, Foi I'll get a pop-gun, And shoot the green grasshopper dead.



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88 Child's Play, HIERE was an old woman, and what do you think ? She lived upon nothing but victuals and drink; Victuals and drink were the chief of her diet, Yet this grumbling old woman could never be quiet. T1HERE were three crows sat on a stone, Fal la, la la lal de. Two flew away, and then there was one, Fal la, la la lal de. The other crow finding himself alone, Fal la, la la lal de. lie flew away, and then there was none, Fal la, la la lal de. TIIHERE was a piper who had a cow, But he had no hay to give her; So he took his pipes and played a tune, Consider, old cow, consider! r. I HIS little pig went to market; 2. This little pig stayed at home; 3. This little pig had roast meat; 4. Th;s little pig had none; 5. This little pig said, "Wee, wee, wee, I can't find my way home "* Addr essed to the five toes.



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CHILD'S PLAY, OLD AND NEW. BY E. V. 13.



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40 Cil/d's Play, HEY diddle diddle, The cat and the fiddle, The cow jumnp'd over the moon; The little dog laugh'd To see such craft,t,And tile dish ran way witly tlhe spoon IIICCORY, diccory, dock, The mouse ran up the clock; "Tlie clock struck one, "T'he mIouse ran (dowvn, iHiccory, diccory, dock. IIIGII diddle doubt, my candle's out, And my little dame's not at home: So saddle my hog, and bridle my dog, And fetch mny little dame home. I LOW\ many days has my baby to play Saturday, Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday. Saturday, Sunday, Monday.



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Old and New. 9' TO market, to market, to buy a plum bun, Home again, home again, market is done. "1 hedgerows and meadows to gather fine flowers, Home again, home again, 'cause of the showers. "1OM, Tom, the piper's son, Stole a pig and away he ran. The pig was ate, and Tom was beat, And Tom ran crying down the street.



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12 Child 's Play, BAHI, bah, black sheep, Have you any wool Yes, marry, have I, Three bags full: One for my master, And one for my dame, And one for the little boy Who lives in the lane. UI3TTERFlLIES are pretty things, Prettier than you or I. See the colour on his wings, 'VWho would hurt a butterfly? Softly, softly, girls and boys, H Ic'll come near us by and by, Here he is, don't make a noise, We'll not hurt you, butterf,-. Not to hurt a living thing Let all little children try; See again he's on the wing, Good-bye, pretty butterfly. BLESS you, bless you, bonnic bee Say, when will your wedding be ? If it be to-morrow day, Take your wings and fly away.





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'I 4r t rr: i i -: I'~i" 'i 9 -4: I; ;. ~AL. iw dq/it Ilanj ;r7L`--k CW12lfCY7-y3tb a. VUo-; QUEEN MARY.



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7:v oc -1 .{~~~~42 ~ ~ kdi C>~i::: ~ - i Kg Ih1\Cme (Ane IZ d v &/



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Old and cNw. "UZZ, buzz, buzz, Says the great buzzing bee, Go away, butterfly, This flower is for me."



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44 Child's Play. I HAD a little pony, His name was Dapple Gray, I lent him to a lady, To ride a mile away. She whipp'd him, She lash'd him, She rode him "Tlhrough the mire: I would not lend My pony now For all the lady's hire. I HAD a little wife, the prettiest ever seen, She wash'd all the dishes and kept the house clean; She went to the mill to fetch me some flour, She brought it home safe in less than half an hour She baked me my bread, she brew'd me my ale, She sat by the fire and told a fine tale. I HAD a little castle upon the sea-side, One half was water, the other was land: I opened my castle-door, and, guess what I found I found a fair lady with a cup in her hand. "The cup was all gold, filled with wine. Drink, fair lady, and thou shalt be mine.





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ioo C/hild's Play WHEN I was a bachelor, I lived by myself, And all the bread and cheese I got I put it upon the shelf. The rats and the mice they made such a strife, I was forced to go to London to buy me a wife: The roads were so bad, and the lanes were so narrow, I was forced to bring my wife home in a wheelbarrow. The wheelbarrow broke, and my wife had a fall, Down came wheelbarrow, wife, and all. WHERE do you live, Jack Frost ? In the wind when the trees are tost, In the ice when the river is crost, In the snow when the sheep are lost, And in your little cold nose. WEE WILLIE WINKIE Runs through the town, Up stairs and down stairs, In his night gown: Tapping at the window, Crying at the lock, "Are the babes in their beds, For it's now ten o'clock!"





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~A (P7 Ir BLO N ROES ,, < ~B~!~~\\ ~-~ / / i ~: ~ ~ /~ c~b,~t/a/7 ~.-c[: 6 ~ ~ ~ i~ 66 ,48( ~ '/i&CL6~6' K, /aF BLOOMINh-G ROSbS.



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r 4 wad -,4 I i \d$%r i ^ffl


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68 Child's Play. ONE, two, buckle my shoe; Three, four, shut the door; Five, six, pick up sticks; Seven, eight, lay them straight; Nine, ten, a good fat hen; Eleven, twelve, who will delve? Thirteen, fourteen, draw the curtain; Fifteen, sixteen, the maid's in the kitchen Seventeen, eighteen, she's a-waiting; Nineteen, twenty,.my plate's empty; Please, mamma, give me some meat, And then some apple-pudding sweet. ONCE on a time, in rainy weather, A dog and a cat, A duck and a rat, All met in a barn together. The dog, he barked, The duck, she quacked, The cat, she set up her back, The rat, he squeaked, And then he sneaked, And hid in a black old crack. OUR roses bloom and fade away, Our Infant Lord abides alway. May we be blest His face to see, And ever little children be.



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rI_---1r aizfl Ca.- Si' c;.& P M THREE PRETTY MAIDS.



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92 Child's Play. TRA, ri, ro! The summer comes once mo'We'll to the garden hie us, And watch there till he come by us; Yo, yo, yo The summer comes once mo'. Tra, ri, ro I The summer comes once mo'! A golden table for the master, we wish, At every corner a silver fish, And cans-full three Of wine, fair to see, That he therewith may jocund beYo! yo! yo! The summer comes once mo'! THE wind one morning sprang up from sleep, Saying, Now for a frolic, now for a leap! Now for a mad-cap galloping chase! I'll make a commotion in every place! TRIP and go, heave and hoe, Up and down, to and fro, From the town, to the grove, So merrily trip and go.



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104 Child's Play, Old and AVezv. /' t 1 "THE END. R, CLAY, SONS, AND TAYLO, IIRAUTD S -HIL..



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IT i 0, "'~' I ~>~~ K: 'Ii ;'Ij7 j "-'-*f;^ \ VK; j -"\ > $eJi -_ / I<.* 'Ii 0 "QctY' p in AND GO, LX I K N,:4 ^^ MW ^) Gw^~ to'Hr '*~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~ ~, *',"/-^'s -', ,?/^^.' *-^ -**^^''* I ;^/^ "' O ~ ox^ r ri(f€''\ ~ 1 |L------^^.._ ^_ ;_ J ^-^^ -^ *r-p ND ;o



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98 Child's Play, WILILY! see the snow! Hear the winter wind blow Make the fire burn bright, Shut the doors up tight; Let it storm, let it storm, My Willy shall be warm. Dear mother, let me go And frolic in the snow, 'Tis so soft and so light, So beautiful and white, 'Twill not hurt me I know, Let me go, let me go! I don't mind the cold, I am three years old; Look at little Rover, He is polwdered allbver ; Let me go, let me go And frolic in the snow I can do what Rover can, 1, am your little man; ALet it storm, let it storm, I don't want to be warm; Dear mother, let me go And frolic in the snow.



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86 Child's Play. "1HE little brown owl sits up in the tree, And if you look well his big eyes you may see. He says whit-a-whoo when the night grows dark, And he hears the dogs howl, And the little fox bark. "TELL tale, tit! Your tongue shall be slit, And all the dogs in the town Shall have a little bit THE man in the moon Came down too soon, And ask'd his way to Norwich; Hie went by the south, And burnt his mouth With eating cold plum-porridge. T HE swallow is come! The swallow is come I Oh, fair are the seasons and light Are the days that she brings, With her dusky wings, And her bosom so snowy and white:



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78 Child's Play, SNAIL! snail! come out of thy hole, Or else I will beat thee as black as a coal. Snail! snail! come out and see I have some nice bread and butter for thee. "4 -" : SPRING-TIME. SPRING, the sweet spring, Is the year's pleasant king,Then blooms each thing, Then maids dance in a ring,Cold doth sting, the pretty birds do sing, Cuckoo, jugge jugge-pawce, to witta a vhoo.



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FA I \RY f BELS / ^Jw'c/,,i,{( tau.//w-K ., _-.... yAlRY BELLS.



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Old and New. 75 ROCK-A-BYE, baby, thy cradle is green; Father's a nobleman, mother's a queen; And Betty's a lady, and wears a gold ring; And Harry's a drummer, and drums for the King. ~r i, She shall have music whatever may hap. She shall have sweeties, and she shall have cakes, And she shall have custards that Margery makes.



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94 C/ild's Play. TWINKLE, twinkle, little star, How I wonder what you are Up above the world so high, Like a diamond in the sky. When the blazing sun is gone, When he nothing shines upon, Then you show your little light, Twinkle, twinkle, all the night. Then the traveller in the dark Thanks you for your tiny spark: He could not see which way to go, If you did not twinkle so. In the dark blue sky you keep, And often through my curtains peep, For you never shut your eye, Till the sun is in the sky. As your bright and tiny spark Lights the traveller in the dark, Though I know not what you are, Twinkle, twinkle, little star.



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72 Child's Play. PUSSY-CAT, pussy-cat, where have you been? I've been to London to see the Queen. Pussy-cat, pussy-cat, what did you there? I frightened a little mouse under the chair. f77 PUSSY-CAT, pussy cat, with a white foot, When is your wedding ? for I'll come to it. The beer's to brew, the bread's to bake, So pussy cat, pussy cat, don't be too late. PUSSY-CAT mcew jump'd over a coal, And in her best petticoat burnt a great hole; Pussy-cat mew shall have no more milk, Till her best petticoat's mended with silk.



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Old and New. 79 TAFFY was a Welshman, Taffy was a thief, Taffy came to my house, And stole a piece of beef. I went to Taffy's house, Taffy wasn't at home, Taffy came to my house, And stole a marrow-bone. I went to Taffy's house, Taffy was in bed, I took the marrow-bone, And beat about his head. TIHANK you, pretty cow, that gives Pleasant milk to soak my bread, Ev'ry day, and ev'ry night, Warm, and fresh, and sweet, and white. Do not chew the hemlock rank, Growing on the weedy bank; But the freshest grasses eat, They will make it very sweet. Where the purple violet grows, Where the bubbling water flows, Where the grass is fresh and fine, Pretty cow, go there and dine.



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38 Child's Play. HERE stands little Toby, With a reed for his spear, IHe's his mother's own boy, A sweet little dear. /lc HERE we come a piping. First in Spring, and then in May; The Queen she sits upon the sand, Fair as a lily, white as a wand; King John has sent you letters three, And begs you'll read them unto me!



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Child's Play, A DILLAR a dollar, A ten o'clock scholar, What makes you come so soon ? You used to come at ten o'clock, But now you come at noon. I l t IHE TEN O CLOCK SCHOLAR. A DUCK and a drake, A nice barley cake, With a penny to pay the old baker, A dog and a gun, A nice plummy bun, Take the old woman and shake her.



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O/ld and New. 97 UNDER the tree tops is quiet now; In all the woodlands hearest thou Not a sound. The little birds are asleep in the trees. Wait wait! and soon like these Sleepest thou! 4 UNDER THE STARS. UNDER the stars that shine so bright Oh! what a beautiful heavenly light! G UP i th sly o a ummr ngh G



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14 Child's Play, Why, why, why? Says the little butterfly; "If you may sit on this flower, Why mayn't I ?" COLD and raw the north wind doth blow, Bleak in the morning early; All the hills are cover'd with snow, And winter's now come fairly. ----"""o -"TIHE RAT AND THE LIZARD, CLOSE by a murmuring brook A lizard basked out in the sun, Where a rat, with a comical look, Sang songs of the nuts he had won.



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Old and New. 99 WiHY here is papa, With Edward and Jane, Come to see good old Nursey Who lives in the lane. She's the best of all Nurseys, And Edward and Jane Love dearly good Nursey VWho lives in the lane. Iere's the hen and her chickens," Says Edward to Jane, "And here's Nursey's pussy That lives in the lane." Nurse gave a good hug "To Edward and Jane, And told them a story As long as the lane; Then gave them some milk, And a nice currant cake, And a sweet apple tart Of Nursey's own bake. They said, "Good bye, Nursey," She said, Come again, To see poor old Nursey Who lives in the lane."



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74 Child's Play, RAIN, rain, Go away, Come again Another day, Little Harry Wants to play. REMEMBER, remember, The fifth of November, Gunpowder treason and plot; I see no reason Why gunpowder treason Should ever be forgot. HIurrah I RIDE a cock-horse to Banbury Cross, To see an old woman ride on a white horse, With rings on her fingers and bells on her toes, And she shall have music wherever she goes. ROBIN and Richard were two pretty men, They lay a-bed till the clock struck ten; Then up starts Robin and looks at the sky, "Oh! oh! brother Richard, the sun's very high; You go before with bottle and bag, And I'll follow after on little Jack Nag."



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OLi and New. 8 THE man in the wilderness asked me How many strawberries grew in the sea? I answered him, as I thought good, As many red herrings as grew in the wood. TIMOTHY TOTT. "TIMOTHY TOTT came home from school And laid his head down on his stool, And dreamed about an apple-pie. Oh! He shall have it by and by, Because he said his lessons well And is always kind to sister Nell.



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IfI ;>,' A... 7-d2 rOM TrICKLER'S GROUNI). ~I' 7, rli :ThN 7sP~~ I~~- -a* Idi '~.-4 fr-L-~ a;1ai OM I ICKI.'' S (7



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go Child's Play, THERE was a little man, And he had a little gun, And his bullets were made of lead, lead, lead; He went to the brook, And saw a little duck, A.ld he shot it through the head, head, head. Hle carried it home To his old wife Joan, And bid her a fire for to make, make, make, To roast the little duck IHe had shot in the brook, And he'd go and fetch her the drake, drake, drake. "1 HtERE was an old woman went up in a basket, Seventy times as high as the moon; What she did there I could not but ask it, For in her hand she carried a broom. "Old woman, old woman, old woman," said I, "Whither, oh whither, oh whither so high ?" To sweep the cobwebs from the sky, And I shall be back again by and by."



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LITTLE POLLY.



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i| ~ ~:;.~ ~ i ; < !| I I" r .-"*wF1i~~ i' ; "-^""'^ 1': 1'1 i'' : i > I t ..... .. ...1i /1 a j j~-"; : ;l i i .-i 7 X' I I ; / --""~~~ I-'ln ~~rv~~ j/rj1 "" t ._ ,_-. i 1i / ... i WEE WILLIE WINKILE.



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Io Child's Play, ANNIE and Minnie and Sam Had for breakfast nice strawberry jam: Each a thick slice of bread And on it was spread A spoonful of strawberry jam. Said Annie, What beautiful jam !" Said Minnie, What lov-e-ly jam Said Sammy, Oh, mammy, dear mammy, Some more of dis bootiful jam!" AS I was going to sell my eggs, I met a man with bandy legs, Bandy legs and crooked toes, I tripp'd up his heels, and he fell on his nose. AS I was going up Pippen Hill, Pippen Hill was dirty, There I met a pretty miss, And she dropp'd me a curtsey. Little miss, pretty miss! Blessings light upon you If I had half-a-crown a-day, I'd spend it all upon you.



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SAli THE MDENS WWII., IE 2 TII .MAIDNEN'S \\ISf.



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,~ ~ Rt (L~t Cas, !: ~~ii ILLL /6 J3 '06 ,,a46, olzat-a 6;vvcP I JACK HORNER. t^^l ^Ufd, J&^MTW^ I :I i^^y ^ i 11: ii i *: .. 'I jIs JACK HORNER.



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36 Child's Play. H ERE primroses, cowslips, are out, And the fields are with daisies all gay: While butterflies, flitting about, Are glad in the sunshine to play. 11ERE stands a €s4 &s, Who set it there ? A better man than you, Touch him if you dare! 11 ERE we are on Tom Tickler's ground, Picking up gold and silver! Buttercups, daisies, and rare little lilies, Butterflies, tulips, and daffy-down-dillies. HERE we go up, up, up, And here we go down, down, downy, And here we go backwards and forwards, And here we go round, round, roundy.



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av V Z Sv i=, /Z ', = I' & ...... | = /," I. "I " Coal ",4.l1 .\t 1 4 POOR BAY.



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1:.', ~~~4II (EJ'~ I rr y4~~;r iA/ '1 ( Yj~ I7 ~ /' L~ / G;~jjj~c%1 N1EW YEAR'S M\ORNING.



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96 Child's Play, "IWO little blackbirds sat upon a hill, One named Jack, the other named Jill; Fly away, Jack; fly away, Jill; Come again, Jack; come again, Jill. 1WO little dogs were basking in the cinders; Two little cats were playing in the windows; When two little mice popped out of a hol<, And up to a fine piece of cheese they stole. The two little dogs cried, Cheese is nice;' But the two little cats jumped down in a trice, And cracked the bones of the two little mice. "I WO little dogs sat by the fire Over a fender of coal dust. Said one little dog to the other little dog, If you don't talk, why I must. \WE are a very lowly pair, As poor as drops, of water; And yonder beam that dances there, Is sunlight's golden daughter. [ lTwo Icices.