• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Map of Canaan
 Preface
 Table of Contents
 Kings of Israel and Judah
 History of Kings of Judah
 Back Cover






Group Title: Kings of Israel and Judah : their history explained to children ; being a continuation of 'Lines left out'
Title: Kings of Israel and Judah
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00026237/00001
 Material Information
Title: Kings of Israel and Judah : their history explained to children ; being a continuation of 'Lines left out'
Alternate Title: Lines left out
Physical Description: xii, 3, 415, 1 p., 26 leaves of plates : ill., maps (some col.) ; 14 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Mortimer, Favell Lee, 1802-1878 ( Author, Primary )
Hatchards (Firm) ( Publisher )
Strangeways and Walden ( Printer )
Publisher: Hatchards
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: Strangeways and Walden
Publication Date: 1872
 Subjects
Subject: Jews -- Kings and rulers -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Bible stories, English -- O.T -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Jews -- History -- Juvenile literature -- 953-586 B.C   ( lcsh )
Kings and rulers -- Juvenile literature -- Palestine   ( lcsh )
Palestine -- Maps -- 1872   ( gmgpc )
Bldn -- 1872
Genre: Maps   ( gmgpc )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by the author of "Peep of day," &c.
General Note: Map of Canaan preceeds preface and is printed in colors.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00026237
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002234592
notis - ALH5024
oclc - 58433266

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Half Title
        Page i
    Frontispiece
        Page ii
    Title Page
        Page iii
    Map of Canaan
        Page iv
    Preface
        Page v
        Page vi
        Page vii
        Page viii
    Table of Contents
        Page ix
        Page x
        Page xi
        Page xii
    Kings of Israel and Judah
        Page xiii
        Page xiv
        Page xv
        Erratum
            Page xvi
        The three kings over all the land
            Page 1
            Page 2
            Page 2a
            Page 3
        Solomon's servant
            Page 4
            Page 5
        Jeroboam's rebellion against Solomon
            Page 6
            Page 7
            Page 8
        Jeroboam's question to Rehoboam
            Page 9
            Page 10
            Page 11
        Rehoboam's answer to Jeroboam
            Page 12
            Page 12a
        Rehoboam's loss of his throne
            Page 13
            Page 14
        The golden calves - Jeroboam
            Page 15
            Page 16
            Page 17
        Jeroboam's dried-up arm
            Page 18
            Page 18a
            Page 19
        The disobedient prophet
            Page 20
            Page 21
            Page 22
        The obedient lion
            Page 23
            Page 24
            Page 25
            Page 26
        Jeroboam's good child
            Page 27
            Page 28
        The queen's secret visit
            Page 29
            Page 30
            Page 31
            Page 32
        Nadab, the second king of Israel, murdered and not buried
            Page 33
            Page 34
            Page 35
        Baasha, the third king of Israel, a murderer and yet spared
            Page 36
            Page 37
        Elah, the fourth king of Israel, or the drinking king
            Page 38
            Page 39
        Zimri, the fifth king of Israel, the king who reigned a week
            Page 40
            Page 41
        Omri, the sixth king of Israel, or the builder of Samaria
            Page 42
            Page 43
            Page 44
        Ahab, the seventh and worst king of Israel
            Page 45
            Page 46
        The prayer for punishment
            Page 47
            Page 48
        The prophet's first hiding-place, in the reign of Ahab
            Page 49
        The prophet's second hiding-place, in the reign of Ahab
            Page 49
            Page 50
        Elijah's first great miracle, in the reign of Ahab
            Page 51
            Page 52
        Elijah's meeting with Ahab
            Page 53
            Page 54
            Page 55
        The great assembly on mount Carmel, in the reign of Ahab
            Page 56
        The great rain, in the reign of Ahab
            Page 57
        Elijah's journey through the wilderness, in the reign of Ahab
            Page 58
            Page 58a
            Page 59
        Elijah's at mount Horeb, in the reign of Ahab
            Page 60
        The three messages, in the reign of Ahab
            Page 61
            Page 62
            Page 62a
        Elijah finds Elisha, in the reign of Ahab
            Page 63
        Ben-Hadad's Insolence, in the reign of Ahab
            Page 64
            Page 65
            Page 66
        The brave pages of Israel, in the reign of Ahab
            Page 67
            Page 68
        The battle of the plain, in the reign of Ahab
            Page 69
            Page 70
            Page 71
            Page 72
        The prophet with ashes over his face, in the reign of Ahab
            Page 73
            Page 74
            Page 74a
            Page 74b
            Page 75
        Naboth's vineyard, in the reign of Ahab
            Page 76
        Ahab taking possession of the new vineyard
            Page 77
            Page 78
            Page 78a
            Page 79
        Ahab deceived by false prophets
            Page 80
            Page 81
            Page 82
        The faithful prophet punished, in the reign of Ahab
            Page 83
            Page 84
            Page 84a
            Page 85
        The death of Ahab
            Page 86
            Page 86a
            Page 87
            Page 88
            Page 88a
        Reign of Ahaziah, the eighth king of Israel
            Page 89
        Ascension of Elijah, in the reign of Jehoram, ninth king of Israel
            Page 90
            Page 90a
            Page 91
        Elisha's miracle on the water, in the reign of Jehoram
            Page 92
            Page 93
        Elisha's first judgment, in the reign of Jehoram
            Page 94
            Page 95
        Three kings in the wilderness, in the reign of Jehoram
            Page 96
            Page 96a
            Page 97
            Page 98
            Page 99
        The red water, in the reign of Jehoram
            Page 100
            Page 101
        The pot of oil, in the reign of Jehoram
            Page 102
            Page 102a
        The generous lady, in the reign of Jehoram
            Page 103
        Weeping turned into joy, in the reign of Jehoram
            Page 104
            Page 105
        The young prophets' dinners, in the reign of Jehoram
            Page 106
            Page 106a
            Page 107
            Page 108
        The little maid's wish, in the reign of Jehoram
            Page 109
        The great Lord's recovery, in the reign of Jehoram
            Page 110
            Page 111
            Page 112
            Page 112a
        The deceitful servant, in the reign of Jehoram
            Page 113
        The borrowed axe, in the reign of Jehoram
            Page 114
            Page 115
            Page 116
            Page 116a
        Elisha's three prayers, in the reign of Jehoram
            Page 117
            Page 118
            Page 119
            Page 120
            Page 121
        The horrible meal, in the reign of Jehoram
            Page 122
            Page 123
        The unbelieving lord, in the reign of Jehoram
            Page 124
            Page 125
            Page 126
        The four selfish lepers, in the reign of Jehoram
            Page 127
            Page 128
            Page 129
            Page 130
        The Lord's goodness to the Shunammite, in the reign of Jehoram
            Page 131
            Page 132
            Page 132a
            Page 133
        Ben-Hadad's death-bed, in the reign of Jehoram
            Page 134
            Page 135
            Page 136
            Page 137
        Jehoram, the wounded king
            Page 138
            Page 139
        The captain made king, in the reign of Jehoram
            Page 140
            Page 140a
            Page 141
            Page 142
        The death of Jehoram and reign of Jehu
            Page 143
            Page 144
            Page 145
            Page 146
        The death of Jezebel, in the reign of Jehu
            Page 147
            Page 148
            Page 148a
            Page 149
        Death of Ahab's sons, in the reign of Jehu
            Page 150
            Page 151
            Page 152
        The forty-two princes, in the reign of Jehu
            Page 153
            Page 154
            Page 155
        The house of Baal, in the reign of Jehu
            Page 156
            Page 157
        The death of Jehu
            Page 158
            Page 159
        The reign of Jehoahaz
            Page 160
        The reign of Joash and the death of Elisha
            Page 161
            Page 162
            Page 162a
            Page 163
            Page 164
        The prophet in the ship, in the reign of Joash
            Page 165
            Page 166
            Page 167
        The prophet in the sea, in the reign of Joash
            Page 168
            Page 169
            Page 170
        The prophet in the fish, in the reign of Joash
            Page 171
            Page 172
        The prophet in the city, in the reign of Joash
            Page 173
            Page 174
            Page 175
        The prophet in the booth, in the reign of Joash
            Page 176
            Page 177
            Page 178
            Page 179
        Death of Joash
            Page 180
        The reign of Jeroboam the second
            Page 181
            Page 182
            Page 183
            Page 184
        The death of Jeroboam
            Page 185
            Page 186
        The reign of Zachariah
            Page 187
            Page 188
        Reigns of Shallum and Menahem
            Page 189
            Page 190
        Reigns of Pekahiah and Pekah
            Page 191
            Page 192
            Page 193
        Reign of Hoshea
            Page 194
            Page 195
            Page 196
        The last long punishment of Israel
            Page 197
            Page 198
            Page 199
        The good king's visit to Bethel
            Page 200
            Page 201
            Page 202
            Page 202a
            Page 203
        List of the kings of Israel, all of whom were wicked
            Page 204
    History of Kings of Judah
        Page 205
        Page 206
        The reign of Rehoboam
            Page 207
            Page 208
        The invasion of Shishak, King of Egypt
            Page 209
            Page 210
            Page 211
        The reign of Abijah
            Page 212
            Page 213
            Page 214
        The reign of Asa
            Page 215
            Page 216
            Page 217
        Sins and Sorrows of Asa
            Page 218
            Page 219
            Page 220
        The reign of Jehoshaphat
            Page 221
            Page 222
            Page 223
        Jehoshaphat with Ahab in the battle against Syria
            Page 224
            Page 225
            Page 226
        The last years of Jehoshaphat
            Page 227
            Page 228
            Page 229
        The reign of Joram (or Jehoram)
            Page 230
            Page 231
            Page 232
        The reign of Ahaziah
            Page 233
            Page 234
            Page 235
            Page 236
        The reign of Athaliah
            Page 237
            Page 238
            Page 239
        Death of Athaliah
            Page 240
            Page 241
            Page 242
            Page 243
        Reign of Joash
            Page 244
            Page 245
            Page 246
            Page 247
        The death of Joash
            Page 248
            Page 249
            Page 250
        The reign of Amaziah
            Page 251
            Page 252
            Page 253
        Amaziah's war against Edom
            Page 254
            Page 255
        Death of Amaziah
            Page 256
            Page 257
            Page 258
        The reign of Uzziah, sometimes called Azariah
            Page 259
            Page 260
        The death of Uzziah
            Page 261
            Page 262
        The reign of Jotham
            Page 263
            Page 264
        The reign of Ahaz
            Page 265
            Page 266
            Page 267
            Page 268
            Page 269
        The death of Ahaz
            Page 270
            Page 271
            Page 272
        Reign of Hezekiah
            Page 273
            Page 274
            Page 275
            Page 276
        Hezekiah's alarm
            Page 277
            Page 278
            Page 279
        Hezekiah's sickness
            Page 280
            Page 281
            Page 282
            Page 283
        The messengers from Babylon to Hezekiah
            Page 284
            Page 285
            Page 286
        The messengers from Assyria to Hezekiah
            Page 287
            Page 288
            Page 289
            Page 290
        Destruction of the Assyrian Army, in the reign of Hezekiah
            Page 291
            Page 292
            Page 293
        The reign of Manasseh
            Page 294
            Page 295
            Page 296
        Death of Manasseh
            Page 297
            Page 298
            Page 299
        The reign of Amon
            Page 300
            Page 301
        The reign of Josiah
            Page 302
            Page 303
            Page 304
        The call of Jeremiah the prophet, in the reign of Josiah
            Page 305
            Page 306
            Page 307
        Hilkiah the priest's discovery, in the reign of Josiah
            Page 308
            Page 309
            Page 310
            Page 310a
        Huldah the prophetess, in the reign of Josiah
            Page 311
            Page 312
            Page 313
        The public reading, in the reign of Josiah
            Page 314
            Page 314a
            Page 315
        Jerusalem's Idolatry, in the reign of Josiah
            Page 316
            Page 317
        The destruction at Bethel, in the reign of Josiah
            Page 318
            Page 319
            Page 320
            Page 321
        The death of Josiah
            Page 322
            Page 323
            Page 324
            Page 325
        The reign of Jehoahaz
            Page 326
            Page 327
        The reign of Jehoiakim
            Page 328
            Page 329
        Jeremiah's journey to the Euphrates, in the reign of Jehoiakim
            Page 330
            Page 331
            Page 332
        Sabbath-breaking, in the reign of Jehoiakim
            Page 333
            Page 334
        Jeremiah's bottle broken, in the reign of Jehoiakim
            Page 335
            Page 336
        Pashur the priest, in the reign of Jehoiakim
            Page 337
            Page 338
            Page 339
        The uproar in the temple, in the reign of Jehoiakim
            Page 340
            Page 341
            Page 342
        The obedient sons, in the reign of Jehoiakim
            Page 343
            Page 344
            Page 345
        The roll written in prison, in the reign of Jehoiakim
            Page 346
            Page 347
        The first captives of Judah, in the reign of Jehoiakim
            Page 348
            Page 349
            Page 350
        The roll read in the palace of Jehoiakim
            Page 351
            Page 352
            Page 353
            Page 354
            Page 355
        The second roll written, in the reign of Jehoiakim
            Page 356
            Page 357
        The death of Jehoiakim
            Page 358
            Page 359
        Reign of Jehoiachin, or Coniah
            Page 360
            Page 360a
            Page 361
        Reign of Zedekiah
            Page 362
            Page 363
            Page 364
        The letter to the captives, in the reign of Zedekiah
            Page 365
            Page 366
            Page 367
        The wooden Yokes, in the reign of Zedekiah
            Page 368
            Page 369
        Hananiah, the rebellious prophet, in the reign of Zedekiah
            Page 370
            Page 371
            Page 372
        The drowning of the roll, in the reign of Zedekiah
            Page 373
            Page 374
            Page 375
        The two great eagles, in the reign of Zedekiah
            Page 376
            Page 377
            Page 378
        Jeremiah's first conversation with Zedekiah
            Page 379
            Page 380
            Page 381
        Jeremiah in the king's prison, in the reign of Zedekiah
            Page 382
            Page 383
            Page 384
        The army of Babylon leaving Jerusalem, in the reign of Zedekiah
            Page 385
            Page 386
        Jeremiah in Jonathan's Prison, in the reign of Zedekiah
            Page 387
            Page 388
        Return of the army of Babylon to Jerusalem, in the reign of Zedekiah
            Page 389
            Page 390
            Page 391
        The lord's messages to the king, people, and princes, in the reign of Zedekiah
            Page 392
            Page 393
        The worst dungeon, in the reign of Zedekiah
            Page 394
            Page 395
            Page 396
        The merciful servant, in the reign of Zedekiah
            Page 397
            Page 398
            Page 399
        The secret meeting of Jeremiah and Zedekiah
            Page 400
            Page 401
            Page 402
        A gracious promise, in the reign of Zedekiah
            Page 403
            Page 404
        The ruin of Zedekiah
            Page 405
            Page 406
            Page 407
            Page 408
            Page 409
        The destruction of Jerusalem
            Page 410
            Page 411
            Page 412
            Page 413
            Page 414
            Page 415
            Page 416
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text











KINGS OF ISRAEL AND JUDAH.



















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KINGS


OF


ISRAEL


AND


JUDAH


(zBtir ffixisfosg (gxplar to fr4*brtn.


BEING A


CONTINUATION OF 'LINES


LEFT OUT.'


BY THE


AUTHOR OF 'PEEP OF DAY,'


SAnd ONE .king shall be king to them all: and they shall be no
more two nations, neither shall they be divided into two kingdom
any more at all.'-EZEK. xxxvii. 22.



LONDON:
HATCHARDS, PICCADILLY.
1872.










PREFACE.



THIS little work is humbly offered to Mothers
and Teachers.
It is not offered as a SUBSTITUTE for the Holy
Scriptures, but as a HELP in teaching them to
the ignorant and to the volatile.
The history of the Kings of Israel and Judah
is complicated, owing to the contemporaneous
double lines. By teaching these lines separately
the difficulty is diminished. Constant reference
to the list of kings and to the map at the begin-
ning will make the history still clearer.
But were this book placed in the hands of a
child, as an amusing book to read to himself,
little benefit would result. Children must be
TAUGHT, because they cannot teach themselves.
They are always seeking for amusement and
never for instruction.
A young person who would condescend to read





vi Preface.

a child's book might find this compendium use-
ful, and so might a sensible grown-up poor per-
son, but not a child.
Much pains must be taken by a teacher who
would instill this history into the minds of children.
After reading to them a portion, it would be well to
let them read those passages of Scripture whence
that portion is taken. Doing this-would be con-
sidered wearisome-if required to be done imme-
diately after this book had been read; but the
next day the little hearers would be better dis-
posed to read out of the Scripture the lesson of
yesterday. After the reading of the Scripture
they might consider it even a treat to hear more
read to them out of the little book.
If any doubt the use of a simple preparation
like this, let them make the attempt to teach
children without offering any explanations or
asking any questions. The attempt will be vain
in most, if not all, instances. It is true an able
teacher would not need such a help as this; but
all teachers are not able, and many who are-
would find a few hints prepared for their use,-
a saving of time and fatigue.
When we consider the great value of the
ROYAL RECORDS of the HOLY NATION, we must feel




Preface. vii
that it is worth taking pains to impress them on
youthful minds.
Where is the history to be compared with
Israel's history? Of this alone God is the
Author; in this alone-facts are never misstated,
motives misunderstood, or characters misrepre-
sented.
Israel alone has for her first and for her
last King the Son of God. The first King of
all Israel dwelt in the cloud between the cheru-
bim, and the last is now seated on His Father's
throne-waiting to take possession of His own.
The first King was ungratefully rejected.
The nation was made to feel her sin by the
human kings who for more than five hundred
years reigned over Israel. For their iniquities
were those kings dethroned.
It is now twenty-five hundred years that the
whole nation of Israel have been 'WITHOUT A
KING.'-Hos. iii. 4. Once, indeed, during that
period,-their true King appeared amongst them,
but He was again rejected with the cry, 'We will
have no king but Caesar.'
It is our ineffaceable blot, as Englishmen, that
we killed our king,-our human king,-Charles;
and it is also the blot of France that she did the





Preface.


same to her King Louis.
of Israel in having killed
who is,--her God ?
Blessed be His name;


He is alive. He is t
throne of David; for
descent from David.
pointed by His Fathe
of all nations, in the
set MY KING upon My
Surely the history
related) must be pla


But what
her King


though


is the blot
who was,-


He was dead-


he only heir to the earthly
He alone can prove His
He is also the King ap-
wr to the heavenly throne
declaration, 'Yet have I
holy hill of Zion.'
of Israel (here familiarly
Iced above all histories.


At the time when Israel's FIRST king manifested
His glory in the wilderness, England, France,
Rome, and Greece, had never been heard of; and
when Israel's LAST King again comes with clouds
to claim His throne, all other kings will fall down
before Him, and the Lord alone will be exalted
in that day.
'Then the moon shall be confounded, and the
sun ashamed, when the Lord of Hosts shall
reign in Mount Zion and in Jerusalem.'--Isa.
xxiv. 23.


0 0 0
Till







CONTENTS.



CHAPTER PAGE
1. The three Kings over all the Land 1
2. Solomon's Servant 4
3. Jeroboam's Rebellion against Solomon 6
4. Jeroboam's Question to Rehoboam 9
5. Rehoboam's Answer to Jeroboam 12
6. Rehoboam's Loss of his Throne 13

KINGS OF ISRAEL.
7. The Golden Calves-Jeroboam .15
8. Jeroboam's Dried-up Arm .. 18
9. The Disobedient Prophet .20
10. The Obedient Lion 23
11. Jeroboam's good Child 27
12. The Queen's secret visit 29
13. Nadab, the second King of Israel 33
14. Baasha, the third King of Israel 36
15. Elah, the fourth King of Israel, or the Drinking King 38
16. Zimri, the fifth King of Israel 40
17. Omri, the sixth King of srael, or the Builder of Samaria 42
18. Ahab, the seventh and worst King of Israel 45
19. The Prayer for Punishment 47
20. The Prophet's first Hiding-place 49
21. The Prophet's second Hiding-place 49
22. Elijah's first great Miracle 51
23. Elijah's Meeting with Ahab 53
24. The great Assembly on Mount Carmel 56
25. The great Rain 57
26. Elijah's Journey through the Wilderness 58
27. Elijah at Mount Horeb 60
28. The three Messages 61
29. Elijah finds Elisha 63
30. Ben-Hadad's Insolence 64
31. The brave Pages of Israel 67
32. The Battle of the Plain 69






Contents.


CHAPTER
33. The Prophet with Ashes over his Face
34. Naboth's Vineyard
35. Ahab taking possession of the new Vin
36. Ahab deceived by false Prophets
37. The faithful Prophet punished
38. The Death of Ahab .
39. Reign of Ahaziah, the eighth King of ]
40. Ascension of Elijah
41. Elisha's Miracle on the Water
42, Elisha's first Judgment .
43. Three Kings in the Wilderness
44. The Red Water
45. The Pot of Oil
46. The generous Lady
47. Weeping turned into Joy .
48. The young Prophets' Dinners
49. The little Maid's Wish .
50. The great Lord's Recovery
51. The Deceitful Servant
52. The Borrowed Axe


Elisha's three Prayers
The Horrible Meal
The Unbelieving Lord
The four selfish Lepers
The Lord's Goodness to the O
Ben-Hadad's Death-bed .
Jehoram, the Wounded King
The Captain made King .
The Death of Jehoram and R
The Death of Jezebel
Death of Ahab's Sons


forty-two Princes
House of Baal
Death of Jehu
Reign of Jehoahaz
Reign of Joash and the
Prophet in the Ship
Prophet in the Sea
Prophet in the Fish
Prophet in the City
Prophet in the Booth


I


.eyard


[srael
.a


Shunammite


teign of Jehu

D *

.

.
)eath of Elisha

.


PAGE
73
76
77
80
83
86
89
90
92
94
96
100
102
103
104
106
109
110
113
114
117
122
124
127
131
134
138
140
143
147
150
153
156
158
1o0
i6i
165
168
171
173
176


53.
54.
55.
56.
57.
58.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
66.
67.
68.
69.
70.
71.
72.
73.


The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The





Contents.


CHAPTER
74. Death of Joash .
75. The Reign of Jeroboam the Second
76. The Death of Jeroboam .
77. The Reign of Zachariah .
78. Reigns of Shallum and Menahem
79. Reigns of Pekahiah and Pekah
80. Reign of Hoshea .
81. The last long Punishment of Israel
82. A good King's visit to Bethel .


83.
84.
85.
86.
87.
88.
89.
90.
S91.
92.
93.
94.
95.
96.
97.
98.
99.
100.
101.
102.
103.
104.
105.
106.
107.
108.
109.
110.
111.
112.
113.


PAGE

181
185
187
189
* 191
. 194
197
200


KINGS OF JUDAH.
The Reign of Rehoboam
The Invasion of Shishak, King of Egypt
The Reign of Abijah .
The Reign of Asa .
Sins and Sorrows of Asa
The Reign of Jehoshaphat
Jehoshaphat with Ahab in the Battle against S.
The last Years of Jehoshaphat .
The Reign of Joram (or Jehoram)
The Reign of Ahaziah .
The Reign of Athaliah .
Death of Athaliah .
Reign of Joash .
The Death of Joash .
The Reign of Amaziah .
Amaziah's War against Edom
Death of Amaziah .
The Reign of Uzziah, sometimes called Azariah
The Death of Uzziah .
The Reign of Jotham .
The Reign of Ahaz .
The Death of Ahaz .
Reign of Hezekiah .
Hezekiah's Alarm .
Hezekiah's Sickness .
The Messengers from Babylon to Hezekiah
The Messengers from Assyria to Hezekiah
Destruction of the Assyrian Army
The Reign of Manasseh. .
Death of Manasseh .
The Reign of Amon .


207
209
212
215
218
221
yria 224
. 227
* 230
. 233
. 237
. 240
. 244
. 248
. 251
254
256
259
261
263
265
270
273
277
280
284
287
291
294
297
300


xi





Contents.


CHAPTER
114. The Reign of Josiah .
115. The Call of Jeremiah the Prophet
116. Hilkiah the Priest's Discovery .
117. Huldah the Prophetess
118. The Public Reading .
119. Jerusalem's Idolatry .
120. The Destruction at Bethel
121. The Death of Josiah
122. The Reign of Jehoahaz
123. The Reign of Jehoiakim. .
124. Jeremiah's Journey in the Reign of Jehoiakim
125. Sabbath-breaking .
126. Jeremiah's Bottle broken
127. Pashur the Priest .


The Uproar in the Temple
The obedient Sons
The Roll written in Prison
The first Captives of Judah
The Roll read in the Palace
The second Roll written
The Death of Jehoiakim.


of Jehoiakim
of Jehoiakim
*


Reign of Jehoiakim, or Coniah
Reign of Zedekiah .
The Letter to the Captives
The Wooden Yokes .
Hananiah, the Rebellious Prophet
The Drowning of the Roll
The two great Eagles .
Jeremiah's first Conversation with Zedekiah
Jeremiah in the King's Prison .
The Army of Babylon leaving Jerusalem
Jeremiah in Jonathan's Prison. .
Return of the Army of Babylon to Jerusalem
The Lord's Messages to the King, People, and
Princes .
The Worst Dungeon .
The Merciful Servant .
The Secret Meeting of Jeremiah and Zedekiah
A Gracious Promise .
The Ruin of Zedekiah .0
The Destruction of Jerusalem .


PAGE
302
305
308
311
314
316
318
322
326
328
330
333
335
337
340
343
346
348
351
356
358
360
362
365
368
370
373
376
379
382
385
387
389

392
394
397
400
403
405
410


xii


128.
129.
130.
131.
132.
133.
134.
135.
136.
137.
138.
139.
140.
141.
142.
143.
144.
145.
146.
147.

148.
149.
150.
151.
152.
153.

















KINGS OF ISRAEL AND JUDAH.




KINGS OF ALL ISRAEL.


Years of
Reign.
17
3
41






25


4*
1
6


40


SAUL
DAVID
SOLOMON


KINGS


OF JUDAH.


REHOBOAM
ABIJAM
ASA


Years
before
Christ.
975


JEHOSHAPHAT


JEHORAM or JORAM
AHAZIAH (married Jezebel's daughter,
Athaliah)
ATHALIAH (his mother)



JOASH (son of Ahaziah)


Years before Christ.
1095
1055
1015


KINGS OF ISRAEL.
JEROBOAM (set up the two calves)


NADAB (his son)
BAASHA (killed Nadab)
ELAH (his son)
ZIMRI (killed Elah and burned himself)
OMRI (built Samaria)
AHAB (his son; married Jezebel)

AHAZIAH (his son)
JEHORAM, or JORAM (his brother)
JEHU (killed Jehoram, the last king of
Ahab's family)


JEHOAHAZ (his son)


Years ot
Reign.
22


2
24
2
1 week
12
22

2
12
28


17





29


52


16
16
29
55
2
31
3 months
11
3 months
11


AMAZIAH


UZZIAH


JOTHAM
AHAZ
HEZEKIAH
MANASSEH
AMON
JOSIAH
JEHOAHAZ, or SHALLUM (taken to
Egypt)
JEHOIAKIMV (died on the way to Baby-
lon)
JEHOIACHIN, Or CONIAH (lived most
of his life in Babylon)
ZEDEKIAH (carried blind to Babylon)

Judah was conquered by Ne-
buchadnezzar nearly 600 years
before Christ.


JOASH (his son

JEROBOAM II. (his son)
Eleven years of confusion.
ZACHARIAH (last of Jehu's children)
SHALLUM (killed Zachariah)
MENAHEM (killed Shallum)
PEKAHIAH (his son)
PEKAH (killed Pekahiah)
HOSHEA (killed Pekah)


Israel was conquered
Assyrians about 720 years
Christ.


by the
before


15

41
11
6 months
1 month
10
2
20
9


SJehoram reigned four years with his father, besides these four years alone.
The years in the two lines of kings agree, when summed up, and make about 250 years from
Rehoboam to Hezekiah, and from Jeroboam to Hoshea.




























ERRATUM.


Page 204,


8th line from bottom,
for Menahem, who killed Zachariah,
read Menahem, who killed Shallum.








THE KINGS OF ISRAEL AND JUDAH.



CHAPTER I.


THE THREE KINGS OVER ALL THE


LAND.


1 KINGS, xi. 1-13.)


THERE once lived a people upon earth who had
God for their King.
This people were called The children of Israel.'
God gave them the beautiful land of Canaan to
live in, and He Himself was their King.
This people might always have been happy,
but they worshipped idols.
One of the first of their idols was made of


silver
Go
idols,
land


,by a wicked man named Micah.*
d punished the Israelites for wc
by letting their enemies come
and rob them, and ill-treat th(


I


when they cried unto Gc
He sent good men, cal
them from their enemies.t


shippingg
into their
em. Yet


)d He heard the
led Judges, to'


m, and
deliver


This history is related in Judges, xvii., xviii. Those
two chapters should be read after Judges, iii, 11.
t The writer of this book has published another on
the Judges, called Lines Left out.'
B





The


Three Kings over all the Land.


Do you know the names of any of these Judges ?
There was Ehud with his dagger, and Shamgar
with his ox-goad :


There
There


was Deborah, with her friend Barak:
was Gideon, with his lamp, pitcher, and


trumpet:
There was Jephthah, weeping over his daughter:
There was Samson, with his jaw-bone :
There was Eli, the aged priest; and Samuel,


the little prophet.
This Samuel was the last of all the Judges,
because when he was grown old the people of
Israel wished to have a man for their king. They
were grown tired of having God for their King,


and wanted a man to rule over
God granted their foolish


them.
desire,


them Saul.
Was he a good king ? Oh, no; he
God, and at last he killed himself.
And who was the next king? Wat
son ? No.
The next king was good David, the
boy, and the sweet singer of Israel.
When he died, who was king next?
His son Solomon, the wisest of i
built the Temple, yet he lost his thror


worshipping idols.
wrsTT 1 q


ne married seven hundred hea
They turned away his heart from G(
suaded him to worship idols.
God sent him a great punishment.


and


gave


disobeyed

Sit Saul's

shepherd-


nen. He
ie through


then wives.
od, and per-


4


I


si


I 12


























































c,
--
----
- -----
ri
----
-~----


7-.


7Nz


11111ii j


1 KINGS, xi. 8.


Solomon and his wives worshipping idols.-P. 3.


~_
___ ___
___~____
____


fili~IIiiir i





The


God


Tlwee Kings


said He would


kingdom and give it
The kingdom was to


SON was to have.


over all the Land.
f


take away PART of his
;o one of his servants.
be divided, and Solomon's


a part


SERVANT was to have the
Why did God let Sol


part?


Why did He


The reason was, that
much that He was kind t
sake.


of it, and
other part.


h
/


Solomon's


lomon's son have any
take away the whole ?
God loved David so
Lo Solomon for David's


Another


He


said


kingdom
promised


r kind thing God did
He would not take away
till after Solomon was
that He would let Solon


to Solomon.
any of his
dead. God
non be king


as long as he lived.


It would be


Solomon's son


that would lose part of the kingdom.
It was for David's sake that God let Solomon
be king as long as he lived. Yet Solomon had
great troubles in his old age. He found that it
is a bitter thing to sin against the Lord, and he
wrote down in one of his books, Fear God and
keep His commandments' (Eccles. xii. 13). Yet


we know that Solomon repented
don, because God loved him, and
His mercy from him.*


and found par-
never took away


2 Sam. vii.
away from him.'


15.


' But my mercy


shall


not depart


t





Solomon's


Servant.


CHAPTER II

SOLOMON 'S SERVANT.
(1 KINGS, xi. 26-37.)


WHO was the servant who was to be king over
great part of' the land ? Solomon did not know,
and the servant did not know who was to be king.
But you shall soon hear. Solomon had a great
many servants. Some of them took care of his
cattle, and some of them took care of his gardens,
and some of them built walls and towers round


Jerusalem.


The builders were masons and car-


centers. The masons hewed stones, and the
carpenters shaped the trees into boards.
Solomon observed his servants while at work.


Amongst them he saw one young man who seemed
very industrious. This young man took much
pains to build up every part of the wall that had
been broken down.
Solomon was so much pleased with this young
man that he made him overseer of the other
builders. An overseer overlooks the other work-
men, and tells them what to do.
What was the name of the new overseer?


It was Jeroboam.
His father Nebat was
a widow, named Zeruah.


dead.
She


His mother was
must have been





Solomon's


Servant.


pleased
world.


to see


her


son get


on so well


in this


To what


tribe
from
work


he
sti


tribe


did


I thi


of Ephraim. So w
Joseph. Solomon
nen of his own tri


s man belong?
ve see he was (


placed
be.


him


To the
descended


over


the


Jeroboam was now a rich and great man, but
was not content. He wanted to be higher
11. Sometimes he thought he should even


like to be king.*
No one is happy who wishes to be great.
children of God are contented, and satisfied,
thankful; and so they are happy.


One
having
walls.


day Jeroboam walked out of
done his business for the (


He


was alone.


i


Jerusalem,
ay on the


At last he came


to a


place where grass grew, but where there were no
houses. He saw a man coming towards him.
He was dressed in a new garment. When he
met Jeroboam, the man stopped to speak to him.
Who was this man ?


IE


sent
off


[e was a prophet named Ahi
him to speak to Jeroboanm.
his own new garment, and


v I


L


jah. God had
Ahijah took
tore it up in


twelve pieces.


How strange to tear up a new garment!
Ahijah counted out ten pieces, and gave them
to Jeroboam, saying, 'Take these ten pieces, for


'Thou
desireth.'


shalt reign
1 Kings, xi.


according
37.


to


all that thy


The
and


soul


V.f A. 46 F,


-~~--





6 Jeroboam's Rebellion against Solomon.

thus saith the Lord: Behold, I will tear the
kingdom out of the hand of Solomon, and I will
give ten tribes to thee.'
How much astonished Jeroboam must have
been to hear he was to be king He had often


wished to be


king, but now he saw he was really


to be a king.
Ahijah did not give all the twelve pieces to
Jeroboam ; he kept back two pieces.
Ahijah told Jeroboam why God would take
away the kingdom from Solomon. It was because
he had worshipped idols.
He told Jeroboam another thing; it was that
God would not take away the kingdom while
Solomon was alive, but that He would do it


when Solomon was dead. So Jeroboam knew he
ought to wait to be king till Solomon was dead.
But we shall see whether he did wait patiently.


CHAPTER III.


JEROBOAM I S


REBELLION AGAINST SOLOMON.


(1. KINGS, xi. 40.)


WHY did Ahijah, the prophet, keep
pieces of his new garment, and not gi
Jeroboam?
Ahijah-told Jeroboam the reason.
God intended to let Solomon's son


back two
ve them to


have


two




Jeroboam's Rebellion against


Solomon.


tribes. T
jamin.* T]
Jeroboam.
Let us
that Jerob
Reuben,
Simeon,
Issachar,
Zebulon.
Gad,
Asher.
Dan,
Naphtali.


hose .tribes were


to be Judah and Ben-


he other ten tribes were to be given to


consider


ooam


what


those


ten tribes


were


was to have.


These tribes were descended from
Leah's sons.


These tribes were descent(
Leah's handmaid's sons.
These tribes were descent
Rachel's handmaid's sons.


led


led


from

from


The tribe
parts :-


of Joseph


was divided


into two


Ephraim,
Manasseh.


These tribes were descended from
Rachel's son, Joseph.


The tribe of Levi was not counted among the
rest, because they had no land of their own, but
lived in forty-eight cities scattered over the land.
The ten tribes were to be the kingdom of Je-
roboam.


The


chest


tribe


salem was built.
Solomon's son.
The tribe of B


it was
Judah.


to belong


of all was Judah, w
That tribe was to


Here Jeru-


belong


benjamin was close to Judah,


to


Solomon's son,


Sto

and


as well as


Sometimes these two tribes are called one tribe
because Judah was much larger than Benjamin.


--





8 Jeroboam's Rebellion against Solomon.

Jeroboam thought a great deal about what
Ahijah had said. He thought he should like to
be king immediately. He was not' content with
being overseer of the workmen; he wanted to be
king.
Soon Solomon heard that Jeroboam was- trying
to make himself king. He did not know that
Jeroboam was the man that God had chosen to
be king one day.
Solomon ordered his soldiers to kill Jeroboam.
This was not wrong,* for Jeroboam was a rebel,
and deserved to die. He was more wicked than
most rebels, for he was very ungrateful, as it was
Solomon who had made him overseer. But he
forgot all this kindness, and wanted to sit on
Solomon's throne. When he heard that soldiers
were coming to kill him, he ran away to hide
himself. Where did he run ? He ran into Egypt.
There was a king named Shishak, who did not
like Solomon. This Shishak was kind to all
who rebelled against Solomon. He took the

The words in 1 Kings, xi. 27, should be joined to
verse 40, and should be read thus: 'And this was the
cause that he lift up his hand against the king: Solomon
built Millo, and repaired the breaches of the city of
David his father.' Even he lifted up his hand against
the king.-Vers. 40: Solomon sought therefore to kill
him'- that is, Solomon sought to kill him, because he
lifted up his hand against him. All the words between
form a parenthesis, and explain the CAUSE of Jeroboam
lifting up his hand, even the prophecy of Ahijab, spoken
secretly in the field.




Jeroboam's


Question


to Rehoboam.


part of Jeroboam, and let him live in Egypt, where
Solomon could not seize him to punish him.
Jeroboam went on living there, till one day he
heard the news, Solomon is dead.' Then he


was gla
of Isra


id, and he wished to g
.1. But he waited till


land sent for him, and begged
He did not wait long, for his
of Israel soon sent for him.


o back to the land
his friends in the
him to come back.
friends in the land


CHAPTER IV.


JEROBOAM'S QUESTION


TO REHOBOAM.


(1 KINGS, xii. 1-5.)


WHEN


Solomon was dead, his


son was


klyig


the whole land.


over


His name was Rehoboam. Would you not
expect him to be wise, as his father was so wise ?
But there are many wise fathers who have foolish
sons; and Rehoboam was a foolish man, as you
will see:


Do you know
earthly wisdom ?


what is the highest sort
Is it knowing the names


of
of


many places, and trees, and stars? Oh, no! A
very silly person might know a great deal. Is it
knowing how to speak many languages, such as
French, Latin, or German ? Oh, no Is it
knowing how to do hard things, such as building


T





Jeroboam's


Question


to Rehoboam.


a ship, making a watch, or painting
Oh, no!
Wisdom is knowing what is the b
do. Heavenly wisdom is shown in f
and earthly wisdom is shown in knov
behave to everybody.
Rehoboam had no wisdom at all,


a picture ?

est thing to
hearingg God,
ving how to


as you


will


soon see.
At first the people of Israel were willing to
have Rehoboam for their king. They came to a
town in the middle of the land, to make him
king. That town was Shechem.*
But some of the people did not like Reho-
boam. What was their reason ? They thought
he would treat them as Solomon had done ? Had
not Solomon treated them well ? He had done
some things they did not like. Solomon had
made them pay many taxes ; for he had built
such fine houses and such strong towers, and he
had made such beautiful gardens and lakes, that
he wanted a great deal of money. Also Soloman
had been a strict king, and had punished thieves
and murderers; and this was right. But some
of the Israelites wanted to have a king that
would let them do as they liked. These Israelites
sent messengers to Egypt to ask Jeroboam to
come to Shechem.


Was
come ?


not Jeroboam pleased
Yes, he was. He


to be
came


invited
quietly


Shechem was called Sychar in
and Jacob's well was there.


our Saviour's


10


to
to


days,




Jeroboam's Question to- Rehoboam. 11

Shechem; and he told the Israelites what they
ought to say to Rehoboam. So Jeroboam went
with the people, and spoke to Rehoboam these
words: 'Thy father made our yoke heavy; if
thou wilt make it lighter, we will serve thee.'
What did Jeroboam mean by a yoke ?
It is a heavy piece of wood put on the necks
of oxen when they draw carts.
Jeroboam meant that Solomon had been a very
severe, unkind king, and had made his people
work too hard. Was this true ? No, indeed.
The people had never been so happy as in his
days. Had not the Queen of Sheba cried out to
Solomon, (Happy are thy servants Because
the Lord loved Israel for ever, therefore made He
thee king, to do judgment and justice.'
This is what the Queen of Sheba had said;
and yet now the people had grown discontented,
and called Solomon unkind.*
When Rehoboam heard the people speak in
this way, he did not know what answer to give.
He ought to have said, 'I will be kind;' but
he said, Go away for three days, and then come
again to me.'
So the people departed for three days.
Solomon had not made his own people do hard work,
but he had made the heathen, who were left in the
land, do the hard work. Upon all the people that were
left of the Amorites did Solomon levy a tribute of bond-
service, but of the children of Israel did Solomon make
no bondmen.' 1 Kings, ix. 21-23.





12 Rehoboam's Answer to Jeroboam.




CHAPTER V.

REHOBOAM'S ANSWER TO JEROBOAIM.
(1 KINGS, xii. 6-15.)

As soon as the people were gone away, Reho-
boam asked his friends what they would advise
him to answer.
First he asked the old men, who had been
with his father. They were very wise, for they
had heard Solomon say many wise things.
Rehoboam said to these grey-headed old men,
' How do you advise me to answer this people ?'
They answered, If you speak good words to
the people, they will be thy servants for ever.'
You see that the old men advised Rehoboam
to promise to be kind.
If Rehoboam had been wise, he would have
taken this good advice. But he was a foolish
man: he did not like the old men's good advice;
and he called the young men, who had been his
playfellows when he was little. He said to them,
' What answer shall I give?'
The young men replied, Say to the people,
" If my father made your yoke heavy, I will make
it still heavier; if my father punished you with
whips, I will punish you with scorpions."'




























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1 KINGS, XII. 11.


' My father chastised you with whips, but I will chastise


you with scorpions.'-P. 13.


h


r
'~C-5i


I
r-




Rehoboam's Loss of his Throne. 13
Scorpions, you know, are little animals with a
horrible poisonous sting in their tails.
The young men asked Rehoboam to give the
people very cruel punishments, and to tell them
so. They advised him to be as much more severe
than Solomon as his little finger was thicker than
his thighs (the upper part of his legs).
Whose advice did Rehoboam like best ?
Wait and you shall hear.
When Jeroboam came again with the people
to know the answer, Rehoboam replied, in a
rough voice,' My father made your yoke heavy;
I will make it heavier. My father chastised you
with whips; but I will chastise you with scor-
pions.,
How could Rehoboam make this foolish an-
swer ?
The Lord let him be so foolish that Rehoboam
might lose his kingdom, and that Jeroboam might
have it instead. The Lord had determined to
take away most of the kingdom from Rehoboam,
and to give it to Jeroboam.


CHAPTER VI.
REHOBOAM'S LOSS OF .HIS THRONE.
(1 KINGS, xii. 16-20.)
WHEN Rehoboam had made his foolish answer,
the people grew very angry. All the tribes,





Rehoboam's Loss


of his


Throne.


except two, said they would n(
their king.
Which were the two tribes
that Jeroboam should be king ?
were Judah and Benjamin.
The people of the ten tribes
have nothing to do with David.'
David was of the tribe of Juda


better having Jeroboam for tl
he was of the tribe of Ephraim.


ot have


him for


who did not say
Those two tribes


cried


out,


'We


They meant that
h; so they liked
eir king, because


They would not have said this of Rehoboam
had he not spoken so unkindly to them. Now
they were glad of an excuse for not letting him
be king. They cried out, To your tents, 0
Israel!' They wanted to go to war and fight
against the tribe of Judah.
Rehoboam commanded one of his men to go
and ask them to pay him taxes. The man's name


was Adoram.
How foolish


it was


of Rehoboam to


give


this


order at a time when the people were so discon-
tented! It was just the way to make them more
angry. Instead of paying money to the man, the
people of Israel rose up in a rage and stoned him
with stones till he died.
Then Rehoboam was frightened. He left
Shechem, where he was, and went quickly back
to Jerusalem.


And now the ten tribes


king.
From


this


time


made Jeroboam


their


Jeroboam was called King


14


h


l(


I




The Golden Calves.--Jeroboam.


15


of Israel, and Rehoboam was called King of
Judalh.
There were now two kingdoms and two kings.
Which was the best kingdom to have ?
The King of Israel had the greater part of
the land ; but the King of Judah had the better
part, because he had Jerusalem, where the Temple
was, where God was.
Jerusalem was the city of God, and the Temple
was the house of God-the most glorious place
in the whole world.


CHAPTER VII.

THE GOLDEN CALVES.- JEROBOAM.


(1


KINGS, xii. 25 to end.)


JEROBOAM


was


have liked to b(
God would not
jamin.
He would ha
his chief city.
city, he built u
Ephraim, and h
there.
But he was n


now King of Israel. He would
e king over the whole land, but
let him have Judah and Ben-


ive liked to have Jerusalem for
As he could not have that blessed


p
le


Shechem in his own tribe of
had his throne and his palace


ot ha


ippy in


his ne


was afraid lest the people should
minds, and turn him away from


:w palace. ]
d change thi
being king.


He
eir


|


dlLJ6





The Golden Calves.-Jeroboam.


Jeroboam knew that the people
to Jerusalem .to worship God
year, but he did not like them


ought
three
to go


to go
times
even


once.
He


said in his heart,


'If this people go up to


Jerusalem to offer sacrifices in the house of the
Lord, perhaps their hearts will turn again unto
their lord, even to Rehoboam; and then they will
kill me, and have Rehoboam for their king.'
He thought of a very wicked plan to prevent
the -eoDle 'oinz UD to Jerusalem. He ordered


two
these
calle
quit(


golden calves to be made: he placed one of
e calves in a town at the top of the land
d Dan; he placed the other calf in a town
e at the border of his part of the land, at the


town of Bethel.
Then he said to the people in a
'It is too far for you to go to Jeru
calves are the gods that brought
Egypt.'
The people were so wicked as 1
their king said, and they came in
ship the calves. At Bethel they


very kind way,
isalem. These


you up out


of


to believe what
crowds to wor-
saw their king


offering incense to the calf.
He made himself a priest to his own idol.
And who were the other priests ?
Not the Levites. They had left their cities in
the ten tribes, and had come to live in the cities
of Judah.*

2 Chron. xi. 14.


t' .


16


up
a-


I




The Golden Calves.-Jeiroboam. 17

But Jeroboam did not want them to be his
priests; he chose the vilest, the wickedest men,
to be his priests; and he did not care of what
tribe they were.*
He made a temple of his own at Shechem, and
he had an altar there; and he made a feast of his
own, instead of the feast of the Passover.
The towns of Dan and Bethel were now the
most wicked places in the land.t
I do not wonder that Dan was a wicked place.
Do you remember that five men from the tribe of
Dan once went to look for a place to live in, and
passed by the house of Micah? And do you
remember how they came again and stole Micah's
idols, and took them to the top of the land and
built a city there ? : That city was called Dan.
Dan was a fit city for the golden calf; but
Bethel was the place where Jacob once had the
dream about the angels. How sad to think that
an idol was placed where once the heavenly ladder
was seen, and the voice of God was heard!

He made him priests of the lowest of the people
(1 Kings, xii. 31.) By the word 'lowest' must be un-
derstood 'Ivilest;' not the poorest, but the worst.
t The city of Dan was in the tribe of Naphtali, very
far from the tribe of Dan. Bethel was in Benjamin
Jeroboam had no right to place it in that tribe, instead
of in Ephraim.
+ See Judges, xviii.
ges,





18


You have heard how Jeroboam built a temple in
Bethel.
One day he was starting before the altar of
Bethel, burning incense.
.Crowds of people came to the altar to worship
the golden calf. Amongst them came a man
unlike the rest: he came from Judah; he did
not worship the calf; yet he went up to the altar
and cried out,' O altar O altar !'
How strange it was to speak to the altar and
not to speak to Jeroboam himself. All the people
round must have been astonished to hear the man
cry out, O altar O altar !'
And what did he say to it ?
He said, 'One day a child shall be born in
David's family called Josiah, and that child shall
offer up, upon that altar, the bones of the priests
who burn incense upon thee.'
What must the priests have thought when
they heard this!
But who could know whether the prophet was
a true prophet?


Jeroboam's Dried-up Arm.




CHAPTER VIII.

JEROBOAM'S DRIED-UP ARM.

(1 KINGS, xiii. 1-8.)


















4i-i-


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1'ii l I


li nfAiiu


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------------------
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---


1 KINGS, XIII. 1.

'And, behold, there came a man of God out of Judah by the word of

the Lord unto Bethel, and Jeroboam stood by the altar.'-P. 18.


~---
----~




Jeroboam's Dried-up


Arm.


To show that he was a true prophet,
he would give a sign : 'The altar shall be
and the ashes on it shall be poured out.'
While the rowhet was snDakinpr .T1


I I 3L..L J X
11 I 1 -


grew so angry that he .stretch
desire his servants to seize him
hold on him!'
Immediately he tried to pull
he could not, for it was dried
stick.


At the


ied out


Kj 1
his


19


he


said


broken,

eroboam
3 arm to


i, calling out,' Lay

back his arm; but
up and stiff like a


same moment the altar was broken and


the ashes were poured out.
Here were two signs to


show that the prophet


was a true one, and sent from God.
What was the first thing Jeroboam did ?
It was to ask the prophet to make his
well. He said, 'Pray to the Lord thy God
my arm may be made well.'
You see Jeroboam did not pray for hin
for the true God was not his God. He


arm
that


self,
said


to the prophet, 'Thy God.'
And would the prophet pray for him when he
had stretched out his arm to tell his servants to
seize him ?


Oh,
prayed
There
spoke 1
home N


yes, he would pray for his enemy. He
for the king, and his arm was made well.
I the king was so much pleased that he
kindly to the prophet, and said, Come
vith me and take some food, and I will


give thee a reward.'
Jeroboam was not


sorry for


his sins, though


, i -


-1





20 The Disobedient Prophet.

he was pleased with the prophet for having
prayed for him.
He had something very sad to think of. One
day there would be a king of Judah, descended
from David, who would punish the priests of the
golden calf; but he would not be born for a long
while. Yet God knew his name, for God knows
the names of all who shall be born a thousand
years to come.
Jeroboam would die a long while before Josiah
was born, and all those wicked priests would die;
but there would be other wicked priests, whose
bones would be burned on that altar three hun-
dred and fifty years to come.



CHAPTER IX.

THE DISOBEDIENT PROPHET,
IN THE EIGN OF JEROBOAM,
(1 KINGS, xiii. 11-19.)
DID the prophet accept Jeroboam's invitation ?
No, he did not; neither would he accept the
reward that Jeroboam had promised.
This was the prophet's answer: If thou wilt
give me half thy house, I will not go in with
thee; neither will I eat bread or drink water in
this plaee; for the Lord said to me, Eat no





The Disobedient Prophet.
4-.


bread, nor drink water, nor return home
way that thou camest.'
Why did the Lord tell the prophet not
back by the way that he came ?


Because the place was so wicked t
people might have hid themselves behi
or walls, and watched for him to kill him.


by the


to


coo
b


;hat the
nd trees
So the


prophet set out to go home by another way.
He had been obedient to all God's commands,
and he must have felt happy as he went along.
But he was hungry, and thirsty, and tired; and
he soon sat down to rest himself under an oak-


tree by the way-side.
If he had known what a


coming on him, surely
under the tree.


hL


great
e would


temptation was
d have prayed


What was the temptation ?
You shall soon hear.
An old prophet lived at Bethel.
Was he a good prophet ? Would
have lived in that wicked place ?


ag


ood man


I cannot tell whether he ever went to worship
the golden calf; but this I know-his sons did.
That morning when Jeroboam's hand was dried


up-these sons were near the altar.
and heard all, and when they came
told all to their father. They told hin


miracles,
God had
When
his mind


They saw
home they
i of the two


and they told him also how the man of
refused to dine with the king.
the old prophet heard this-it came into
to ask the young prophet to dine with


21


-ir-.





The Disobedient Prophet.


him. This was a very wicked
old man knew that God had


thought, for
forbidden the


phet to dine anywhere in Bethel.
He said to his sons,-
Which way did the man of God go ?'
When they had told him which way, he said,-
Saddle the ass for me to ride.'
You see he had but one ass, or he would not
have called it THE ASS.


The sons saddled the ass, and the old man
rode on it. He went along hoping to overtake
the prophet, and at last he found him sitting
under an oak.
There the poor tired prophet was resting.
How did the old prophet know him when he saw
him ? He could not be quite sure who he was,
and so he said, 'Art thou the man of God who


came from Judah ?'
The prophet answered,
Then the old prophet
him, and said, 'Come 1
bread.'


'I am.'
spoke very kindly to
home with me and eat


The man of God replied, I may not return
with thee, nor go in with thee: neither will I eat
bread with thee or drink water with thee in this
place; for the Lord commanded me not.'
Then the old man answered, 'I am a prophet


also, as thou art, and an
by the word of the Lor4
Back with thee into thin
eat bread and drink water.'


angel
d, say
e hou


spake unto me,
ing, Bring him


s-e, t


hat he


may


22


the
pro-


y.





Obedient Lion.


Was not
old prophet
Liar.


this story an
was a child


awful lie?


of the devil,


rely
the


But the propi
How could he
change His wore
His word. He
house in Bethe
think that God


let from Judah believed his words.
believe him ? God could not
1. No, the Lord always keeps to
had told the prophet to go to no
1. Why then did the prophet
1 would not keep to what He


said?


sir


This is the way Satan has always deceived men
ice the day he said to Eve, Thou shalt not


surely die.'
The young prophet
his house' at Bethel.


went with the old one to


CHAPTER


X.


THE OBEDIENT LION,
IN THE REIGN OF JEROBOAM.
(1 KINGS, xiii. 23-32.)


THE tWO prophets were sitting at
house at Bethel, when something
make them sad.
The Lord spoke to one of them.
To which ?


table in the


happened


to


To the wicked old prophet. In the midst of
the dinner, that old man cried out to the prophet


The


23


this
old


Su


10




24


The


Obedient Lion.


of Judah, 'Thus saith the Lord, Because thou
hast disobeyed the Lord and hast come back,
and hast eaten bread and drunk water in this
place, thy dead body shall not be buried in the
grave of thy fathers.'
Thus was this old prophet made to confess his
own lies. What did the man of Judah feel when
he found out he had been deceived ?
He must have been filled with horror; yet he
little knew how very soon he was to die for his
sin.
When dinner was over, the old prophet de-
sired the ass of the man of Judah to be saddled.
Perhaps this poor prophet thought he had a
long journey to make, but he had not gone far
before he saw a lion. The lion seized him, tore
him to pieces, but did not eat him. After killing
him, the lion stood by his dead body.
What a great wonder that was!
Here was another wonder. The ass did not
run away, but stood quietly by the lion and the
dead body of his master. And here was another
wonder. The lion did not kill the ass, but stood
near him without hurting him.
Soon some men passed by. These men were as-
tonished to behold the two beasts standing by the
dead body. They did not venture to go near
them, but ran quickly to Bethel, and told every
- 1 jI t 11


one what they had seen.
The people in the city d
body-was' lying in the r


lid not know whose dead
oad; but when the old





The


Obedient Lion.


2.5


prophet heard about the dead body, he cried out,
'It is the man of God, who was disobedient to the
word of the Lord: therefore the Lord hath de-
livered him unto the lion, which hath torn him
and slain him, as the Lord told him.'
Should you not have thought from this speech
that this prophet was good ? But he was a
wicked old deceiver. He was a hypocrite pre-
tending to be good. He spoke of the sin of
the man of Judah; but he said nothing of his
own far greater sin in tempting him and telling


him lie
No


where
He k:


nl


knew tl
of Juda


S.
one was brave enough to go to the place
the lion stood except this bad old man.
ew the lion would not kill him, for he
hat God had sent the lion to kill the man
Ih, and no one else. not even the ass. So


the old prophet said to his sons,' Saddle the
for me,' and they saddled it.


ass


Then the prophet rode all alone to the spot,
and found the dead body and the lion and the ass
still standing by it.
He took it up and laid it upon the prophet's
ass, and brought it to Bethel.
The lion never touched him all the time he
was taking up the body.
The old prophet seemed to be much grieved
for the man of Judah; and he laid his dead body
in his own grave which he had prepared for him-


self.
He, with


his sons, mourned


over


him, saying,





26


The


Obedient Lion.


'Alas! my brother.' Yet he was no real brother
to that good man. He said to his sons, When
I am dead bury me in the grave where the man
of God is buried; lay my bones beside his bones,
for what he said about the altar in Bethel will


surely come to pass !'
Where was the grave of the old prophet?
was in a horrible place.
The altar of the golden calf was on a hill
Bethel, and all around lay the tombs of


It

in
the


priests; and very near them was the old pro-
phet's grave. THERE was the man of Judah laid
--all amongst the wicked people. An epitaph was
written on his tomb with his name. People who
looked at the tomb talked of what the man of
Judah had prophesied against the altar. You
will hear of this tomb again, when you hear
about Josiah, who came to that place 350 years
afterwards to fulfil the word of the Lord.
Those two prophets slept together in that


tomb many
their bones
But will
Oh, no ;
everlasting
destruction


hundreds


of years:


and


even


now


are mingled together.
they rise together ?
the righteous prophet will rise to life
; and the liar will rise to everlasting
in the lake which burneth with fire


and brimstone, where all liars must be cast.


r




Jeroboam's


Good


Child.


CHAPTER


XI.


JEROBOAM'S GOOD CHILD.


(1 KING, xiii. 33, 34;


xiv. 1-3.)


JEROBOAM heard of the
Judah, and of the three
at the time:


death of the
miracles that


prophet of
took place


tu
H(


1. The-lion not eating the prophet.
2. The lion not touching the ass.
3. The ass not running away from the lion.

Jeroboam had seen three miracles himself: -
1. The drying up of his arm.
2. The healing of his arm.
3. The breaking of the altar without hand.

Yet these six miracles did not make Jeroboam
rn from his evil ways and serve the true God.
e still went on worshipping the calves, till the


Lord determined to destroy his whole tai
though not immediately.
Jeroboam had wicked sons, as might be
pected. If they had been good, God would
have punished them for their father's sins.


nily,


ex-
not
It is


27





28


Jeroboam's


only w


hen


father, that
You will
this ungodly
loved God.


Good


Child.


the children are wicked,
God punishes them.*


like their


be surprised to hear that, even in
y family, there was one child who


We are now going to hear about him.
Jeroboam did not always live at Bethel, though
he went there very often to burn incense. He
lived on a beautiful hill called Tirzah.t There
he had a fine palace.
His little son Abijah fell dangerously ill.
His parents were alarmed lest he should die.
What could they do ? They could not pray to
the true God, for they had forsaken Him.
Why did they not pray to their golden calves ?
They did not feel that these calves could help
them in this great trouble. They determined to


send t<
Did
No,
an old
it was


o a prophet.
they send to the old prophet of Bethel ?
they oould not trust him; but there was
prophet that Jeroboam felt he could trust:
the prophet who had once met him when


It is written of Jeroboam's sons, in 2 Chron. xi. 14,
'For Jeroboam and his sons had cast them (the Levites)
off from executing the priest's office.'
t Tirzah in the maps is placed in the tribe of Manas-
seh, just above Ephraim; but its real situation is not
known, and many think it was very near Shechem in
Ephraim. It must have been a beautiful place, as it is
written in Solomon's Song, vi. 4, 'Thou art beautiful,
my love, as Tirzah !' Very likely Solomon had a palace
there.


<




The


he


was returning


Secret


from


Visit.


overseeing


Solom(


workmen,--that prophet who tore up his (
garment and gave him ten pieces. What he
said had all come true, and Jeroboam felt


could trust him. It was a long while ago since
they had met in the field, and the prophet was
now very old. His name was Ahijah.
Could Jeroboam go himself to see him ?


No; he was ashamed to visit him. Perhaps
he thought a good prophet would not answer
him after all his wickedness. So he made up
his mind to send his wife, the queen, to inquire
of the prophet; and he told her to dress herself
in such a manner that no one would know who
she was: that is called disguising oneself.
Now Jeroboam felt the need of a true friend
who could comfort him in his distress.
Happy are the people who have God to go to
in all their troubles !
You shall hear now of the queen's sad visit.


CHAPTER


XII.


QUEEN'S


SECRET


VISIT,


IN THE REIGN OF JEROBOAM.
(1 KINGS, xiv. 1-20.)


JEROBOAM wanted his wife to go and see the good
prophet; he told her where she ought to go.
The prophet lived at Shiloh, the place where (od


Queen's


29


)wns
had
he


THE





30 Tlhe Queen's Secret Visit.
Eli had lived about two hundred years ago. It
yas the place where the tabernacle had once
rested, and where the glorious ark had been
kept. But now the ark was on Mount Zion, in
Jerusalem, and the tabernacle had been taken
away.
Shiloh was now a desolate, lonely place.
Jeroboam told his queen to take with her some
presents for the prophet. He did not wish her
to take grand presents to the prophet, such as a
queen might bring; but he wished her to take
little presents, such as poor people might bring,
because he did not wish the prophet to find out
who she was.
He said to his wife, 'Take with you ten
loaves' (small loaves like rolls); take with
you some cracknels, or cakes, and a bottle of
honey.'
With these presents she set out from Tirzah
to go to Shiloh. She must have ridden upon an
ass, because she had to carry the presents, and to
go a journey of fifteen miles, or more.
The old prophet Ahijah was very old, and he
had grown blind, as old people often do. Yet as
soon as the queen came near his house, when he
could hear her steps, he cried out, Come in,
thou wife of Jeroboam! why dost thou pretend
to be another woman ?'
How was it that the prophet knew who she
was ?
God had told him that the queen was coming




The Queen's Secret Visit. 31
and He had told him also what to say to her.
Ahijah did not say,' queen !' because she was
pretending to be another woman; so he only said,
'Thou wife of Jeroboam!'
It was very wrong of her to try to deceive the
prophet, though it was still worse of Jeroboam
to command her.
The prophet knew what she was come to ask
him about; but at first he did not tell her what
she wished to know, but something she did not
like to hear.
It was the dreadful message that God sent to
her husband: 'Go, tell Jeroboam, I made thee
king over Israel, and took away the kingdom
from David's family; but thou hast not kept my
commandments as David did, but hast gone and
made thee images. Therefore I will bring evil
upon Jeroboam's family, and I will take them
away, as a man takes away a heap of filth, till it
is all gone. None of Jeroboam's children shall
be buried: those who die in the city shall dogs
eat, and those who die in the country shall the
birds of the air eat; for the Lord hath spoken
it.'
What a terrible message! What must the
queen have felt as she was hearing it ?
At the last the old prophet spoke of her sick
child. The queen was resting herself while the
prophet was speaking. He said, Arise, and get
thee to thine own house; and when thy feet shall
enter the city the child shall die; and the people





Queen's S'earet


Visit.


of Israel shall mourn for him and bury him ;


and


he is the only one of Jeroboam's children who
shall be buried, because there is something good
in him towards the Lord God of Israel.'
Was it not wonderful that there should be
something good in this child, though his parents
had taught him nothing good? No one but God
can put good into any one's heart, and God had
put this good thing into the child's heart.
What was this good thing ?
It was the love of God.
How did the mother feel as she travelled home
to Tirzah!


th

do


She must have felt very unhappy. S1
at she would not find her child alive.
As she put her foot upon the threshold
or of the palace--the child died. If


been a pious mother, it would have
comfort to know he was gone to God, to
ever with the Lord. But this queen w


ie knew

d of the
she had


been
be j


a
for


ras not


pious.
The child was buried with honour, and he was
mourned for by the people of Israel, as Ahijah
the prophet had said.


32


The




Nadab,


the Second King of Israel.


CHAPTER XIII.


NADAB, THE SECOND KING OF


ISRAEL,


MURDERED AND NOT BURIED.

(1 KINGS, xv. 25-30.)


JEROBOAM was more wicked than any king who
had reigned before him.
What kings had reigned before him ?
Saul, David, and Solomon-kings of the whole
of Israel-even of the twelve tribes.
Jeroboam was more wicked than the wicked
Saul.
And why ? Because he taught the people to
worship the golden calves; he asked them to
come and worship those idols.
It is true that Solomon worshipped idols in
his old age; but he did not ask his people to
worship idols; he worshipped them to please his
wives, and that was very wicked; but he would
have been more wicked had he asked his people
to worship them.
So Jeroboam made Israel to sin. It was this
which made God so very angry with him. Yet
God let him reign over Israel twenty-two years.
Then he died and was buried.


33





2 adab,


the


Second King of Israel.


But how did he die ?
An awful account is given of his death.
Lord struck him, and he died.' This shove
angry the Lord was with him, till he could
him no longer.
When Jeroboam was dead, his son reig
his stead. His name was Nadab. We ki
was wicked, because all Jeroboam's son
wicked (except that little one who died).
Nadab went on worshipping the golden
as his father had taught him.
Very soon he led out his people t


6/


He heard
one of his
of Dan.
tribe, and
Israelites,


KL Ji


xT
Id


'The
how
bear


;ned in
now he
s were

calves,


0


that the Philistines had taken
cities: it was Gibbethon, in the
The Philistines lived chiefly in
they were always doing harm t(
as in the days of Samson.


war.


away
tribe
that
) the


When Nadab and his
on, they laid siege to it.


ny arrived at Gibbe-
They surrounded the


and tried


to prevent


anyone


going


out.
While they were doing this-a terrible event
happened. There was a man called Baasha, be-
lpnging to the tribe of Issachar. This man wished
to be king, and so he killed Nadab. We do not
know how he killed him. There must have been
many soldiers on his side, for as soon as Nadab
was dead Baasha was made king.
Then Baasha began to do the horrible work of
punishing Jeroboam's family for their crimes. He


34


thi


city,


in


or


ario





Nadab,


the


Second King


of Israel..


killed all the children of Jeroboam, and all his
grandchildren.
What was his reason for killing them ? It was
that none of them might reign, as they had a
better right to be king than Baasha. But God's
reason for letting Baasha kill them was because
they all worshipped the golden calves that Jero-
boam had made. If there had been any good one
among them, God would have blessed that one,
as He blessed the little Abijah.
Nadab's body lay unburied on the fields of
Dan, where he had been fighting; and the vul-
tures devoured it. It happened as Ahijah had
told Nadab's mother,--none of the bodies of Je-


roboam's family were buried: all were devoured
by vultures or by dogs.
Nadab reigned only two years; so he died


when he was young. I


Ie was not so wicked as


Jeroboam, who first set up the golden calves.
Yet he came to a worse end; for God does not
punish sinners according to their wickedness in
this life: some who are the most wicked are less
punished than some who are the least wicked;
but God will see hereafter that all are judged
according to their evil deeds.


25


I


I





Baasha, the


CHAPTER


XIV.


BAASHA, THE THIRD KING OF


A MURDERER AND YET SPARED.


(1 KINGS, xv. 33, 34;


WHEN
king. ]
of Nada
How
palace!


murd(


xvi. 1-8.)


Baasha had killed Nadab, he became
He went to Tirzah, and took possession
Lb's palace on the beautiful hill.
must he have felt when he sat in that
He could not feel happy, for he was
erer and a rebel. When he lay down


Nadab's bed, did
shed the blood


6t
he never think to himself,
of the man who once slept


here ?'


But it was not Nadab only that he had killed;
he had killed his children, and his brothers, and
their children. What dreadful thoughts Baasha
must have had As he walked in the garden or
sat under the trees, he never could shake off the
remembrance of his crimes.
One day a prophet came to him. It was very
good of God to send a prophet to warn him.
Who was the prophet ? Not old Ahijah, but
a man named Jehu, the son of a prophet.
It was very brave of Jehu to go to the king


36


Third King of Israel.


ISRAEL,


a
in
'I


%- u





Baashla, the Third King of Israel.


with such a terrible message, for Baasha m
have been angry, and might have killed him.
But Jehu was a faithful man, and s]
boldly. What was the message ? The very s
that God once sent to Jeroboam by the m(
of Ahijah.
God said by the mouth of Jehu to Baash
SI raised thee out of the dust. and made


/


37


ight

poke
lame
south


thee


prince over my people Israel, and thou hast
made my people Israel to sin. So I will make
thy family like the family of Jeroboam. I will
take away thy children, 0 Baasha! Hifn that
dieth of Baasha in the city shall dogs eat, and
him that dieth in the field shall birds eat.'
So you see Baasha was to be treated just as
Jeroboam had been. Though he was so wicked
he was not to be killed, but his children were to
be killed. As the prophet said, so it happened.
Baasha reigned for twenty-four years, and


then d
But I
and a]
His


ied,
jaash
lI hi,


and was buried in his palace-garden.
ia knew that his son would be killed,
Children.


soni's name was


what the prophet had
afraid, as he mounted


Elah. If he had heard
said, he must have felt
the throne, to think he


was so soon to be pulled down from it.


-9


0 '


-- -





E]lah, the


Fourth King of Israel.


CHAPTER


x1V.


ELAH,


THE FOURTH KING OF


ISRAEL,


OR THE DRINKING KING.

(1 KINGS, xvi. 8-10.)


ELAH now lived as king in the beautiful palace at
Tirzah.
You have not forgotten the city of Gibbethon
in Dan. More than twenty-four years ago the
Philistines had taken that city, and the Israelites
had tried to get it back, but they had not been
able all this while to turn the Philistines out of
Gibbethon.
Elah was not a man who could lead soldiers
out to battle, but he had two captains who could


fight for


him, and lead out his soldiers.


captains were named Zimri and Omri.
One of these captains led the army
bethon to fight against the Philistines.
captain was Omri. The other captain,


These

to Gib-
That
Zimri,


stayed with the king in Tirzah.
The king little knew what a wicked plan Zimri
had made up in his mind. If he had known, he
would have sent him with Omri to Gibbethon.
The plan was to kill the king while he was
drinking.


38


-- -


Ak 9


L





L'lah, the


Elah was a
sit up at nigl
panions. He


Fondne


self in I
know, is


pays the b
Elah left
his stewar(
It is di
When he


I ourth


King of Israel.


39


man fond of drinking; he liked to
it drinking with his wicked corn-
had a steward who was like him-
.ss for drink. The steward, vou


the head-servant of


ills and ma


ages the


a rich i
house.


--.. 7 -, %'.
man, and
One day


his palace, and went to the house
d to enjoy himself in drinking.
graceful for any man to drink mu(
becomes intoxicated he is below


of


ch.
a


beast; he cannot speak plain, or walk straight;
he talks nonsense, and laughs and shouts wildly:
at last, perhaps, he falls down on the floor and
lies with the dogs.
King Elah was drinking away when a man
rushed into the house with a sword or a spear,


or some weapon, and struck the
and killed him on the spot.


drunken king,


His body was cast into the street, and it lay
there unburied till the dogs devoured it.
Thus was fulfilled part of the word that Jehu
the prophet spoke to Baasha from the Lord.
Elah had reigned only two years.
The people of Tirzah did not punish Zimri
for killing the king, but let him reign instead of
Elah. If they had liked their drinking king,
they would have slain Zimri for killing- him.
No doubt the steward was killed at the same
time as the king, though nothing is said of his
death in the Scriptures.





"Zimri, the


Fifth King of


Israel.


CHAPTER


xv'.


ZIMRI,


THE FIFTH KING OF


ISRAE~L#


THE KING WHO REIGNED A WEEK.


(1 KINGS,


THE
made
Elah,
bodies
dogs.
and tl
p


xvi. 11-15.)


first thing that Zimri did, when he had
himself king, was to kill the brothers of
and all his relations. He left their dead
;in the city of Tirzah, to be devoured by
If any fled to the country, they were killed,
heir dead bodies were devoured by fierce birds


or prev.
Thus the L
had spoken to
opened to Baas
to Jeroboam's


ord fulfilled t
Baasha. Ex
ha's family, as
family.


he word that Jehu
actly the same hap-
had once happened


Whilst this slaughter was going on, Zimri
lived in the palace at Tirzah, eating at the table
where Elah had lately eaten, and sleeping in his
bed, sitting on his throne, and wearing his crown.
But he did not enjoy his grandeur.
Omri, the other captain, was still at Gibbethon,
trying to take the cities.
Some men ran to Omri at the camp, bringing
wonderful news. They said,-


40





Zimri, the Fifth King of Israel.


SZimri has risen up against the king and
him.'
But the soldiers and the captain did not
Zimri to be king. They said,-


slain

wish


SLet us


this
So


day.'
they


very day.
The next


make our captain


gave on0

Thing


that


1


throne.
Omri went up to
soldiers after him.
But they found tl


So O
They
lately
tents


sol
ru

H
cai
wh
pr
pr<


imri and his
knew well h
besieged Gi
all around tl


Omri


to do was to

Tirzah, with


gates


Omri


to be king


was king


that


set him on the


a great


of Tirzah


men began


-ow to
bbethon
ie city.


to b


many


fast shut.
esiege it.


besiege, for they
SThey spread t
In a day or two


had
heir
the


[diers broke open the gates of Tirzah, and
shed into the city.
Zimri heard their shouts, and he was terrified.
e knew not what to do. A very wicked plan
me into his mind. He went into the palace
ere he lived and set fire to it. There he re-
iined till he was killed by the flames. It is
obable that he was suffocated by the smoke,


which is an easy way of dying.
It was very wicked of Zimri to kill himself,
the Lord has said, Thou shalt not kill.'


There was no palace now for Omri to


live


for

in.


We shall soon hear what he will do for a palace.
How long did Zimri reign? Seven days.


41


ie


Lt


I





Omri,


the


Sixth King


of Israel.


How much had happened in that one week ?
Zimri had slain Elah and all his relations, had
burnt the palace, and himself within it, in one
short week. It was a week of murder and re-
bellion.


Zimri was quickly
did not reign, like
than twenty years,
Yet during his


ly punished for
Jeroboam and
but only one.


short


reign he


his sins.
Baasha,


had


He
more


time


to


worship the
for this sin
be devoured
cinder in the


golden calf, as
he was cut off.
by dogs, because
palace.


>e


they had done, and
His body could not
. it was burned to a


CHAPTER


XVII.


OMRI, THE SIXTH KING OF


OR THE BUILDER OF SAMARIA.
(1 KINGS, xvi. 21-20.)


OMRI was now the kin
had to fight again, for a
to be king. Half the
half for Omri. So th
the land.
When people of the
one another, the war is
is the worst kind of
does not mean kind a


g of Israel. But soon he
% man named Tibni wanted
people were for Tibni, and
ere was much fighting in


same :
called
war.


nation fight against
' Civil War,' which
That word civil'


nd obliging,' as we say of


42


ISRAEL,


T


!




Omri,


the


Sixth


King


of Israel.


a boy he is a 'civil' boy.


war is
land.
Omri.
It is
j *


war between people
Such was the wa


It means 'city.' Civil
of the same city, or
r between Tibni and


dreadful, indeed, when people of the same
T m'I 0 -1 -10 '1


naton are at war. ''his dreadful war went
on for six years; it must have made the land
miserable.


At last Omri conquered Tibni. It
in the Scriptures, 'So Tibni died


is written
and Omri


reigned.'
When Tibni was dead, then there was no more
fighting. But Omri was not grateful to God
for letting him conquer. He continued to wor-
ship the golden calf, and to walk in the way
of Jeroboam. It was his wish to have a grand
palace. While he was fighting against Tibni he
did not want a palace; he slept usually in a tent
in his camp, but now he felt the want of a palace.
There was none in Tirzah, it was burned to the
ground.
So he determined to build another, but he did
not wish to build it in Tirzah.
There was a beautiful hill a few miles off.
There was no hill so beautiful in the whole land.


Omri wished to


It belonged


to


build his new palace on this


a man


named


Shemer.


hill.
Omri


asked him to sell it, and he paid him two talents,
which was a large sum of money, equal to thou-
sands of our money. On this hill Omri built his
new palace and his new city. He called the city


J.


43


I


J


u




44 Omri, the Sixth King of Israel.

after the name of Shemer. Yet its name was not
Shemeria, but Samaria.
Perhaps you wonder that Omri did not call it
after his own name; but it may be that Shemer,
when he sold it, desired it to be called after him.
Samaria became a very famous city. It was the
capital city of the ten tribes of Israel. The hill
was very steep, and winding paths led to the top.
There was a broad valley at its foot, waving with
yellow corn. There were hills all round, that
seemed to guard it from enemies, and the sides
of the hills were covered with tall olive-trees,
broad-leaved fig-trees, and trailing vines, adorned
with purple grapes.
Samaria was, indeed, a lovely place. The Lord
likens it to a garland of flowers upon the head of
a man at a feast of wine.*
This lovely city was a most wicked city, for
Omri, the king, was extremely wicked. He was
even more wicked than Jeroboam. He was the
worst who had yet reigned over Israel-worse
than Nadab, worse than Baasha, worse than Elah,
worse than Zimri. He not only worshipped the
golden calves, but other idols also.t Yet he was

'Woe to the crown of pride, to the drunkards of
Ephraim, whose glorious beauty is a fading flower on
the head of them that are overcome with wine. The
crown of pride shall be trodden under feet.' (Isa. xxviii.
1, 3.
t To provoke the Lord God of Israel to anger with
their vanities. (1 Kings, xvi. 26.)





Ahab, the


Seventh King of Israel.


I


-1 S*


not slain, nor was his body eaten by dogs; but
he died in his bed, and was buried in his own
tomb in his new city of Samaria. He reigned
twelve years; six were spent in fighting against
Tibni, and six in building his new palace and
living in it. He was not punished for his sins in
this life, as Nadab and Elah were punished, but
God has judgment in store for those who die in
their sins.


CHAPTER


AHAB THE


XVIII.


SEVENTH AND WORST KING OF ISRAEL.


(1 KINGS, XVi. 29-33;


xviii. 13.)


Omri


was dead,


his


son reigned


in his


WHEN
stead.


There are few people who have not heard of
is son, for we read more about him in the
ble than of any other king of Israel. He was
e most wicked of all the kings-more wicked


than his father Omri-and we know that Omri
was more wicked than Jeroboam, and that Jero-
boam was more wicked than any that were before
him. One thing he did more wicked than his
father had done-he married a heathen woman.
There was a city called Zidon. It was close to
Tyre. These cities lay just at the top of the


land of Israel.


Zidon was a very rich city, for it


sent out ships to other nations with


things


45


thi
Bi
th(


to


_~~___ __ I~


q




Ahab, the Seventh King


of Israel.


sell, and the ships came home laden with trea-
sures from other nations, such as silver, and gold,
and precious stones. In this way Zidon became
a very rich city. It was also a very wicked city;
it was a heathen city. The chief idol was Baal.
The king himself was called after his idol, Eth-
baal.
Ahab married his daughter Jezebel. The last
syllable of her name,' Bel,' was the same name
as Baal. Jezebel was a worshipper of Baal.
When she became queen of Israel she was not
content with the golden calves; she persuaded
her husband and her people to worship her god
Baal. To please her-Ahab built a temple to
Baal in his beautiful city of Samaria. In this
temple he reared up an altar, and round about he
made a grove. The people followed Ahab's
example, and built altars to Baal all over the
land on all the high places, and under all the
green trees.
Jezebel had a great many prophets who taught
the people how to worship Baal. She had four
hundred favourite prophets, who worshipped in
the groves. She showed her favour to them by
giving them messes of food every day from her
own table.
All these doings provoked the Lord God to
anger. No king had ever made the Lord so
angry as Ahab did; for he allowed Jezebel to do
all she liked, when he ought to have prevented
her.


46





The


Prayer for Punishment.


But were there no prophets of the Lord ?
Yes, there were many, but Jezebel killed
she could seize.


It may seem strange tl
pious servant; but his
in who feared the Lord


I 10 1


iat


Ahab


should


chief steward


from his


youth,


name was ubacdiah; he saved the lives
hundred prophets; he put fifty in one cav
fifty more in another cave, and he went
often with bread to feed them; and he br
them water also from the nearest streams.


servants must


bread. I
night, for
places she
What a
full of idol


s,


have


helped


to


carry so


h[ ave
was a
. His


of


'e, and
t very
'ought
His
much


suppose he went to the caves in the
if Jezebel had found out the hiding-
would have killed all these prophets.
dreadful state the land was now in-


and stained with innocent blood!


CHAPTER


XIX.


THE PRAYER FOR PUNISHMENT,
IN THE REIGN OF AHAB.


(1 KINGS, XVii. I


; JAMES, v. 10,,17.)


THERE were many good prophets
of Israel, though Jezebel had


left i
slain


The greatest of them all was Elijah.
from the mountains of Gilead, on the
of Jordan, and he was called the Tish
do not know why.


in the land
so many.
He came
other side


bite.


We


a
im~


47


all


__1~_1


1




The Prayer for Punishment.


He
skins, 1
girdle.
The
prophet
warning
wicked
on in th


vore a
bound r(


very
found


uncommon
his waist


dress,
by a


made of
leather


people of Israel knew him well as a
, but they would not attend to his faithful
rs when he spoke to them against their
idolatry. He was grieved at their going
leir sins.


At last he made a wonderful prayer. It was
that God would not let it rain for a long while,
nor let dew fall upon the earth to moisten it.
What could be his reason for making such a
prayer? It was to bring the king and the people
to repent of their sins. He knew that if no rain
fell, there would be no corn or grass, and that
many people and animals would die from famine.
But how would Elijah himself get food?
He left that to the Lord. He wanted to save
the souls of the people of Israel.


Elijah was a very brave man. I
King Ahab himself in his palace,
' As the Lord God of Israel liveth, b(
I stand, there shall not be dew nor


Le went


to


and said,
before whom
rain these


years,
What


but according to the word
did Ahab say to this ?


of the


Lord.'


We do not know why Ahab did not seize him
and put him in prison; but perhaps he thought
the prophecy would not come true. If he thought
so at first, he soon found out how true it was,


for month after month
seen, and no rain fell.


passed and no dew was


48





Prophet's


First tHiding-Place.


CHAPTER XX.


THE PROPHET'S


FIRST HIDING-PLACE,


IN THE REIGN OF AHAB.
(1 KINGS, xvii. 1-7.)
AND how did the Lord take care of his prophet ?
He found a hiding-place for him by the side of
a little stream that runs into the river Jordan.
Amongst the thick trees a little running brook
was shaded from the scorching sun.
This thicket was the dwelling of the prophet.*


CHAPTER


XXI.


THE PROPHET'S SECOND HIDING-PLACE,
IN THE REIGN OF AHAB.
(1 KINGS, xvii. 8-16.)


THE Lord could have filled
the prophet's thirst, but I
him a second hiding-place.
the brook Cherib.


ti
e


ie brook
thought


to quench
fit to find


It was very far from


As this simple history has been relate
upon Line,' it has been thought best not
here, but to let the child read it from the
the parent to read it to the child.


Led in 'Line
to repeat it
Bible, or for


The


49


II _


i





Prophet's


First tHiding-Place.


CHAPTER XX.


THE PROPHET'S


FIRST HIDING-PLACE,


IN THE REIGN OF AHAB.
(1 KINGS, xvii. 1-7.)
AND how did the Lord take care of his prophet ?
He found a hiding-place for him by the side of
a little stream that runs into the river Jordan.
Amongst the thick trees a little running brook
was shaded from the scorching sun.
This thicket was the dwelling of the prophet.*


CHAPTER


XXI.


THE PROPHET'S SECOND HIDING-PLACE,
IN THE REIGN OF AHAB.
(1 KINGS, xvii. 8-16.)


THE Lord could have filled
the prophet's thirst, but I
him a second hiding-place.
the brook Cherib.


ti
e


ie brook
thought


to quench
fit to find


It was very far from


As this simple history has been relate
upon Line,' it has been thought best not
here, but to let the child read it from the
the parent to read it to the child.


Led in 'Line
to repeat it
Bible, or for


The


49


II _


i





ThIe Prophet's Second


I~idingwuP tce.


The Lord told


Elijah to go


to a village


'",I a0 1 I


was iEijan to go n
could be so dangerous ?
that queen Jezebel ca


be many heathens their
bring him to the queen?


Already
Elijah.
Israel to


ear Zid
Was
ime ?


e to N)


.on ? What place
it not from Zidon
Would there not
ratch Elijah, and


y a great search was being ma
Ahab had sent to all the kings
know whether they had seen


tde


for


round
Elijah.


Would he not send to the king of Zidon, Je-
zebel's father ?
But God promised Elijah that he should be
safe. He told him that a poor widow would give
him food. She did not live in Zidon, but in a
city close by, called Zarephath. She was not a
Jewess, but a heathen. It did seem strange that
Elijah should go to a heathen widow to be fed.
But the prophet believed God, and he set out
on his dangerous journey. He had to go about
a hundred miles.
Perhaps Elijah travelled in the night, that
he might not be seen. But it was not night
when he arrived at the gate of Zarephath, for he
found the poor widow close by gathering sticks.
What he said to her, and all that happened,


you can read in


Kings, xvii.


10-16.


50


Zidon.
rTur


near




Eljah's First




CHAPTI


Great Miracle.




CR XXII.


51.


ELIJAH'S FIRST GREAT MIRACLE,
IN THE REIGN OF AHAB.
(1 KINGS, xvii. 17 to end.)


WHILE Elijah lodged in the widow's house
great affliction befell the poor mother.
little boy died -he was a very little child,
his mother carried him in her bosom, and El
also carried him up to his room in the roof, ca
the loft.
The widow behaved ungratefuillv ,in F]
y7oE


when the child
through Elijah
long; for when
was going to ma
But he had live(
and the oil.


die(


d.
d.


She forgot -
She forgot t


that


e, a
Her
for
Iijah
killed

niLh


it was


Yet the woi
wished -Elijah ]
to do with thee,


nan spoke unk
had never come.


:indly, as
What


0 thou man of God?


if she
have I


Art thou


come unto me to bring
and to slay my son ?'
She had committed sc
think was pardoned, anm
punished for it.
Till she lost her bo


my sin to remembrance,


mHIe
a sh


y


sin that


she di


was looking


d not
to be


she had forgotten her
t) ~i~~4a


coming there he had lived so
Elijah first saw her she said she
Ike a cake for him before he died.
I all this time by eating the meal


le





Elijahl's


'I fst


Great Miracle.


sin, but now she remembered it. God wished
her to remember it, that she might repent of it.
Elijah answered her meekly,' Give me thy son.'
He took up the child into his own room.*
Elijah's feelings were much hurt by the widow
saying that it was through him her -son had
died.
He told this to God in his prayer. God likes


us to tell Him our feelings.
Elijah said, 0 Lord, my God, hast
brought evil upon the widow with whom
staying, by killing her son?'
Then he stretched himself three times
the child, and he cried, 0 Lord, my C
pray Thee, let this child's soul come int


again
W(
body,
(The
body
Th
of th
*


Thou
I anm


upon
rod, I
o him


.
e see the soul had gone out of the child's
for death is the, separation of soul and body.
second death is the separation of soul and
from God, and that is dreadful.)
e Lord heard Elijah's prayer, and the soul
e child came into him again, and he lived


again.
The child could now walk
Elijah led him to his mother.
must have felt.


downstairs, and
Oh, what joy she


And was


she


not ashamed


for having


been so


This room seems to have been but of the house, up
some stairs outside, because in verse 23 it is written
that Elijah brought him down out of the chamber into
the house.'





Elijah's Meeting with A-hab.


ungrateful ? Ye


s, she was.


Now she was glad


the prophet had ever come. Now she was sure
he was a man of God (though she called him so
before). She said, Now by this I know that
thou art a man of God, and that the word of the
Lord in thy mouth is truth.' Would she ever
worship Baal again? I think she would bring
up her child to worship the God of Israel.


CHAPTER


XXIII.


ELIJAH'S MEETING WITH AHAB.


(1 KINGS, xviii.


1-20.)


ALL the time that Elijah lived with
there was no rain nor dew.
Elijah prayed again that rain might
God heard his prayer, and let him
rain would soon come.


the widow

be sent.*
know that


At the same time
very hard to obey,-
'Go, show thyself
rain upon the earth.'
Ahab had been se


past.


He had sent


God gave


to


Ahab,


him

and


a command


will send


;eking Elijah for three years
to kings of other countries


to know whether


Elijah was


with them, and


* James,


v. 18.


' And


he prayed


again,


and the


heaven gave rain.'


53


he




E la ii's


I t W -


Meeting with Ahab.


had made them swear they did
he was.
Had he sent to the king of
king little knew that Elijah wa
dom-in the city of Zarephath.
Elijah obeyed God's command


not know where


Zidon ?


tS


That


in his king-


1. He left the


widow's cottage, and he parted from the little
boy he had raised from the dead. He set out
to go towards Samaria, where King Ahab still


reigned.


About the time that Elijah set out on his
journey to Samaria, two other men left Samaria
to travel about the land.
These two men were King Ahab, and his
pious steward Obadiah.
The king had lost many of his animals, and
he was afraid he should lose them all unless he
got some more food. Rich as the king was, he
could not get hay even for money, for there was
none.


So he said to Obadiah,' Let us go a
for grass, and let us go different ways.


ind look
There


may be grass g
water and brooks.


'rowing


close


by fountains


of


Let us try to save the horses


and mules alive.'
So Ahab set out one way and Obadiah went
another; and as they went they looked at the
little rivulets to see whether they were dried up,
and whether grass was growing near them; and
they looked in all low shady places in hopes of
finding a little fresh grass.


54





El'"1 ah's


;ilab.


Obadiah went the way that leads to the top of
the land. What was his surprise to meet Elijah!
The prophet must have been much changed in
his looks, as he had lived so long on nothing but
bread; yet Obadiah knew him, and fell on his
face and said, Art thou my lord Elijah?'
You see what honour he naid to the holy


prophet.
Elijah answered,
Elijah is here.'


'I


.- -W--


am; go tell thy lord that


But Obadiah was afraid to do this. He sa:
'When I am gone, the Spirit of the Lord w
carry you somewhere; and so when I bring Ahl
and he does not find thee here, he will kill me.'
Obadiah told Elijah how he had fed t
hundred prophets in two caves, that Elijah mig
know how much he loved God.
Elijah promised that he would not go awq
but stay till Ahab came.
So Obadiah went to look for his master, a:


brought him to the place.
As soon as Ahab saw Elijah h
roach him. savin, Art thou he


Israel?'
What


saved


Isr


---7l


<- <1 0J7


id,
rill
ab,

he
lht


Yad

nd


ie began to re-
that troubleth


a wicked speech, for Elijah would have
ael. He meekly answered,' I have not


troubled Israel; but thou and thy father's house;
in that you have forsaken the commandments of
the Lord, and followed the Baal-gods.'
Then Elijah made a great invitation: he in-


55


31e~etii-i g with


I I .A J W 16-1 L L _' WWA %/. 0%. .MJ NI


I





Great Assemblq on


'ifount


Carmel.


vited


eight hundred and fifty prophets
a -1 r o a r


of Baal


come to Mount Carmel.
These prophets were of two kinds: four hun-
dred and fifty were called Baal's prophets, and
the other four hundred worshipped in the groves,
and were Jezebel's favourites. eating from her


table


- --, C


Would Ahab
please Elijah?


gather


all these


together


Yes; for he wanted rain
Elijah could bring it dow
Wicked people will sometimes
to get something they want.


1,
p.]


Sand he
n by his
obey God


thought
prayers.
in order


CHAPTER


XXIV.


THE GREAT ASSEMBLY ON MOUNT


CARMEL,


IN THE REIGN OF AHAB.


THE place to
Mount Carmel.


which


Baal's prophets


came


That Mount juts out into the


sea.


A few


miles off runs a little river called Kishon.
Besides the river, there is a deep well in the
mount. From that well the water in the barrels
may have been fetched.
This was the place to which Ahab came with


56


The


to


to


was


I_ i _





T

the four hundred
the four hundred
Multitudes can
whether Baal was
God.


he Great
I


Rain.


57


and fifty prophets of Baal and
prophets of the groves.
ie to see the mighty question
God, or whether the Lord was


In the evening the eight 1
prophets were hurried down to
river Kishon, about five miles
and the people took care that


hundred and
the banks c


fifty
)f the


from the mount,
not one of them


escaped.
The
'Line u
20-40.


wonderful
ipon Line


history (already
') is found in 1


explained in
Kings, xviii.


CHAPTER


XXV9


THE GREAT RAIN,
IN TH.E REIGN OF AHAB.


AFTER


Elijah had


commanded


the ]


Baal to be killed, he passed the
prayer on the mountain. At last he
cloud, not bigger than a man's hand.
this little cloud would end in a great


prophets of
evening in
saw a little
He knew
it storm of


rain.
Ahab
Samari


He desired Ahal
had another. pala4
ia. This palace


b


to make haste home.


ce besides
was in Je;


his palace in
zreel, another


city.
Ahab drove home in his chariot to
Then Elijah did a wonderful thing.
before the chariot, at least twenty miles,


Jezreel.
He ran
and was


_I~




58 Elisha's Journey through


the


Wilderness.


ready at the gate of Jezreel to receive Ahab.
Jezebel was in Jezreel. That evening Ahab had
a strange history to relate to Jezebel.
He told her all about the fire coming down
from heaven, and about all her prophets' being


tin by the river-side.


How
She wa
senger
let the
the life
time.'
Why
evening


leaving


do you think Jezebel liked this history ?
is in such a fury, that she sent a mes-
to Elijah that very evening, saying, So
gods do to me, if I make not thy life as
of one of them by to-morrow about this


did she not send men to Rill
? No doubt she was afraid
off. But, oh how wicked


to believe after hearing


J)roln


This


upon
1 Kin


of the


fire


I Elijah
of the


that
rain


she was not


conuI9


heaven.


history


having


Line,' it will
gs, xviii. 41-46;


T been explained
be enough to r
xix. 1-2.


in
ead


Down

'Line
it in


CHAPTER


XXVI.


ELIJAH S JOURNEY THROUGH THE WILDERNESS,
IN THE REIGN OF AHAB.

(1 KINgs, xix. 1-11.)


AFTER Jezebel's threatening, Elijah made
long journey. He went from Jezreel to


a very
Beer-


I_ ______ _~___


sls



























--


--- --L
n-' ~
1.


--


'7


A1


-- ~ 9i~


S


1 KINGS, XIX. 5.


'Behold, then an angel touched him, and said unto him,

Arise and eat.'-P. 59.


r
I'-


/ 1
















I''


/I













II /i'/


--- -------------------Y---~Uoll --II-_


--


X
j Z

~Z.;;


i
~

:

iari


jo~ cia- g^ --g-
M_ !_5 ;


---------_~--~a~j~ ~;'-



~c
--





---




2lisha's Journey through the Wilderness. 59
sheba, the lowest city in the land. That was a
distance of more than a hundred miles. He did
not travel alone; his servant was with him.
But when he came to Beersheba he left his
servant there, and he went on alone. We, do not
know his reason for leaving him.
It is probable that good people gave Elijah
food as he passed through Judah, where many
served the Lord. But now he was going through
the wilderness;-how would he get food there ?
Perhaps Elijah did not wish his servant to
stay with him in a place where there was no food.
Yet Elijah found food in the wilderness, for an
angel fed him.
Once ravens fed him; then a poor widow; and
last of all, an angel.
But, after the angel had fed him, he lived
without food for forty days, through the power of
God. He travelled through that wilderness,
where the Israelites had once wandered forty
years.
He was only forty days crossing it. Then he
came to the mountain where God once gave the
ten commandments to the Israelites Mount
Horeb.- One peak of it was called Mount Sinai.
As the history of Elijah's journey has been
explained in Line upon Line,' the child will
read it in 1 Kings, xix. 1-11.





Elja h


at Mount floreb.


CHAPTER


XXVII.


ELIJAH AT MOUNT HOREB,
IN THE REIGN OF AHAB.


ELIJAH arrived at Mount
forty days and forty nights.
ber, did the same on Mount
before.
This long' fasting Drepare


God speak.


slept.
i-


the
he


After


There
rsleepin o
~linm0


(b FN 1


e voice ot ioCI, s
re, Elijah?'


-.


ras
in


aying


Horeb, after fasting
Moses, you remem-
Horeb a long while


d Elija:


a cave
the ca-
What


h for hearing
in which he
ve, he heard
Sdoest thou


Then the sorrowful prophet told his g
God in prayer. His chief grief was tl
edness of the children of Israel.
Elijah said,' I have been very jealous
Lord God of hosts.'
How was he jealous ?
He wanted the Israelites to love G(


and he could not bear their
than God. This was his


jealousy.
Another thing made
there was no prophet
thought all the good
This was a mistake.


loving Baal
jealousy his


griefs to
he wick-

for the


best,
better
holy


him unhappy. He thought
left alive but himself: he
prophets had been killed.


60


- -


t.)


T .


od


I


t





Three Messages.


Then some wonderful


ard and seen
)od by, hiding
As this seen
)on Line,' let


sounds and


I


on that mountain,
his face in his cloak.
e has been explains


it


sight
while


,d


now be read in 1


s were
Elijah


I in 'Line
Kings, xix.


9-14.


CHAPTER


THE


THREE


XXVIII.


MESSAGES,


IN THE REIGN OF AHAB.
(1 KINGs, xix. 14-18.)


ELIJAH was standing at the mouth of the cave;
his face wrapped up in his cloak, listening to the
gentle voice of God.
Then he repeated his complaining prayer about
being the only prophet left to serve the Lord.
And I, even I only, am left, and they seek
my life to take it away.'
The Lord replied by giving him three mes-
sages. -They were hard messages to deliver;
almost as hard as the message Moses once had,


to tell Pharaoh to let Israel go.
What were these messages ?
The first message was, Go
Syria, and anoint Hazael to be
The second message was, A
king over Israel.'


to Damascus
king of Syria.'
noint Jehu to


rp-7 e


he
st(


up


61


in

be


s ____ 1


V





The


Three Messages.


The third message was, 'Anoint Elisha t
prophet instead of thee.'
These were three hard messages, to anoint
men to be kings, and one to be a prophet.
Why was Elijah to anoint these three ?
That they might punish Israel for their
The kings Hazael and Jehu would slay
wicked with swords, and Elisha would slay
another kind of sword,-the word of G
wrath.


o be


two


sins.
the
with
rod's


You will be surprised to hear that Elijah
never performed the first message; he never
anointed Hazael to be king of Syria.
Nor did he ever perform the second message.
He never anointed Jehu to be king over Israel;
but he did perform the third message: he


"a


anointed Elisha t(
you will soon hear.
And why did h


be prophet in


his stead,


as


not perform the other mes-


sages ?
Because


he left


this world very soon; and he


let Elisha anoint those kings, instead of anoint-
ing them himself.
Elijah did not know then HOw God was going
to take him out of the world. He would have
been pleased if he had known. A little before,
he had requested that he might die. But God
had something better than death in store for
him.
The Lord ended talking with Elijah by sweet
words of comfort, saving, 'I have left me seven


I w


62


I


le


6


3

























2ZZ


--
_

rl ~-- z_ =;--_



-2--



-rr~F47


1 KINGS, XIX. 19.

'And Elijah passed by him, and cast his mantle upon him.'-P. 63.





Elijah finds Elisha.


thousand in Israel;


bowed unto Baal
not kissed him.'
Elijah thought
left; and God sa
Many of them, r
and caves of the


all the knees which have not
mnd every mouth which hath


there was no righteous
id there were seven th


o1 doubt,
earth.


person
ousand.


were hidden in dens


CHAPTER


XXIX


ELIJAH


FINDS


ELISHA,


IN THE REIGN OF AHAB.


IT was a long journey that Elijah had to make
in order to find the new prophet. He had to go
through all the wilderness, but we do not know
in what place in Israel he found him.
Neither do we know whether Elijah had ever
seen the new prophet before. Now he was going
never to part from him while he remained on
earth. His other servant had not been a friend
and companion to him. Now God had given


him a comfort in all his afflictions.
This history has been explained
Line.' Read it in 1 Kings, xix. 1


in


SLine


upon


9 to end.


.63


1;




64


Ben-hladad's





CHAPTER

BEN-HADAD S


IN THE REIGN OF AHAB.


(1 KINGS, XX.


1-12.)


AHAB'S great trouble was now over.
What was that trouble ?
Famine.
But Ahab had not turned to God
troubles; he still went on in his sins.
Another trouble came. It was WA:
There was a fruitful land on th
Canaan, called Syria. The capital ci
mascus.


through his


R.
e north


[ty was Da-


There was a king of Syria, named Ben-hadad
(which means the son of Hadad). He was a
very wicked man, and an enemy to Israel and to
Israel's God.


This king came up to Samaria, where Ahab
lived in his grand palace. Nor did he come
alone; he brought with him an immense number
of soldiers, besides horses and chariots.
Thirty-two kings accompanied Ben-hadad.
They were kings of little countries round about
Syria.


Insolence.





I XXX.

INSOLtNCE,


of


I




Ben-hadad's Insolence. 65
It was a fearful sight to see these hosts of
soldiers approach the lovely hill of Samaria.
There were walls all round the city. The
Syrian hosts were not able to get in; but they
surrounded the city so as to prevent the people
in the city obtaining food from the country. You
know it is the people in the country that bring
the food into cities. They bring the oxen and
the sheep, the butter and eggs, milk and cheese,
fruit, vegetables, and corn.
It is dreadful for a city to be besieged, as the
food in the city is soon eaten up. Besides this,
the Syrians shot arrows over the wall.
Ben-hadad sent some messengers from his camp
to Ahab in the city. The messengers were al-
lowed to pass through the gates.
They brought a very proud message to Ahab.
It was this: 'Thy silver and thy gold are mine;
thy wives and thy children, even the finest, are
mine.
What a daring, insolent message !
Ahab was so much frightened that he sent
back a very civil answer: My lord, O king as
thou sayest, I am thine, and all that I have!'
Though Ahab sent this answer, he hoped that
Ben-hadad would not take away his things, but
be content to call them his.
But soon the messengers returned and said:-
Thus speaketh Ben-hadad: To-morrow about
this time I will send my servants to search thy
houses, and the houses of thy people; and they




66 Ben-hadad's Insolence.
will take away in their hands all the things you
like best to look at.'
Ahab was much displeased at hearing that
Ben-hadad would take away all his most beautiful
things. He knew that his lords would not like
to lose all their precious things; so he sent for
them to tell them of Ben-hadad's rudeness. Ahab
said,-
SDoes not this man seek to quarrel with
me ?
His lords advised him to tell Ben-hadad that
he would not consent to let the Syrians come to
take away his things.
When the messengers returned with Ahab's
answer, Ben-hadad was very angry; and he sent
another message to say he would come and de-
stroy Samaria, and crumble the walls and the
houses into dust; so that there should be no more
than a handful of dust for each of his soldiers.
He swore by his gods that he would do so, if
Ahab did not let him in.
Ahab sent him back an answer to reprove his
pride: Do not let a man putting on his armour
to go to battle--boast of what he will do, as if he
was taking off his armour after the battle.'
Ahab's messengers went to the Syrian camp
with this speech. They found Ben-hadad at a
great feast. Thirty-two kings were with him
among the tents. They were all drinking them-
selves drunk in the early morning. None but the
worst people do this.




The Brave Pages


of Israel.


Ben-hadad had sense enough ]e
stand the message. He called out to
SGet ready for battle.'
They got ready, and went towards
fight against the city.
01


CHAPTER


THE


ft to
his


under-
soldiers,


Samaria.


to


XXXI.


BRAVE PAGES OF ISRAEL,


IN THE REIGN OF AHAB.
(1 KINGS, xx. 13-21.)


AHAB was much alarmed at the great army that
surrounded Samaria. He was quite perplexed to
know what to do.
Where was Elijah? Where were all the pro-
phets of Israel? Hidden in dens and caves, and
wandering about the land.
Now in this time of trouble-one of these good
prophets appeared before Ahab. There was no
danger of Ahab hurting him now for he wanted
his help.
'The prophet brought a message from God: it
was, Hast thou seen this great multitude ?
Behold, I will deliver it into thy hand this day,
and thou shalt know that I am the Lord.'
What a merciful message from the Lord to
wicked Ahab!


67





The Brave Pages of Israel.


The king
do.


asked


the prophet


what


he was to


The prophet replied that he must not send his
soldiers to attack Ben-hadad's, but he must send
some young men who were pages to the great
lords of Israel.
These pages were young servants who waited
on the lords: they were not accustomed to war.
Yet the Lord chose them to be sent against the
Syrians.
The prophet told Ahab to number these young
pages. There were two hundred and thirty-two.


What


small


number to


attack an immense


army !
Then Ahab counted his soldiers, and


they were seven thousand. That
army compared with the Syrians.
It was noon when the pages left
forwards to the Syrian camp.
At the same time Ben-hadad ha4


he


was a


found
small


Samaria to go

d sent out his


great army to go to Samaria, while he went on
drinking in his tents with the thirty-two kings.
His soldiers told him that some men were just
coming out of Samaria.
Then Ben-hadad cried out, 'Whether they come
for peace or for war, take them alive.'
'Ben-hadad thought it would be very easy to
take them alive, but his soldiers did not find it
so; for each of the pages killed the man that
tried to take him: thus two hundred and thirty-


68





Tlhe Battle


of the


Plain.


two Syriar
beginning
Israel's


and
even


1S


fell dead.


But that was


of the battle.
little army of seven thousand


only

came


the immense army of Syria ran away;
Ben-hadad, intoxicated as he was, es(


the
tllp0

up,
and


caped


on a horse with


the horsemen;


while the seven


thousand


I of
A 1 1


Israel


1


many. nah 1
helped in the s
and slew the h
What mercy
delivering him
to the God of


pursued,


and slew


himself came out of the


laughter;
.orses.
the Lord
! Would
Israel ?


a great
city, and


he overtook chariots,


showed Ahab
the king's he


in thus


art


turn


CHAPTER


XXXII.


BATTLE


OF THE


PTL A IIN7


IN THE REIGN OF AHAB.

(1 KINGS, xx. 22-31.)


THE prophet came a second time to Ahal
came to tell him that Ben-hadad would retu:
the spring and fight against Israel. He w
Ahab to prepare for another war. IHe
' Mark, and see what thou doest !'
Though God took such care of Ahab, hie
tinned the bad man he ever was.
Just as the prophet said-so it happened.


; he
ri in
anted
said,

con-


69


THE




70 The Battle of the Plain.

The next spring Ben-hadad's servants advised
him to try again to conquer Israel. They
thought of a very strange reason why Ben-hadad
had not overcome.
They said,-
Perhaps the gods of Israel are gods of the
hills, and that was the reason that the Israelites
were stronger than we. Let us fight against
them next in the plain.'
The Syrians thought their gods were the gods
of the plains. The heathen think there are gods
for everything: some gods of the sea, and some
of the rivers; some of the hills, and some of the
plains.
Ben-hadad took the advice of his servants.
In the spring he came out again with an army
just as large as the other that had been con-
quered; but instead of bringing thirty-two kings
with him, he put captains over his soldiers, for so
his servants had advised. It was well to get rid
of those drinking kings.
This time the Syrians did not come to Samaria,
which was on a hill and surrounded by hills.
They went to a great plain-one of the greatest
in the world--and they spread their tents near a
city called Aphek.*
The Israelites came to the same place, and
pitched their tents, but they were so few that

Aphek was on the great plain of Esdraelon, near
Megiddo.





The Battle of the Plain.


71


they looked like two little flocks of kids ; while
the Syrians filled the country.
How could Ahab dare to attack such an army?
There he was waiting, when a man of God came


to him again.
It seems as


if it was


another prophet, and


the same that came before.


He
Lord,
is God
valleys,
into th
the Lo:


brought
Because
of the
I will
ine hand
rd.'


this message:
the Syrians have
hills, and He is
deliver all this
, and thou shalt


'Thus
said,


saith the
The Lord


not God


great
know


of the


multitude
that I am


*I.


A P


Atter waning seven c
fought, and the Israelites


lays


the two armies


slew 100,00


4


The rest fled to Aphek, and there a
down and crushed 27,000 Syrians.
wall and by the sword together 127,00
were killed.
Ben-hadad himself fled into Aphek,


0 Syrians.
wall fell
So by the
)0 Syrians


and


took


shelter in a secret chamber.
Again the servants came to give advice to
their unhappy king:-
'We- have heard that the kings of Israel are
merciful. Let us go to him clothed in sackcloth,


with ropes round our necks.
save thy life.'


Perhaps he may


Ben-hadad gave them leave to go, and the
went and made this humble prayer to Ahab:-
'Thy servant Ben-hadad saith, I pray thee 1
me live.'


y

et


not


-1





The BcNtle of the Plain.


Ahab


answered,


'Is he yet


alive '


He is my


brother.'
How much astonished the Syrians were to hear
him call Ben-hadad his brother !
They had been watching to see what he would
say, and they did not expect to hear such a word
as brother.'


They replied,
They could
right.
Then Ahab s
What good


' Thy brother Ben-hadad ?'
scarcely believe they had


aid,
news


chamber. Ahab had
selt for him.
Ben-hadad gladly
meet him, and asked
him in his chariot.


Go, bring him.'
for Ben-hadad in I
called him brother,


set
him


out.
to get


Ahab
up and


heard


his secret
and had

came to
sit with


He got up and talked to Ahab. They made
an agreement or covenant together. It was that
Ben-hadad should restore to Ahab some cities of
Israel that had been taken away from Omri,
Ahab's father. They also agreed that some of
the Israelites should live in Damascus, and that
some of the Syrians should live in Samaria.
Then Ahab said,' I will send thee away with
this covenant.'
Ben-hadad returned to his own land, but he did
not keep the covenant, nor restore the cities that
had been taken away.


Had Ahab done right
with Ben-hadad?


in making a covenant


72


c




The


Prophet with Ashes over his Face.


73


No; most wickedly.
Ahab was ungrateful to God, who had delivered
him from Ben-hadad.


God did not I


Like His people to


be friends with


heathens. He wished them to keep away from
them, lest they should learn to worship idols.
But Ahab did not care about pleasing God.
His reason for sparing Ben-hadad was not kind-
ness, but fear. He thought if he destroyed Ben-
hadad, other kings would come against him, and
he did not trust in God to deliver him.


CHAPTER


XXXIII.


THE PROPHET WITH ASHES OVER HIS


FACE,


IN THE REIGN OF AHAB.
(1 KINGS, xx. 35 to end.)


IT was very wrong of Ahab to n
with Ben-hadad, when it was his
him. In doing this he acted a
acted. You remember how he


of

wa


1ake


a covenant


duty to destroy
,s Saul had once
spared the king


the Amalekites, Agag.
God told one of His prophets how much He
Ls displeased with Ahab. There were certain


men, called Sons of
men, called I Sons of


young
were
their


prophets, and


the Prophets.'
they lived tc


instructed by older prophets.
chief teacher.


They
)gether,
Elijah


were
and
was


0




74


The Prophet with Ashes over his Face.


One of these young prophets had received a
very strange command from God. It was-to ask
a man to give him a blow with a sharp weapon.
,The prophet obeyed, and said to one of his
neighbours, 'Smite me, I pray thee.' But the
man refused, though it was the Lord's com-


mand.
Then the prophet said, Because thou hast not
obeyed the voice of the Lord, behold as soon as
thou art gone away from me, a lion shall slay
thee.'


As soon as this man
lion found him and killed


had left the
him.


prophet


Surely this man could not have believed the
prophet, or he would have been afraid of leaving
him. See what came of his unbelief.
The prophet found another man, and said to
him, 'Smite me, I pray thee.'
The man obeyed and smote him, so that he
wounded him. That man acted right, for he
believed the prophet, and obeyed the Lord.
The man who would not smite the prophet at
God's command was like Ahab, who would not
slay Ben-hadad. That man was killed by a
lion, and Ahab would be punished in some way
for his disobedience.


The prophet, who had b
ashes and covered his face w
would have known who he v
ashes. It was the custom of
grief to use ashes as a sign


een
ith
vas,


t


wounded, took
them. No one
because of the


he people in great
of their, grief, and


I

























.JI
^ ^ v-7
-7


A^


N


1 KINGS, xx. 38.


So the prophet departed, and waited for the king by

the way,' &c.-P. 75.


SI'


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1 KINGS, xx. 40.

'And the King of Israel said, So shall thy judgment be.'-P. 75.


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