The little reading book

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Material Information

Title:
The little reading book in words of one syllable ; illustrated with pretty pictures
Physical Description:
72 p., 1 leaf of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 16 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Marks, Edward N
Thomas Nelson & Sons ( Publisher )
Publisher:
T. Nelson and Sons
Place of Publication:
London ;
New York
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1872   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1872
Genre:
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
United States -- New York -- New York

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by Edward N. Marks.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002233735
notis - ALH4144
oclc - 58433596
System ID:
UF00026235:00001

Full Text
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THE LITTLE READING-BOOK.


5PEM WEST READS TO HER OLD NURSE7',,-


THELITTLE READING-BOOKIN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE).IXutistrateb toith Prettt Picturie.BTYEDWARD N. MARKS,AUTBOR OF "WORDS TO SPELL," " THE EAR AND THE EYE,"ETC., ETC.LONDON:T. NELSON AND SONS, PATERNOSTER ROW;EDINBURGH; AND NEW YORK.1872.


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Preface.THIS book is all in short words. If here andthere you find a word that looks like a longone, you will soon see that it is made of twoshort words, such as "steam-boat," or "play-mate; " so that they are not hard to read,or hard to say. If you meet with a wordthat is strange to you, and you do not knowwhat it means, ask some one to tell youwhat it means. That is the way to learn.Those who wish to be wise must learn fromthose who can teach them. When you canread short words with ease, you will wantto try to read books with long words; butyou know that when you learnt to walk, you


Vi PREFACE.had first to learn to step. You took stepby step till you could walk fast, then youlearned to run, and to jump, and to skip.Skip now as much as you like, you willnot have to skip hard words in this book, forthere are no hard words in it.


fonttnis.THE FALSE STEP, ... ... ... ... ... 9THE FRENCH FLEET, ... ... ... ... 11SQUIFF AND WHUSK, ... ... ... ... ... 13PLAY, ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 15CAN SHE KNIT ? ... ... ... ... ... ... 17THE RED-BREAST, ... ... ... ... ... 19WORK, .. ... ... ... .. .. ... 21THE LARK, ... ... ... ... ... ... 23A DOG FIGHT, ... ... ... ... ... ... 25THE HEN AND CHICKS, ... ... .. ... ... 27SPORT, ... .. ... ... ... ... ... 29THE KIND HINT, ... ... ... ... ... ... 31THE ASS, .. ... ... ... ... ... 33NURSE, ........ ... .. ... 35TRY, ... .. ... ... .. ... ... 37THE TWO FRIENDS, ... ... ... ... -... 39


V111 CONTENTS.CLEAN AND NEAT, ... ... .. ... ... 41QUITE A MAN, ... ... ... ... .. ... 43THE LAME MOTH, ... ... ... ... ... 45MACK, ... ... **... ... ... ... 47THE POOR CHILD, ... ... ... ... .. 49SIR JOHN GRAY, ... ... ... ... ... ... 51THE CAGE BIRD, ... ... ... .. ... ... 53THE NEST, ... ... ... ... ... ... 55THE SUN, ... ... ... ... ... ... 57THE MAN AT THE WHEEL, ... ... ... ... ... 59OLD JACK, ... ... ... ... ... 61THE PET LAMB, ... ... ... ... ... ... 63THE COAST, ... ... ... ... ... ... 65THE SEA, ... ... ... ... ... ... 67THE KITE, ... ... .... ... 69TRUE TALES, ... .. ... ... ... 71


THE FALSE STEP.PooR boy How pale and how sad he looks !By what he holds in his left hand we cantell that he has not the free use of his legs.If you were to ask him why he looks sosad, he would tell you that it makes himfeel sad when he thinks how it was that hebroke the great bone of his leg.Then if you were to ask, "How was itdone ?" he would say, "I took a false step."Ha! he means more than he says whenhe tells you that he took a false step.It is quite true that through a false step-


10 THE FALSE STEP.or a step that he did not mean to take-he felldown the saw-pit and broke his leg. Thatwas one false step, and some would say thatthat was the worst false step for the poor boy.He took the worst false step when he didwhat he was told not to do. He thinks ofwhat, his aunt said to him on the same day"that he broke his leg. "Keep from the saw-pit. If bad boys want you to go with themthere to play, do not heed them."He thought of his aunt when the boys withwhom he was at play said, "Let us go tothe saw-pit. The men" have left it, to go totheir homes; no one will know."Ah! when he went with those boys' hemade the false step that he thinks most ofHe sees his young friends all at play, andhears them laugh as though there were nosuch thing as pain in the world.Let us hope that he will soon be well andstrong once more, and that he will take carefor the time to come. And let us bear inmind that a false step may do great harm.


THE FRENCH FLEET."YES, I see it! The French fleet! Thewhole fleet, with a man and two boys onboard Dare they touch our shores ? No!The sight of our flag-the flag of the braveand the free-will-put them to flight !"So said Fred White, as he stood on thesands with his young friend Ben Hill."Is that small craft the whole Frenchfleet ?" said Ben."Well, no; we shall not see the wholefleet till it is in sight-I think.""You think! Nay, you may be sure


12 THE FRENCH FLEET.of that. How can we see what is not insight ?"" Why, Ben, what a boy you are Howcan I teach you whilst I am on the look-out for the French fleet ? Stand to yourgun !-I mean, Stand to your spade !"" Am I to dig the grave for the Frenchfleet when you kill it, Fred ?"" How can I kill the fleet ? I must holdthe flag in my right hand and my gun in myleft. If the French do not go back whenthey see the flag, they may when they seeI have a gun as well. They do not like tobe shot."" Then, what have I to do with my spade ?"" Why, call it a gun, and stand to it like aman! You need not call a spade a spade,when you call a smack with a man and twoboys a fleet. But we must move, or weshall get wet. See how the waves flow tous! There will be no war. The Frenchare our friends. Three cheers for the red,white, and blue !"


-7-SQUIFF AND WHUSK.SQUIFF and WHUSK What strange names !Well, yes, the names are strange; but thosewho bear them are firm friends for all that.Friends? What! your friends, or myfriends ? Just think of "My dear friendSquiff'!" or, "Our good friend Whusk "Ohrdear! what names! Squiff and Whusk!But tell us, whose friends are they ?Squiff and Whusk are two young rats.Squiff is the friend of Whusk, and Whusk isthe friend of Squiff. And firm friends thyare, and will be, till they fall out.


14 SQUIFF AND WHUSK.Squiff and Whusk were born in the sameweek and on the same farm.One day, when Squiff and Whusk wereat their play-a game 'of squeak, I think itwas-they made such a noise that all theold rats told them to leave the farm at once.Squiff and Whusk said to the old rats," Let us stay, and we will try to be good.""What! " said the chief of the old rats;" young irats be good why, that is worst ofall! What is the use of rats if they aregood ? They will not steal. Off you go !We want no good rats here, and we will notput up with your noise; be off, both of you !"Squiff and Whusk knew it was of no useto say "No," so off they went as fast asthey could to the next farm.They had not long to search for food.There they are in high glee. Whusk says,"Let us try which can eat most."" No," says. Squiff, "let us try which canmake the least noise; I heard the maid callthe dogs. What if we were caught! "


PLAY."LOOK, Jess That is the bird that is sofond of play ""What do you mean, Frank ? How doyou know that that bird is fond of play?""Why, when you told me to wait by thebeech-tree whilst you had a run with yourhoop, the bird had such fun with Flo.""What do you mean, Frank ?""Well, Jess, you know you told Flo tostay with me. As soon as you were out ofsight, that bird came close to Flo and me.I think I should have caught it, but Flo4':


16 PLAY.would not sit still. Then the bird flew up,and sat on a bough of the tree. I saw it,and so did Flo. You should have seen Flowag her tail! It was as though she wouldsay, I'll catch that bird for you, if I get afair chance.' The bird flew to the ground,and stood a long way off from Flo; as muchas to say, Catch me if you can, fat fourlegs !' Flo ran-oh, so fast I But back thebird flew to the tree. It was such fun ""But how do you know that that is thebird that came to play with you and Flo ? ""Why, there has been but that one birdall the time I have been here. If you wait,you will see it fly back to the beech-tree.I am sure Flo knows it is the same bird ""Now, Frank, I'll tell you what I think.That bird may be fond of play, but it is morefond of its young. See, its nest is on a boughof the beech-tree. It did not like to see aboy and a dog so near to it. There It hasflown back to the beech-tree Now, Frank,let ydu and me and Flo have a run up thehill."(364)


CAN SHE KNIT?" KING JAMES the First and Sixth," of whomyou will read a good deal some day, wasthought to be a wise man.One day a lass was brought to the kingby her friends, who were quite proud ofwhat she knew and what she could do.They told King James that she knew threeor four tongues, such as French, and Greek,and Dutch; she could paint, and play theharp, and sing; she could hunt and fish, anddo all sorts of things that few of her ageand sex could do.(364; 2


18 CAN SHE KNIT?When the king had heard all they had tosay, he said, " Can she knit?"Now, he did show good sense when hesaid that. In those days a girl who couldnot knit was of no more use than a girl isnow who does not know how to do a stitch.It is well for all girls to know how to dosuch things as need be done in a home. Onecould have a nice home and yet talk noFrench; but we could not have a nice homeif there were no one in it to cook and tokeep things as they should be kept.Some think that none but poor girlsshould be taught to knit. Why do theythink so ? What a good thing it would beif some who are well off knew how to knit,and were to teach poor girls how to do it!All girls and boys should be taught to dowork of some sort-such work as they wouldget pay for if they had to work for pay.There are lands in which each boy is taughta trade, and each girl is brought up to dowork of some sort. It is a good plan.


THE RED-BREAST.COME, Dick! You need not be so shy. Youknow us as well as we know you.How shy you look! Do you think wewant to catch you? Not we. We like tosee you, and to hear you sing, but we donot wish to put ydu in a cage.Come! You need not keep so far off!I will not throw the crumbs out so far asthat. Here they are; come and take themif you want them.Ha! hop, hop, hop! You are glad tocome for them, are you, sir? Hop, hop,


20 THE RED-BREAST.hop Come, you are still too far off to pickup the crumbs.How well you look in that brown coatand red vest! You do not seem to caremuch for the cold.Dick, you look as though you knew allwe say to you It makes one smile to seeyou turn your wee head from side to side, asif to try on which side you hear best.Why do you not bring your friends withyou? Have you no friends of your ownkind ? Where is your mate ? Why do younot bring her with you ? I dare say youtake good care of her. She is in some snugplace, in which she has food to eat; and youleave her for a time and fly off to suchfriends as we are for a few crumbs.How tame you are I do not think youknow what we say, or you would come andplay with us here in the room. Do youthink we can fly as you can? I wish wecould fly in such fine months as May andJune, when we could have such fine fun.


WORK.HERE yOU see a shed, with two carts in it.Just in front of the shed is a white horse.Close by the white horse is a brown horse,and just by the tail of the brown horse is atall stout man in a smock-frock.Ten years since, that tall stout man wasa poor, thin, weak boy. He had but one'friend in the world. Her name was AnnBriggs. Joe Small was the son of friendsof hers who were dead. Ann Briggs took--care of Joe from the time he was a babe.But Ann Briggs was old as well as poor,and at her death Joe was left to get on in


22 WORK.the world as best he could. Rough workthat for a boy ten years old.Joe had been taught at a Free School.He could read and write as well as mostboys of his age in the school; and I amglad to say he made it his aim to do whatis right in the sight of God as well as in thesight of man.One day Joe went in search of work; forhe did not know how to get food to eat, orhow to pay for a place to sleep in.But no work could he get. Night cameon, and poor Joe did not know where to sleep.At last he came to a farm. No light wasto be seen in the house. The folks had allgone to bed. Joe saw the shed with thecarts in it. " I think I can sleep in one ofthose carts," said he.At break of day Joe heard a man shout,"Heigh, boy what do you want here ?"" I want work," said Joe.From that day Joe has had work on thefarm; and there he is, a fine tall man.


THE LARK.THREE boys, Dick, Sam, and Ned, went outto play in the fields, and fine fun they had.As they sat down to rest for a short time,they heard a lark sing." How well he sings !" said Dick." He must be quite close to us, I think,"said Sam." I should like to see him-that I should,"said Ned."There he is, then," said Sam, "so youcan soon have your wish."" Where ?" said Dick, and up he sprang.Just then he saw Ned with a small stone


24 THE LARK.in his hand, and Dick thought he meantto throw it at the poor lark; so he said,"Ned, do you mean to throw that stone athim ?""Yes; why not ? What harm ?" said Ned;" I want you to see how well I can aim."" For shame, Ned !" said Dick. " Throwdown the stone; why should you want tokill that poor bird, that sings so sweet asong to cheer us ? If you like, I will soonshow you that I can aim quite as well asyou can; but I should not like to aim to doill."That made both Ned and Sam laugh, andNed threw down the stone.The lark went on with his song. Nedsaid, " I like to hear the lark sing. I amglad I did not kill him.""Ned," said Sam, "do not make up yourmind that you could throw a stone at a larkand hit it and kill it. You might, I think,throw stones at birds all day and not hit oneof them."


A DOG FIGHT.THERE are some bad men who, for what theycall sport, set dogs to fight. I dare say youhave seen boys in the street try to get dogsto fight. ,It is wrong to do so.If dogs fight when they meet, and theyare not set on to fight, no one can help it.If one dog has a bone, or a piece of meat,and a dog comes and wants to take it fromhim, they first snarl, and growl, and bark,and then they fight; and the strong one, orthe one that is most fierce, gets the bone orthe meat.No one can tell why, if some dogs meet,they fight.These two dogs, Bob and Bounce, are


26 A DOG FIGHT.sure to fight when they meet. Bouncebarks, then Bob growls; for he does notlike to hear Bounce bark. Then, whenBob growls, Bounce snarls. Bob looks atBounce, as much as to say, " I do not likeyour bark, but I hate your snarl;" he fliesat him, and they fight. Bob 'is- not so biga dog as Bounce, but yet in most of theirfights Bounce gets the worst of it.I do not like to see dogs fight, but if theyfight, I like the one which is most to blameto get the worst of it.Bounce has no right to bark at Bob in theway he does. But Bob is not so wise a dogas he looks, or he would take less heed ofBounce. When Bounce snarls at Bob, Bobsays, " What teeth !"" They are quite as good as yours," saysBounce."No doubt you think so," says Bob."Bow-wow-wow to you, bad Bob!"" Bow-wow-wow to you, big Bounce !"Then comes the fight.


THE HEN AND CHICKS.How fond the hen is of her chicks! Shehas ten of them. If she could speak, shecould not tell you which of them she likesbest; for they are all dear to her, and sheloves each one of them so much that shewould die to save its life, or to keep it fromharm. When the hen thinks that her chicksmay be hurt, she says, " Cluck! cluck!cluck !" and the chicks make a noise muchlike that made by young birds in theirnests. They run to the hen, and she hidesthem with her wings till she thinks it is safefor them to go a short way from her. Theytake good care not to go too far from her;but she would soon call them back if they did.


28 THE HEN AND CHICKS.See! one is on her back. He may havegot up there for fun, and it may be that, inchick words, he says to the chicks whichare round the hen on the ground, " Ah, youpoor wee chicks, you are not so tall as I am !"The hen looks as if she would say, " Youwill have to get down when you want to eat,grand as you are."The hen is proud of her chicks. Sheseems to think that there are no chicks sofine as hers in the whole world. She doesnot care to go with the hens that have nochicks. She likes to stay with her brood.The hen shows her chicks how to find food.They would not know how to do so if shewere not to teach them. They like to learn,and she likes to teach, so they get on well.Though the chicks have food brought tothem twice a day, they like to find tid-bitshere and there when they are out for a walk.It is good for their health. Have you notseen cocks and hens and chicks scratch upthe ground to look for food ?


:"c7-" Ii' ; ')n*OH, you bad puss You have gone up thatold oak-tree to catch a poor bird! Youhave caught one-a large, fat one too Ittries all it can to get free; but you will holdit fast in your teeth. You bad cat let thepoor bird go; it may have some young onesat home in its nest. How bad you are tocatch it and I am sure that when you bringit down from the tree, you will kill and eatit. You will not heed its cries, and you donot care a bit if it has a nest with youngones in it or not-it is all the same to you.


30 SPORT.If puss could speak, I think she wouldsay, "Yes, dear, it is all the same to me.I like to eat birds. Nice young ones pleaseme well. If I could get young birds to eat,I would leave the owl to catch mice. Ilike birds best. Men catch birds. Theyshoot them-kill them-cook them, and eatthem-and that they call sport; why maynot we cats have sport too ? We do notwant to sell the birds we catch-we do notcare to cook them-we do not know how toshoot them;-but we like to eat them. Ithink that a cat has a right to catch birds."Cats are beasts of prey, just the same asbears and wolves are. In their wild statetheir chief food is the flesh of birds. Tamecats catch mice, but they would catch birdsif they could. That is why cats climb trees.We do not like to see cats catch birds,though we like them to catch mice. Buthow are cats to know that ? Birds are ofuse to us, and we are glad to hear themsing; but cats like their flesh!


I 1THE KIND HINT.PEM WEST had a nice book, which her auntbought for her on New Year's Day. Shetook great care of it, and had it put withher aunt's best books in the case, so that itwas free from dust. One day she had itout to show to some of her young friendswho came to take tea with her. One childwho came had not clean hands. She tookhold of Pem's book, and made a mark on it.Pem did not look cross or cry, as somewould have done. In a kind way she saidto the child, "Would it not be well, dear,


82 THE KIND HINT.if you were to wash your hands ? Will youcome with me to my room ? Jane, the nurseis there, and I am sure she will wash yourhands for you, if you ask her. I think,though, you would like me to ask her. Iwill do so. Those of our young friends whohave hands quite clean, can play with mytoys and books till we come back." Thiswas a kind hint to each child whose handswere not clean. The child put her armsround Pem's neck, and said, " I love you,Pem, you are so good and so kind to me. Iwish that my hands had been clean when Itook hold of your book."But Pem was kind to old folk too; forshe went now and then and read to her oldnurse out of God's Book. It is the bestBook. It tells us what- is best for us inthis world, and it tells of the world to come.I hope that you will soon learn to readthat good Book, and that you will bear inmind what it says. You should love it, forit is the word of God, who is your best friend.


THE ASS."HERE we are, four of us, with our ass; anda fine strong young ass he is. We get onhis back one at a time, though I doubt notthat he could bear us all on his back atonce. When one gets down, the one whoseturn it is to ride next gets up, and off theass trots-not as fast as he can, for we donot let him do that, but as fast as those canrun who have to keep up with him. The onewho drives has a small whip; but we do notwhip our Ned much. He is a good ass, and3i64: 3


34 THE ASS.minds what we say to him. But now andthen he stands stock still, as if to tease us.We say, " Go on, Ned !-good Ned, go on !"but there Ned stands. He moves his longears to and fro, and looks at us. If we usethe whip to him, he will not move at all; sowe pat him, and give him some hay: thenoff he goes, so fast that we have hard workto stop him when we want to do so. Thosewho say that an ass is too dull to knowkind words from sharp blows should see ourNed. They would call him a wise ass.It is a great shame to ill-treat an ass. Ifhe is as dull as some say he is, blows will notmake him bright and sharp. How is he toknow why he is hit ? May he not think itis to make him stand quite still? I knowwe take great pains to teach our Ned; and,ass as he is, he seems to know his friends.One day Ned was in the field, and somebad boys threw stones at him. He saw usat play, so off he ran to us; and when theboys saw that Ned was our pet, off they ran.


NURSE.How kind nurse is! We all love her, forshe loves-us all, and does what she can to.please us. She takes care of our toys whenwe go to bed; she cuts our cake for us, andcracks our nuts. Nurse knows such a lot ofrhymes, which she says she learnt whenshe was a young girl, and she knows a lotof nice tales'; so when we are good and sitstill, she tells the tales and says the rhymes.so well, that she has not to stop to thinkwhat comes next. What a long time itmust take to learn such a lot of rhymes so


86 NURSE.well! But nurse says she learnt them oneby one. She says that no one should try todo too much at once. Drop by drop therain comes from the clouds; blade by bladethe green grass springs up from the earth.One by one go the hours of the day; andone by one the days, weeks, and months ofthe year.See! Fred has got -on the couch to givenurse a kiss! I want babe to look at myhorse. It is such a fine one. It is made ofwood, and it goes on wheels as fast as I canrun with it.Our babe is too young to. care much for ahorse. He does not know which is the headand which is the tail. He takes hold of thetail and tries to put it in his mouth.When he grows up to be a big boy, andhe has a live horse, I hope he will not tryto bite its tail!My horse is white, with black spots onit. Its legs are straight and stiff, and willnot bend.


TRY." COME to me, Fred, and learn to read," saidRose, who was not eight years old." I am too young to learn to read yet, andyou are too young to teach me," said Fred." When I want to learn, I shall get a greatbig man, with a large, wise head, and a lotof great books; and he will teach me allthat I shall need to know in less than threeweeks; and then I shall be a man, and readthe 'Times,' and write notes, and say,'John, please bring my coat!'"" But, Fred dear," said Rose, "if you try


38 TRY.to learn now, I can try to teach you; andyou will have to try when you get thatgreat, wise man to teach you. The moreyou learn now, the less you will have tolearn then.""Dear Rose," said Fred, "P think youwill grow up to be a wise man !-Why doyou laugh? I will try, and then the wiseman-will find that I shall learn all he has toteach me in two weeks. How he willstare !"Now let me try to learn ;-A, B, C.There now! All that 'in one day! I cansay that by heart-A, B, C. Look at me,Rose; I can say A,.B, C, with my eyesshut!"" Why, Fred," said Rose,-" you could sayA, B, C, last week; but you did not knowA or B or C in print, and I do not thinkyou know it now. But I will let you offthis time, and will read to you a nice taleall in short words. I am sure you will likethat."


THE TWO FRIENDS.Miss MARSH and Miss Hill were friends.They were both the same age and the sameheight; they were born in the same town;they dwelt in the same street; and theywent to the same school, and to the samechurch.One day they went out for a nice longwalk in the fields. They went on andon, till they came quite close to the nekttown to which they dwelt. They satdown to rest on the root of a fine largetree.


40 THE TWO FRIENDS."What a long walk we have had! " saidMiss Hill; "and we shall have to walk allthe way back."" That will be nice!" said Miss Marsh;" it does us good to have nice long walks."" It tires us, that's what it does," saidMiss Hill, in so cross a tone of voice thather friend felt sad, and did not speak forsome time.At last, when the church clock struckfour, Miss Hill got up, and said, " It waswrong for me to say what I did to you,when you were so kind as to take a nicelong walk with me."Miss Marsh gave Miss Hill a kiss, andsoon the two friends were once more full ofglee."Why, here we are, close to our homes !"said Miss Hill. " What a short walk backwe have had !""I am glad you think so," said MissMarsh; "it shows that you are not so weakas you thought you were."


CLEAN AND NEAT."WHAT a Miss Prim you look! " said NellSmart to Ruth Field, " How soon you leftus, to wash your face and hands, comb andbrush your hair, change your frock, put onclean boots, and make as much fuss asthough you were to go to some grandplace."" I like to be clean and neat at school,"said Ruth; "and I- like to be in good timetoo.""Well, so do we all, Ruth," said BessMills, as she leaned on her hoop.


42 CLEAN AND NEAT.Now, I must tell you that each day inthe week Bess was late at school; and morethan four times in the week Miss Grangehad to tell her that she must have herhands clean, and her hair neat. All thefour girls who spoke to Ruth, and said shewas Miss Prim, were late at school thatday, and when they came they felt ill atease-they were not clean and neat. Theday was hot, and the dust' flew up andround; so that made them wish all themore that they had done as Ruth did. Thenext day they were not at play when it wasnear school-time; and when they came toschool they were in good time, and they"were clean and neat.A girl who can walk, and run, and skip,and romp; and play at all sorts of games,ought to 'learn to wash her own face andhands, and to comb and brush her own hair.To be clean is good for health. .It ought tomake a girl blush to be seen when she isnot clean and neat.


-QUITE A MAN." I THINK I am quite a man, a young mannow, Liz," said Tom to a girl whom heknew well, as she sat by the gate of herhome, and not far from a dear friend." Well," said Liz, " I heard Ted say lastweek that boys are young men by the samerule that kits are young cats; and that nowboys think they are men, but act as boysfor all that. If you were a man, Tom, youwould not throw plum-stones at me; youwould not tease my dog; you would notput your leg out to make me fall down;you would not laugh when you see rude


44 QUITE A MAN.boys do things which you know are wrong.You may be a big boy, and you may be anold boy, but I shall not think you a mantill you act as a man."Ted says no true man would do a meanthing. A true man is brave and just; hewill do what is right, and fear not. Thinkof that, Tom.""Yes, Liz, I will, and thank you. Whatyou say is quite true. A boy in yearsmay be quite a man in sense, whilst an oldman may be worse than a boy in somethings.""I have heard it said," said Liz, " that'boys will be boys and it would be wellif men would be men that is, truemen. There are boys who think that theyact like men when they smoke, or whenthey drink what does them harm, or whenthey make use of bad words, or when theystroll in the streets when they should bein the house of God, or at school, or atwork."


THE LAME MOTH.JAMES and ANN took a nice walk at theclose of a fine day; and on a rose-tree quiteclose to their path they saw a large moth.They went to look at it, and they thoughtthat it would fly away when it saw them.But it did not. James then took it up, andhe soon found that it could not fly far.Poor thing, some of its legs were as if theywould fall of, and one of its wings was torn!"What shall we do with the poor moth?"said Ann."I know not what would be the bestthing to do," said James. "I have no skill


46 THE LAME MOTH.for such work; and I do not think Dr.Hunt could set a moth's leg, or sew up amoth's wing. I think the best thing todo is to put it on a nice fresh leaf, in aplace where the birds will not see it." Justas James said these words, off the mothflew !The next day, when Ann was out atplay, just the same moth came down on atwig close to her. She knew it was thesame one by the wing. "'Ah, Mr. Moth,"said Ann, "you are not so lame as youseem. I will not touch you, lest I shouldhurt you." While she yet spoke the mothflew off.Did the moth come to Ann just to showher that it was quite well, and that it coulduse its wings ? No one can tell. But Annwent in great glee to James, to tell him thatStheir friend, Mr. Moth, had made a call tosee how they were, and to let them know hewas all right once more, and was not a lamemoth.


MACK."MACK, what would you do if a great bigman were to come now and try to take me ?.Mack, there you stand and wag your tail,and look at me as if I were a doll withglass eyes; why do you not speak ?""Bow-wow !" said Mack."There now," said Jane, " I thought youwould say Bow-wow! All dogs say Bow-wow! You can do more than most dogscan ; why do you not learn to speak ?"


48 MACK." Bow-wow-wow!" said Mack."Ah, Mack, I see how it is; each timeI say the word 'speak '-- ""Bow-wow!""Yes; each time I say speak,-"" Bow-wow-wow! ""You say Bow-wow. Is that the wayyou speak ?"" Bow-wow!"" Well: now let me put this wreath roundyour neck; you are a good dog, though it isof no use to try to teach you to speak.""Bow-wow! Bow-wow-wow! Bow-wow! "Jane has taught Mack to speak in his way.iHe knows that "speak " means to make akind of noise with the mouth; and the bestsort of noise he can make with his mouth is"Bow-wow," and that means all sorts ofthings. One sort of " Bow-wow " may mean,"I'm glad to see you;" the next way in whichhe says "Bow-wow" may mean, "Will youcome for a walk ? " A third kind of " Bow-wow " may mean, "What a fine day "


THE POOR CHILD.BESS and NAN were on their way to seetheir Aunt Jane at Oak Farm. Though itwas in the spring of the year, it was a coldday, and they were glad to put on theirthick wool gloves and their warm furcapes.When they came to the cot near the endof the lane which leads to the first field,they saw at the door a poor child with noshoes or socks. When the child saw themshe put her hand up to her poor, pale face,to hide the tears which ran down hercheeks.(364) 4


'0 THE POOR CHILD."Why do you cry, poor girl?" said Bess;" are you cold ?""Oh yes," said- the poor child; "I amcold-oh, so cold You know not how coldit is, for you have such a nice warm frockand a fur cape; your socks are made oflamb's wool, and your shoes have goodthick soles to keep out the wet and cold.See my poor bare feet! My toes are quitesore. I have had no food to-day, and wehave no fire in the house-we have nocoals.""Poor child! " said Bess; "I will bringyou some food.""And I," said Nan, "will bring you apair of socks and a pair of shoes."" Oh, thank you !" said the poor child.Bess and Nan did not stay long at OakFarm. As soon as they got home, theyspoke of the poor child, and they weresoon on their way to her cot. How gladshe was to see them and their goodgifts!


SIR JOHN GRAY.SIR JOHN GRAY was an old, old man, when Ifirst knew him. I was quite a child then;and so was my wife, who was my play-mate.We are both old now, but still we think ofthe way in which good Sir John Gray toldus things which both old and young oughtto know. He told us of God who made allthings, and who does good to all-whosends the rain and the sun to make the corngrow, that we may have bread to eat.How glad we were to go to Sir JohnGray's house! Though he was so old, hewould have his chair brought out and put


52 SIR JOHN GRAY.on the lawn; and there he would sit andtalk to us, and would hear us read our nicetoy-books; and he would tell us nice tales,and ask us to spell the names of some ofthe things that we saw, and of some of thefruit which he gave us to eat. He did allhe could to please us, and to teach us; andhow he would laugh at our fun He wouldsay, "My dears, have as much fun as youcan. I love to see the mirth of youngfolks; but do not in fun do -what is wrong,or say what you should not say. Sin is notfun, and all that is wrong is sin."We were sad when we heard that SirJohn Gray was dead. We were told his endwas peace. The way to die a death of peaceis to live a life of peace-peace with God.No one is too young to die, and all shouldstrive so to live that they may not feardeath. The young may die, the old must.It is said that they live long who live well.If we love life, we should not waste time, for"time is the stuff life is made of."


THE CAGE BIRD."I WISH I were as free as those birds outthere " said a cage bird one day as he saw alot of birds fly past his cage, and heard themsing as they flew."They do not sing so well as I do," saidr he; " yet they can fly just where they please,and can do just what they like, whilst poorI am kept in this cage."One of the free birds heard this, and said:"True, we are free; but we have to seekour own food; and we know not how soonwe may be shot by a man, or caught by akite. You have some one to take care of


54 THE CAGE BIRD.you. It is well to be you, I think. Yourfood is brought to you day by day; you eatand drink as much as you like; and youneed not fear hawks, or kites, or guns, orstones which are thrown by bad boys at uspoor birds, that must fly here and there insearch of food. One day I went down thereto pick up a worm, and a great black catran to catch me, so I flew off and left theworm."" Quite right," said the bird in the cage." You were wise to fly when you saw thecat. What a good thing it must be to befree "Well, it is a good thing to be free. Itmust be a sad thing to be a slave. And yet,whilst there are slaves who in one way arefree, there are those who, though not slavesto man, are slaves' to vice-slaves to sin.He is free whom the Truth makes free; all.else are slaves. It is well for some of usthat we are not as free as we should like tobe.


THE NEST.THREE birds: one in the nest, one on thebough, and one on wing. It seems to methat the bird on wing wants to peck at thebird on the bough. Why does he want todo that ? I should like to know. Can youtell me ?I am not sure that the bird on wing wantsto peck the bird on the bough, but yet itdoes seem like it. It may be that the birdon wing has no young ones to take care of,and that he wants the bird on the bough tofly with him from tree to tree, and frombough to bough. " Oh no, thank you," saysthe bird on the bough; " I want to be near


56 THE NEST.to my mate, who means to stay here to takecare of our dear young ones in the nest tillthey can fly."" The bird on wing says, "0 you crossthing, I will not be your friend; I will comeand peck, peck, peck ""Ah, but," says the bird on the bough,"I can peck, peck, peck, as well as you can;and if you come and peck me, I may try topeck you. I must take care of my nest.My mate is in the nest with her youngbrood, and she will not fly out, so I sit onthe bough and sing to her; and I will takecare that you shall not come too close toher. You are a bad bird to say you willpeck, peck, peck at me."It is bad for birds to fall out, but it isworse for girls and boys to" Fall out and chide-and fight."Cross words may lead to hard blows, and ahard blow may cause death. Try all youcan to speak kind words and to do kinddeeds.


THE SUN.IT is a fine sight to see the sun rise. Itmakes one feel glad. The best way to seethe sun rise is to go to the top of somehigh hill, and turn to the east. You willsee just a small streak of light at first, butby-and-by there will be such a rich blaze oflight, that no gems in the crown of a kingor a queen are half so bright. Boys andgirls who lie in bed late lose a great treat.They do not see the sun rise. What a sadthing it must be to be kept in a place wherethe light of the sun is not seen The sun isthe source of heat and of light. Not a tree


58 THE SUN.or shrub-no, not a blade of grass-couldgrow, if it were not for the heat and thelight of the sun. The sun is a long wayfrom the earth. The earth goes round thesun once a year. The sun is said to rise inthe east, and to set in the west. It seemsto do so, but the fact is that the earth goesround; the sun stands still. When we saywe see the sun rise, we mean that we see itin the east as soon as it can be seen; whenwe say we see the sun set, we mean that wesee the last of it for the day, as it seems tosink in the west. It is a treat to see thesun set at the close of a fine day.The sun shines in his full strength at mid-day.The moon gives light to the earth atnight. But the light of the moon comesfrom the sun. The light of the sun shineson the moon and makes it so bright that itgives light to the earth. God made "thesun to rule the day," and "the moon to rulethe night."


"iHE MAN AT THE WHEEL.HAVE you been -on board of a steam-boat ?If you have, of course you saw the man atthe wheel. The wheel is at the stern of theboat-that is, at the back part of it; andthe use of it is to turn the boat, and tcguide it. If the man at the wheel were notto mind his work, and were to look fromside to side, much harm might be done.This is why on most steam-boats there is,near the wheel, a board with the wordson it,-DO NOT TALK TO THE MAN AT THE WHEEL.


60 THE MAN AT THE WHEEL.If the man were to talk he might notthink of what he had to do; and it wouldbe a sad thing if lives were lost through hiswant of care. Those who have work to doshould not stop to talk, or to do thingswhich should be left till they have donetheir work. It is not fair to take up thetime of those who have their bread to earn ;and it is not right to tempt girls or boysat school to play or talk when they oughtto learn."Work while you work; play while you play."Those who play when they are at work,spoil their work; and those who workwhen they are in play, spoil their play-and their work too. All work and no playmay be bad, but all play and no work isworse.When you have a task to learn, try togive your whole mind to it. At first itmay seem a hard one. But give all yourthoughts to it for a time, and you will soonfind that you can with ease learn it.


OLD JACK.Now, old Jack, you have had a good longrest, so you need not hang your head downso low, as soon as Hodge brings you up tothe cart. Oh, I see now why you hold yourhead like that. It is not that you do notwant to draw the cart; you want Hodge topat you and say, "Poor Jack Good Jack !Fine old Jack !" And I think that youcan smell the new hay that lies there justby the side of the cart; and your head hungin that sly way may mean: " As we have along way to go, Hodge, I think that a fewbites of that new-mown hay would not do


62 OLD JACK.me harm-I feel sure that it would do megood."Hodge seems to know what the horsemeans, for he turns to look at the hay, andI think that he will give Jack some of it;then he will make him draw the cart full ofsacks of corn to the great town, which isfive miles off.Five miles to the town and five milesback will be ten miles. That would be along way for you to walk, but Jack canwith ease walk two or three times ten milesin a day, and draw a cart too.The horse is of great use to man. Itworks hard for him. The horse, like thedog, is the friend of man. The horse goeswith man to plough in the field. It drawsthe gay coach and the light gig, the strongcart and the grim hearse. The horse is ofuse when it is dead. Its flesh is food forcats and dogs; and, in some parts, for men.Its hair is of use, so is its skin, so are itsbones.


THE PET LAMB.KATE was six years old. When the dayswere long and all, the trees were full ofleaves, and the sun was so hot that Katedid not know where to go to find a coolplace, she would take off her shops and hersocks, and with her bare fegt she wouldwalk on the soft green grass. She said itwas nice towash her feet in the clear brook,and to wipe them dry on the hay.Kate had a pet lamb. It was but a fewmonths old, yet it knew her voice, andwould come to her as soon as it -heard hercall it. It would drink from the bowl whichshe held in her hand. The lamb wouldwalk by the side of Kate just like a dog.


64 THE PET LAMB.It would stop when it saw Kate stop; andwhen Kate ran, the pet lamb would run too.It was quite a treat to see the two weethings run side by side. The pet lamb on itsfour legs went hop, skip! hop, skip! andKate on her two legs went trip, trot! trip,trot! Then how she would laugh to seethe pet lamb run twice- as fast as shecould !When Kate grew to be a big girl, shehad to go to work; and her pet lamb hadgrown big too-it was a large fat sheep.But when Kate went to the field in which itwas kept, it would run to her, as if to say,"How do you do? I am glad to seeyou."Sheep know the voice of those who takecare of them. In the East, the herds-thatis, those who have charge of large flocks ofsheep-call them when they want them tocome to the fold. They do not drive them,they lead them ; that is, they go in front ofthe sheep, and where they go the sheep go.


THE, COAST.JANE and ANN once went with their AuntCole on board of a ship of which Aunt Coleknew the mate. They did not go far outto sea, so that they did not lose sight ofland.Both Jane and Ann saw much that madethem think a great deal of what they hadread in books. They saw the wide, widesea, and the great ships and the small shipson it; they saw gulls, and sea-birds of whichthey did not know the name; and more thanthat, they saw the coast, and the town inwhich they dwelt. They saw shafts, and(364) 5


66 THE COAST.the smoke from them; they saw churchspires and trees. Here a tall house, andthere a wharf. Then they saw green hillswith sheep on them, and they saw men atwork in the fields; and Ann told Jane andher aunt that she thought she could seesome boys and girls_ at play on their wayfrom school. I dare say she could, for hereye-sight was strong, and the day wasclear.But as the ship went on, Ann said, " Thegirls and boys seem to get less and less insize, and the sheep on those hills look likesmall white stones. The great mill lookslike a toy that a child could take in hishand!"When a ship is far out at sea,-"O'er the deep o'er the deep!Where the whale, and the shark, and the sword-fish sleep,"no land can be seen. Look which way onemay, it seems as though the whole worldwere sea and sky When the world comesto an end, there will be "no more sea."


c1-4---~- -~-THE SEA.IT is a fine, clear day; and the sea is socalm that a small boat might float on it andbe as safe as a great ship. Those who arein the skiff seem to like their sea trip. Onehas a glass which makes, things that are along way off seem to be quite close. He cansee a ship a long, long way off Then thereis one man who thinks he can catch a fish inhis hand. Not quite so fast, my good man.The fish are too swift for you. They do notwant to be caught in your hand. Thosebirds are gulls. They catch fish, though they


68 THE SEA.do not use nets. When I was at the sea-side last June I saw lots of gulls. Theymake their nests of sea-weed, and on rockswhich rise out of the sea, or which are onthe coast. Each hen gull lays two or threeeggs, so by-and-by each hen gull has two orthree young gulls. For some time they keepclose to her, to learn how to fly, and how tocatch small birds, and to fish.In the sea, the large fish feed on the smallones. Men, and beasts, and birds catchfish and eat them. On the coast of our ownland, sprats have been caught and put on theland to make it rich, so that good cropsmight grow on it.God made the sea and all that is in it.There is more sea than land in the world.In the Psalms we read of the "great andwide sea," in which are more things thatcreep than man can count, and " both smalland great beasts." We do not now speak of" beasts" that live in the sea. We call allthings that walk on four legs beasts.


THE KITE.JOHN and FRANK had a fine large kite, witha long tail to it; and when they came homefrom school, and had had their tea, theywent a short way out of the town to fly theirkite. They went as far as the field by theside of the old mill. There was a goodbreeze, and their kite flew up so high thatyou would have thought it was a bird in thesky; but when the wind got less strong,the kite came down-down-down-till theboys thought it would fall to the ground.But in a short time it went up-up-up-till it was hard work to hold the string. The


70 THE KITE.kite went as high as the string would let itgo.Ned Brooks had been sent to the mill forsome flour. He put the bag of flour on theback of his nag, and he rode on the bag.There was a change in the wind: downcame the kite in front of Ned's nag. Thenag took fright, and ran off as fast as itcould. Poor Ned Brooks was thrown off,and hurt so much that at one time it wasthought he would die. He could not leavehis bed for some weeks, and he was in sogreat pain some nights that he could notsleep. John and Frank were glad when Nedgot quite well. Of course they could nothelp the change in'the wind, nor did theythink that the sight of their kite would makeNed's horse start off as if it were mad. NedBrooks knew that, so he did not blame Johnand Frank for what they could not help.He went to play with them when he gotwell. You may be sure that when he wentwith them to fly the kite he thought of his fall.


TRUE TALES.ALL girls and boys like to hear tales, andto read them. Some tales are all true,and some tales have much that is not truein them, and some tales are not true at all-they are just made up to please those towhom they are told. A tale may be a nicetale, and may please us much, and may help*us to see what is right and what is wrong,what is good and what is bad, and yet it maynot all be true. Gilt is not gold, and yet itlooks nice to the eye. We know that theframe of the glass is not made of pure gold;but the gilt is made of gold-just a wee bit


72 TRUE TALES.of gold spread out makes the frame look asthough it were all gold.' And so it is with agood tale : it may not all be truth, but yetit is the truth that makes us .like it-it istruth spread out, like the gold on the woodof the frame."When you can read with ease books withlong words, you will find in them tales "noless strange than true." Some of them inaybe read to you or told to you now. Some ofthem you may have heard, and some are putin short words so that you can read them.Young folks like to read tale books; andold folks like to hear the young folks readthem. And how nice it is to read tales thathave no long words in them !FNS)-IO-


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16 PLAY. would not sit still. Then the bird flew up, and sat on a bough of the tree. I saw it, and so did Flo. You should have seen Flo wag her tail! It was as though she would say, I'll catch that bird for you, if I get a fair chance.' The bird flew to the ground, and stood a long way off from Flo; as much as to say, Catch me if you can, fat four legs !' Flo ran-oh, so fast I But back the bird flew to the tree. It was such fun "But how do you know that that is the bird that came to play with you and Flo ? "Why, there has been but that one bird all the time I have been here. If you wait, you will see it fly back to the beech-tree. I am sure Flo knows it is the same bird "Now, Frank, I'll tell you what I think. That bird may be fond of play, but it is more fond of its young. See, its nest is on a bough of the beech-tree. It did not like to see a boy and a dog so near to it. There It has flown back to the beech-tree Now, Frank, let ydu and me and Flo have a run up thehill." (364)



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64 THE PET LAMB. It would stop when it saw Kate stop; and when Kate ran, the pet lamb would run too. It was quite a treat to see the two wee things run side by side. The pet lamb on its four legs went hop, skip! hop, skip! and Kate on her two legs went trip, trot! trip, trot! Then how she would laugh to see the pet lamb run twiceas fast as she could When Kate grew to be a big girl, she had to go to work; and her pet lamb had grown big too-it was a large fat sheep. But when Kate went to the field in which it was kept, it would run to her, as if to say, "How do you do? I am glad to see you." Sheep know the voice of those who take care of them. In the East, the herds-that is, those who have charge of large flocks of sheep-call them when they want them to come to the fold. They do not drive them, they lead them ; that is, they go in front of the sheep, and where they go the sheep go.



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CAN SHE KNIT? KING JAMES the First and Sixth," of whom you will read a good deal some day, was thought to be a wise man. One day a lass was brought to the king by her friends, who were quite proud of what she knew and what she could do. They told King James that she knew three or four tongues, such as French, and Greek, and Dutch; she could paint, and play the harp, and sing; she could hunt and fish, and do all sorts of things that few of her age and sex could do. (364; 2



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60 THE MAN AT THE WHEEL. If the man were to talk he might not think of what he had to do; and it would be a sad thing if lives were lost through his want of care. Those who have work to do should not stop to talk, or to do things which should be left till they have done their work. It is not fair to take up the time of those who have their bread to earn ; and it is not right to tempt girls or boys at school to play or talk when they ought to learn. "Work while you work; play while you play." Those who play when they are at work, spoil their work; and those who work when they are in play, spoil their playand their work too. All work and no play may be bad, but all play and no work is worse. When you have a task to learn, try to give your whole mind to it. At first it may seem a hard one. But give all your thoughts to it for a time, and you will soon find that you can with ease learn it.



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14 SQUIFF AND WHUSK. Squiff and Whusk were born in the same week and on the same farm. One day, when Squiff and Whusk were at their play-a game 'of squeak, I think it was-they made such a noise that all the old rats told them to leave the farm at once. Squiff and Whusk said to the old rats, Let us stay, and we will try to be good." "What! said the chief of the old rats; young irats be good why, that is worst of all! What is the use of rats if they are good ? They will not steal. Off you go We want no good rats here, and we will not put up with your noise; be off, both of you !" Squiff and Whusk knew it was of no use to say "No," so off they went as fast as they could to the next farm. They had not long to search for food. There they are in high glee. Whusk says, "Let us try which can eat most." No," says. Squiff, "let us try which can make the least noise; I heard the maid call the dogs. What if we were caught!



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THE RED-BREAST. COME, Dick! You need not be so shy. You know us as well as we know you. How shy you look! Do you think we want to catch you? Not we. We like to see you, and to hear you sing, but we do not wish to put ydu in a cage. Come! You need not keep so far off! I will not throw the crumbs out so far as that. Here they are; come and take them if you want them. Ha! hop, hop, hop! You are glad to come for them, are you, sir? Hop, hop,



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48 MACK. Bow-wow-wow!" said Mack. "Ah, Mack, I see how it is; each time I say the word 'speak '-" "Bow-wow!" "Yes; each time I say speak,-" Bow-wow-wow! "You say Bow-wow. Is that the way you speak ?" Bow-wow!" Well: now let me put this wreath round your neck; you are a good dog, though it is of no use to try to teach you to speak." "Bow-wow! Bow-wow-wow! Bow-wow! Jane has taught Mack to speak in his way. iHe knows that "speak means to make a kind of noise with the mouth; and the best sort of noise he can make with his mouth is "Bow-wow," and that means all sorts of things. One sort of Bow-wow may mean, "I'm glad to see you;" the next way in which he says "Bow-wow" may mean, "Will you come for a walk ? A third kind of Bowwow may mean, "What a fine day



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fonttnis. THE FALSE STEP, ... ... ... ... ... 9 THE FRENCH FLEET, ... .... ... ... 11 SQUIFF AND WHUSK, ... ... ... ... ... 13 PLAY, ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 15 CAN SHE KNIT ? ... ... ... ... ... ... 17 THE RED-BREAST, ... ... ... ... ... 19 WORK, .. ... ... ... .. .. ... 21 THE LARK, ... ... ... ... ... ... 23 A DOG FIGHT, ... ... ... ... ... ... 25 THE HEN AND CHICKS, ... ... .. ... ... 27 SPORT, ... .. ... ... ... ... ... 29 THE KIND HINT, ... ... ... ... ... ... 31 THE ASS, .. ... ... ... ... ... 33 NURSE, ........ ... .. ... 35 TRY, ... .. ... ... .. ... ... 37 THE TWO FRIENDS, ... ... ... ... -... 39



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THE LITTLE READING-BOOK IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE). IXutistrateb toith Prettt Picturie. BTY EDWARD N. MARKS, AUTBOR OF "WORDS TO SPELL," THE EAR AND THE EYE," ETC., ETC. LONDON: T. NELSON AND SONS, PATERNOSTER ROW; EDINBURGH; AND NEW YORK. 1872.



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-7SQUIFF AND WHUSK. SQUIFF and WHUSK What strange names Well, yes, the names are strange; but those who bear them are firm friends for all that. Friends? What! your friends, or my friends ? Just think of "My dear friend Squiff'!" or, "Our good friend Whusk Ohrdear! what names! Squiff and Whusk! But tell us, whose friends are they ? Squiff and Whusk are two young rats. Squiff is the friend of Whusk, and Whusk is the friend of Squiff. And firm friends thy are, and will be, till they fall out.



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28 THE HEN AND CHICKS. See! one is on her back. He may have got up there for fun, and it may be that, in chick words, he says to the chicks which are round the hen on the ground, Ah, you poor wee chicks, you are not so tall as I am !" The hen looks as if she would say, You will have to get down when you want to eat, grand as you are." The hen is proud of her chicks. She seems to think that there are no chicks so fine as hers in the whole world. She does not care to go with the hens that have no chicks. She likes to stay with her brood. The hen shows her chicks how to find food. They would not know how to do so if she were not to teach them. They like to learn, and she likes to teach, so they get on well. Though the chicks have food brought to them twice a day, they like to find tid-bits here and there when they are out for a walk. It is good for their health. Have you not seen cocks and hens and chicks scratch up the ground to look for food ?



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c1-4 ---~-~THE SEA. IT is a fine, clear day; and the sea is so calm that a small boat might float on it and be as safe as a great ship. Those who are in the skiff seem to like their sea trip. One has a glass which makes, things that are a long way off seem to be quite close. He can see a ship a long, long way off Then there is one man who thinks he can catch a fish in his hand. Not quite so fast, my good man. The fish are too swift for you. They do not want to be caught in your hand. Those birds are gulls. They catch fish, though they



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20 THE RED-BREAST. hop Come, you are still too far off to pick up the crumbs. How well you look in that brown coat and red vest! You do not seem to care much for the cold. Dick, you look as though you knew all we say to you It makes one smile to see you turn your wee head from side to side, as if to try on which side you hear best. Why do you not bring your friends with you? Have you no friends of your own kind ? Where is your mate ? Why do you not bring her with you ? I dare say you take good care of her. She is in some snug place, in which she has food to eat; and you leave her for a time and fly off to such friends as we are for a few crumbs. How tame you are I do not think you know what we say, or you would come and play with us here in the room. Do you think we can fly as you can? I wish we could fly in such fine months as May and June, when we could have such fine fun.



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-QUITE A MAN. I THINK I am quite a man, a young man now, Liz," said Tom to a girl whom he knew well, as she sat by the gate of her home, and not far from a dear friend. Well," said Liz, I heard Ted say last week that boys are young men by the same rule that kits are young cats; and that now boys think they are men, but act as boys for all that. If you were a man, Tom, you would not throw plum-stones at me; you would not tease my dog; you would not put your leg out to make me fall down; you would not laugh when you see rude



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TRUE TALES. ALL girls and boys like to hear tales, and to read them. Some tales are all true, and some tales have much that is not true in them, and some tales are not true at all -they are just made up to please those to whom they are told. A tale may be a nice tale, and may please us much, and may help *us to see what is right and what is wrong, what is good and what is bad, and yet it may not all be true. Gilt is not gold, and yet it looks nice to the eye. We know that the frame of the glass is not made of pure gold; but the gilt is made of gold-just a wee bit



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THE FALSE STEP. PooR boy How pale and how sad he looks By what he holds in his left hand we can tell that he has not the free use of his legs. If you were to ask him why he looks so sad, he would tell you that it makes him feel sad when he thinks how it was that he broke the great bone of his leg. Then if you were to ask, "How was it done ?" he would say, "I took a false step." Ha! he means more than he says when he tells you that he took a false step. It is quite true that through a false step-



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5 PEM WEST READS TO HER OLD NURSE 7',,-



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I 1 THE KIND HINT. PEM WEST had a nice book, which her aunt bought for her on New Year's Day. She took great care of it, and had it put with her aunt's best books in the case, so that it was free from dust. One day she had it out to show to some of her young friends who came to take tea with her. One child who came had not clean hands. She took hold of Pem's book, and made a mark on it. Pem did not look cross or cry, as some would have done. In a kind way she said to the child, "Would it not be well, dear,





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Preface. THIS book is all in short words. If here and there you find a word that looks like a long one, you will soon see that it is made of two short words, such as "steam-boat," or "playmate; so that they are not hard to read, or hard to say. If you meet with a word that is strange to you, and you do not know what it means, ask some one to tell you what it means. That is the way to learn. Those who wish to be wise must learn from those who can teach them. When you can read short words with ease, you will want to try to read books with long words; but you know that when you learnt to walk, you



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82 THE KIND HINT. if you were to wash your hands ? Will you come with me to my room ? Jane, the nurse is there, and I am sure she will wash your hands for you, if you ask her. I think, though, you would like me to ask her. I will do so. Those of our young friends who have hands quite clean, can play with my toys and books till we come back." This was a kind hint to each child whose hands were not clean. The child put her arms round Pem's neck, and said, I love you, Pem, you are so good and so kind to me. I wish that my hands had been clean when I took hold of your book." But Pem was kind to old folk too; for she went now and then and read to her old nurse out of God's Book. It is the best Book. It tells us whatis best for us in this world, and it tells of the world to come. I hope that you will soon learn to read that good Book, and that you will bear in mind what it says. You should love it, for it is the word of God, who is your best friend.



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THE PET LAMB. KATE was six years old. When the days were long and all, the trees were full of leaves, and the sun was so hot that Kate did not know where to go to find a cool place, she would take off her shops and her socks, and with her bare fegt she would walk on the soft green grass. She said it was nice towash her feet in the clear brook, and to wipe them dry on the hay. Kate had a pet lamb. It was but a few months old, yet it knew her voice, and would come to her as soon as it -heard her call it. It would drink from the bowl which she held in her hand. The lamb would walk by the side of Kate just like a dog.



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40 THE TWO FRIENDS. "What a long walk we have had! said Miss Hill; "and we shall have to walk all the way back." That will be nice!" said Miss Marsh; it does us good to have nice long walks." It tires us, that's what it does," said Miss Hill, in so cross a tone of voice that her friend felt sad, and did not speak for some time. At last, when the church clock struck four, Miss Hill got up, and said, It was wrong for me to say what I did to you, when you were so kind as to take a nice long walk with me." Miss Marsh gave Miss Hill a kiss, and soon the two friends were once more full of glee. "Why, here we are, close to our homes !" said Miss Hill. What a short walk back we have had !" "I am glad you think so," said Miss Marsh; "it shows that you are not so weak as you thought you were."





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^/ *//i(/f/t /2 L ^d 1 i /1 (7;> / if 'I4



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42 CLEAN AND NEAT. Now, I must tell you that each day in the week Bess was late at school; and more than four times in the week Miss Grange had to tell her that she must have her hands clean, and her hair neat. All the four girls who spoke to Ruth, and said she was Miss Prim, were late at school that day, and when they came they felt ill at ease-they were not clean and neat. The day was hot, and the dust' flew up and round; so that made them wish all the more that they had done as Ruth did. The next day they were not at play when it was near school-time; and when they came to school they were in good time, and they "were clean and neat. A girl who can walk, and run, and skip, and romp; and play at all sorts of games, ought to 'learn to wash her own face and hands, and to comb and brush her own hair. To be clean is good for health. .It ought to make a girl blush to be seen when she is not clean and neat.



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WORK. HERE yOU see a shed, with two carts in it. Just in front of the shed is a white horse. Close by the white horse is a brown horse, and just by the tail of the brown horse is a tall stout man in a smock-frock. Ten years since, that tall stout man was a poor, thin, weak boy. He had but one 'friend in the world. Her name was Ann Briggs. Joe Small was the son of friends of hers who were dead. Ann Briggs took --care of Joe from the time he was a babe. But Ann Briggs was old as well as poor, and at her death Joe was left to get on in



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THE CAGE BIRD. "I WISH I were as free as those birds out there said a cage bird one day as he saw a lot of birds fly past his cage, and heard them sing as they flew. "They do not sing so well as I do," said r he; yet they can fly just where they please, and can do just what they like, whilst poor I am kept in this cage." One of the free birds heard this, and said: "True, we are free; but we have to seek our own food; and we know not how soon we may be shot by a man, or caught by a kite. You have some one to take care of



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THE SUN. IT is a fine sight to see the sun rise. It makes one feel glad. The best way to see the sun rise is to go to the top of some high hill, and turn to the east. You will see just a small streak of light at first, but by-and-by there will be such a rich blaze of light, that no gems in the crown of a king or a queen are half so bright. Boys and girls who lie in bed late lose a great treat. They do not see the sun rise. What a sad thing it must be to be kept in a place where the light of the sun is not seen The sun is the source of heat and of light. Not a tree



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38 TRY. to learn now, I can try to teach you; and you will have to try when you get that great, wise man to teach you. The more you learn now, the less you will have to learn then." "Dear Rose," said Fred, "P think you will grow up to be a wise man !-Why do you laugh? I will try, and then the wise man-will find that I shall learn all he has to teach me in two weeks. How he will stare "Now let me try to learn ;-A, B, C. There now! All that 'in one day! I can say that by heart-A, B, C. Look at me, Rose; I can say A,.B, C, with my eyes shut!" Why, Fred," said Rose,-" you could say A, B, C, last week; but you did not know A or B or C in print, and I do not think you know it now. But I will let you off this time, and will read to you a nice tale all in short words. I am sure you will like that."



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MACK. "MACK, what would you do if a great big man were to come now and try to take me ?. Mack, there you stand and wag your tail, and look at me as if I were a doll with glass eyes; why do you not speak ?" "Bow-wow !" said Mack. "There now," said Jane, I thought you would say Bow-wow! All dogs say Bowwow! You can do more than most dogs can ; why do you not learn to speak ?"



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44 QUITE A MAN. boys do things which you know are wrong. You may be a big boy, and you may be an old boy, but I shall not think you a man till you act as a man. "Ted says no true man would do a mean thing. A true man is brave and just; he will do what is right, and fear not. Think of that, Tom." "Yes, Liz, I will, and thank you. What you say is quite true. A boy in years may be quite a man in sense, whilst an old man may be worse than a boy in some things." "I have heard it said," said Liz, that 'boys will be boys and it would be well if men would be men -that is, true men. There are boys who think that they act like men when they smoke, or when they drink what does them harm, or when they make use of bad words, or when they stroll in the streets when they should be in the house of God, or at school, or at work."



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18 CAN SHE KNIT? When the king had heard all they had to say, he said, Can she knit?" Now, he did show good sense when he said that. In those days a girl who could not knit was of no more use than a girl is now who does not know how to do a stitch. It is well for all girls to know how to do such things as need be done in a home. One could have a nice home and yet talk no French; but we could not have a nice home if there were no one in it to cook and to keep things as they should be kept. Some think that none but poor girls should be taught to knit. Why do they think so ? What a good thing it would be if some who are well off knew how to knit, and were to teach poor girls how to do it! All girls and boys should be taught to do work of some sort-such work as they would get pay for if they had to work for pay. There are lands in which each boy is taught a trade, and each girl is brought up to do work of some sort. It is a good plan.



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A DOG FIGHT. THERE are some bad men who, for what they call sport, set dogs to fight. I dare say you have seen boys in the street try to get dogs to fight. ,It is wrong to do so. If dogs fight when they meet, and they are not set on to fight, no one can help it. If one dog has a bone, or a piece of meat, and a dog comes and wants to take it from him, they first snarl, and growl, and bark, and then they fight; and the strong one, or the one that is most fierce, gets the bone or the meat. No one can tell why, if some dogs meet, they fight. These two dogs, Bob and Bounce, are



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NURSE. How kind nurse is! We all love her, for she loves-us all, and does what she can to. please us. She takes care of our toys when we go to bed; she cuts our cake for us, and cracks our nuts. Nurse knows such a lot of rhymes, which she says she learnt when she was a young girl, and she knows a lot of nice tales'; so when we are good and sit still, she tells the tales and says the rhymes. so well, that she has not to stop to think what comes next. What a long time it must take to learn such a lot of rhymes so



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34 THE ASS. minds what we say to him. But now and then he stands stock still, as if to tease us. We say, Go on, Ned !-good Ned, go on !" but there Ned stands. He moves his long ears to and fro, and looks at us. If we use the whip to him, he will not move at all; so we pat him, and give him some hay: then off he goes, so fast that we have hard work to stop him when we want to do so. Those who say that an ass is too dull to know kind words from sharp blows should see our Ned. They would call him a wise ass. It is a great shame to ill-treat an ass. If he is as dull as some say he is, blows will not make him bright and sharp. How is he to know why he is hit ? May he not think it is to make him stand quite still? I know we take great pains to teach our Ned; and, ass as he is, he seems to know his friends. One day Ned was in the field, and some bad boys threw stones at him. He saw us at play, so off he ran to us; and when the boys saw that Ned was our pet, off they ran.



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PLAY. "LOOK, Jess That is the bird that is so fond of play "What do you mean, Frank ? How do you know that that bird is fond of play?" "Why, when you told me to wait by the beech-tree whilst you had a run with your hoop, the bird had such fun with Flo." "What do you mean, Frank ?" "Well, Jess, you know you told Flo to stay with me. As soon as you were out of sight, that bird came close to Flo and me. I think I should have caught it, but Flo 4':



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70 THE KITE. kite went as high as the string would let it go. Ned Brooks had been sent to the mill for some flour. He put the bag of flour on the back of his nag, and he rode on the bag. There was a change in the wind: down came the kite in front of Ned's nag. The nag took fright, and ran off as fast as it could. Poor Ned Brooks was thrown off, and hurt so much that at one time it was thought he would die. He could not leave his bed for some weeks, and he was in so great pain some nights that he could not sleep. John and Frank were glad when Ned got quite well. Of course they could not help the change in'the wind, nor did they think that the sight of their kite would make Ned's horse start off as if it were mad. Ned Brooks knew that, so he did not blame John and Frank for what they could not help. He went to play with them when he got well. You may be sure that when he went with them to fly the kite he thought of his fall.



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68 THE SEA. do not use nets. When I was at the seaside last June I saw lots of gulls. They make their nests of sea-weed, and on rocks which rise out of the sea, or which are on the coast. Each hen gull lays two or three eggs, so by-and-by each hen gull has two or three young gulls. For some time they keep close to her, to learn how to fly, and how to catch small birds, and to fish. In the sea, the large fish feed on the small ones. Men, and beasts, and birds catch fish and eat them. On the coast of our own land, sprats have been caught and put on the land to make it rich, so that good crops might grow on it. God made the sea and all that is in it. There is more sea than land in the world. In the Psalms we read of the "great and wide sea," in which are more things that creep than man can count, and both small and great beasts." We do not now speak of beasts" that live in the sea. We call all things that walk on four legs beasts.



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THE KITE. JOHN and FRANK had a fine large kite, with a long tail to it; and when they came home from school, and had had their tea, they went a short way out of the town to fly their kite. They went as far as the field by the side of the old mill. There was a good breeze, and their kite flew up so high that you would have thought it was a bird in the sky; but when the wind got less strong, the kite came down-down-down-till the boys thought it would fall to the ground. But in a short time it went up-up-uptill it was hard work to hold the string. The



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46 THE LAME MOTH. for such work; and I do not think Dr. Hunt could set a moth's leg, or sew up a moth's wing. I think the best thing to do is to put it on a nice fresh leaf, in a place where the birds will not see it." Just as James said these words, off the moth flew The next day, when Ann was out at play, just the same moth came down on a twig close to her. She knew it was the same one by the wing. "'Ah, Mr. Moth," said Ann, "you are not so lame as you seem. I will not touch you, lest I should hurt you." While she yet spoke the moth flew off. Did the moth come to Ann just to show her that it was quite well, and that it could use its wings ? No one can tell. But Ann went in great glee to James, to tell him that Stheir friend, Mr. Moth, had made a call to see how they were, and to let them know he was all right once more, and was not a lame moth.



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86 NURSE. well! But nurse says she learnt them one by one. She says that no one should try to do too much at once. Drop by drop the rain comes from the clouds; blade by blade the green grass springs up from the earth. One by one go the hours of the day; and one by one the days, weeks, and months of the year. See! Fred has got -on the couch to give nurse a kiss! I want babe to look at my horse. It is such a fine one. It is made of wood, and it goes on wheels as fast as I can run with it. Our babe is too young to. care much for a horse. He does not know which is the head and which is the tail. He takes hold of the tail and tries to put it in his mouth. When he grows up to be a big boy, and he has a live horse, I hope he will not try to bite its tail! My horse is white, with black spots on it. Its legs are straight and stiff, and will not bend.



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THE HEN AND CHICKS. How fond the hen is of her chicks! She has ten of them. If she could speak, she could not tell you which of them she likes best; for they are all dear to her, and she loves each one of them so much that she would die to save its life, or to keep it from harm. When the hen thinks that her chicks may be hurt, she says, Cluck! cluck! cluck !" and the chicks make a noise much like that made by young birds in their nests. They run to the hen, and she hides them with her wings till she thinks it is safe for them to go a short way from her. They take good care not to go too far from her; but she would soon call them back if they did.



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SIR JOHN GRAY. SIR JOHN GRAY was an old, old man, when I first knew him. I was quite a child then; and so was my wife, who was my play-mate. We are both old now, but still we think of the way in which good Sir John Gray told us things which both old and young ought to know. He told us of God who made all things, and who does good to all-who sends the rain and the sun to make the corn grow, that we may have bread to eat. How glad we were to go to Sir John Gray's house! Though he was so old, he would have his chair brought out and put



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58 THE SUN. or shrub-no, not a blade of grass-could grow, if it were not for the heat and the light of the sun. The sun is a long way from the earth. The earth goes round the sun once a year. The sun is said to rise in the east, and to set in the west. It seems to do so, but the fact is that the earth goes round; the sun stands still. When we say we see the sun rise, we mean that we see it in the east as soon as it can be seen; when we say we see the sun set, we mean that we see the last of it for the day, as it seems to sink in the west. It is a treat to see the sun set at the close of a fine day. The sun shines in his full strength at midday. The moon gives light to the earth at night. But the light of the moon comes from the sun. The light of the sun shines on the moon and makes it so bright that it gives light to the earth. God made "the sun to rule the day," and "the moon to rule the night."



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THE LITTLE READING-BOOK.



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26 A DOG FIGHT. sure to fight when they meet. Bounce barks, then Bob growls; for he does not like to hear Bounce bark. Then, when Bob growls, Bounce snarls. Bob looks at Bounce, as much as to say, I do not like your bark, but I hate your snarl;" he flies at him, and they fight. Bob 'isnot so big a dog as Bounce, but yet in most of their fights Bounce gets the worst of it. I do not like to see dogs fight, but if they fight, I like the one which is most to blame to get the worst of it. Bounce has no right to bark at Bob in the way he does. But Bob is not so wise a dog as he looks, or he would take less heed of Bounce. When Bounce snarls at Bob, Bob says, What teeth !" They are quite as good as yours," says Bounce. "No doubt you think so," says Bob. "Bow-wow-wow to you, bad Bob!" Bow-wow-wow to you, big Bounce !" Then comes the fight.



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10 THE FALSE STEP. or a step that he did not mean to take-he fell down the saw-pit and broke his leg. That was one false step, and some would say that that was the worst false step for the poor boy. He took the worst false step when he did what he was told not to do. He thinks of what, his aunt said to him on the same day" that he broke his leg. "Keep from the sawpit. If bad boys want you to go with them there to play, do not heed them." He thought of his aunt when the boys with whom he was at play said, "Let us go to the saw-pit. The men" have left it, to go to their homes; no one will know." Ah! when he went with those boys' he made the false step that he thinks most of He sees his young friends all at play, and hears them laugh as though there were no such thing as pain in the world. Let us hope that he will soon be well and strong once more, and that he will take care for the time to come. And let us bear in mind that a false step may do great harm.



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'0 THE POOR CHILD. "Why do you cry, poor girl?" said Bess; are you cold ?" "Oh yes," saidthe poor child; "I am cold-oh, so cold You know not how cold it is, for you have such a nice warm frock and a fur cape; your socks are made of lamb's wool, and your shoes have good thick soles to keep out the wet and cold. See my poor bare feet! My toes are quite sore. I have had no food to-day, and we have no fire in the house-we have no coals." "Poor child! said Bess; "I will bring you some food." "And I," said Nan, "will bring you a pair of socks and a pair of shoes." Oh, thank you !" said the poor child. Bess and Nan did not stay long at Oak Farm. As soon as they got home, they spoke of the poor child, and they were soon on their way to her cot. How glad she was to see them and their good gifts!



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THE ASS. "HERE we are, four of us, with our ass; and a fine strong young ass he is. We get on his back one at a time, though I doubt not that he could bear us all on his back at once. When one gets down, the one whose turn it is to ride next gets up, and off the ass trots-not as fast as he can, for we do not let him do that, but as fast as those can run who have to keep up with him. The one who drives has a small whip; but we do not whip our Ned much. He is a good ass, and 3i64: 3



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THE FRENCH FLEET. "YES, I see it! The French fleet! The whole fleet, with a man and two boys on board Dare they touch our shores ? No! The sight of our flag-the flag of the brave and the free-will-put them to flight !" So said Fred White, as he stood on the sands with his young friend Ben Hill. "Is that small craft the whole French fleet ?" said Ben. "Well, no; we shall not see the whole fleet till it is in sight-I think." "You think! Nay, you may be sure



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30 SPORT. If puss could speak, I think she would say, "Yes, dear, it is all the same to me. I like to eat birds. Nice young ones please me well. If I could get young birds to eat, I would leave the owl to catch mice. I like birds best. Men catch birds. They shoot them-kill them-cook them, and eat them-and that they call sport; why may not we cats have sport too ? We do not want to sell the birds we catch-we do not care to cook them-we do not know how to shoot them;-but we like to eat them. I think that a cat has a right to catch birds." Cats are beasts of prey, just the same as bears and wolves are. In their wild state their chief food is the flesh of birds. Tame cats catch mice, but they would catch birds if they could. That is why cats climb trees. We do not like to see cats catch birds, though we like them to catch mice. But how are cats to know that ? Birds are of use to us, and we are glad to hear them sing; but cats like their flesh!



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As g~: A~';;:



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56 THE NEST. to my mate, who means to stay here to take care of our dear young ones in the nest till they can fly." The bird on wing says, "0 you cross thing, I will not be your friend; I will come and peck, peck, peck "Ah, but," says the bird on the bough, "I can peck, peck, peck, as well as you can; and if you come and peck me, I may try to peck you. I must take care of my nest. My mate is in the nest with her young brood, and she will not fly out, so I sit on the bough and sing to her; and I will take care that you shall not come too close to her. You are a bad bird to say you will peck, peck, peck at me." It is bad for birds to fall out, but it is worse for girls and boys to Fall out and chide-and fight." Cross words may lead to hard blows, and a hard blow may cause death. Try all you can to speak kind words and to do kind deeds.



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TRY. COME to me, Fred, and learn to read," said Rose, who was not eight years old. I am too young to learn to read yet, and you are too young to teach me," said Fred. When I want to learn, I shall get a great big man, with a large, wise head, and a lot of great books; and he will teach me all that I shall need to know in less than three weeks; and then I shall be a man, and read the 'Times,' and write notes, and say, 'John, please bring my coat!'" But, Fred dear," said Rose, "if you try



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THE NEST. THREE birds: one in the nest, one on the bough, and one on wing. It seems to me that the bird on wing wants to peck at the bird on the bough. Why does he want to do that ? I should like to know. Can you tell me ? I am not sure that the bird on wing wants to peck the bird on the bough, but yet it does seem like it. It may be that the bird on wing has no young ones to take care of, and that he wants the bird on the bough to fly with him from tree to tree, and from bough to bough. Oh no, thank you," says the bird on the bough; I want to be near



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THE TWO FRIENDS. Miss MARSH and Miss Hill were friends. They were both the same age and the same height; they were born in the same town; they dwelt in the same street; and they went to the same school, and to the same church. One day they went out for a nice long walk in the fields. They went on and on, till they came quite close to the nekt town to which they dwelt. They sat down to rest on the root of a fine large tree.



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* ^ 93Vv\e^^r81 s *l;.;. s"^ '**tj ^ : ;: sl, **** .-, ...'I



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THE, COAST. JANE and ANN once went with their Aunt Cole on board of a ship of which Aunt Cole knew the mate. They did not go far out to sea, so that they did not lose sight of land. Both Jane and Ann saw much that made them think a great deal of what they had read in books. They saw the wide, wide sea, and the great ships and the small ships on it; they saw gulls, and sea-birds of which they did not know the name; and more than that, they saw the coast, and the town in which they dwelt. They saw shafts, and (364) 5



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CLEAN AND NEAT. "WHAT a Miss Prim you look! said Nell Smart to Ruth Field, How soon you left us, to wash your face and hands, comb and brush your hair, change your frock, put on clean boots, and make as much fuss as though you were to go to some grand place." I like to be clean and neat at school," said Ruth; "and Ilike to be in good time too." "Well, so do we all, Ruth," said Bess Mills, as she leaned on her hoop.



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62 OLD JACK. me harm-I feel sure that it would do me good." Hodge seems to know what the horse means, for he turns to look at the hay, and I think that he will give Jack some of it; then he will make him draw the cart full of sacks of corn to the great town, which is five miles off. Five miles to the town and five miles back will be ten miles. That would be a long way for you to walk, but Jack can with ease walk two or three times ten miles in a day, and draw a cart too. The horse is of great use to man. It works hard for him. The horse, like the dog, is the friend of man. The horse goes with man to plough in the field. It draws the gay coach and the light gig, the strong cart and the grim hearse. The horse is of use when it is dead. Its flesh is food for cats and dogs; and, in some parts, for men. Its hair is of use, so is its skin, so are its bones.



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"iHE MAN AT THE WHEEL. HAVE you been -on board of a steam-boat ? If you have, of course you saw the man at the wheel. The wheel is at the stern of the boat-that is, at the back part of it; and the use of it is to turn the boat, and tc guide it. If the man at the wheel were not to mind his work, and were to look from side to side, much harm might be done. This is why on most steam-boats there is, near the wheel, a board with the words on it,DO NOT TALK TO THE MAN AT THE WHEEL.



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66 THE COAST. the smoke from them; they saw church spires and trees. Here a tall house, and there a wharf. Then they saw green hills with sheep on them, and they saw men at work in the fields; and Ann told Jane and her aunt that she thought she could see some boys and girls_ at play on their way from school. I dare say she could, for her eye-sight was strong, and the day was clear. But as the ship went on, Ann said, The girls and boys seem to get less and less in size, and the sheep on those hills look like small white stones. The great mill looks like a toy that a child could take in his hand!" When a ship is far out at sea,"O'er the deep o'er the deep! Where the whale, and the shark, and the sword-fish sleep," no land can be seen. Look which way one may, it seems as though the whole world were sea and sky When the world comes to an end, there will be "no more sea."



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24 THE LARK. in his hand, and Dick thought he meant to throw it at the poor lark; so he said, "Ned, do you mean to throw that stone at him ?" "Yes; why not ? What harm ?" said Ned; I want you to see how well I can aim." For shame, Ned !" said Dick. Throw down the stone; why should you want to kill that poor bird, that sings so sweet a song to cheer us ? If you like, I will soon show you that I can aim quite as well as you can; but I should not like to aim to do ill." That made both Ned and Sam laugh, and Ned threw down the stone. The lark went on with his song. Ned said, I like to hear the lark sing. I am glad I did not kill him." "Ned," said Sam, "do not make up your mind that you could throw a stone at a lark and hit it and kill it. You might, I think, throw stones at birds all day and not hit one of them."



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Vi PREFACE. had first to learn to step. You took step by step till you could walk fast, then you learned to run, and to jump, and to skip. Skip now as much as you like, you will not have to skip hard words in this book, for there are no hard words in it.



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12 THE FRENCH FLEET. of that. How can we see what is not in sight ?" Why, Ben, what a boy you are How can I teach you whilst I am on the lookout for the French fleet ? Stand to your gun !-I mean, Stand to your spade !" Am I to dig the grave for the French fleet when you kill it, Fred ?" How can I kill the fleet ? I must hold the flag in my right hand and my gun in my left. If the French do not go back when they see the flag, they may when they see I have a gun as well. They do not like to be shot." Then, what have I to do with my spade ?" Why, call it a gun, and stand to it like a man! You need not call a spade a spade, when you call a smack with a man and two boys a fleet. But we must move, or we shall get wet. See how the waves flow to us! There will be no war. The French are our friends. Three cheers for the red, white, and blue !"



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OLD JACK. Now, old Jack, you have had a good long rest, so you need not hang your head down so low, as soon as Hodge brings you up to the cart. Oh, I see now why you hold your head like that. It is not that you do not want to draw the cart; you want Hodge to pat you and say, "Poor Jack Good Jack Fine old Jack !" And I think that you can smell the new hay that lies there just by the side of the cart; and your head hung in that sly way may mean: As we have a long way to go, Hodge, I think that a few bites of that new-mown hay would not do



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72 TRUE TALES. of gold spread out makes the frame look as though it were all gold.' And so it is with a good tale : it may not all be truth, but yet it is the truth that makes us .like it-it is truth spread out, like the gold on the wood of the frame. "When you can read with ease books with long words, you will find in them tales "no less strange than true." Some of them inay be read to you or told to you now. Some of them you may have heard, and some are put in short words so that you can read them. Young folks like to read tale books; and old folks like to hear the young folks read them. And how nice it is to read tales that have no long words in them FNS)-IO-



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THE LARK. THREE boys, Dick, Sam, and Ned, went out to play in the fields, and fine fun they had. As they sat down to rest for a short time, they heard a lark sing. How well he sings !" said Dick. He must be quite close to us, I think," said Sam. I should like to see him-that I should," said Ned. "There he is, then," said Sam, "so you can soon have your wish." Where ?" said Dick, and up he sprang. Just then he saw Ned with a small stone



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V111 CONTENTS. CLEAN AND NEAT, ... ... .. ... ... 41 QUITE A MAN, ... ... ... ... .. ... 43 THE LAME MOTH, ... ... ... ... ... 45 MACK, ... ... **... ... ... ... 47 THE POOR CHILD, ... ... ... ... .. 49 SIR JOHN GRAY, ... ... ... ... ... ... 51 THE CAGE BIRD, ... ... ... .. ... ... 53 THE NEST, ... ... ... ... ... ... 55 THE SUN, ... ... ... ... ... ... 57 THE MAN AT THE WHEEL, ... ... ... ... ... 59 OLD JACK, ... .... ... ... ... 61 THE PET LAMB, ... ... ... ... ... ... 63 THE COAST, ... ... ... ... ... ... 65 THE SEA, ... ... ... ... ... ... 67 THE KITE, ... ... .... ... 69 TRUE TALES, ... .. .... ... ... 71



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54 THE CAGE BIRD. you. It is well to be you, I think. Your food is brought to you day by day; you eat and drink as much as you like; and you need not fear hawks, or kites, or guns, or stones which are thrown by bad boys at us poor birds, that must fly here and there in search of food. One day I went down there to pick up a worm, and a great black cat ran to catch me, so I flew off and left the worm." Quite right," said the bird in the cage. You were wise to fly when you saw the cat. What a good thing it must be to be free Well, it is a good thing to be free. It must be a sad thing to be a slave. And yet, whilst there are slaves who in one way are free, there are those who, though not slaves to man, are slaves' to vice-slaves to sin. He is free whom the Truth makes free; all .else are slaves. It is well for some of us that we are not as free as we should like to be.



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THE LAME MOTH. JAMES and ANN took a nice walk at the close of a fine day; and on a rose-tree quite close to their path they saw a large moth. They went to look at it, and they thought that it would fly away when it saw them. But it did not. James then took it up, and he soon found that it could not fly far. Poor thing, some of its legs were as if they would fall of, and one of its wings was torn! "What shall we do with the poor moth?" said Ann. "I know not what would be the best thing to do," said James. "I have no skill





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22 WORK. the world as best he could. Rough work that for a boy ten years old. Joe had been taught at a Free School. He could read and write as well as most boys of his age in the school; and I am glad to say he made it his aim to do what is right in the sight of God as well as in the sight of man. One day Joe went in search of work; for he did not know how to get food to eat, or how to pay for a place to sleep in. But no work could he get. Night came on, and poor Joe did not know where to sleep. At last he came to a farm. No light was to be seen in the house. The folks had all gone to bed. Joe saw the shed with the carts in it. I think I can sleep in one of those carts," said he. At break of day Joe heard a man shout, "Heigh, boy what do you want here ?" I want work," said Joe. From that day Joe has had work on the farm; and there he is, a fine tall man.



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:"c7" Ii' ; ')n* OH, you bad puss You have gone up that old oak-tree to catch a poor bird! You have caught one-a large, fat one too It tries all it can to get free; but you will hold it fast in your teeth. You bad cat let the poor bird go; it may have some young ones at home in its nest. How bad you are to catch it and I am sure that when you bring it down from the tree, you will kill and eat it. You will not heed its cries, and you do not care a bit if it has a nest with young ones in it or not-it is all the same to you.



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THE POOR CHILD. BESS and NAN were on their way to see their Aunt Jane at Oak Farm. Though it was in the spring of the year, it was a cold day, and they were glad to put on their thick wool gloves and their warm fur capes. When they came to the cot near the end of the lane which leads to the first field, they saw at the door a poor child with no shoes or socks. When the child saw them she put her hand up to her poor, pale face, to hide the tears which ran down her cheeks. (364) 4



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52 SIR JOHN GRAY. on the lawn; and there he would sit and talk to us, and would hear us read our nice toy-books; and he would tell us nice tales, and ask us to spell the names of some of the things that we saw, and of some of the fruit which he gave us to eat. He did all he could to please us, and to teach us; and how he would laugh at our fun He would say, "My dears, have as much fun as you can. I love to see the mirth of young folks; but do not in fun do -what is wrong, or say what you should not say. Sin is not fun, and all that is wrong is sin." We were sad when we heard that Sir John Gray was dead. We were told his end was peace. The way to die a death of peace is to live a life of peace-peace with God. No one is too young to die, and all should strive so to live that they may not fear death. The young may die, the old must. It is said that they live long who live well. If we love life, we should not waste time, for "time is the stuff life is made of."