The Lightning express

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lightning express
Physical Description:
17 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Howard, Justin H ( Illustrator )
McLoughlin Bros., inc
Publisher:
McLoughlin Bros.
Place of Publication:
New York
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Railroads -- Trains -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1881
Publishers' advertisements -- 1881   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1881
Genre:
Children's poetry
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York

Notes

General Note:
Includes publisher's advertisement on back cover.
General Note:
Some illustrations signed J. H. Howard.
General Note:
Illustrated paper covers.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001630436
oclc - 24898943
notis - AHQ5206
System ID:
UF00026226:00001

Full Text
Air,~a ,lip;Awl


THE LIGHTNING EXPRESS.THE STATION."COME ALICE," said papa, "I guessWe'll ride upon the "Fast Express."It flies so swiftly o'er the plainThat it is called "The Lightning Train."Hark! to the whistle sounding shrill,I see the smoke beyond the hill;With clanging bell, and dreadful din,The Lightning Train is coming in.Here is the station, what a crowd!That frightened woman screams aloudTo see her darling puppy's paws,Held fast between the monkey's claws;While for his hinder feet, a placeHe finds upon her husband's face.The organ grinder pulls him downAnd raps him well about the crown;While big, and little, every one,The trav'lers laugh to see the fun.But now is heard a lively cheer,"Come, all aboard, the train is here !"2R UnimsityTheBdwinLbrary


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TEAM ON THE TRACK.A moment's halt, and off they go,They hear the screaming whistle blow,And soon the wheels with steely ringAlong the rails begin to sing. \As on they rattle down the track,The smoke is pouring thick and black,With now and then a tinge of red,From out the Engine's funnel head.And now the piercing whistle screams"A warning loud to careless teams,"A pair of mules, who will not "back"Is just ahead, upon the track:With vicious force they kick and rear,The drivers face is pale with fear;And though he plies his heavy whip,Which makes them wince at every clip,With frightened neigh, they kick and prance,But will not "back," nor yet advance!The engineer, with watchful eyesTheir danger sees, and soon appliesThe "Patent Brakes" whose mighty-strain,"Slows down" and stops the "Lightning Train."Which comes so close, that gently glidesBeneath the off mule's panting sides,4


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KILLING A COW.The cow-catcher, whose iron noseThe track clears, as the engine goes!Now, onward with a rush they fly,The trees and rocks seem floating by;When, suddenly, the travelers hear"A sound appalling to the ear,"A sound .of breaking, grinding bones,Of bellowings and fearful groans!And little Alice frightened quakesTo hear the creaking of the brakes.The engineer shuts off the steam,The passengers begin to scream,The boldest hearts with terror fail,And timid women weep and wail!Now, what had caused this fearful row ?Why one old, stupid, harmless cow.The cow-catcher had caught her fairAnd tossed her swiftly in the air,Pulled out her tail, and cracked her head,And stretched her by the road-side dead.Beef-steaks were scattered all around,And hides and tallow strewed the ground,While to the hub, the driving wheelWas choked and clogged with "grown-up veal!"5


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THE LOCOMOTIVE.This little business did detainFor half an hour the Lightning Train,But when it rolled away once more;At such a headlong rate it toreAlong the steel-bound level way,To make up for the long delay;That one old farmer said, he "reckoned"They made at least "a mile a second."And as it fast, and faster flew,The panting Engine thirsty grew---Its boiling blood was getting low,And soon the water cool must flowInto its fiery brazen veins--For Engines cannot draw their trains,Unless with water, and with coalThey're well supplied to make them roll.So here you see our Engine fineStopped at a station on the line.With long-nosed oil-can in his handYou see the careful stoker stand,Who quickly oils .each heated place,Now dry and burning from the race.'Tis resting now, and you can seeThe shining strange machinery;8


GOING THRO THE BARN.That turns the driving-wheels aroundAnd makes the " Steam Horse" leap and bound!The cylinder of polished steel,The bell that rings its warning peal,The levers, and the sand-box gay,With brilliant paint,---a grand display!The water now is taken inWell oiled is ev'ry crank and pin,And off with tail of sparks we fly,As meteors dart across the sky-.Then with a frightful crash and crackThe'fiery Engine "jumped the track,"And with its string of cars "astarn"Went tearing thro' a farmer's barn;A warning not to use a placeTo build, where engines daily race.As thro' the sides, and thro' the hay,The "Fast Train" tore its furious way,The boards, and shingles high it threw,The porkers ran, the chickens flew!It rushed along the stony. ground,Till'with a neat hop, skip, and bound,Upon the rails once more it prancedAnd gaily on its journey danced!9


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JUMPING THE CHASM.And now, as on the Engine flies,The watchful engineer espiesAn awful chasm just ahead,That fills his sturdy soul with dread.The bridge that spanned it yesterday,Has by a flood been swept away!But, firm the dauntless driver stands,With "throttle-cord" held tight in hand;Lets on a mighty head of steamAnd jumps his train across the stream!Right thro' the air the Engine sailsAnd lands exactly on the railsUpon the river's further bank,Without the breaking of a crank.Nor bolt, nor pin, nor driving wheelThe smallest fracture did reveal!Of course, the train's terrific jumpGave to the trav'lers many a bump,As back, and forth, between the wallsThey bounced about like rubber balls.Yet no one in the cars was hurt,Though one, a dandy, tore his shirt;And two old ladies had a spasmWhile flying o'er the yawning chasm.12


TRAMP ON THE COW-CATCHER.And when the other side was reached,The gasping babies loudly screeched;But their small fears were soon allayed,By pop-corn balls, and lemonade.And now my little ones, I meanTo please you with the coming scene.A tramp was walking on the track,When suddenly he felt a whack---The cow-catcher it was that struckThe tattered man---but by good luck,It tossed him up, and placed him whereHe sat, as in an easy chair!When he recovered from his fright,He fairly shouted with delight;For tramps, are as a rule, denied,On " Lightning Trains"---a gratis ride.Behind him swings his carpet-bag,---While his old coat---a dirty ragAbout him flutters in the breeze,Which makes the cadger cough and sneeze.When at the town the Engine stopped,Down from his perch the rider hopped,And cried, as off he whistling went,"My ride has cost me not a cent."13


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--I--II. I:>1;1A


RUNNING OVER FREIGHT TRAIN.The train now leaves the town behindAnd races onward like the wind,Until the trav'lers see with dread,Some cars disabled, just ahead.The frightened tourists scream with fear,To see the other train so near;But to their joy and great surprise,They feel their own train quickly riseAnd with an easy, graceful hop,Run swiftly on across the topOf the Freight Train! The picture showsWith what a rush the "Fast Train" goes,When it performs this wondrous feat,Which no " Fast Train" will soon repeat!And fast and faster, now it flew,And burning hot the axles grew,"Till from the wood-work flames burst outAnd wrapped the cars with fire about!But on it kept with headlong pace,Until it reached a marshy place;Soft was the spot, like pudding nice,And men and women, in a triceSprang from the fated burning train,And wished themselves at home again!16


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THE FRIGHTENED FAT-PASSENGER.One portly man caught in the doorAnd stuck there with a frightened roar.He was so very---very stout,It took two men to chop him out.With swollen face and horrid stare,You see him in the picture there;And as the burning wood he smells,With open mouth he loudly yells!The other trav'lers, in the muck,Knee-deep, waist-deep, and neck-deep stuck,But all were safe, as safe could be,And none were killed as you may see.From all the houses round about,The neighbors now came rushing outEach, with a pole and trusty ropeAnd bearing each a cake of soap;Pulled out the tourists, fat and lean,And rubbed them down, and scrubbed them clean.As for the fated " Lightning Train,"It still flew on with might and main,Up from the Earth it mounted high---With fiery track across the sky;A blazing Comet it became,And long shall live its wondrous fame!17


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Full Text

PAGE 1

THE LIGHTNING EXPRESS. THE STATION. "COME ALICE," said papa, "I guess We'll ride upon the "Fast Express." It flies so swiftly o'er the plain That it is called "The Lightning Train." Hark! to the whistle sounding shrill, I see the smoke beyond the hill; With clanging bell, and dreadful din, The Lightning Train is coming in. Here is the station, what a crowd! That frightened woman screams aloud To see her darling puppy's paws, Held fast between the monkey's claws; While for his hinder feet, a place He finds upon her husband's face. The organ grinder pulls him down And raps him well about the crown; While big, and little, every one, The trav'lers laugh to see the fun. But now is heard a lively cheer, "Come, all aboard, the train is here !" 2 R Unimsity TheBdwinLbrary



PAGE 1

7 J, TR 2 MCL L t, N Ld LA4 VARIETY,` 80101W 41 ),Iocl,, auq )T 0, 1 iA R11 rIll ft j7f, of th ldiid, -et f;, j 14 QU I' L U Llj Av Irvasure ot ti 'I A vI 1, 1 1, -.r', .'fi-`Iry of ... I airl's 'Ividfl11 d i-(,;Iy 10 iey prel %dtl Fi iF J WO V 1A 7! 1 I" or W11 9 ta ohspf*an e Ou i ttj Z Z' ou s e 0 Ur. A 'I t1l s le6411 GM16, xz 1Y QI i.l "0 e fl iliF419speet"A"Vurpos'e, 04 RESS CROT, ,S..,6 EILLI N lit tiie pregoll blit Of )JOU ii a .11poll wliich a-re 10Iiteat1w e2i at 1v ures. ii E'i hjibt' cotiains s% 10 a)u 1 CO OT'K"' -1111( -IS Mfltdro-6'9. of ft t f1l, 11 I f, r I It Ile t 9-F 4*r l-w Sv 474 401, 1 Set" A cowbiuA --v` ,A04` I %"4,f, 00a f i 0. No.': KLThree tittle K i 4 e'n 8. In Kwrhiz, APITE "or CA G . Om 10"Sfyt( 0 t -or o--rl I AXAM:,B d li, OMWTnt,(v is lie,.1utifull v dt-, s'1gq3j)Qdi ("I egiitly pr!- I wrf -'of Rio wliflmi j3oard, 114, L11 es are Von, m color,% in tho tyle -i, I o 4t.04 0 t t1w new Jdpotlll(,(11 0 U ke -i -01 Q I u o 'WqdQ1ght,,'d1 wb; 11P ilaw*Ug and, 'tilie -mo ('I' andi V w a, IS U 4It '8 ob a;, hi m of, ehhRft-, Aiu lwjoarn fT in a 31141ulul(h %u ISP by 1itiditlts wifli equ, st. All 'wlhi I 1 I cl 'p'ra JU In UnrfieahU' le ed'tems T A--,pvV Otvfj Aj HnokebeiuObatch V1 t4: urt a, a Ism-( qjf,61jj] vv M11,14rations, and r*Ivllnlg-"4610, A m 1brL iflluW f4l u to c cl Uh TOY BOO SALEALT A'Llr BOOKSTORE TO v BOO OR s;1 V1 xao ux"HLI N -11"'S,



PAGE 1

TRAMP ON THE COW-CATCHER. And when the other side was reached, The gasping babies loudly screeched; But their small fears were soon allayed, By pop-corn balls, and lemonade. And now my little ones, I mean To please you with the coming scene. A tramp was walking on the track, When suddenly he felt a whack--The cow-catcher it was that struck The tattered man---but by good luck, It tossed him up, and placed him where He sat, as in an easy chair! When he recovered from his fright, He fairly shouted with delight; For tramps, are as a rule, denied, On Lightning Trains"---a gratis ride. Behind him swings his carpet-bag,--While his old coat---a dirty rag About him flutters in the breeze, Which makes the cadger cough and sneeze. When at the town the Engine stopped, Down from his perch the rider hopped, And cried, as off he whistling went, "My ride has cost me not a cent." 13



PAGE 1

GOING THRO THE BARN. That turns the driving-wheels around And makes the Steam Horse" leap and bound! The cylinder of polished steel, The bell that rings its warning peal, The levers, and the sand-box gay, With brilliant paint,---a grand display! The water now is taken in Well oiled is ev'ry crank and pin, And off with tail of sparks we fly, As meteors dart across the sky-. Then with a frightful crash and crack The'fiery Engine "jumped the track," And with its string of cars "astarn" Went tearing thro' a farmer's barn; A warning not to use a place To build, where engines daily race. As thro' the sides, and thro' the hay, The "Fast Train" tore its furious way, The boards, and shingles high it threw, The porkers ran, the chickens flew! It rushed along the stony. ground, Till'with a neat hop, skip, and bound, Upon the rails once more it pranced And gaily on its journey danced! 9



PAGE 1

~1i:;: A5A i>I



PAGE 1

--I--I I. I: >1 ;1A



PAGE 1

THE LOCOMOTIVE. This little business did detain For half an hour the Lightning Train, But when it rolled away once more; At such a headlong rate it tore Along the steel-bound level way, To make up for the long delay; That one old farmer said, he "reckoned" They made at least "a mile a second." And as it fast, and faster flew, The panting Engine thirsty grew--Its boiling blood was getting low, And soon the water cool must flow Into its fiery brazen veins-For Engines cannot draw their trains, Unless with water, and with coal They're well supplied to make them roll. So here you see our Engine fine Stopped at a station on the line. With long-nosed oil-can in his hand You see the careful stoker stand, Who quickly oils .each heated place, Now dry and burning from the race. 'Tis resting now, and you can see The shining strange machinery; 8



PAGE 1

J4 ,-- ~p 77A "4"Ž ~0 REM"" C -:



PAGE 1

7 -74;~ ~ ~ j1 ~~j -' '. -~ ~ ~4~*''V ~ 7 7' <-77 -~7~B 4.. ;~'7-774-427 ~aa-,~74 ';7' 7,74-77 ~~-,7 '<'-F <: ~~~ ::27 -7'iY~-.: "-'-'-4 "4' 7 '77I -7-,~n "4 4 7-4 7;;_



PAGE 1

/-P'-'C' 'A 'a A sa~A -Ai Ag;~: "~ A ~ s '-'--A-



PAGE 1

U1 V I1 A---i 4VVVVVVV -V V: 4aV V V"-I ~" VIf ~ VV Vk VV ~VV, ~~. ~-V U>~ V V-'F nj



PAGE 1

'K <4~ ~ ~~;; ~ Cs~ K~ A::y K' AK I



PAGE 1

RUNNING OVER FREIGHT TRAIN. The train now leaves the town behind And races onward like the wind, Until the trav'lers see with dread, Some cars disabled, just ahead. The frightened tourists scream with fear, To see the other train so near; But to their joy and great surprise, They feel their own train quickly rise And with an easy, graceful hop, Run swiftly on across the top Of the Freight Train! The picture shows With what a rush the "Fast Train" goes, When it performs this wondrous feat, Which no Fast Train" will soon repeat! And fast and faster, now it flew, And burning hot the axles grew, "Till from the wood-work flames burst out And wrapped the cars with fire about! But on it kept with headlong pace, Until it reached a marshy place; Soft was the spot, like pudding nice, And men and women, in a trice Sprang from the fated burning train, And wished themselves at home again! 16



PAGE 1

A -.,/' A,^ A -' ''j'-'l A,4, AMA 5:-~Q ;-_i PQ A6, A AL"


PAGE 1

Air, ~a lip ;Awl



PAGE 1

JUMPING THE CHASM. And now, as on the Engine flies, The watchful engineer espies An awful chasm just ahead, That fills his sturdy soul with dread. The bridge that spanned it yesterday, Has by a flood been swept away! But, firm the dauntless driver stands, With "throttle-cord" held tight in hand; Lets on a mighty head of steam And jumps his train across the stream! Right thro' the air the Engine sails And lands exactly on the rails Upon the river's further bank, Without the breaking of a crank. Nor bolt, nor pin, nor driving wheel The smallest fracture did reveal! Of course, the train's terrific jump Gave to the trav'lers many a bump, As back, and forth, between the walls They bounced about like rubber balls. Yet no one in the cars was hurt, Though one, a dandy, tore his shirt; And two old ladies had a spasm While flying o'er the yawning chasm. 12



PAGE 1

THE FRIGHTENED FAT-PASSENGER. One portly man caught in the door And stuck there with a frightened roar. He was so very---very stout, It took two men to chop him out. With swollen face and horrid stare, You see him in the picture there; And as the burning wood he smells, With open mouth he loudly yells! The other trav'lers, in the muck, Knee-deep, waist-deep, and neck-deep stuck, But all were safe, as safe could be, And none were killed as you may see. From all the houses round about, The neighbors now came rushing out Each, with a pole and trusty rope And bearing each a cake of soap; Pulled out the tourists, fat and lean, And rubbed them down, and scrubbed them clean. As for the fated Lightning Train," It still flew on with might and main, Up from the Earth it mounted high--With fiery track across the sky; A blazing Comet it became, And long shall live its wondrous fame! 17



PAGE 1

KILLING A COW. The cow-catcher, whose iron nose The track clears, as the engine goes! Now, onward with a rush they fly, The trees and rocks seem floating by; When, suddenly, the travelers hear "A sound appalling to the ear, "A sound .of breaking, grinding bones, Of bellowings and fearful groans! And little Alice frightened quakes To hear the creaking of the brakes. The engineer shuts off the steam, The passengers begin to scream, The boldest hearts with terror fail, And timid women weep and wail! Now, what had caused this fearful row ? Why one old, stupid, harmless cow. The cow-catcher had caught her fair And tossed her swiftly in the air, Pulled out her tail, and cracked her head, And stretched her by the road-side dead. Beef-steaks were scattered all around, And hides and tallow strewed the ground, While to the hub, the driving wheel Was choked and clogged with "grown-up veal!" 5



PAGE 1

V ~ :;: I I~ i iiii Ie ii I V ii!'" :-: / V >w-;~i~ ll 'V. -L V V V,,V



PAGE 1

TEAM ON THE TRACK. A moment's halt, and off they go, They hear the screaming whistle blow, And soon the wheels with steely ring Along the rails begin to sing. \ As on they rattle down the track, The smoke is pouring thick and black, With now and then a tinge of red, From out the Engine's funnel head. And now the piercing whistle screams "A warning loud to careless teams, "A pair of mules, who will not "back" Is just ahead, upon the track: With vicious force they kick and rear, The drivers face is pale with fear; And though he plies his heavy whip, Which makes them wince at every clip, With frightened neigh, they kick and prance, But will not "back," nor yet advance! The engineer, with watchful eyes Their danger sees, and soon applies The "Patent Brakes" whose mighty-strain, "Slows down" and stops the "Lightning Train." Which comes so close, that gently glides Beneath the off mule's panting sides, 4