• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Preface
 Chapter I
 Chapter II
 Chapter III
 Chapter IV
 Chapter V
 Chapter VI
 Chapter VII
 Chapter VIII
 Chapter IX
 Chapter X
 Chapter XI
 Chapter XII
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Sandford and Merton in words of one syllable
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00026200/00001
 Material Information
Title: Sandford and Merton in words of one syllable
Physical Description: 288, 8 p., 8 leaves of plates : col. ill. ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Aikin, Lucy, 1781-1864
Day, Thomas, 1748-1789
Cassell, Petter & Galpin
Belle Sauvage Works ( Printer )
Publisher: Cassell, Petter and Galpin
Place of Publication: London ;
New York
Manufacturer: Cassell, Petter & Galpin ; Belle Sauvage Works
Publication Date: [186-?]
 Subjects
Subject: Boys -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Prejudices -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Natural history -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Country life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Courage -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Boys -- Education -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Animal welfare -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Dialogues -- 1865   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1865   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1865
Genre: Dialogues   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Mary Godolphin.
General Note: Publisher's catalogue follows text.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00026200
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002248806
notis - ALK0531
oclc - 14341859

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Plate
    Title Page
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Preface
        Page 4
    Chapter I
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Chapter II
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 40a
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
    Chapter III
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 68a
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
    Chapter IV
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 104a
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 122a
        Page 123
        Page 124
    Chapter V
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
    Chapter VI
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
    Chapter VII
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
    Chapter VIII
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 190a
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
    Chapter IX
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
        Page 216
        Page 217
        Page 218
        Page 219
        Page 220
        Page 221
    Chapter X
        Page 222
        Page 223
        Page 224
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
        Page 228
        Page 229
        Page 230
        Page 231
        Page 232
        Page 233
        Page 234
        Page 235
        Page 236
        Page 236a
        Page 237
        Page 238
        Page 239
        Page 240
        Page 241
        Page 242
        Page 243
        Page 244
        Page 245
        Page 246
        Page 247
    Chapter XI
        Page 248
        Page 249
        Page 250
        Page 251
        Page 252
        Page 253
        Page 254
        Page 255
        Page 256
        Page 257
        Page 258
        Page 259
        Page 260
        Page 261
        Page 262
        Page 263
        Page 264
        Page 265
        Page 266
        Page 267
        Page 268
        Page 269
        Page 270
        Page 271
        Page 272
        Page 273
        Page 274
        Page 275
        Page 276
        Page 277
    Chapter XII
        Page 278
        Page 278a
        Page 279
        Page 280
        Page 281
        Page 282
        Page 283
        Page 284
        Page 285
        Page 286
        Page 287
        Page 288
    Advertising
        Page A 1
        Page A 2
        Page A 3
        Page A 4
        Page A 5
        Page A 6
        Page A 7
        Page A 8
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
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SHp took hold of the snake i its neck and tore it from kis leg."- Faye i i


tw.(














IN


Words


of


One


Syllable.


BY


-MARY GODOLPHIN.




Just at the age twixtt boy and youth,
When thought is speech, and speech is truth."
M___MARMON.




LONDON:
CASSELL, BETTER, AND GALPIN;


SAND 596, BROADWAY, NEW YORK.


I__I








































LONDON:
CASSELL, BETTER, AND GALPIN, BELLE SAUVAGE WORKS,

LUDGATE HILL, E.C.










PREFACE.


THE great popularity of SANDFORD AND
MERTON" among all classes of young readers
has induced the Author to select it for the
purpose of translation into easy words of
one syllable. But in order to maintain the
identity of the book, it has been thought
right to retain the proper names of Sand-
ford, Merton, and Barlow, which form the
only exceptions to the rule of using words
of one syllable exclusively. The writer
takes -this opportunity of acknowledging
the valuable aid she has received in
monosyllabic words from the Rev. E.
Dalston's book of "Brief Thoughts"' by
the kind permission of the author.
A 2









SANDFORD AND



CHAPTER I.


THERE wa
whose nar
had a yot
the whole
This boy 1
and Mr.
give it to 1
one night
put him


MERTON.


s a man of great wealth,
ne was Merton, and he
ing son, whom he made
joy and pride of his heart.
iad but to cry for a thing,
and Mrs. Merton would
him then and there. But
when the nurse went to
to bed, he thought he


should like to have the moon to
play with. Well, what was to be
done? It was clear that none of




SA NDFORD


AND


MERTON.


them could give him the moon, let
him cry for it all the night and all


the day.
was too


When they told him


far off for


them


it


to reach


it, he fell down flat on the ground,


tore


his


hair,


and


said


he


would


have it.


So


Tom (for that was his


name) wept on, till at length, with a
deep sigh he fell off to sleep.


Tom


would


eat sweet things till


he was sick, and when this brought
pain, he could not be made to take
a dose to cure him.


When


friends


came


to dine


the house, Mr.


at


Merton would help


Tom first, and give him the choice


parts
shock


of
the


the


meat, lest


guests


with


he should


his


cries;


and when


Tom


they


would


sat


down


not wait,


to


tea;


,but would




SAVNDFORD AND MERTON. 7

seize hold of the cake and jam and
eat them.
The least rain gave him cold.
He was kept in-doors when the
wind was in the east; ard in a
high wind, let it blow from the
north, south, east, or west, young
Tom was not to stir out of the
house, lest he should take a chill.
He could not leap, or jump, or
run, as most boys do,. nor was
there a child's game that he could
play at; and Mrs. Merton would
not let him learn to read, for Tom
said it made his head ache.
A man of the name of Sandford,
who kept a small farm close to
Mr. Merton's grounds, had a son
who was just Tom's age, and his
name was Hal,




8'


AND


MERTON.


This boy


much
men. o
cows,
had a
but to
Wh
if he


was


brought up to be


out in the fields \
in the farm, and to c
and mind the shee
nice frank face, and
look at him to love
ile young Hal ate hi
saw a poor wretch


Aith the
Irive the
p. He
you had
him.
s meals,
in want


of food, he was
half of his own, if
kind was he, th
rob the birds' nes
young ones, and
no kind of sport


to
tha
pin
he
he
for


poor
t onc(
thrust
held v
did th
as so(


sure to give him
not all of it. So
at he would not
ts of their eggs or
he would join in
which gave pain


dumb brutes. It is true
Hal was caught with a
t through a moth, which
vith a piece of string; but
is from want of thought,
:n as Mrs. Sandford told


SANDFORD


~




SANDFORD AND MERTON..
9


him
pain,
were
he d
and
fresh
would
worn-
get
whici
was
did
his h
he w
love
and
when
with
as m


that the moth felt as much
or more, than Hal would do
a knife thrust through his hand,
rew the pin out of the moth,
took it home and kept it on
leaves. From that time Hal
d step out of the way if but a
I were in his path. He would
green boughs for the sheep
h ran by his side, and there
not a horse on the farm that
lot know Hal, and like to feel
iand pat and stroke him while
ras at work. So great was his
for dumb things, that toads


frog,
Swe
Hal
uch


. which most


of


us kill


find them, were quite safe
,who would say they had
right to live as we have.


Then


you


could


trust


Hal


for




IS ANDFORD A-ND


the truth of all tha
for if you were to
have a plum cake ii
tell a lie, yet would
The way in which


1


mr"


I


came to know I om MIerton
this. One fine day, Tom to
walk in the fields -with his n
when what should start up fron
high grass but a large snake,
coil round Tom's leg. The i
ran with loud shrieks for
while Tom did not dare to
from the spot where he stood.
Just then Hal, who was
ran up to see the cause of
cries. But poor Tom could
speak, for the sobs came so


All h
his le


oe
boT


could do was
to show him


to put
the s:


was
,ok a
lurse,
a the
and
nurse
help,
stir

near,
such
not
fast.
out
nake.


MER TON.

t he told you;
say he- should
he would but
he not tell one,
Hal Sandford
"A /r .




SAJVDFORD AND


MER TON.


Hal
to fe
hold
tore
M


the
quit
up
kiss
"
but
bite
if tI
him

whc

Ha


)

I


Wo
ar;
of
it
rs.


is brave, and told
, at the same tim
the snake by its
off from his leg.
Merton, who


cries of
e out of
her dear
him, and
No, said
I think
me, and
iat boy h
Soff from
And who


mn- w
My
. "


Tom not
e he took
neck, and


iad


heard


the nurse, came up
breath. She caught
boy in her arms to
hear if he was hurt.
I Tom, I am not;
the snake meant to
would have done so,
ad not come* to pull
my leg."
are you, my dear, to


e owe :so much?"
name is Sandford,"
Our farm is just a


said
the


foot of the hill."
"Well, my child, you are a dear,


t


it




SANDFORD AND


MER TON


brave boy
and dine
my child
you ?
"If yo


,and you must go home
with us. You shall be
from this time; will
q --


u please, if


may


have


my own home too," said Hal.
Mrs. Merton sent to the farm
to say where Hal was to dine, and
then led him by the hand to her
own house, where she found Mr.
Merton, and told him all that took
place in the field.
Hal was now in the midst of a
new scene, and he could but gaze
at Mrs. Merton, who wore a dress
of rich silk, such as he had not
seen till now. Then they took him
through the great halls, till they
came to the room where they were
to dine. There was a train of men


12




SANDFORD AND


MERTON.


to wait
was sp
thought
There
that co
please t
grace, t


on
read
mil
was
uld
:he
hey


th(
I w
ght
to
ten
eye.
all


and


the


I


ith food that
feed a whole
be seen on i
npt the taste
Mr. Merton
sat down, and


C, m


Merton, who saw Hal's eyes rest
on a gold cup, said-
Should you like to have such a


fine cup of your
of, my dear be
Tom's cup, but
be glad to give
young friend."
Yes, that I
"for you know I
a one, as well as


I
)
I


own to drink
y ? True, it
am sure he
it to his k


out
is
will
:ind


will," said Tom;
have quite as fine
two large ones."


Hal.-"Thank you, with all my
heart; but I will not take it, for I


-3


L _I_ _~


3oard
Hal
town.
it all
and
said
Mrs.




S*'i4 SANDFORD AND MERTON.
have one I like quite as well at
home."
Mrs. Merton.-- How so ? Do
they drink out of such cups as this
at the farm ?"
Halo-" I don't know what you
call this, but we drink out of long
cups, made of horn such as the
cows have on their heads; and
they suit us best, for they do not
make us cross."
SMrs. Mertonu.-" Make you cross,
my child. What do you mean?"
Hal.-" Why, when the man threw
down that great bright thing, which
is just the shape of my cup at
home, I saw that it made you look
quite pale in the face. Now, our
horn cups are thrown down by us
all, and no one ihinds it."




SAiNDFORD AND MERTON.


15


Mrs. Merton (to Mr. Merton).-
"Of a truth, my dear, I do not
know what to make of this boy; he
says such strange things!"
The fact was the man had let
fall a large gold cup, for which
Mrs. Merton took him to task for
his want of care. Mrs. Merton
then gave Hal a glass of wine,
and bade him drink it off.


Hal
did not
"But
is sweet
a good
"Ay
Barlow
ought n


said, with thanks,
wish to take it.
, my dear," said s
and nice, and as
boy, you may drir
Said Hal;
said at church
ot to eat and dr


when we stand
and drink, and


that


he, "i
; you
ik it
yet
that
ink,


he


this
are
up."
Mr.
we
save


in want of meat
that this was what




SANDFORD AND


MERTON.


the good men of old
by our Lord."
Here Mr. Merton ,
his chair.. "And pra
said he, "do you kno
men were ?
Hal.-" Oh, yes, sil
I do."
Mr. Merlto.--" An
they ?"
Hal-. Why, sir,
time when men had g
that they did not care v
The great folk were
they ate, drank, and sl
no heed of the poor.
the poor would not
taught; and boys and
the world were as bad


be.


And then


were taught


drew back in
ly, my boy,"
,w who these


to


d


be sure


who


were


there was a
rown so bad
vhat they did.
proud, and
ept, but took
At this time
work nor be
girls, and all
as they could


there came a man
45.


-- -- --


r,




SA NDFORD AND MERTON.


from God, whose
and he took care


went fr(
good, ar
ills, and
ought to
to do.


men
same
did:
drani
and
They
love
heal
poor,
hate
And
and


to


om place
d cure m
taught
feel, and
And He
go with


things.
not care


name was Christ,
of the poor, and
to place to do
en of all sorts of
them what they
what they ought
chose out twelve
Him and do the


These twelve
what they ate


men
and


:: for food they had dry bread,
they drank from the wells.
told all whom they met to
God, and to do His law; to
the sick, feed and' clothe the
-to wish well to those who
them, and to love all men.
so the world was more kind


good


through


the


means


of


Christ our Lord,"


17


I*
>




SANDFORD


AND MERTON.


On my word!" said Mr. Mer-
ton, this young child is quite a
sage! And I should be glad if


Mr. Barlow would
to teach him, for h
boy, and it is time
to read. What
should you like to
our young friend h
I don't know


mear
Kng^,
and
him'


take our Tom
Le grows a great
for him to learn
say you, Tom,
be a sage like
ere ?
What a sage


is; but I should like to be a
for he is so rich and fine,
all men wait on him and fear
"


"Well
Merton,
child a
ought to
of wine
like to b


said, my dear," quoth Mrs.
as she rose to give her
kiss. "And a king you
be. And here's a glass
for you. Should you not
e a king, Hal?"


______


'. ,, .




SANVDFORD AND MER TON


I
said h
go to
own


don't know what
ie; "but I hope I
the plough and we
bread, and then I


that
shall
)rk fo
shall


0


is,
soon
r my
have


no need
"But
rich, my
No,
No,
Merton ;
Hal
but one
and that


hard
corn
down
there,
cows,
they


by,
wh
- a


of men
should
dear ?"
sir.
you gc
" and
vent on
rich r


e


Skill
and
say


to wait on me.
you not like to be
said Mr. Merton.


)ose
why

nan


?" quoth
not ?"
Well, th
that I


Mrs.


ere is
know,


0m
is Squire Chase who lives
and he rides through folk's
n he hunts, and breaks
hedge here and a gate
s their dogs, lames their
Swears at the poor; and
he does all this for that


he is rich, though they dare not tell
B 2


19


7




SANDFORD AND


MER TON.


him
not h
him
"I
have
Mert
from
"p


so
ia
fol
3u
fi
or
P
s


is not
it will


ve
r
a


to his face. Oh, I would
men hate me as they hate
all the world !"


1 1 1


t snouia you
ne clothes on ?
i; "and a coach
lace to place ?"
to that," quoth
much to choose
but keep you w


not like to
Said Mrs.
to take you

Hal, "there
in a coat, if
arm; and as


for the coach, i
men to mind it,
work for them,
where I choose.
Mrs. Merton
at this speech
no more.
At night Hal
farm, and Mrs.
up till it was


f
,


I had one, and
I could not find
for I can walk


threw up her eyes
of Hal's, but said

went home to the
Sandford kept him
quite late, to hear


I




SANDFORD AND


MER TON.


what he had to
the great house.
"They were


say of


all


kind


the folk at


to


me,


said Hal; but I
soon have been at


best
meal.
my F
and
just t
blind
do t
that


had


hard


There was
ate, a man tc
man to staid
; though I ha


3
d


would
made


Then th
put this
ish off, the
be no en(
to sit still


hear


M


but not as
she thought
clothes, .and


ere


(
at
d
1


rs


Mr.
I ,
*


0
It


wish


would quite as
home, for at the
work' to get a
a man to take
Give me drink,
nd by my chair,


id been lame or
was so much to


lish on, and take
t I thought there
of it. And I was
two whole hours
.erton talk to me,
Barlow does; for
ught to love fine
Sto be a king or


rich


man


(and


to have all


21


to


a


the


r


M


w




SANDFORD


AND


MERTON.


folk hate me, as they do Squire
Chase)." While Hal told all this to
Mrs. Sandford at the farm, at the


great


house


much


on young Hal. Mrs.
him brave as well
the same time she
not but be struck t(
more gross were the
poor man's child th
Mr. Merton did
He thought that H
shame boys who v
rank of life. "A
and a way of the


of the talk ran
Merton thought
as good, but at
said she could
) see how much
:thoughts of the
an of the rich.
Snot think so.
[al might put to


vere in
grace
world,"


a high
of dress
said he,


"a man may soon pick up; so
much so, that these might be found
with grooms; but the real geat of
good taste must be in the heart and
mind, not in dress and fine airs."


22




SAND FORD AND MERTON.


23


"My dear," said Mr. Merton,
in a grave tone, to his wife, "I
think this boy of the farm has in
his mind the seeds of a true and
great man. And I know of no
one thing that would give me more
joy than to find that our child did


not fall short of Hal Sandford
the Farm House."
Mrs. Merton did not speak,
Mr. Merton went on to say:
is our fault that Tom has not b(
taught to read, and to learn w
most boys of his age know. I h;
long seen all this, but have not
yet told out my thoughts to y
I must now let you know thai
have made up my mind to pl
Tom with Mr. Barlow, if he
take him. I am quite firm in w


of


but
'It
een
hat
ave
as
'ou.
: I
ace
will
That




SANDFORD AND


MER TON.


I say,
the san
Sandfor
and I
brought
been to
speak),
I mean
let me


and I hope
ne light as
,d is just th
should like
up with I
o fond of hi
and have sp
to ask Sar
pay to have


you
I do.
e age
our b
im. (if
m (if .


)oilt
idfor
his


I.
see it in
Young
of Tom,
ioy-to be
We have
I may so


him.
d if
son


by Mr. Barlow for a fe
while Tom is there, if Mr
will take the boys in han(
Merton said this in so firrr
that his wife, who knew th
high time that Tom, should
read, at last made up her
part with her dear boy.
They wrote to ask Mr.
to dine with them. that th(


Iw



at


.


. And
he will
taught
r years
Barlow
" Mr.
a tone,
: it was


learn to
mind to

Barlow


vr 1nigbht


know what he thought of the plan,


24


L




SANDFORD AND MERTON.


25


and he told 'them that he would do
his best to teach their son, but not


if he
would
a frie
those
would
short
house,


was paid for it.
take Tom in h
nd, till he could
faults which he
yield to his will
time Tom was
where Hal had


He said I
is house
find out
saw in hi:
SSo, in
sent to h
been for


7e
as
if
m
a
is
a


week or more.




SANDFORD


AND MERTO-.


CHAPTER II.


TH
a sj
the
the

Mr
this
W(
tim
raise
bes
us,
gro
all
owr
"


[E ne
pade,
y mi
wee
'All


xt day Mr.
and gave
ght set to
ds.
that eat sh


Barlow took up.
Hal a hoe, that
work and dig up


would work,


. Barlow to Tom. "
Sis my bed, and that
Both work at them i
e each day, and he
e the best crops will
t. Now, Tom, if you
I will mark you out a
und which you shall h
that grows on it shall


No,


says


Tom,.


said


)ee here,
is Hal's.
For some
that can
fare the
will join
piece of
ave, and
be your


"I


don't


2 -




SA NDFORD


AVND


MER TON.


choose
plough.'
Jus
said M1
will mir
By a


to slave like a

t as you please,
r. Barlow; "but
id our work."
nd by Mr. Bai


boy at the

young sir,"
Hal and I
1


rlow


said it


was time to leave off, and he took
Hal by the hand, led him to a seat,
and brought out a dish of ripe
plums which were quite fresh from
the tree, with the bloom on them,
and gave one half to Hal, while
he ate the rest. Tom thought he
should have had his share; but
when he saw that he was quite left
out, he flew in a great rage, and
burst out with sobs and cries.
"-What do you cry for?" said
Mr. Barlow.
Tom said not a word.


27


__ _




SANDFORD


AND


MER TON.


"Well, sir, if
talk, you need
e need talk in
not like it."
At this speech


you don't c
not do so.
my house if


Tom


hoose
No
they


got much


worse, and went round the grounds
in a great rage, for he found he
was in a place where no one took
pains to please him.
Mr. Barlow and Hal then went
for a walk in the fields, and as
they came home Hal saw a kite
on the ground, which had a young
chick in her claws. The kite flew
off when Hal came up to it, and


left
it -

he
will


the chick
iad life in
Look, sir,
bleeds and
hold him


much


hurt,


but still


it.


said Hal, see how
hangs his wings! I
to my breast to warni


28


to
on
do


!





SA ND FORD AND MER TON.


him, and
when I g
shall have
is well."
As soo
walk, Hal


I will take him home
o to the farm, where he
part of my meals till he


n
S


as he came from his
first care was to put


his chick in a cage with
turf and some crumbs
and then Mr. Barlow a
to dine. In the mean
Tom, who was seen to
place to place, was glad


at
his


some fresh
of bread,
nd he went
time poor
skulk from
to find that


last a meal was spread, and took
chair to sit down to it with the


rest.

"as
we,
work
At


'top,
you
vho
for
this


sir,
are
are
you.
Ssp


" said Mr. Barlow;
too proud to work,
not, do not choose to
"


eech


Tom wept


as


if


29




SA NDFORD AND


30


MERTON.


heart


would break,


but


more


from


grief


than


rage,


for


he


saw


that no one in the house took heed
of his cries.
But Hal, who could not bear to


young


friend


in


such


state of


woe,


said


" Pray, sir, may


to


do


Mr.


as


Barlow:
I please


with my share of the meal ?"
"Yes, to be sure you may,' said he.
Why, then, I will give it all to


Tom,
do."


who


So


wants it


he


gave


more


it to


than


him where


which


was


some


way


from the rest.


Tom took it with thanks, but he


lift


his


eyes


frorn


ground.


"I
proud


see,e


said Mr.


young


boys


Barlow,


who


will


"that
l not
j


his


see


his


a


he


sat,


did


off


not


the




SANDFORD


AND


MERTON.


work, are not too great to
the bread from those who
gone through some toil to ea
This speech brought fresh
from Tom.
The next day, Mr. Barlov
Hal went to work once more


31


take
have
rn it."
tears

v and
; but


they had not been out long, when
Tom came to them to ask if he
might have a hoe too. Mr. Barlow
then gave him one; but as he did
not know how to use it, he hit some
strokes on his leg with it. So Mr.
Barlow laid down his own spade,
that he might teach Tom how to
hoe; and in a short time he got on


well with i
was done,
bench to
his share,


t. When
they all
eat fruit;
which he


the (
three
and
ate


dav's
sat
Tom
with


work
on a
had
great




SANDFORD


AND


MERTON


E *


glee, as he had done some hard
work.
From this time, Mr. Barlow and
the boys went day by day to work at
their beds; and as they sat in the
shade to rest from their toils, Mr.
Barlow gave Hal this tale to read
out:-
SA _A I ..


ny lfand an ant once came to0


in
you
e of
the
ing,
toil
Life
say


words as to which stood first
rank. The fly said, 'How can
place-your mean state by the sid
mine ? Look how I soar up in
air, skip round the head of a k
and kiss the lips of a queen! I
not, nor stoop to work; but live a


ease. V
this ?'
"'Why,'
ne, 'to be


that can you have to


quoth the ant, in a sharp
made much of by kings


32


of
to


tot


1-1


"t,


dq


.0 .0




SA NDFORD


AND


MER TON


0


and queens is a great thing, I grant,
if they send for you; but not if they
deem you a pest. In good sooth, I


think it i
screens yc
to work,
when the
the cold
reap the
Hal Sa
a week
Tom M
Barlow ;
their wor


s but your s
>u from their
you will learr


frost
winds
fruits


and sn
blow;
of my


Lndford now
or so to th
erton was
and they
k at the c


day. When they
to eat- their fruit,


at
T


that Mr. Barlow would
as Hal was not there;
Tom, he did not so
how to spell. But


mall size that
wrath; and as
I the use of it
ow come, and
while I shall
toil.'


went home for
e farm; while
left with Mr.
went on with
lumps day by
on the bench
om made sure
Id read to him,
; for as to poor
much as know
that day Mr.


33


r




34


Barlow
to him
all the
this to
source
tales.
At 1


that
San
ask
him.
Hal
Ton
but
had
I sh
as


if


SANDFORD


had too r
; the sam
rest of th
heart, f(
of joy to


ast the
he could


thought struck him,


I


but read


dford, he should not
Mr. Barlow or Hal to
Why may not I
Sandford has done ?
n. "To be sure, he
he could not have r
not been taught. I
tall soon learn to rea,
ie. The first thing


like Hal
need to
do so for
do what
"thought
is sharp;
ead if he
dare say
d as well
when he


comes home,
me.
In' ten c


I will ask him to teach


lays'


time


Hal


came


- R w f


AND MMERTON.

nuch to do to read
le thing took place*
e week. Tom laid
)r it was a-great
him to hear Hal's


,I
-1


,%v




SANDFORD AND MERTON.


back from the
said to him:
How came
read ?"
Hal-" Why


farm,


you


and


to


Tom


learn


to


, Mr. Barlow taught


me to
then to
Tom.
teach n
Hal.-


-m


spell short \
read them."
-" Do you
ie to read ?"
-" To be si
i i


vords


first, and


think you could


ire I could.'
S 1 i


lIom then took up a book for
the first time in his life, and on
that day he learnt more than most.
boys could have done.
Days, weeks, and months went
on, and Tom took so much pains
with his task, and was so quick at


it, that he now read out to Mr.
Barlow this tale in short words:-
"A poor lark was kept in a cage
C2


35


f4-


I




SANDFORD AND


MER TON


that hung on a wall in a
was full of dust and dirt.


as h
turf
finch
said
blith
that
rang
ton e
did 1
here,
mind


e stood on his
to sing out- his
, who by chance
S' How canst
e a strain while
vile cage?' '1


s,
l1(

I


for me
to the
Mr.
for us
while v
our flig
have. d


piece
swee
flew
thou
e shi
Finch


out the lark, in
'Know you not
t sing while I a
I should fail 1
my song when the


to get tree, and r
sky!'"
Barlow.--" So it
to sing hymns
ve are on earth, to
ht to realms of bl
one well, my boy,


town that
One day
of dead
t song, a
that way,
sing so
it up in
I, finch!'


his clear
that if I
m shut up
to call to
time came


nount


is
of
fit
iss.
to


up


meet
praise
us for
You
learn


36


r




SANDFORD AND MERTON.


to read. How glad
you will not find the
it did, and you will
you want to know."
"Yes," said Tom
doubt that I know r
1 1 T-


am I, for now
Time creep as
soon get at all

; "I make. no
nore than most
1i, _i


men ao; ana i am sure, tnougn
there are six black men in our
house, there is not one of them
that can read half as well as I
can.
Mr. Barlow, whose face grew
grave at this vain speech, said:
Pray who has taught them ?"
"No one that I know of, sir,"
said Tom.
"Then why should you think it
strange that they do not know how
to read so well as you ?"
Mr. Barlow went on to hint to


37




38


SANDFORD .


Tom that he
known how to r
Hal Sandford ha
to do so, day by
step..
"Why, Tom,
boast of yours is
Rhodes."
Tom.-" How


4ND MERTON.

would no
-ead, if his
d not taug
day, and


t have
friend
rht him
step by


said he, this
like the Leap at


far was that, sir?"


Mr.


who
two
must
of th(
when
feats
they


Ba


riow.-


made the b
score yards.
know, had t
e world, and t<
he came ho


he had dor
at first heard


but in time ti
what he said
and worse than


ley
wa1
tl


"Well, the man
oast said it was
This man, you
)een in all parts
)ld his old friends,
me, of the great
ie. These tales
Switch great glee,
found out that
s a mere boast,
his, that he told




SANDFORD


AND


MERTON.


39


lies, and when he once did that he
set less and less guard on his


tongue, till he made those
heard him stare. "How c
it, said they, "that this man,
when at home, could boast o
great feats, should, when he
to strange lands, do such
things ?" One day he told


that
world
men
them
leap 1
grave
said,
tale t


there was no
where men
at Rhodes.
all," said he,


there o
old m
-with
e true,


Rhodes,
more.


f
a
a


and
But t


place
leapt
But
"for I


in
ike

toI
to(


two score yards.
,n, who sat near
sneer, "Sir, if
think this place
take the leap
;he man kept his


who
homes
who,
f no
goes
great
them
the
the
beat
)k a
A
him,
your
:o be
once
seat,


and had not a word more to


say.


1



t




SANDFORD AND


40


MERTON.


As the


time had now come, for


the boys
took his
fell in a
where a


to g
bat a
field
poor


*o
nc
of


1

1


" Bring that ball
in a harsh voice.
no heed of this,
and left the ball.
in a tone still
vou not hear wh


I -1


Boy.
Tom.-
bring me
Boy.-
Tom.-


out to pi
ball, and
corn not
boy was
to me, s
But the
but went


ay,
th<
far
at
aid
bo3
his


Tom
e ball
from
play.
Tom,
r took
way,


Tom now spoke


me
at


'Yes, yes;
"Oh, are
my ball."
'I don't
" Don't cl


ii:


-e gruff,
I say?"
I am not
you not ?


choosee to.
loose to ?


" Do


deaf."
then


If I


come
choose
Boy
Tom


to you I shall soon make you
S it.
-" May be you may not."
.-- If I come on that side


_


W-.' J6









. A


'A *c

A '4


\~


~'1'
,'~ii~: "
Uj yi ::1t

~;~ "I
I*lh?:
:. r.: r ~, ;I.: '1`,
r
''
t''J '' '" I~~ ~~


)


'I


- wz-
--nAA, ~
rj VR


IF


" He fell in a wet ditch which was full of mud."-Page 41.


L'-
"''r :'


~ulc~l 5;~!
; ~: $Jli-CsR
-'' ~".~~P"
L~: I~ I;CI:!l


;nl, :,
rl (
riI~'
:'4i
Y.. I ; ~...
~I c-.;,,~,
""
B
.-




SANDFORD AND


MERTON. 41


the hedge, I
take all the b
then we will
or no.
At this tl


laugh,
rage,
the h(
have 1
him i
stood,
fell in


of r
som
side
get


which
that he
edge, fr
made a
in the
but h
a wet


nud.
.e time
in the
free.


will thrash you till I
reath out of you; and
see if you choose to


hte


boy


gave


put Tom ii
sprang to tl
om whence
jump so as
field where
is foot slipt,
ditch which


There
, to
vain
But it


his feet stuck in
from the bank,
to his smart c
his right shoe,


poor
kick
hope 1
; was
the n
and tl
)at.
and


a
s


I


n
t}


Ton
from
that h
of no


le
ie
to
th(
ai
w
al
si
ie
u


iud, or sl
ie mire (
He first
then his


loud


;uch a
top of
would
'bring
e boy
nd he
as full
ay for
de to
should
se, for


id off
clung
lost
left,


w


P


----


Mw




SANDFOR D


AND MER TON.


and his fine hat
head, and was s
There Tom mi
some time, had
in rags come t
could not so mi
'him for shame, r
word, but ran
plight, that Mr.
him, had fears
hurt. But when
from Tom, he
smile from his li1
look sharp when
play at ball that
poor boys in re
had seen to his
gave Hal this t
Ton :-
"A fine war


A


ich as look up at
ior could he say a
home in such a
Barlow, who met
that he had been
he heard the tale
could not keep a
ps, and told him to


next he w
he did not
ags. When,
dress, Mr. I
ale to read


horse


broke


ent to
thrash
Tom
Barlow
out to

loose


42


too
poilt
ust
not
o hi


fell from his
by the mud.
have lain for
the poor boy
is aid. Tom




SAIADFORD AND


MERTON.


from his st
the road wit
You might J
as if the gr
too poor for
that went or
,a load upon
the horse, in
he did not
he should tr
.so the poor


as
go


-we
the
loc
,as
'wo
i


fast
by.
" In
nt to
e-ye
)ks;
a wai
rk in
" Stri:


as


all,
h a


and sprang down
loud, shrill neigh.


hear him sniff the air,
found he trod on was
such as he. An ass
i the same track, with
his back, was told by
L a proud tone, that if
clear the way for him
ead him in the dust;
ass got out of his way
ie could, and let him


h


- -


course of time the
the war, and was
Which spoilt his
nd he was now of
r horse, so he was
a farm.
)t of all his ornmo. I


JL .tJ /


horse
shot in
good
no use
sent to


he was


43


- -----~---~




SANDFORD AND MERTON.


met by the


ass,


who said


to


him,


'Hey day, is it you? Well, I
must say I thought your pride
would, soon or late, have a fall.'"
Hal thought that the grand war
horse must have had the look of
a fool, when the ass came up to
him and saw him hard at work
on the farm!


" Yes,


said 1


Jr.


Barlow, "rr


the same as Tom did, when
poor lad whom he meant to L
lent him his aid as he lay in
ditch!"
"Sir," said Tom, I should
have had the least wish to beat f
but he would not bring my ball."
Mr. Barlow.-"And what r
had you to make him bring )
ball ?"


luch
the
)eat,
the


not
iim,

eight
'our


44




SANDFORD


AND MER TON.


Tom.-" Sir,
boy; and I,
son of a rich n
Mr. Barloz
the sons of ric
to make all
them what they
Tom.-" To
are in rags.


he
lou
ran.


was but a poor
know, am "the


.-" So, then,
h men have a
poor boys do
choose?"
be sure, sir, if


all
right
for


they


Mr.
clothes
worn to
have a
they pie
Tom
said: "
one it,
done it,


Barloq
should
rags,
right
ase ?
hung
But he
as h


w.-" Then, if
wear out, and
all rich men's
to make you d


.


your
get
sons
3 as


down his head, and
Might as well have
e was on that side


the hedge."
Mr. Barlow.- "And so
say he would have done,


I dare
if you


45.


- ----~--~-'


/
1


4
{




46 SAN.

had said,'
up my b
tone; but
proud voice
to serve
no doubt
poor, and


DFOR


VD AND MERTON.


I will thank you to pick
ll,' in a kind sort of
when boys speak in a
e, they will find few
them. Still, I make
that, as the boy was
in rags, you took out


I 1 1 a


your purse to nelp nim o
world."
Tom.- "No, that I an
did not."
Mr. Barlow,.-" May be
no purse with you ?"
Tom.-" Yes I had th,
had all this" (here Tom
a pound).
Mr. Barlow. -" Was it
boy was as rich as you ?"
Tom.-" No, that he
sir, I'm sure; for he had


n


I


in

sure


the

I
re


you had

ough; I
took out

that the

was not,
no -coat;
/-


D




SANDFORD AND


MER TON.


clothes were


all


torn, and


shoes
Mr.
what


were full of holes.
Barlow.-" So
makes the son of


now I see
Sa man of


rank and wealth; and that is,
when he has all he wants, and
more, and keeps it; when he beats
the poor if they will not serve him,
though he pay them not for it;
and when they have done him a


-o


great good, does him no good in
his turn.
Let us not set the poor at
naught, Tom; make sure of this.
We may be poor in this world's
goods; we may have no lands, no
gold, no fine clothes, no great
friends; but if we have love in
our hearts, we have what is best


all-we


have


what


is


worth


his


47


his


of


I





SAVNDEORD AND MERTON.


more than the whole world with
all its wealth."
This speech from Mr. Barlow
found its way to Tom's heart, and
he could scarce keep the tears from
his eyes. Tom had a large heart,
but he had not been taught to use
it. He made up his mind to give
the poor boy some new clothes the
first time he should see him.
Tom did not have to wait long,
for that same day he met him, and
said:
Boy, I want to know why you
are in rags; have you no clothes
but those on your back ?"
"No, sir, I have not," said the
boy. There are eight of us, and
the rest are as much in rags as I
.m, but I think we should not so


48




SANDFORD


AND


EMER TON.


49


0


much mind that if we cou
more to eat.
Tom.-" And why have y
more to'eat ?"
Boy.-" Dad is ill, and
work, so that we must all
if God does not take care o:
Tom did not say a word
but set off at full speed
house, and soon came back
loaf of bread, and a whole
his own clothes.
Here, boy," said Tom,
were kind to me, so I wil
you .all this, for I am rid
have more."
The joy that shone out frc
face of the poor boy made ;
as bright as the deed, and
Tom, he felt quite as glad


ld


get


ou not


can't
starve
f us.
more,
to the
with a
suit of

" you
l1 give
h, and

)m the
it look
as to
as the


14


49


46




SANDFORD AND MERTON.


boy did, if not more


so,


for it was


the first time in his life that he had


gone
what
have
in hi
hear
went
Mr.


out of his way to do to a fri
he would like that friend
done to him, if he had I
s place. He did not wail
the poor boy's thanks,
home with a strut, and fo
Barlow at the door of


end
I to
)een
t to
but
und
his


house


to whom he told all that he


had done.
Mr. Barlow s
done well to gi
clothes, for they
but what right ha,
loaf of bread ?"
Tom.-" Why,
he stood much in
was one of eight,
of it."


aid :
ive tl
were
d you


,, y
ie
yo
to


ou
boy
ur
giv


have
the
:wn;
Smy


sir, the boy said
need of food, and
and all the rest




SALNDFORD AND MERTON


51


Mr. Barlow.-" This made it
just and kind in you to give what
was your own, but not that which
was mine. What should you say
if Hal were to give some one all
your clothes, and not tell you of it ?"
Tom.-" I should not like it at all."
Mr. Barlow,-" Do you think it
would be just and right ?"
Tom,-" No, I don't think it
would."
Mr. Barlow.--" I do not grudge
the boy my loaf of bread, far from
it, for there is no one to whom I
would so soon give a loaf of bread
as to that poor boy, who had it in
his heart to do for you what he
would wish you to have done for
him, were he to lie and kick in the
mud of a ditch; and this, too, when
D 2




SAINDFORD AND MERTON


you had been so proud
Still, Tom, there is but
to give to this act of y
that is the word 'theft.'
you have heard that it is
who would steal an our
steal a pound.'"
Tomz.-" I can't say I


J.1


to him.
one name
ours, and
It may be
said, 'He
ice would

have, nor


should I think it was true."
Mr. Barlow then told Tom of a
boy who stole a horn book from
school, and brought it home to his
aunt, but she did not take him to
task for what he had done, but
gave him some plums for his pains.
In course of time the child grew up
to be a man, and need I say a
thief? He stole more and more,
and at last was caught in a great
theft, for which he was hung. A


52




SANDFORD


AND MERTON.


crowd came to look on at
scene, and with them the
the thief, who, with sobs a:
tore her hair and beat he
The thief saw her, and
those who were in charge
"Give me leave to say a


the sad
aunt of
Id tears,
r breast.
said to
of him,
word to


my aunt."
put his fac
speak, and
the aunt g
who stood
awe at so
sirs," said
she who is
for if- whe
from school
to point ou


When she


came


e to hers as if h(
bit off her ear!
ave a loud cry,
near were stru
base a deed.
the young man,
the cause of m
n I stole a hon
1 she had had th
t to me that I ha


up, he
e would
At this
and all
:k with
" Good
"it is
y guilt;
n book
e sense
id done


wrong, I should not have come to
this end."


53


e __




SANDFORD


AND MERTOIVN
ANID HER TOY.


So you
"if we do n
it will grow
Just then
to Tom wit
hand. His
he had had


" Here,


see,


ot
str
a
h
ey
a
sir


said Mr. Barlow,


crush sin in the bud,
ong, and crush us."
boy in rags came up
some clothes in his
,es were black, as if
fight.


take


back


your


clothes,


"said he,


had been
you out o1
my back.
more with
long -as I
What
said Mr.
Sir," s
all he -cot
would not
fell in th(


left in
F, and
You
such
live."
does
Barlow


aid he,'
ld to
fetch
e ditch,


"and I wish they


the
not
will
fine

all
to


bea
his
ar


ditch
been
catch
things
6


I took
put on
me no
on as


this mean ?"
the poor boy.
[r. Mertoni did
t me when I
ball, but he
id then, as I


__ ___


,


b




SANDFORD


AND MERTON.


55


took


him


out, he


gave


clothes here, all out of
know. But the worst


was
and
me
Jack
me
you
gave


S1
th
a;

a
at


which
up B
and t
but I


ich a- fool as to
lis made all the 1
s I went down
Sparkes was the
blow. Oh, s'
that sort of wo
him a punch ii
made him roar.
ill Miles and J
hey said I was


don't choose


'French,' and


me


rk
n

in"
1r


them
don't


the
hen


good
of it
wear
boys h
the
first tc
ays I,


1 Stubbs,
French;'
to call me
want the


clothes,
back."
Then
word all
thus :


so


have


brought


them


Tom, who had not said a
this -time, spoke to the boy


--


these
will I
is I
them,
loot at
road.
) give
are
So I
ribs
came




SANDFORD


AND MER TON.


"I am sure you are much hurt,
for there is blood on your dress,
and as for the clothes I gave you,
I grieve much to hear that-they
should have done you all this harm."
As soon as the poor boy had
gone, Hal and Tom made a plan
to buy some clothes for him that
would suit his rank of life. So the


next day, at d
They had
'they heard the
hounds which
way off.
"What does


awn,
not
nois
ran


off
gonc
e of
ful


it all


I


they set.
far when
a pack of
1 cry some

lean ?" said


Tom.
Ia.-" I know
means. It is the
dogs in chase of a
I live, there she


too well what it
squire and his
poor hare. As
skulks, poor


56




SANDFORD


AND


MER TON


wretch. I hope they will not find
her. If they ask me, I will not
tell them which way she has gone."
Soon the dogs came up, and a
man on a fine horse said:
"Have you seen the hare?"
Hal did not speak, so the squire
said once more, in a loud tone:
Which- way has she gone?"
Sir, I shall not tell you.?" said
Hal.
"-Not tell me!" said the grand
man, who then came up to Hal to
lash him with his whip. Now,
you young thief you, will you tell
me now ?
To which Hal said:
If I would not tell you then,
I won't now, though you should
kill me."


57




58 SANDFORD AND MER TON.


But the squire went on lil
brute with his lash, till a loud
of "help, help!" from Tom bro
a friend of the squire's to the
at full speed, who said:
"For God's sake, Chase, 1
off. What are you at? You
kill the child if you do not take c
"It will serve the young
right if I do," said he, "for he
seen the hare, and will not tell
which way she ran."
Take care," said his friend
a low voice; "I know the c
who is with him is the son (
rich man, who lives not far off
Then he said to Hal:
Why, my dear, would you
tell the squire which way the
had gone, if you saw her ?"


:e a
cry
ught
spot


eave
will
are.
dog
has
me


1,
h
of
."


in
ild
a


not
hare




SANDFORD


AND


MERTON.


Hal, who had scarce got
to speak, said:
"I don't choose to let ti


kill the
The
Th
it is a
is but
of his
his wil


hare if I can
squire's friend
iis boy is quite
good thing for
a child; though
mind, and the
1 might shame a


me,


Chase,


are


breath


/e


help it."
aid :
a sage,
you thai
the gr<
strength
t man.
vou at


tell


times so fierce as this with
poor ?
Just then the hounds found
scent, and burst out into full
so the- squire got on his horse,
rode off with the rest. When
were gone, Tom -came up to
Hal how he did, and flung
arms round his neck.


59


man


and
t he
owth
I of
But
all
the

the
cry;
and
they
ask
his





SANDFORD AND MERTON.


I feel sore," said Hal, "but
that will go off soon."
Tom.-" I wish I had had a
gun or a sword."
Hal.-" Why, what would you
have done with it ?"
Tom.-" I would have shot the
wretch, of course, or cut off his
head. He is a brute, that he is,
to beat you so.'
Hal.-If I had been a man, he
should not have done it. I don't
think he meant to kill me. But
it is all past now; and we ought
to try to love those that hate us:
hate the deed we may, but not the
man-as Mr. Barlow says our
Lord Christ did. And then, may
be, the squire may come to love
me, and grieve at what he has done."


6o




-SANDFORD


AND 'MERTON.


Tom.


bear


the


" But how
whip all that


could
time,


you
and


not cry out


Hal--


no


"Why,
ood in


to


cry out would


such


a case


that,
would
knew


would it?


say


what


And


think you


this is not much, if


some


boys


you


have


to


bear, and yet do not flinch at it."


"


do


as





SANDFORD


AND MERTONi


CHAPTER III.
THE next day, when the boys
went to their books, their thoughts
were so full of the hunt, that Hal


chose
"A
some
who
ask if
safe p
bade
which
lay th


this
stag,
way
was
he
)lace
him
was
ere q


tale to read
that had left
off, came uI
at work on
would, show
to hide in.
hide in his
close by.
uite still, and


out :-
the hounds
Sto a man
a farm, to
-him some
The man
own hut,
So the stag
Sin a short


time .up came the squire and his
train with the hounds. The squire,
who caught sight of the boor, drew


62




SANDFORD


AND M2ERTON.


back from the rest, a
'Have you seen the s
this way?'
"'No,' said the boor, i
tone, 'I have not.'
"At the same time-as
wish to keep on good te
the squire-he held out


63


nd
tag


said:
pass


in a loud

he had a
rms with
his hand


with a sly
hut where
luck would
no heed of
much as s(
to join the


rod(
hut
stag

of
hut,


loo
the
hav(
this
ee it
rest


e through
Swas, they
r.
As soon as
sight, the
but said


k, to point to
stag lay; but
e it, the squire
sign, nor did h
SSo on he
;but though


the
did


field where
[ not see


the
as
took
.e so
went
they
the
the


they were quite out
stag stole from the
not a word to the


j





SANDFORD AND AERTON.


boor, who now gave a loud call to
him.


Wretch


I


your life to
leave my hut,
screen you fro
not one word
'Nay,' sai
make sure I
as full of prai
joy, if your de
your words; ii


said he, 'you
me; yet when
where I sent yo
m your foes, you
of thanks !'
d the stag, 'you
should fill your


owe
you
u to
say


may
ears


as my heart is of
had been true to
short, if I had not,


throu
your
tongzP-
TI
and
cloth
to I
there


[gh the door
hand play
(C.
ie boys then
Tom laid c
es for the po
Ial: You
,you know."


of the
false


hut, seen
to your


went to the shop,
ut a pound in
or boy, and said
must take them


64


it '




SANDFORDD AND MER TON.


"That I


will,"


said


Hal


65


" but


why will you not take them ?"
Tom.-" Well, it is not for


the


child of a rich squire to take such


a load as
Hal -"


that.


Why,


what


harm


does


it do, if he has strength for it


Tomr.-" I


think it


is


don't


that


he


know


may


but


not


look


like the poor boys in the road."


Hal>.


" Then


he


should


not


have


mouth
same.


hands,
: for


feet,
poor


eyes,
boys


ears,
have


Tom.-" No-no, he


must have


these,


for


they


are


of


use to


him.


Hal-" And is it


do things by one's self?"
Tom.- Yes; but the


not of use to


sons


of


or


the


all





SANDFORD


AND


MER TON.


the rich have all these things done
for them."


Hal.


" Then


I should


think it


must be


a bad


thing .to be one of


them.


Tom.-
Hal-


thing:
then


" Why so?"
" Well. if a


11


s would not be dc
we should all starve.


were


)ne


rich,
and


Tom.-'


" Starve !


live,


get


"Yes ;
could


why,


you,


if


you
you


bread ?"
" No, I know that."


could
could


Halde
made from


Bread,


a


plant


you
that


know,
grows


the earth, and
Tom.-" Wh


we call it wheat.
ly, then, I, wo


,uld


pick it and eat it."
Hal.-" Then you would have to


66


Hal.-


not
not


Tom.-


is
in


y


1




SANDFORD


AND


MAER TON.


work, you see. Bi
no good, for wheat
and you would no1
Tom.-" No; I
bread, then ?"
Hal,-" Corn is
Tom.- "I should
mill, that I may
make bread."
Hal-:" There
and if you ask MI


go with you, f
man who works
Tom.-" Well,
much like to see
Just then the
cry, and they s
down the lane


ut
is
t 1
)ut


67


that would do
a hard grain,
ke to eat it."
how comes


sent to a mill."
d like to see a
know how they

is one close by,
. Barlow he will


or he knows the
it.
I will, for I should
them make bread."
two boys heard a
aw a horse come
at full speed, and


drag a man with him.
Hal, who at all times was


glad


E2


__ __





SANDFORD AND


ME R TON.


to do a kind act, ran up to a gap
in the hedge, which lie saw the
horse meant to go through, and
just as the horse made a stop that
he might take a 'good leap, Hal
caught hold of his head.
Two or three men soon came
up, and set Squire Chase on his
legs-for the squire it was. He
gave a wild stare round him, and
took breath; the first-use he made
of it was to swear at the horse,
and to ask who it was that laid
hold of his head.
"Who ?" said his friend; "why,
the self same boy that you gave all
those blows to, and had it not been


for him that skull of yours would
have had more flaws in it than it
has now.


68









SI
Js ,


*<- *
.(" <.*


C





SA.


. *"


.. .
.9.1r.$-


N>'-


N


1-


I I


V~"


f N


2 TV .Ii


" Hal caught hold of his head."-Page 68.


us


-4--


* .
'".


elk~


41 a


I


.' R


;;^ L-,


~

~~


ell le


* '


rsk 11.1v


~T~:
cl :t.i
, ;J .:?
LL~ .~ ,r ~L


r,
ii:,o r,
r


"9,


I




SA NDFORD


AND


MERTON.


The


Hal,


squire gave


with


a


face


a


full


glance
of sha


69


at


mne.


At length he put his


hand


purse, a
But Hal


nd


gave


him


drew up with


a
a


pound.


look


pride


(which


was


rare


with


of


him),


and would


in


not take it.


So the boys went their way, and
a short time they found the


poor


lad,


whose


cot


they were


search of.


Tom told him that they


had brought him a suit of clothes, in


which


there could


be no


fear that


the boys would call him


He then
suit each,
poor folk
Tom so


as


he


" French.


gave all the young boys a
and the thanks from the


for
full


went


his
of


kind
joy tl


home, that


gifts
hat h,


he


made
e said,
would


take care to spend all that Mr. and


in


his


in


_ _




SANDFORD AND MERTON.


Mrs.
way.


Merton gave him in the same


In the space
Barlow took tI
mill, and they
it. Tom was s
sails, which we
with the wind,
move two large
the corn.
"Well, to b
the way they r
"Yes," said
there is more
this."
As they wen
Tom :-
"So you se
men chose to w
no bread to ea


of a few days, Mr.
e two boys to the
saw all the parts of
;truck with the great
nt round and round
and were made to
flat stones to bruise


e sure! So this is
nake bread."
Mr. Barlow; but
to be done than


t home, Hal said to ,

Oe, now, that if no
rork, we should have
t."


70




SA2NDFORD


AND


MER TON.


Tom
corn g
Hal
ground
plough
Tom
Hal
plough
fields i
drives,
and th
Tom
the wa


1


71


.-" Why not ? Does not
row in the ground?"
-" Corn grows in the
1, but then first you must
the ground to break it up."
".-" How do they plough ?"
.-" Have you not seen a
drawn up and down the
n a straight line ? One man
and one holds the plough,
e horse pulls."
-0" Yes, I have. Is that


y tl


for the
Hal/
kind ol
ground
Tom. -
Hal.-
in the


ey


break up the ground


and there's a sharp
which turns the
e way as it goes."
and what then ?"
they sow the seed
and rake it, and


corn ?"
-" It is;
F wedge
up all th
-" Well,
-" Why,
ground,


w




SANDFORD


AND


MER TON.


then the seed grows, and shoots
up high, and at last the corn gets
ripe, and then they reap it."
Torm.-" How strange, to be sure.
I should like to sow some seed, and
see it grow. Do you think I could ?"
Hal--" Yes, of course you could;
and if you will dig the ground, I will
go to our farm and get you some
corn to sow.,
The next day Tom was up with
the lark, and went to work and dug
the ground for some hours. He


must needs tell
he had done, an
not a good boy
to raise corn ?
Mr. Barlow.-
know till I hear
make of it."


Mr. Barlow what
d said: "Am I
to work so hard

"That I do not
what use you will


72




SANDFORD


AND


MER TON.


Tom.-" Why, sir,


shall


73


send


it to
and
shew
and
nursc
that


the
then
me
then
thai
I ha


mill an(
I will
how to
I will
t I ate
ve sowi


d have it ground,
get your cook to
make bread of it,
eat it, and tell my
bread out of corn
1 in my own piece


of ground."
Mr. Barlow. That wi
well done, but where will b
great good for you to sow coi
your own self? That is no
than all the folk round do;
were they not to do it they
starve.
Tom.--" But then they ,ar
all rich men's sons like me."
Mr. Barlow.- "What then?
not the sons of the rich eat a
as the poor ? And it is for


.11 be
e the
rn for
more
and
would


e


not


Must
s well
their




74 SAND.FORD AND MERTON.
own good that they should know
how to get food."
Tom.-" Yes, sir; but they can
have the poor to raise it for them,
so that they need not work at all."
Mr. Barlow.-" How is that ?"
Tom.-." Why, sir, they pay the
poor to work for them, or buy
bread of them when it is made, as
much as they want."
Mr. Barlow.- -"Oh, Mr. Tom;
but what if the rich man should
lose all his wealth, or go to strange
lands where hands are scarce ?"
Tom. -" Well, true, sir, -he ought
to know how to make it in case
these things should come to pass."
Mr. Barlow then told Tom of an
old man who had a field, and by his
skill and care made it serve him




SANDFORD AND MEIRTON.


75


for food. At length he fell ill, and
he sent for his three sons, that he
might take leave of them, and give


them
said
with
to d
rich
and
field'
voice
down
sons
their


his last charge
he, "there is o
my last breath
o, and that is
gift which I
which you wi
'-but here the
grew faint, and


I


the old
till wan
field fo
be a
made a


on his
were in
loss to 1


man
drov(
what


breast


. My sons,
ne thing which
I beg of you
to seek out a
have left you,
11 find in my
poor old man's
I his head sank
in death. The


too much grief for
ut in force that which
had bade them do,


V


hoard
search


them
they
of gol
iin it


end, till there was


(


no


to seek ir
thought
1. So
from en(
t a clod


Sthe
must
they
d to
that


I




SANDFORD


AND


MERTON,


they did not turn. At last they
gave it up.
It is strange that the old man
should have set us on this long
search for a thing that is not here,"
said Jack.
"Come," said Dick, "since we
have gone through so much toil on
the field, we may as well sow it
with cori, and so make the most
:of our pains.
At this bright thought they set
to work 'to sow the grain; and in
due time a crop sprang up, five
times as large as those crops which
had grown there in the old man's
life time.
The youths now said that tIis
must have been the wealth the old
man meant, and that his wish was


76


de


I

!




SAND FORD AND MERTON.


that


they


should


earn


their


77


bread


by the sweat of their brow.
Hal now came in from the farm,


where
time,


he


and


had


been


brought


for


with


a


short


him


the


chick which he took from the claws


kite, and


which had now got


quite well, and was so fond of Hal


that it ran by his side


like


a dog,


would perch on his arm, sit in the


breast of his coat, and


eat


crumbs


out of his hand.
How did you make it so tame ?"


said


Tom.


Hal


pains


told


to


do


him


so,


that
but


he


that


took


as


poor bird had


been


so much hurt,


had fed


from


his


it


own


at


the


hand,


farm
and


house


it


was


that that made it


so tame.


of


a


he


no


the




AND MERTOV.


"Well, how odd, to be sure!"


said Tom; "I thought all birds f
off when a man came near th(
The fowls that are kept at
place will not let me touch their
Mr. Barlow.-" Why is tl
Tom ?"
Tom.-" Well, they are wild."
Mr. Barlow.-" And what
you mean by the word wild ?"
Tom.-"When they will not
you come near them."
Mr. Barlow.-" Then it cor
to this, does it? A bird is v
when he will not let you cc
near him,, and he will not let
come near him when he is w
But I want you to tell me why
is wild."
Tom.-" That I can't say, sir.


w


lew
em.
our
n.
hat,


do

let


nes
vild
)me
you
ild.
he

"V
91f
\


78


"V224NDORD>




SANVDFORD


AND


MERTON.


79


Mr. Barlow.-Birds and beasts
would not be wild if they did not
fear us, and if we are kind to them
they get tame. I think if a large
beast of prey were to come up to
you, you would run from him."
Tom.-" Should I not, in truth?
Ah, as fast as my feet would take me."
Mr. Barlow.--" And yet you do
not think that you rank with the
wild men ?"
Tom gave a loud laugh at this;
and Hal then told him that he knew
a boy who had a tame snake, and
when he ate his bread and milk
in the shade of a tree, he would call
the snake up to him to drink out
of his bowl.
Tom.-" And did it not bite
him ?"





SANDFORD


AND


MERTON.


Hal/-


"No.


He


gave.


him


pat now and
if he ate too
no fear that I
From that
up his mind
some pet. S
with a large
hand, in sear
beast to pet
the first thine
pig, that lay


So Tom
look kind,
dear pig,
you; come
the young
of what T(
a squeak


put


then
fast ;
he wo
hour
that
;o off
slice
ch of
or bri
She
in tt


on


and sai
here is
to me,
pig coulc
om's vie,
and ran


with his spoon
but the boy had
uld bite him."
did Tom make
he would tame
he set at once,
of bread in his
a young bird or
ng up tame; and
met was a young
e sun to bask.
a soft smile, to
1, Pig, pig, my
some bread for
come!" But as
1 not quite judge
ws were, it gave
off to the old


sow.


" You


young


wretch,


- said


8o


a






Tom, "to
feed and
know your
you." So
caught it
hand, and
of bread
the young
make of
gave were
they soon


ru
pet
be
he
by


SANDFC


held ou
with the
pig kn
it, and
so shril
brought


the spot, with all
young pigs at her


t the large slice
left. But still
ew not what to
the squeaks it
1 and loud that
the old sow to
the rest of the
heels.


Tom
fear to
arms w
let it g
of Ton
Then t
on him


held tl
keep h
vhile sh
:o, and
n, which
he sow
in her


ie sow in too r
er young one ir
e was near, sc
it ran just in
1 threw him d
came up, and
rage. So there


nuch
1 his
) he
front
own.
trod
poor


)RD AND MERTON. 81

n off when I want to
you; if you do not
st friend, I must teach
sprang at the pig and
the leg with his right





SANDFORD AND MERTON.


Tom lay in. the mud and dirt. It
was Tom's turn now to be in a
rage, so he took the old sow by the
leg and beat her with all his might.
At this, she and all the young pigs
sent forth grunts and squeaks that
rent the air. The old sow led
Tom through the midst of a large
flock of geese that by chance fed
near the spot where all this took
place. You who read this, may
guess how a flock of geese would
add to the noise; but worse than
all, the old goose, to save her
brood, gave Tom a sharp peck
with her bill, which put him to so
much pain that his shrieks now
fell in with the shrill sounds all
round him, and this brought Mr.
Barlow to the spot.


82




SANDFORD


AND


MERTOiN


Hey day!"
this ?"


said he,


83


what is all


Tom, as soon as he could speak,


told


Mr.


Barlow


that


it was


fault,


and


that he might trace


it to what he had told him.
To what that I have told you?"


quoth


Mr.


Barlow.


Tom.-


" You


said,


sir,
sir,


that


tame


to


him
it.


a


give


bird
him


and


or


food,


now


beast


and


all


this


ought


be


kind


comes


Mr.
been in


Barlow.-


" I


see


the mud, but I


you


have


hope you


are not hurt, and if it is from what


I may have said,
the more.


I shall grieve all


Tom.-


" No,


am


not


much


hurt."


F2


his


all


to


to
of





84 SANDFORD AND MERTON.
Mr. Barlow.-" Well, then, now
we will come home, that you may
wash off the mud, and we will talk
of what you did with the pigs and
the geese by and by."
When Tom came down from his
room, Mr. Barlow said: My dear
boy, what could be the cause of
the sad plight I found you in? I
am sure I hope that I was not the
cause of it; but I don't think that
I told you to catch pigs by the
hind legs."
TomO.-" No, sir; but you said
that to feed wild things was the
way to make them love me, and
that then I could tame them, and
so I went to feed the pig with a
slice of bread."
Mr. Barlow.-" But it was not




SANDFORD


AND


MER TON.


my fault that you did it the wrong
way. The pig did not know what
you meant, and so when you went
to seize hold of him, he did all he
could to get free, and the old sow,
who heard the cries of her young


one, came to
Mr. Barlow
in days long
slave wrote a
is not wise to


as Tom 1
slave did
and her
this truth,
a crane,
"A wolf
his throat,
pain that


had
not
youi
bul
anc
had
,an
he


help
then
gon
tale
play
just
take


him."
told Tom that,
e by, a Greek
to prove that it


with edge


done
"a


be


Ig one to
t he took "
I this was
a bone tha
d gave him
ran with a


Bul
)y, a
set
1 wol
the
t stu
so


tools,
t this
sow,
S OW)
forth
f and
tale :
.ck in
much


howl


up


I


and down, to ask all whom he met


I




SANDFORD


AND MERTON.


to lend him a kind hand, and said


he would
or beast
At last a
the bribe,
bill down
drew out
the nsaid,
which yoi
that you
ask for m(


1


give a larg(
who would
crane, who
came up,
the wolf's
the bone.
'Now, wh(
1 spoke of
are !' said


e sum to bird
take it out.
had heard of
put her long
throat, and
The crane
ere is the fee
?' 'Wretch,


the wolf. 'to.


ore than this--whn you
ore than this-when you
1 1 "i .


nave put your neacd in
mouth, and brought it safe
As Tom had cause to kn
the sound of a squeak of a
to cheer him up Mr. Barl
told him of a man who


a wolf's.
out !'"
ow what
pig was,.
ow then
said he


could show a trick; so he stood on
a stage, when all at once he thrust
down his head, and gave out a,


I


86




SANDFORD


AI


VD MERTONV 87


c''iv1- f-


t-4 xv12 /_ 0_%1 -7.


-r


uuIu II c t&ic H bLqucaK oi a pig.
This he did so well that all thought


he


his
was
one.


had


brought


cloak;
made,


but


the'


a


young


though
y did


pig


in


search


not


find


A rough- man from a farm,


had come to look on, said,


who


" Faith,


can do this


as well


the next


night


they were


both


try their:


to


see


r skill. A great crowd came
them, and the men went on


the stage.


One of


them


gave


squeak like a pig,


which brought a


shout of praise, as it had done the


first


night.


The


boor's


turn


then


came, and he did hide a young pig


in his cloa
it squeak
ear, all ga


but


though


by a hard


Wve


the


palm


he


pinch


made
on the


to the first


as


he.


So


to


his


-%


1 11;11 -lea


+- -*




SANDFORD


AND


MERTON.


man, and they sent the 1
stage with a loud hiss.
Hal and Tom now
Barlow that they meant
house.
Mr. Barlow.-" T(


boor off the

told Mr.
to build a


)


build


house ? And have you got a
of bricks and lime ?"
Tom.-" No, no, Hal and
build a house that will not
bricks or lime."
Mr. Barlow.-" What, is it
made of cards then ?"
Tom. -"Dear sir! do you
me such a child as to wish


a


stock

I can
want

to be


think
for a


card house? No, we
one fit to live in.
ought to know how to
lest we should get po
on some wild part


me<
You
do
or,
of


in to build
1 said we
all things,
or be cast
the earth


88





SANDFORD


AND


MIERTON


where


for


us ;


there


in


are
that


no


case


men
you
wo


to


see,


work


sir,


we could build our own


house.


Barlow.--


built with,
Tom.-'


then,


" What is it to be
Tom ?"


'The first things


want are wood and an


Mr. Barlow.-


you,


and


loads of


we shall


axe.


" Wood I can


it,


but


do


give
you


know how to use an


To m.-


axe


" No, sir.


Mr.


Barlow. Then


I fear to


let you have one, as you might get
much hurt by it. But if vou tell


- ,


j -


me what wood you want I will cut
down the trees for you."
Tom.--" Thank you, thank you."


Mr.


Barlow then went to work,


and cut dow
man's wrist,


n poles
eight fee


as thick
t long,


as a
which


89


Mr.


~





SANDFORD AND


9


MERTON.


the boys made sharp at the end to
force them in the ground; and so
mad was Tom to build a house,
that he had quite lost sight of the
fact that he was "the son of a rich
squire," and went on with the work
with all his might.
Mr. Barlow.-" Where shall you
place your house ?"
Tom.-" This will be the spot
for it, just at the foot of this hill,
for here we shall be warm and
Y)


snug.
Hal took the stakes, a
them in the earth, and
house ten feet long and
wide. When this was
and Tom took the small
wood which they had cut
stakes, and wove them in


Lnd drove
made the
eight feet
done, he
sticks of
from the
with the




SANDFORD


poles,
fence
days
To


wel
to
ma
mu
Mi
larl
in
me
the
to


tc


so
and
do.
give


to
this


them


AND


MfERI


form
took


h


nt on with this
show them that
ke sure that a th
st work at it with
r. Barlow told the
k that had a nest
a field of corn, a
n came to look
crop. Well," s,
his son, I thin


) TON. 9

a sort of
them some


heart while they
slow work, and


if
ing
ou
m
of
nd
at
ays
k


we want to
is done, we
Lr own hands,
the tale of a
young birds
one day two
the state of
one of them
this wheat is


ripe, so now go and ask our friends
to help us to reap it."
When the old lark came back to
her nest, the young brood told her
in a great fright what they had
heard. So they look to their


as


L





SAfNDFORD AND


MiERTON.


friends for help,"
I think we hav
fear."
The next day
and as he saw r
corn field, he ba
his kith and kin
This the you


said she. "
-e no cause


Ic

t(
[n


Vell,
for


the man came;
) friends in the
le his son fetch
3 help him.
ig birds heard,


and
she

not
thei
the
I
as
cam
ye,


told it to the old one
came home to her nest.
Fear not," quoth she;
see that men go much
r way to help those that
same kith and kin."
n the course of a day c
the man found that n
Ie, he said to his son,'
John! we will trust to


but you and I will
at dawn of day."


reap


th


when

"I do
out of
are of


)r two,
1o one
Hark
none;
e corn


92


NOHOW




SA NDFORD


AND


MER ON.


"( Now,
must be
takes his
it is sure


said
gone;
work
to be


the old lark, "we
for when a man
in his own hands,
done."


-93




SANDFORD


AND


MER TON.


CHAPTER IV.


WHEN


Hal


to their work
great grief, th
doors, a stor
had blown dc
So this i
toil!" said T


of tears. W
at the stake:
blown down,
of it all was
deep in the
have done;
blew on the


they had


not


and


Tom


they foi


iat v
m
)wn
s th
om,


vhile
)f wi
their
e en
with


'hen Hal


went


mnd, to
they we
nd and
new hc
d of al
his eye
went to


s that the wind
he found that the
that they did not
ground as they s
so that when the
flat side of the


strength to


back
their
ire in
rain
)use.
1 our
s full
look
had
cause
go so
should
wind
wall,


bear


it;




SANDFORD


AND


MERTON.


but Mr. Barlow struck the tops of
the stakes (which the boys could
not reach), and drove them in so
firm that, let the wind blow as
hard as it might, they would be
quite safe.
The.next thin to be done was


to put a roof (
their house had n
long poles to rest
four walls, and o
straw; and they '
the house would 1
By and by the


hard on
proud -to
it kept th(
that was
through ;
there was


it,
thin

on


and
k ho\
but ;
the


)n for
lone; s(
on the t
n these
thought
be snug
rain c


a
a


the
Sdry
t las
top


till now,
)they put
:ops of the
they laid
now that


and


ame


boys
and
L, the
got


dry.
down
were
warm
straw
wet


for as their roof was flat,
no way for the rain to


95


rl_ I.- %-I& Nr J v%.Of v v %-j V.




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