Good stories for young people

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Material Information

Title:
Good stories for young people
Uncontrolled:
Good words for the young
Physical Description:
173, 2 p., 1 leaf of plates : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Swain, Joseph, 1820-1909 ( Engraver )
Houghton, Arthur Boyd, 1836-1875 ( Illustrator )
Zwecker, Johann Baptist, 1814-1876 ( Illustrator )
Griset, Ernest Henry, 1844-1907 ( Illustrator )
J.B. Lippincott & Co ( Publisher )
Dalziel Brothers ( Engraver )
Publisher:
J.B. Lippincott & Co.
Place of Publication:
Philadelphia
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1871   ( lcsh )
Hand-colored illustrations -- 1871   ( local )
Bldn -- 1871
Genre:
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Hand-colored illustrations   ( local )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by popular authors ; selected from "Good words for the young" ; with numerous illustrations.
General Note:
Some illustrations engraved by Dalziel and Swain and some illustrated by A.B. Houghton, J.B. Zwecker, and E.H. Griset.
General Note:
Baldwin Library copy illustrations are hand-colored: probably by young owner.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002223585
notis - ALG3835
oclc - 57726796
System ID:
UF00026196:00001


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"MARY AND KATIE."See page S.


GOOD STORIESFOR YOUNG PEOPLE.BY POPULAR AUTHORS.SELECTED FROM" GOOD WORDS FOR THE YOUNG."WITH NUMEROUS ILLUSTRATIONS.PHILADELPHIAJ. B. LIPPINCOTT AND CO.1871.


CONTENTS.PAGEMARY AND KATIE....................................................By Charles Camden. 5THE FRENCH DOLL.............................................. By Katharine S. Macquoid. 8A NIGHT IN AN AFRICAN CRUISER.................................... By S. W. Sadler. 13RUNNING AWAY TO SEA................................................By Richard Rowe. 18THE BOY WHO HAD NO MEMORY.................................................... 25THE FIRST ALMOND-TREE................................. .......... By Helen Zimmern. 27A MEMORY OF THE THAMES TUNNEL.............................................. 31PEGGY'S AFTERNOON NAP...........................................By Charles Camden. 37THE ENGLISH GIRL IN THE FRENCH SCHOOL .............By Katharine S. Macquoid. 39CHESSY CHALK AND HER BABY......................................By Edward Howe. 47TACKLING OLD EPHRAIM.............................................................. 50PAUL AND JEAN......................................................By Bessie P. Belloc. 57MASTER EPHRAIM JONES, JR......................................................... 63BUSH NEIGHBOURS....................................................By Edward Howe. 66THE CROWN IMPERIAL LILY..........................................By Helen Zimmern. 73GIACOMO AND PALLIDINA; OR, THE ITALIAN BEGGARS .......................... 76HOW MAY'S DREAM WAS PROVED TRUE........................... By Randall Bevan. 92THE TWO NESTS ..................................................... ........ ... 96THE RIDE ON THE CLIFF...........................................By Charles Camden. 98KEEPING THE "CORNUCOPIA"........................................................ 102YARNS.............................................................By a Young Sea-Captain. 116LIME'US AND PADDY ............................................ By Charles Camden. 124THE LAST NEWS OF THE FAIRIES..................................... By Miss Mulock. 130TWO STORIES................................................. By Hans Christian Andersen. 134THE SWALLOW-WORT................................................By Helen Zimmern. 139DAPPLE'S OPINIONS....................................................By Richard Rowe. 144ABOUT PHILIP............................................................By G. Crockford. 148URSULA SWAYNE'S TROUBLE..................................By Katharine S. Macquoid. 152JACK AND JANE.............................. ...............................By Richard Rowe. 159COME TO THE WOODS. A POEM...................................................... 162AUNT ANNIE'S STORY ABOUT JAMAICA............................. By Lady Barker. 162


GOOD STORIESFOR YOUNG PEOPLE.MARY AND KATIE.", TOW then, Katie, we'll go somewhere lower windows, and a row of plump pigeonsSNo else," said Mary; and Katie, as usual, cooing sleepily on the ridge of the thatchedobeyed her elder sister. roof. Two men thrashing old corn in theMary and Katie were two little town-girls barn brought down their swinging flails withwho had been sent to spend a fortnight at a a monotonous thud-thud, but Katie called itfarmhouse, for health's sake; or rather, timid, "blunt music." One of the flails, too, in-dreamy little Katie had been sent into the terested her. She could see the -man whocountry in the hope that she might borrow a wielded the other, working away in his bluelittle bloom from the dog-roses, and a little shirt and corduroy breeches with his loosenedspringiness from the fresh meadow-breezes; braces dangling from them; but this flailand bustling, unromantic Mary had been sent went up and down as if it did so of its own-ac-with her that she might not feel lonely, and cord, because the man who was using it stoodthat she might be forced to run about. The farther back than the other man ; and there-sisters had been sitting in a little green lum- fore Katie had been watching its mysteriousber-yard between the barn and the high, appearances and disappearances with a curi-straggling hedge that bordered the winding osity which was half-frightened but still veryroad which led up to the farmhouse. A pleasant. Katie could have sat on the crookedbroken old waggon-wheel leaned against the little tree-trunk all day, but Mary had soongreyandgreen, warped weatherboards of theold tired of the little lumber-yard. " Come along,barn. A gnarled old tree sprawled its rustling Katie," she said-very pleased to find whatleaves over the gabled, moss-patched thatch, she thought her duty tally with her ownTwo or three brown hens and a cream-coloured wishes. "Come along, Katie; you knowcock were scratching and clucking in the green Mamma said that I was not to let you l.mope."little yaAi. Amongst its other lumber was a They scrambled through ahole in the hedge,mossy, crooked little tree-trunk, and on this and went along the winding road. But Katiethe little girls had been seated-Katie en- soon wanted to sit down again. She wasjoying the sunny quiet only broken by lulling tired, for one thing; and for another, it wassounds. The barndoors were open on both not so necessary for her enjoyment as it wassides, so the little girls could see through for Mary's to be always moving on or " doingto the strawyard beyond, in which purple and something." She leaned back against theplumpudding pigs were basking, brown spar- grassy hedge-bank, and looked at the solitaryrows hopping, and black "beasts" and the oak drooping its scalloped leaves over thesilver-tailed, silver-maned chestnut colt pull- green corn in the middle of the opposite field,ing green food out of a grey, roofed rack in and looked so pleased that Mary looked at itsociable silence; and beyond the strawyard, too-but when Mary found that she had onlythe low-pitched, yellow-washed farmhouse, a tree in the middle of a corn-field to look at,,with its tiny,,paled strip of garden in front, the she could not help saying rather testily, " Why,tall hollyhocks blinding the leaden-latticed Katie, what a goose you are-I thought there5


6 MARY AND KA TIE.was something to see!" When a Scarlet "What nonsense you do talk, Katie! IAdmiral fluttered over the nettles in the ditch, really believe you're growing silly. If youMary was pleased, and tried to catch it; but were a sheep, the butcher would kill you,she could not make out why little Katie called and perhaps you'd be put into those greasyout "Please dort! " and to see Katie watch- mutton pies. Wouldn't that be nice ? Littleing the flies, and the little burnished beetles girls should be seen and not heard. Youcrawling on the dock and plantain leaves, and should think before you speak. You're too"nasty weeds with nothting on them," and a fond of talking, Katie.""stupid old dusty donkey," that was standing It wasn't fair of Mary to say so, for shestock-still-except when it whisked its tail or talked twenty times as much as Katie; and iftwitched its ears to get rid of the flies,-with Katie did not exactly think, she dreamt aits head down and a clog on, leaning against good deal before she spoke. One reason whythe gate of the cornfield : watching things she spoke so little was because she did notlike these "as if there was anything worth know how to talk about the things she waslooking at" in them-to see this angered always thinking about in her way.sturdy little Mary, good-natured though she Mary's lecture made Katie's lips twitchwas. and great tears come into her great eyes."Oh, do come along, Katie," sh' said,- " Don't talk about putting me into mutton" what fun is there sitting down here, do'ng pies as if you didn't care-I thought you'dnothing?" be sorrier to get rid of me than that, Mary,"Katie could not tell her sister; she could sobbed poor little Katie, and she threw heronly say she "liked it." arms round her sister and hugged her hard."No, of course you can't tell me," an- Mary was vexed that she should have madeswered Mary, triumphantly. "You're only Katie cry, and so she gave her a hug; butmaking pretence, because you think it's fine. Mary was so utterly puzzled to guess how itI heard Aunt Annie tell Mamma that if she was that she had made her sister cry that shedidn't take care, she'd let you grow up into a was as much annoyed at Katie as she was atsentimental silly. She did-that's just what herself. "Now, do give over, Katie. Itshe said-I heard her. It made Mamma cry. isn't nice to be always crying, and for nothingMamma said perhaps you'd never-but I too-it seems so silly."wasn't to tell you that. Big girls hear things So on they went, between the tall whitethey mustn't tell little girls. But Aunt Annie windmill, that was taking a holiday, on asaid, 'Stuff and nonsense !'-so come along, mound on one side of the road, and the low,you little goose '" brown, old watermill, that was still at work,Katie wanted to sit down again in a place but in a very sleepy sort of fashion, on thewhere the hedgerow trees met overhead, other side of the road. On the top of theSome sheep that had got out of a meadow windmill steps sat a miller's man half asleep.through a gap in the fence were lying panting In the willow-fringed pond behind the water-on the chequered roadside turf. Another mill floated a pair of white swans, lazilysheep was standing in the gap motionless, as drifting or paddling to and fr'o.if it had gone to sleep whilst trying to make "Don't you like the country better thanup its mind as to whether or not it should the streets?" asked Katie.play truant too. A clear little roadside runnel " Oh, it's all very well for a change, but Imade cool music as it ran over its smooth should soon get precious tired of the countrystones and between its trembling grass-tufts. -everything's so quiet."" Don't they look pretty ? " cried little Katie, " That's why it seems nice to me-there'smeaning the sheep. no need to hurry. At home, sometimes, it" They've no business out here," answered makes me feel as if I'd walked ever so manypractical Mary; and she began to drive miles, and had ever so many more to walk,them back into the meadow, but soon de- when I sit at the window and see the peoplesisted, saying, " It's no use-they'd get out rushing along the streets."again as soon as we were gone. If I were a "There, you're talking nonsense again,farmer, I wouldn't have holes in my hedges." Katie. You can't feel tired sitting still, be-The sleepy sheep, however, had run back out cause other people are running about. Butof the gap, and the others had run up the if you feel tired now, we'll go in here and sitlane, jostling one another in huddled bewilder- down."ment, as startled sheep generally do. They had come to the churchyard just" Oh, Mary, you've spoilt it," said Katie, outside the village, and easily climbe. overreproachfully. "They did look so comfort- the low mossy wall. Mary seated herself onable-I was just thinking I should like to be one of the graves, but Katie sat down in thea sheep like that." grass beside it.


MfAR Y AND KA TIE."Why don't you come and sit by me?" ing the cool draught and the sight of iteasked Mary. shady li't'e back garden, down which she" It doesn't seem kind-the grave doesn't could see the good woman going with herbelong to us." jug. The bottom wall of the back garden" Why, who said it did? What are you was a bank of red earth and rock. Bramblestalking about, Katie ?" and ferns grew on it. A silver birch-stem"I should like you or Mamma or Papa to twisted itself out of one cranny; out cfcome and sit on my grave; it would seem as another, that had been widened and squaredlif I was in bed, and you'd come up stairs to a little, trickled clear cold water. Thetalk to me; but I don't think I should like woman picked a dock-leaf, made a spout ofany one I didn't know to come." it, and soon came back with a jugful ot ice-" Well, you are a queer child, Katie," said cold water. Katie thought her big mugful ofMary; but she, too, after that sat still for a few it was the most delicious drink she had everminutes. The churchyard was a very quiet tasted ; but though it had cooled her so atplace. One of the Rectory bedroom-windows, first, she was astonished to find that in apeeping through the limes that divided the minute or too she felt hotter than before.churchyard from the Rectory garden, was the "You don't look well, Miss; you'd betteronly sign of a house in sight. There was an stop and rest a bit longer," said the woman.old sun-dial over the old church clock. When Whilst Katie was resting, Mary ran outthe clock had struck the hour, they could into the garden, and having noticed a littl-hear a hum in the ivy-covered old tower for wood at the bottom of the field on the othlr"ever so long" afterwards. Little birds side of the garden fence, she ran back to in-chirped in the ivy; rooks cawed sleepily as quire whethertherewere anyblackberrics there.they flew about the churchyard elms. A "Tain't blackberryin' time, Miss."superannuated blind white horse lay in the " Well, but may people go in there ?"shade of the black yew tree; and Mary and " Oh, yes, them may go as likes, but thereKatie sat quite silent in the midst of the warm ain't much to see, and if you're going thatgreen graves and hoary tottering gravestones, way, you'd better take care you don't go tooBut Mary soon grew tired of this. " Now nigh the Witch's Pool."then, Katie, you must get up. Mamma said " What's that? " asked Mary.I was not to let you sit on the grass too long." " A nasty, black, deep pool o' water downAs they were going out of the graveyard, at the bottom t'other side o' the wood-Katie turned round to look at it once more. nobody don't know how deep it is. If you"Oh, that is a pretty place," she said. was once to fall in, nobody could get ye out.""When I die, I should like to be buried "But why is it called the Witc.is Pool ?"there-just where I was sitting." asked Katie." I wish, Katie, you wouldn't be so gloomy. "I don't know, my dear. They do sayYou take all the fun out of everything. Aunt that if you chucks a stone in, the number o'Annie says that it's wicked, besides being silly, bubbles as comes up will show you how manyto talk about dying before your time like that. years you's lived, and has got to live. IAin't you thirsty?-l am. Let's go and see don't believe that. I never tried it, but if Iif we can get a drink of water somewhere." was to, I 'ont believe there'd be fifty-threeThey passed the pound, and the cage, and bubbles come up-no less, let alone noa roadside cart-lodge without seeing any cot- more-and that's my age, if I was to dietages, but the road swept round sharply at this minute. If you're going a.nywheres neirthe cart-lodge, and just beyond they came the pcol, mind you don't let your little si "er,upon three or four old gabled cottages, lean- pretty dear, get too near the edge, M bis."ing forward as if they had nodded in their "Oh, I'll take care of her," answeredsleep. A water-butt stood beside the porch Mary. " We are much obliged to you for theof one of them, and in front of it, just off nice water." And the little girls went throughthe road, there was a well. So the liitle girls the cottage-garden, and out through the gatetripped up to the open door of the cottage, into the field, and so into the little wood.and- Mary asked for water. Katie felt that the sight of the pool would"Surely, Miss," said the good woman of frighten her, and yet she had a strange long-the house. " Well's dry, and the water in ing to see it; and Mary, though she didn'tthe butt ain't fit to drink; but I'll fetch ye care anythirg about the bubbles story, thoughtsome from the spring if ye'll step in and set that as there was nothing eLe to see, shedown a bit. The little gal seems tired-she might as well have a look at a pool so deepdon't look strong Set ye down, my dear." that nobody knew how deep it was.The back door was also open, and Katie They soon found their waydown to the pool.seated herself between the two doors, enjoy- A little sunlight had strag led in upon it, but


8 THE FRENCH DOLL.the sunshine only made the dark, lonely water seen that day-Mary was frightened, and shelook more gloomy. A few rushes grew just was very frightened when she got out of bedat the edge, and a single white waterlily was and found that her sister did not know her,in blossom there, but most of the water- though she was sure that Katie was awake.which looked very much like dusty ink-had She called up the farmer's wife, and whennothing growing in or moving on it. Katie she came to Katie with a light, she was soshuddered when she saw it. But presently she frightened that she called up one of the farm-picked up a pebble, and whispered to Mary, boys, and bade him put the bridle on the"Will you count ? " Mary burst out laughing. pony, and go at full gallop to fetch the doctor,"Oh, you little silly And you that want to who lived six miles away. And when thepretend that you know about grown-up things. doctor came again in the morning, Katie wasBut I'll count, that will be some fun." so much worse that her mamma and papaKatie dropped in her stone, and half turning were sent for, and the next day Katie died.away her head, clung to Mary, who, with one After that the people about there believedarm round a hung over to count the more than ever in the Witch's Pool. But allbubbles. " Here they come,-one-two- that the seven bubbles had to do with Katie'sthree--four- five-six-seven-no-there's death on her seventh birthday, I think, wasno more. Well, that is funny. If it had been this. She had been fevered and then sud-to tell how old you were, instead of how old denly chilled before she got to the pool, andyou will be when you die, it would have been was going to be ill anyhow; under these cirrjust right. Your birthday's the day after to- cumstances she saw the seven bubbles, andmorrow, and you will be seven then, you as she was a morbidly impressionable littleknow. But that wasn't it, so, of course, it's girl, who had long brooded over the thoughtall nonsense. Fancy your dying the day after that she would die young, they made herto-morrow, and ever so much younger than illness worse.me, for I shall be nine next birthday-it's Mary told her mamma and .papa whatperfectly ridiculous." Katie had said about the churchyard, and sheThat night when Mary and Katie were was buried there. Her little grave is justlying in their beds in their pretty little farm- where she sat; and when Mary is at the farm-house bedroom, where the roses tapped at house she sometimes goes to sit beside it,their old-fashioned .latticed window in the though Mary is still so practical that shemorning to wake them, Katie began to talk, cannot quite "see the use of it." But I thinkjust as Mary was going to sleep. it is of some use to her, at any rate. She"Do hold your tongue, Katie," said Mary; thinks of the little girl with whom she sat"I'm so tired, and it is such nonsense." there on that bright morning, and whom sheBut when Katie went on talking louder will never see again on earth; and thoughtsthan ever-a strange jumble about the of that kind are just the ones to do MaryWitch's Pool and every other place she had good. CHARLES CAMDEN.THE FRENCH DOLL.BY THE AUTHOR OF " HESTER KIRTON."PART I. she said, "and it seems to me you are forin"M/ RS. SMITH'S is a very nice school, of children." I bowed. "Well then, youThere are usually about twenty girls can be very kind if you will;-we expect athere, big and little, and sometimes quite new pupil to-day, a little French girl, and Igrown-up young women are there for a time, am afraid the poor child will be so strangeas parlour-boarders. The parlour-boarders do at first."not go into the class-rooms; they get private I was just seventeen, very intent on per-lessons from the masters in their own study, fecting my education, and I thought it aI was in this study one day hard at work great infliction to be saddled with a trouble-at a German exercise, when Mrs. Smith came some child.in. She looked worried. "Very well," I said; "I'll do what I can."You have lived in France, Miss Tyrrel," But don't you think, Mrs. Smith, childrenak;.


THE FRENCH DOLL. 9always shake down best when they are left she knows exactly how we are each of usto themselves ?" dressed; I felt her look me all over-suchMrs. Smith smiled; she often smiled at insolence in the little monkey !"me when I argued. Rose was tall and very awkward; her face"Not always," she said, and she went flushed while she spoke; in her heartaway. she envied the French child's easy self-I wrote on, and forgot all about the little possession.French girl. I smiled. "What is the child's name?"I was the only parlour-boarder then, and I " Emilie de Champ-Louis, but she is to belunched at the school-girls' dinner, called Mimi. Isn't it a silly name?" saidI noticed to-day that the girls did not rush Ursula Swayne-the clever girl of the school,off to croquet as they usually did when they though she was only a younger one.left the dining-room. They stood gathered "I think Mimi is a pretty name," I said;in a little crowd on the lawn, in eager dis- " and it is easy for you all to pronounce ;"-cussion. here I saw a universal smile of derision-"Some nonsense or other," I thought. "but Rose, when you have lived abroad aI had forgotten the expected arrival of the little you will notice at once the markedFrench child, and I rather looked down distinction between French children andon school-girls, and considered myself a English ones : they are never shy-at leastwoman beside them, and I had put "The they never seem so-because they have noMagic Ring" in my pocket, and was thirsting false shame."to be alone in a snug summer-house, behind I thought myself very kind in thus enlight-the shrubbery. I am quite sure anybody ening Rose. She only burst out laughing.who is reading "The Magic Ring" for the "Oh, Miss Tyrrel, you are qbite wrong,first time at seventeen will know how I felt, quite; the French are false altogether, theyand how very trifling and ridiculous the ideas have no sincerity. I wish you joy of yourof the little crowd of school-girls seemed French doll.-Come along, girls."to me. The girls as a matter of course echoedI sat down, and found my place, and then Rose's laughter, and followed her to thesuch a buzz of excitement reached, me that croquet-ground..my indifference was stirred. I forgot all about "The Magic Ring.""Perhaps some one is hurt," thought I, " Poor little Mimi! I'm afraid she won'tand I went to a gap in the shrubbery which be happy. How prejudiced these childrenshut off the summer-house from the lawn. are. I shall go in to school-room tea thisThe buzz had suddenly hushe'd, the girls evening, and see how they treat her."stood still, looking towards the house and at By fits and starts I was popular in theMrs. Smith, who came from it leading a little school-room, and occasionally I conde-girl by the hand. scended to drink a cup of tea with the girlsA little girl! a little monkey I thought her before dinner.in that first glance. I could not make out I suppose Mrs. Smith had accepted myher face, but she looked exactly like one of rebuff as final. She did not try again tothe children one sees in a fashion-book- interest me in little Mimi.from her fanciful hat to her high tasselled " How very quiet they are," thought I, atblack morocco boots. the door of a pleasant bow-windowed room"And Mrs. Smith wants me to act show- looking on the garden. This was a sort ofw man to a little conceited puppet like that indoor play-place, a room where consulta-No, re illy that sort of thing is quite out of tions were held about charades and croquet-my line." matches, where the chief amusements wereMrs. Smith and her charge went back to hatched and planned, and here the girlsthe house again, and just as the girls were always assembled before the bell summonedrushing off to croquet they spied me out. them to tea."Oh Miss Tyrrel, did you ever?" I opened the door and stood still, looking" Isn't she a little stuck-up thing ?" at the group in the middle of the room."I tell you what"-Rose Watson was Rose Watson leaned against the wall withhead-girl this half, and was as much inclined half-closed eyes in disgusted silence; Ursulato plume herself on her new position as Swayne held back with a half-amused smilesome others are on their new clothes-" she's on her clever flexible mouth, but the restnothing but a doll; she has no more feeling in clustered closely round the little Frenchher than dolls have. Why, a new girl is always girl.shy, but that mite of a creature held up her She looked simple enough now, so far ashead and looked at us all round: I believe dress went, in her little foulard frock and


o1 THE FRENCH DOLL.black silk bibbed apron, but her hair was " I'm not sure," Ursula's voice had a tonestiffly strained back, and gave her an artificial of doubt in it. "I don't think the littleappearance. She had a sweet little face, creature is natural yet, she looks as if sheround and babyish, with large dark liquid could be full of fun ; I'm not sure that 1eyes, and well-cut expressive lips. Just now should like fat Amy's hugs either, she's sothey were pressed closely together with a stupid."troubled, puzzled look ; the child seemed to "Stupid As if a baby like that ought notbe fumbling in her apron pockets. Amy to be grateful for any notice."Glossop, a good-tempered dunce, had thrown " Hush !" Ursula looked over her shoulderboth arms round her, but Mimi kept her and saw how near Mimi was. " Miss Pearsonhead turned another way. says the child understands some English. IRose Watson looked round at me. wish I knew whether one ought to like her."" Oh, you've come, have you, Miss Tyrrel, I too felt puzzled, but I confess I wasto see your doll?" disappointed in Mimi. I did not stoopShe spoke in a whisper, but she might just down and kiss her, though I longed to do it;as well have spoken out loud. she would probably repulse me too.A bright flush spread over Mimi's face, "So strange,-one would have thoughtand she pushed Amy away. that here all alone among strangers she"I say, Miss Mimi, we shall have to teach would have been grateful for any affection;you manners," said rough good-natured a little creature like that cannot discriminate;Amy. so long as she is loved it cannot signify whoJust then the tea-bell rang, and as they all the person is."passed out I found myself close to little I felt sorry for poor untidy, good-naturedMimi; involuntarily I slid my hand down and Amy.took hers in it. " Mimi is a cold-hearted little puppet afterShe gave a quick observant glance from all," I decided, as I let go her hand, andunder her long lashes, and almost, like Rose saw her pass into the school-room with theWatson, I shrank from her scrutiny, it was rest.so searching. However, I suppose she wassatisfied ; the little plump hand was not drawn PART II.away. " E all brAeakfasted together, and I founiI sat by Mimi at tea-time. She evidently v my eyes straying after Mimi. She satnoticed everything, but she scarcely spoke, next Mrs. Smith, looking a picture of dainti-and she never once smiled,-still she sat ness this morning. It was difficult to sayerect, and there was no look of shyness on what it was that made the difference betweenher face. her and her English schoolfellows, but thereAmy sat on the other side of her, and was a striking difference between them.when tea was over she bent down, and Mimi had such a finished little manner; shelooked into the sweet little face beside her. looked so exquisitely neat, and yet so grace-"You're such a nice little doll, ain't you, ful, it seemed to me that she was like a littleMimi ? " and she tried to kiss her. fairy yacht among a fleet of fishing-boats.Mimi looked so distressed that I feared She talked and laughed with Mrs. Smith, andshe would burst out crying and offend Amy. looked about her easily and naturally.But Amy was not sensitive; she wanted to I was sitting next Rose.kiss Mimi, and she kissed her, hugging her " Well, Miss Tyrrel," she said presently,as if the child really were the doll she called " I hope you have looked long enough ather. your French doll.""Leave me quiet," said the little one in I blushed; it certainly was very absurd toFrench, and her face was red with vexation, be so taken up by this one child.There was a half-suppressed buzz of dis- " Stay here till I come back, Mimi," Mrs.pleasure. " Little stuck-up goose !" " Cold- Smith said, and I was left alone with her.hearted little puss!" "Doll indeed !" came " Good morning, Mees," said Mimi andin very audible whispers, and the girls broke she looked up at me with her large darkup in twos and threes, holding counsel eyes. If I had not remembered her treat-together on their way to the school-room. ment of Amy, I must have kissed her, sheI took Mimi's hand again, looked so engaging, her manner was such aUrsula and Rose went on before me, and charming mixture of frankness and exquisiteI could hear all they said. good-breeding; but I resolved not to exposeRose spoke first, myself to a repulse." Well, what do you say now ? I tell you "Good morning, Mimi." I nodded, andshe hasn't any feeling in her." shook hands, and then I fancied that a dis-


THE FRENCH DOLL. I1appointed look came into the dark bright In the afternoon I stayed in the study. I"eyes. meant to have read some German there, butMrs. Smith came back. seeing the girls clustered round Mimi on" You can go to the school-room now, my the lawn, I went to the window and watcheddear," the principal said; " have you been them.making friends with Miss Tyrrel ?" They were asking her questions in French," Yes, and no," said Mimi, in French, and and she answered them readily.she darted off like a butterfly. " Can you play croquet?" said Rose." She is a most charming child," said Mrs. Mimi shook her head and smiled. "ButSmith. I can learn," she said gaily; " I can learn"I can't make her out," I answered. everything."Page zo.Rose translated this speech for the benefit " After her! after her!" Amy shouted.of the little ones. Her temper was fairly roused by the child's" Oh, she can learn everything, can she ? dislike, and, strong in all her impulses, sheThe conceit of the little puss !" ran off at a headlong pace." You shan't bully her," said Amy ; "she's But slender, quick-witted Ursula Swayneonly a baby, and she's too pretty to be bul- stood in her path.lied. Come along, little one." She snatched " Leave the child alone; she shan't beMimi up in her arms, and was carrying her off. hunted, Amy. You don't understand h-r,Mimi struggled; in another minute she you great clumsy thing !"freed herself, and darted across the lawn Amy looked at Rose, and Rose hesitated.towards the gap in the shrubbery. Amy might be stupid, but she was very


I2 THE FRENCH DOLL.willing and very strong, a most useful adhe- surely Mrs. Smith, and the governesses, andrent, and yet Rose did not want to offend I have not been rude."Ursula. Mimi flushed up to the forehead." If Amy leaves Mimi alone, you must do " Pardon, Mademoiselle, but it is you Ithe same, Ursula. We can't have you senti- think of in this moment."mentalising with Mimi, and making her think My ears tingled; I began to think Rose'sherself a victim, when she's only a spoiled, estimate had been near the truth: Mimi must,stuck-up doll." indeed, be stuck-up if she ventured to callUrsula cast a wistful look at the gap, but me rude.she was no match in strength for Amy, and " What was I rude about, pray ?" I saidshe followed Rose. stiffly.At seventeen girls are a hard-hearted race, Mimi smiled.and now, though I was longing to comfort " Ah, Mademoiselle is angry, but I mustMimi, I said to myself that it was too hot to tell the truth if she asks it. Well, then,stay indoors. Mademoiselle, I said to you, 'Good morning,"I can read Sintram' just as well in the Mees;' if I say this in France, a Frenchsummer-house." young lady of your age takes me in her armsBut the summer-house was empty. I went and embraces me, and says to me so manyon reading " Sintram," but I was listening tender words; and you, Mademoiselle, youinstead of trying to understand it. Presently make to me a little cold shake hands."I heard a sob; one of those deep-drawn I got red now.quivering sounds that thrills through you, " Why, Mimi, I wanted to kiss you, and Iand takes pain along with it. saw you push Amy away; I thought youJust outside, between the summer-house would push me away too."and a huge pollard-oak under which it stood, Mimi laughed merrily; the tears were notwas Mimi. Her arms clasped the rough bark, dry on her cheeks, but she looked as blitheand her face was pressed against it. as a butterfly. She came close to me, and" Maman! Maman !" that was all her looked searchingly into my face.little cry, and then the deep-drawn quivering " Mademoiselle should have been moresob. wise. It is possible I never could like that" Mimi." I touched her hand. She looked Amy should kiss me; she is greedy andround quickly, and showed me her great ugly, and she has such-oh, so untidy hands,dark eyes brimming with tears, and her poor with cuts, and scratches, and long nails !little face puckered up with sorrow; only Ah!" Mimi shrugged her little shouldersjust a glance-she buried her face again and with disgust. "But," she put her head onkept in her sobs. one side reflectively, " if she had kissed" What is it, Mimi?" I spoke in French. me for love, bon / I would still have let"Amy only means to be kind to you. Don't her do it, but it is quite different for amuse-you like to be kissed?" ment."Mimi did not answer, but she sobbed "But, Mimi," I argued, "how can youagain, know whether people kiss you for love or" The little English girls like to be kissed, not? "and poor Amy thought she was being kind " But-yes-yes-yes, Mademoiselle, it isto you. She kissed you as if you were her not possible to mistake. Mademoiselle her-little sister." self is not very tall, and how would she likeMimi let go the tree; she turned round that a big fat woman should take her up andand faced me with great reproachful eyes. carry her like a doll, and kiss her hard at" No, Mees, she kiss me like a doll-like pleasure? I cannot-I will not," she saida plaything." impetuously ; " I will tell to Mrs. Smith thatI was puzzled, so I waited, for Mimi's face I go home to-morrow."was full of indignation. " You dear little thing." I stooped down" I do not want to be a little English girl. and kissed the hot flushed cheek, and MimiPapa said I was to become a little English nestled herself into my arms at once, and letgirl at Mrs. Smith's, and I will not. I will me hug her like a baby. " You don't under-go back. English girls are so unpolite-so stand English girls, darling," I said; " theyharsh; English people do not love each are full of love and affection, but they areother. No," she stamped her little foot, "I rough in showing it. Let them love you inwill go back." their own way, Mimi, and you will soon beI began to understand, happy."" But, Mimi, why do you say we are im- " No-no." Mimi gave another quiveringpolite? The school-girls are perhaps, but sob, and nestled still closer in my arms.


A NIGHT IN AN AFRICAN CRUISER. 13At the sound of voices on the lawn, she sat encouraged Mimi to spend the play-hoursup and clung to me. with me, but just at the same time I was" It is only Mrs. Smith, dear." summoned home to be bridesmaid to my" Then I will go to her." Mimi slid down eldest sister.to the ground, and walked away with the I stayed away a week. I shall never forgetmost charming little self-possessed air. I my first sight of Mimi when I went back tofollowed her. I wanted to see how it would Mrs. Smith's. She stood waiting for me atall end. the gate, so pale and thin, her eyes looked" Madame," the child curtsied, " if you larger than ever, with great hollows underplease I wish to be sent to Mamma to- them.morrow. I do not wish to learn English." " I am so, so glad you are come," she putMrs. Smith looked at Miss Pearson, the both arms round my neck when I kissed herhead governess, and smiled; then she stroked little white face, "but I am going home."Mimi s hair. I looked surprised. "Come in," she said in" My dear, your mamma would be dis- her little old-fashioned courteous way; "sitpleased if you went back to her. What has down, Mademoiselle, and I will tell you. Yes,been happening, Miss Tyrrel?" I am going; the doctor says I am to go, andI told Mimi's story as well as I could, and he says I have a hard heart not to love myI was surprised at Mrs. Smith's troubled face; schoolfellows. Mademoiselle, do you thinkbut probably her experience had taught her I have a so hard heart ? I love you, and Iwhat would be the end of Mimi's school love them too, if they would leave me; butlife. I cannot love to be their plaything, and toIt was vain to remonstrate with Rose, and make them always laugh."Amy, and the rest. They said it was all The little creature quivered from head tononsense ; they were not going to alter ways foot. There was no use in reasoning withwhich had no harm in them, to suit the Mimi, in endeavouring to show her that ifFrenchified whims of a little doll like Mimi ; she would try to learn endurance, Rose andstill for a day or two the child was left in Amy, and the rest, might in turn learn for-peace, and then Amy's restraint gave way, bearance. She was too ill to be lectured.and she treated Mimi like a baby again. The It was as impossible for her highly-wroughtchild seldom resisted, but there was a heart- nature to understand that real feeling andsick impatience on her face, very painful to tenderness may lie hidden under a roughsee, and I noticed that she grew pale and had manner, as it was for Rose and Amy tolittle appetite for her meals. understand her sensitiveness.Mrs. Smith wrote to Madame de Champ- She went home next day, and when theLouis, but the answer was, that Mimi must girls saw how she cried and clung to me atlearn English, and that the.more she was left parting, I think they believed that Mimi wasto her playfellows the sooner this would be not quite the doll they had so persistentlyaccomplished. Till this letter came I had called her.KATHARINE S. MACQUOID.A NIGHT IN AN AFRICAN CRUISER." Q AIL ho !" The cheering cry from the eagerly trying to discover the chase, which- masthead aroused the slumbering was as yet visible to no eyes except those ofwatch of Her Majesty's brig Pantaloon, and the Krooman at the masthead who had firstdispelled the waking dreams in which I, the reported the strange sail. As a colouredofficer of the watch, was indulging, man's power of vision in the night-time isWe were cruising-looking out for slavers generally superior to that of a white person,-off the mouth of the Congo; and as a the suspense was endured for nearly apleasant change in the middle of the rainy quarter of an hour, but at length the captain,season, the night was starlight. Sending word fearing lest the anticipated prize should proveto the captain, I made all sail on the ship, a myth, hailed in dialect suited to the Kroo-and in a few minutes our spars were covered man, " King Tom i You sure you see him ?"with canvas, and the brig gliding through "Yes, captain, him live out dere," repliedthe smooth water under the influence of a the individual bearing the regal cognomen,land wind which had just sprung up. pointing right ahead. In a few more minutesOur men clustered forward in the bows, the good faith of King Tom was verified,


14 A NIGHIT INA AN FRICAN CRUISER.the strange hail being plainly seen on the a charnel-house, passed over-a few big dropsline of the horizon, and the distance between of rain splashed upon the deck. Then closedthe Pantaloon and her prey rapidly lessen- round the ship the arch of the storm-cloud;ing. and with a mighty roar, lashing the water"Clear away the gun forward and give into foam, the tornado swept down upon us.her a blank cartridge," was an order obeyed Notwithstanding all our precautions, theas soon as given. The long thirty-two first shock threw the Pantaloon nearly on herpounder bellowed forth, and the flash beam-ends; for a few moments of painfulillumined momentarily the excited faces on suspense she remained in that position, thendeck. As the report died away, all eyes were suddenly righting-all her timbers groaningbent on the chase to discover if she obeyed --gradually yielded to her helm. Immediatethat authoritative signal to "heave to;" but danger was now over, it being only necessaryher white sails stillgleamedin the moonlight, to keep the ship driving before the windand she pursued her course regardless of the until the storm should subside. The officers,mandate. This perseverance in attempting released from their deepest anxiety, wereto escape gave good assurance that we were now able to note-some even to enjoy-thein pursuit of a slave-ship. Many of the crew magnificent spectacle of an African tornado.began already in imagination to spend their In that roaring wind and deafening thunderprize-money; the Kroomen especially were no man could hear his fellow speak, or inchuckling with delight, for the very day pre- the thick darkness see the rope to which heceding, at their earnest request-made in clung or the deck whereon he stood, saveconsequence of no slaver having been seen when. the blinding lightning at quick recur-for some months-the figure-head of the ring intervals disclosed the wild scene aroundPantaloon (a capital reproduction of the well- him.known personage in the pantomime) had had Two hours passed thus, and the fury ofhis spectacles repainted,. "to make him see the tornado began to decrease, when-withbetter." a simultaneous crash of thunder-the light-The proverbial "slip between cup and ning struck our foremast. On reaching thelip" had, however, yet to be illustrated. The deck the electric fluid was first attracted byguns having been again loaded, this time the chain cable, along which it ran hissingwith shot, the gunner was standing, lanyard until, reaching the quarter-deck,. it leapedin hand, awaiting the order to fire, when the with a loud report to the nearest gun, flash-captain's attention was attracted by the flap- ing from gun to gun until it plunged into theping of the sails-which hitherto had kept water astern, the old helmsman as it passedfull-against the masts; the land wind had him ducking his head as he would to ansuddenly subsided, and a hot stifling calm enemy's shot. Happily no 'one was seriouslysucceeded. On looking round he discovered hurt, although some men standing round thein one quarter of the horizon the small cloud, mast were partially stunned. The thunderliterally as a man's hand, which to experi- now ceased, and the wind fell. Quitting myenced eyes betokens the quick approach of station on the forecastle, I joined the officersa tornado; and he knew well that, if one of on the quarter-deck, where we congratulatedthese awful tropical storms struck the ship' ourselves that the elements had done theirwhile all sail was set, nothing but the loss of worst, and speculated on the chances of theher masts could save her. morning light gladdening our eyes with aNo time now to think of aught but the safety view of the lost slaver. In all probability,of the ship. " Hands shorten sail! Quick, though, the tornado had either capsized ormen,-quick,.-for your lives! " shouted the driven her far beyond our reach.captain. The crew, aware of the danger, It being now midnight, I was stepping,worked well; sail after sail was taken in, until, wearily enough, towards the companion-instead of a cloud of canvas, the cruiser ladder, intending to go below, when I wasshowed nothing aloft but the clear tracery of met by an officer who rushed violently upspars and rigging; In time, and only just tke ladder and attempted to pass me. Re-in time, was the work completed, the ship cognizing our surgeon-who was sufferingmade snug and the men down from aloft, from a severe attack of yellow fever-IMeanwhile the cloud had rapidly increased attempted to stop him, but, tearing himselfin volume un'til now it overspread half the from my grasp with the strength of delirium,horizon, the remainder of the heavens being he forced his way overboard.yet bright and clear. The dead silence of Giving orders to the boatswain's mate toexpectation was broken by a low growl of call away the lifeboat's crew, I sprang aft.thunder. One breath ot wind, cold as from and let go the life-buoy. The portfireSA fact attached to the apparatus blazed up, and by


A NIGHT IN AN AFRICAN CRUISER. r5its light the form of the doctor was visible, of the rest in my own little cabin, which afloaing rapidly astern. Not a moment was few moments more would bring. But notto be lost, and divesting myself of coat and easily were these enjoyments to be gained-waistcoat, I was quickly in the water at his not yet were the dangers of this eventful nightside. Being a good swimmer, there was passed.little difficulty in supporting him; the shock As we neared the ship it became percepti-of the plunge had apparently restored his ble that she was rolling heavily in the troughsenses, for he recognized me, and feebly of the sea, and that the act of getting onsyllabled my name. A few strokes brougat board and hoisting up the boat would be aus to the life-buoy, and resting my feet 'on perilous one. Nothing, however, could bethe lower part under water, one arm clinging gained by delay,'so seizing what appeared toto the upper rod, and the other round the be a favourable moment, during a temporarywaist of my friend, I awaited with impatience lull ii. the ship's motion, we pulled up along-the approach of succour from the ship. The side. Just as the boat cadme abreast of thesituation was by no means agr eable; the half- gangway, we rose on the crest of an immensedrowned man soon lost the little conscious- wave: a crowd of men were on deck readyness that remained, and hung a dead werht to assist us, and into their outstretched armson my arm. The recent tornado had occa- we litcrally threw the insensible form oi thesioned a heavy sea; and, though the life- doctor. Two of our men also leaped on thebuoy-bore our weight well, yet frequently the deck and were safe, but the danger to uswaves, dashing over our faces, half-choked who still remained was imminent. Our boatme. I was also myself much weakened, sank with the receding wave, the ship at thehaving only lately recovered from an attack same time rolling heavily over to starboard,of yellow fever; and as the light at the away from us. With the return roll wouldPantaloon's masthead dimmed and faded come the danger. In vain with desperateto my eye as we drifted more and more efforts we tried with oars to force the boatfrom the ship, so also fainter and more away from her dangerous proximity. Closerfaint waned my hopes of deliverance. Thq and closer yet the power of attraction pressedportfire was quickly burning out, already its her to the ship's side. The return roll came.brilliancy had much lessened, and the fine I looked up, saw the heavy dark mass descend-volume of light it had at first given was ing remorseless upon our heads; then a crash,dwindling into a fitful gushing of sparks, as a cry of agony-a few struggling, breathlessin a badly-prepared schoolboy's squib. I moments in the dark depths; and I wasknew well that, if the light should intdeed go floating, halt-stunned, but unhurt, on theout entirely, the boat sent to our aid would surface, amidst oars and fragments of therow in vain quest of such a speck as the life- wrecked boat. One poor fellow, whosebuoy; when morning broke it might'be dis- death-shriek we had heard, hid sunk to risecovered, but long before that time my ex- no more, but the others were swinaling be-hausted arms would have loosened their hold, side me uninjured.and our bodies found the sailor's grave. And now the safest way of regaining theWith despair in my heart I gazed upwards ship had to be considered. The '- falls," orat the portfire, which now suddenly shot ropes by which the lost boat had beenforth an expiring gleam-tinting with a blue lowered, were hanging from the. projectingunearthly glare the closed eyes and senseless davits, their ends trailing in the water someform of my companion: and then all was six or eight feet from the side ; and to climbdarkness. But, even at that moment, I heard up by their assistance was an easy mode ofthe welcome sound of the measured beat of escape for trained sailors.oars. Gathering all my strength, I hailed; S,therefore to these ropes, Ithe hail was answered cheerily by many directed my men to go up first, and soonstrong voices, and guided by my shout the had the satisfaction of seeing them all safelyboat discovered our position. Soon friendly on board, the ship at this time being tolerablyhands grasped us, and in another minute I steady. Then grasping the falls I began mywas safely seated in the boat, with the doctor, own ascent hand over hand. Scaicely hadstill unconscious, by my side. my feet left the water, however, when theThe boat's crew gave way cheerily for the rolling motion once more commenced. Asbrig, towing the life-buoy astern. Overhead the ship inclined gradually over, my feetthe sky was clearing, the stars again shone again touched the surface ; still I descendedout; and as the black form of our floating until the waters closed over my head, and thenhome once more became visible-her hull lower and lower yet-clinging the while tolooming large in the obscurity of night-I the rope as my only chance of ultimate safetyrevelled in anticipation of the comforts and -until at length I telt the downward motion


I6 A NIGHT IN AN AFRICAN CRUISER.cease. Quickly succeeded a sudden jerk, I was carried upwards being enormous. Atnearly wrenching my hands from their hold ; last, panting and exhausted, but with presenceand with a velocity far exceeding that of the of mind still unimpaired, I emerged, and withdescent, a roll of the ship in an opposite desperate haste-dreading the coming down-direction was dragging me into upper air. It wardroll-began again to clamber up the rope.required all my remaining strength to retain I succeeded in gaining a point about twomy grasp, the opposing pressure of water as feet higher than my former position; anotherfoot or two and should be safe-already It has been averred that, of all deaths,had, several men slipped down the ropes, drowning is the most painless; nay, accord-whose hands nearly touched mine. I strug- ing to some writers it is even agreeable: that,gled hard, but with all my efforts could not after a rapid review of past existence, thegain another inch--again the horrible down- mind appears to '"babble of green fields," award motionrecommenced, and, while breath- delicious dreamy mistiness steals over theless from the last descent, again I was plunged senses, and the dying man gradually andbeneath the water pleasantly glides ovLr the boundary which


A NIGH] IN AN AFRICAN CRUISER. 17separates life from death I cannot say- of her cargo. Attracted b: the scent, thesesuch may possibly have been the case with monsters of the deep follow in the wake ofmany-but my own experience of the sensa- slave-ships, accompanying them across thetions of drowning, extending even to the Atlantic, and becoming the tloatinggraves ofverge of absolute unconsciousness, is far many a victim to the horrors of the Middledifferent. The agony of this second immer- Passage.sion was almost insupportable. As in the On boarding and taking possession, thefirst instance, I sank slowly, then after a prize proved to be the Aventureiro, a finemomentary pause was dragged violently up- yacht-like schooner, carrying one long swivelwards, the resisting body of water clinging gun amidships. Small need was there toto me as if loth to lose its prey. Once more inquire of her sullen commander whethermy face reached the surface ; I gave a deep the cargo was lawful or " contraband," andgasp for breath. But nature had been too our sailors at once proceeded to open theheavily tried. A loud booming in my ears closely-covered hatchways. On removing-flashes of light before my eyes-and I them a dense steaming mist of foul sickeningknew no more air ascended from the slave-deck below ; andWhen consciousness returned, I was in my three hundred unhappy beings of both sexesown cabin, the assistant-surgeon bending were discovered lying down, their feetover the bed. Although too feeble for con- manacled to long iron bars placed " fore andversation, I could understand from him that aft" throughout the ship. From this piteousmy rescue had been effected by the men writhing mass of humanity arose strangewho had descended the rope ; they had seized voices and shouts of joy, as the irons weremy hands just as insensibility was unlocking unloosed and the fact of their deliverancetheir grasp. He also informed me that, con- dawned upon their minds. Half the num-trary to all expectation, the shock expe- ber were brought on deck to breathe therienced by the surgeon was likely to prove purer atmosphere, and the rest, unfettered,beneficial-that, all fever having left him, he roamed about at will below.was now sleeping calmly and peaceably. The crew of the slaver, twenty-four inWith strict injunctions to follow so good an all, were transferred to the Pantaloon, andexample, I was left to my repose. a lieutenant and party of men detailed toIn these southern latitudes no soft inter- convey the prize to Sierra Leone. Beforevening twilight exists; the change from parting company, however, an exciting sceneobscure night to glaring broiling day is of plunder was enacted; officers and sailorsalmost instantaneous. No sooner did' day keenly searching after comestibles which-break on the following morning, and the sun although articles of daily consumption onappear, than all eyes were anxiously engaged shore-were luxuries to men shut up forsweeping the horizon in hopes of encounter- months in an African cruiser.ing the lost slaver. Fifty voices quickly ex- Tins of preserved meats, sardines, pottedclaimed, " There she is!" and there indeed, salmon and lobster, boxes of crystallizednot two miles off, was the luckless vessel, sugar, raisins, potatoes, butter, wine, andwhich even the tornado had failed to save, bottled pale ale rewarded the laughing plun-The sea was calm; not a ripple disturbed its derers; and were passed into the ship underglassy smoothness as it gently heaved in the the very eye of the slave-captain, who, aslong low swell which prevailed. It was evi- he leaned over the side, muttered the notdent to the crew of the slave-ship that no inappropriate word, " Ladrones! " Soon,chance of escape remained; although armed, however, his face cleared up, and ejaculatingthey were no match for the English cruiser. "Fortuna de la guerra!" he smoked hisSoon a Brazilian ensign fluttered up to her paper cheroot with calmness, consoled doubt-masthead, waved there for a moment, and less by the recollection of former successfulthen slowly and reluctantly descended, in. trips; for slave-traders confess that if onlytoken of surrender. one vessel out of four escapes, they are amplyOur boats, well manned and armed, now repaid.pulled towards the prize, pasing through And now, all arrangements being com-some dozens of empty wine and ale bottles plete, the prize-crew gave a hearty farewellrecently thrown overboard, demonstrating cheer as the Aventureiro, with England's flagthat the slave-crew had begun to drown their of liberty waving at the peak, bore away tosorrows in the good liquor the cabin stores the westward, a cheer returned as heartily byafforded, determined it should not be wasted their comrades in the Pantaloon, as thatdown the throats of their, captors. Lazily vessel's head was once more turned towardsfloating also close to the vessel were several her cruising ground.large sharks, showing too clearly the nature S. W. SADLER.2


IS RUNNING A WAY TO SEA.RUNNING AWAY TO SEA."1NOT very long ago a little chap ran away and with your gold epaulettes, and swordfrom school to go to sea. I chance (hacked like a saw), and a baker's dozen ofto know almost exactly how he felt, and all medals on ?that happened to him; so I can give a true, Not a hundred miles from one of theas well as a full and particular account of his suburbs of London, there used to be-per-adventures. But as it might hurt his feelings haps there is still, and so I cannot give itsif I were to give his right name, we will call whereabouts more plainly-a Boys' School,him Jack Sprat. which Jack declares to have been " the beast-Jack's notion was that all sailors were liest hole that ever called itself a school."jolly fellows, who led very jolly lives. They Outside its wall, from week's end to week'smight have dangers to encounter, but, if they end, the little chaps were scarcely ever allowedwere wrecked, they were almost sure to get to go, except on Sundays; when the schoolback to England somehow, or if they didn't, was marched, two and two, like Noah's arkto have beautiful desert islands waiting for beasts and birds, to church. Now this con-them, which was even better. And then finement was one thing which Jack did nottheir life was so unlike school-so free-and- relish; and, for another thing, he had noteasy. There were such chances in it, too. been accustomed to be knocked about atYou might begin as cabin-boy in a merchant- other people's pleasure. Accordingly, to se-man (hadn't Captain Cook, and Sir Clou- cure liberty, the sagacious Jack made up hisdesley Shovel, and ever so many of the mind to turn cabin-boy.famous fellows, been cabin-boys either in the He resisted the blandishments of themerchant-service or the navy ?), but then you basket-woman, and saved up two weeks'mightbe the first of a crew of twenty gallant pocket-money. The eventful morning cameBritish tars to board a pirate, and haul down at length, and Jack woke early in the autumnthe black flag with its death's-head and cross- moonlight. All the other fellows in the longbones, the said pirate being manned by three dormitory were sound asleep. He felt ratherhundred bearded ruffians, black, brown, and scared, but as he was, he said his prayers beforerenegade-white, and carrying thirty long brass he crept out of the room. Perhaps he hurriedguns, which your ship had fought for five them over rather, and, perhaps, he did not feelhours, muzzle to muzzle, with a rusty little bit quite sure that boys who were running awayof an iron cannon, suddenly remembered and had any business to say prayers; but still he diddragged out from under the longboat; and say them, partly from habit, and partly becausethen, before you could say Jack Robinson, he felt that people who were going to sea couldyou might find yourself, cadet,-midshipman, not make sure for a moment what would-first lieutenant,-captain, of a dashing fri- happen to them. Then he went out of thegate, sink or capture two French first-rates, room on tiptoe, carrying the shoes whichand half-a-dozen corvettes in single combat, he had smuggled up to bed the night before,and take no end of American clippers. How instead of pushing them into his pigeon-holethe Portsmouth bells would ring when it was in the shoe-rack to be cleaned; and stoleknown that the " flying, fighting Arethusa " almost as silently as a shadow down the stairs.had anchored at Spithead with a kite-tail of Boards would creak, though, when he wasfresh prizes under her stern! The Mayor passing the bedroom doors he dreaded most;and corporation would come down to wel- and he had to make a rush past the tall oldcome her heroic young captain, when he clock on the last landing. "Tick-tick, tick-landed, for the first time during his brief but tick," it said. "I'm awake-I've been awakeeventful life at sea, upon his native soil. all night. I know what's going on, if everyMamma would not be sorry then that he had one else is asleep."run away from school; and wouldn't " the In the hall Jack put on his shoes, andgirls "-sisters, and cousins, and all the rest prepared to tackle the front door. Thereof them that you used to lark with under the were two bolts to shoot back, and a bar tomistletoe-envy the one that had hold of take down, and a chain to unsnack, andyour sound arm (one arm, of course, would then a huge key to turn. Jack almostbe in a sling, but sure to get quite well the tumbled off the tottering scaffolding of hall,week after next), when you walked to church chairs, &c. he constructed to reach the topthe first Sunday after you got home, in your bolt; but all the obstacles except the lockcocked hat, and blue coat, and white trowsers, were overcome at last. The key for a time0


RUNNING A WAY TO SEA. 19would only give a grating creak that made shirts, low-waisted breeches, and long-quar-Jack shiver-it obstinately refused to turn. tered pumps. Some of them had their trow-With a wrench that almost put his wrists sers braced up almost to their arm-pits, and-out of joint, Jack twisted it round. A mo- worse still-instead of hailing him with ament afterwards he had lifted the latch, and " What cheer, messmate?" some of themwas running down to the great gates, leaping gave Jack a shove, and swore at him, if heover the shadows of the trees that stretched happened to stumble against them, as heout gaunt black arms, as if they wanted to caught his foot in the great iron mooring-trip him up or catch him by the ankle. rings, or groped his way under and over theJack had expected that he would have to gangways, chains, and hawsers that every-clamber over the great gates, but-hooray! where stopped the way. Some of the mates,-the little door in one of them had been to be sure, had gilt bands round their caps,left unlocked, and was idly swinging back- and gilt buttons on their blue coats, but thewards and forwards in the breeze. Jack had greasy, white-seamed uniforms had a verytime to turn round and shake his fist at the shabby-genteel look, and Jack did not likerusty old bell that wouldn't ring him up to see sailors quill-driving on the other sideto work before breakfast; and then he of the little tables at which the cargoes wereplunged into the outside moonlight and being checked off.felt free, although he still ran on as if the However, there were the ships, at any rate,whole pack of his tormentors were after him. some of them with bunting flying, or a looseIt was easy enough for him to find his way sail bellying out, or sailors' clothes hung upinto London-he had only to follow his nose to dry-real big ships from all parts of the-but it was a good while before he could world. When Jack thought of the pure seafind his way to " the Docks." When he to which they were accustomed, he wonderedasked his way to them, people said, " What that they did not fidget in the stagnant,docks, you young silly ?" and others told him muddy-green dock-water. But some of theto go to such-a-street, and turn down such- ships did not smell very sweet; unpleasantanother-street, and anybody would tell him whiffs came from them of bilge-water, per-there; but Jack didn't know where such-a- spiring sheepskins, and putrid horns .andstreet and such-another-street were, any more hides.than he knew where the Docks were. " But I needn't go in a ship that carriesWhen he reached Ratcliff Highway at nasty things like those," thought Jack; "I'velast, and threaded his way through the throng plenty to pick from."of greasy, ragged, unshaven labourers still He made up his mind, for one thing, thatwaiting to be hired outside the gates, the he wouldn't go in a steamer, or in a blistered,London Docks were in full swing of business, rusty, old-fashioned sailing tub, with a bow asThe bustle pleased Jack at first. Men were broad as its stem, and its gray, ragged rig-hewing sugar hogsheads open with great ging all in a tangle. At last he found a craftaxes, white coopers were hammering away at just to his taste, with a clipper-bow, andcasks, blue custom-house officers were gauging raking masts, and gilt stars on the catheads,casks, men were trundling casks, casks in and bright brass belaying pins, and deck asthousands stood along the quays. Dangling white as milk, and ropes coiled down on itfrom top-floors of the tall warehouses, and like Catherine-wheels. A placard lashed onover the mine-like holds of the ships, boxes, to her shrouds announced that she was boundbarrels, crates, bales, hogsheads, and huge for Hong Kong, and "the East" was justbundles of hides and sheepskins, and skeins where Jack wanted to go to. So he went upof jangling iron bars, were everywhere going to some men who were swinging on a stage,up or down. Tea-chests were being shot painting the clipper's sides, and said, as know-into lighters, like boys sliding down a hill. ingly as he could, " Can you tell me if thisThere was a smell, too, here of sugar, there ship is in want of a hand?"of tobacco, and yonder of vinegar, or drugs, " Can't say, sir," answered one of the menor brandy-and everywhere of tar-that with a grin; " better ask the mate. Theresomehow sharpened Jack's desire to be a he stands by the gangway."sailor. But he soon felt half disappointed; " If you please, sir, I want to go to sea,"nobody in the Docks looked jolly. The said Jack to the mate, very respectfully.men who were crying "Heave-heave- ".Do you? Go back home, you little fooL"heave altogether!" as they strained at the Ship after ship he tried with no better suc-winches, looked far more like depressed dust- cess, and what that mate said was quite politemen than dashing mariners. Even the real compared with the answers Jack got fromsailors had nothing rollicking about them. some of the mates and captains. WhereThey hadn't broad turnover collars to their ,there were men on board, too, they made fun


20 R UNNING A WA Y TO SEA.of him ; told him that they had got a monkey ears with his clenched fists. The first mate,already, and disagreeable things of that kind; Mr. Munnens, was not much better temperedand one sulky old black cook dabbed a dirty than the skipper. The carpenter and two ordishclout into his face, and threatened to send three of the foremast men were hearty fellows,a bucket of water over him, if he didn't make but the rest of the crew were blackguards.tracks, tarnation slick out of his galley. Jack Off Margate the pilot insisted on bringingdid not try an American ship again after that. up, although the skipper wanted to crack on.Just as he was giving up hope, Jack got When Jack looked at the Margate lamps,his ship, twinkling through the rushing rain, and overA red-faced man came reeling down to a the wild black waters, he almost wished him-boat that was waiting to pull him to a ship self back at Elm House. How he longedwhich was being warped out of dock. He to be at home I The watch were clusteredoverheard. Jack speaking to a captain, and round the galley, out of which the howlingsang out, " Want to go to sea, eh? Come wind blew a long line of red sparks; the restalong wi' me.; I want a boy, an' one's as of the men were under cover in the fore-good as another." castle; Mr. Croggan, swathed in oilskins, wasJack did not much like the look of the tramping to and fro upon the poop; butman, but he was ashamed to hold back. He Jack, wet to the skin, was shivering, waitingscrambled down into the boat, and presently for orders, outside the door of the cabin inwas scrambling up the side of the Onyx, 960 which the skipper, and the first mate, and thetons, bound for Port Natal. The Onyx was pilot were taking their grog. Every now andnot A i, and she didn't carry "a cow and an then a damp sheep dangling on the gallowsexperienced surgeon." As soon as the cap- came thump against Jack's face, and lone-tain got on board, he tumbled into his cabin liness had so taken the pluck out of him, thatto sleep off his drink. Jack enjoyed the bustle he felt half inclined to cry. There wasof the river as they were being towed down nothing dignified in his distresses. He hadto Gravesend, but felt rather uncomfortable found out that he was nobody on board;because no one gave him anything to do. that if he had a moment to spare from the" If you please, sir, I've come on board captain's work, he was at the beck and callto work," he said to the second mate. of everybody, and would be expected to do" Oh, have you? Where did you sign all the dirtiest jobs. As he thought of whatarticles? I thought you was the skipper's he had already done, he grew sick again;kid. Don't distress yourself, he'll find you and because he was hanging over the side,plenty to do; we've none too many hands instead of waiting to receive the captain'son board. Make yourself happy whilst you orders to fetch some more hot water fromcan; it's a poor soul that never rejoices." the galley, he got another hiding. PoorThis was the nearest approach to his idea Jack did not teel much like the gallant capof sailors' talk which Jack had heard, and tain of the " flying, fighting Arethusa," whenhis heart warmed accordingly to Mr. Croggan. he crept into the dog-kennel of a bunk thatWhen the Onyx brought, up for the night at had been assigned him, together with a fewGravesend, he asked Mr. Croggan where he rough slop-clothes that had been thrown atwas to turn in-Jack was just going to say his head, as a bare bone might be pitched to"go to bed," but remembered the proper a mangy, stray, mongrel cur. The nextphrase in time. morning the cable parted, the remnant frao-" Why, where did you put your chest?" ment thumping against the bows with a dullasked Mr. Croggan; and when he learnt thud, distinguishable even in the roaring ofhow Jack had come to sea, he gave a long the storm. The ship swung round, andwhistle, and said, "You-poor-little-devil; floundered broadside towards the land. Sea-why, what a born idiot you must be !" sick Jack almost hoped that she might driveJack slept that night on the floor of the ashore. Sea-sick as he was, he could notdeck-house, which the second mate and the help seeing and wondering at the same hopecarpenter shared, and thought himself very in the halt-drunken skipper's eyes. But thelucky to get such shelter, for the rain thumped pilot, and the mates, and the men rusheddown on the roof like marbles. The next forward like race-horses; another cable wasmorning the Onyx took her pilot, weighed paid out, and the Onyx was brought up inanchor, and beat out to sea. Captain water just deep enough to float her.Mitchell came on deck in the vile temper " What are you skulking for there, youwhich was "his usual," as the Scotch say, young lubber?" was Captain Mitchell's Teunless when stupified by drink. Deum, and Jack received his thank-offer-"Why didn't you bring me my coffee?" ing in a rope's-ending. The skipper sworehe growled to Jack, and then he boxed Jack's fiercely at the luggers that swooped down


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RUNNING A WAY TO SEA. 23on and skimmed round the Onyx, like a flock ways miserable; no boy can be, howeverof dark-winged sea-birds; but he was obliged badly he is treated. Jack soon got his sea-to go ashore in one of them to buy a new legs, and grew proud of being able to goanchor and cable; and when the anchor had aloft without feeling at all funky. When Mr.been fished, the skipper relieved his feelings Croggan, as was often the case, had the soleby giving Jack a drubbing, for which he did command during the captain's watch, andnot take the trouble to invent a reason, the drunken captain was snoring in his"Run up and shake out the main-royal, berth, Jack was safe. Mr. Croggan was asyou lazy young whelp !" the skipper bellowed kind to him as he could be, and the goodto Jack in the fair weather that followed the fellows, who happened to be all in thefoul, as the Onyx stooddown Channel. Jack, captain's watch, wouldn't let the other menwhose sea-sickness had passed, was delighted treat Jack as a football. Besides, theat the chance of getting something sailor-like savagest people cannot keep on beingto do, but he had the vaguest idea of where savage for ever. They will let you aloneand what the main-royal was; and because sometimes, because they cannot get anyhe hesitated, the skipper was going to lick fun out of plaguing you-especially if they seehim again. The pilot, however, interposed, that you are beginning not to mind-andand gave Jack a dim notion of what he was that was how Jack began to feel after a bit.expected to do. He did not run up the rig- And then he saw Madeira-a silver mistging very nimbly-especially when he had no rising out of a golden sea; and porpoisesrattlins to help him; he turned giddy every were harpooned, and dolphins grained, andnow and then, and clutched the shrouds as if bonito hooked, and flapping sharks hauledhe could not "run" or "shin" up another on board with a lump of pork down theirfoot: he fumbled sadly with the unfamiliar horrid horseshoe mouths, and flying-fish fellsail-fancying every moment that he was on deck; and Jack managed to get a tastegoing to be shaken off the yard like a rotten of them all; and as he ate, he thoughtpear; but still, as the pilot said, when Jack what a much more heroic personage he wascame down) beginning at last to recover his (though he was kicked about like a dog)old opinion of his special aptitude for a than the fellows who used to lick him atsailor's life), his performance was "very fair Elm House, but who had not the pluck tofor a beginning." Jack had expected louder run away from Saturday's "resurrection-pie."laud than that; he had thought that even Jack did not much relish crossing thethe skipper would clap him on the back. Line, however. He was the only one onThe skipper did clap him on the back-in a board the Onyx who had not crossed itvery unpleasant manner-the next time he before, and the savage fellows made up forran foul of Jack when the pilot was not by. their lack of other fun by " taking it out of"The pilot was a very trifling check on the Jack extensively, and even the jolly fellowsskipper's bad temper, but still Jack looked thought that he was fair game then. Jackruefully on the boat that carried the pilot was lathered with unmentionable soap, theashore, huge shaving-brush was dabbed into hisWhen Eddystone's star had faded from mouth, the skin was rasped off his cheeksthe sky, Jack began to think that he had and chin with a jagged bit of rusty ironbeen brought on board the Onyx simply to hoop, and then-up flew his heels, and hebe tormented. With the rowdy portion of the was floundering in a tub of filthy water.crew, Jack was sharp enough to see, the And when he had scrambled out, in spiteskipper wanted to curry favour. The first of the many hands that tried to keep hismate, too, he seemed to want to win over- head under, and was gasping for breath asand to be puzzled because Mr. Munnens did if he must shake to pieces, bucketful afternot respond more cordially to his advances, bucketful of water was shot into his face toMr. Croggan and the carpenter he snubbed, drive the breath out of him again.and the jolly fellows in the forecastle, who But Jack recovered his breath, and the lum-were far and away the best seamen in it, he bering, leaky old Onyx waddled on with himwas so fond of " bully-ragging," that even Mr. into the South Atlantic. He saw the SouthernMunnens, well as he liked to hear any one Cross and the Magellan Clouds, and whalesblown up, when he had not the chance of sending up silvery jets, and routing about inblowing anybody up himself, used to put in the waves like monstrously magnified pigshis oar on the other side, simply out of the in a monstrously magnified strawyard. Hesympathy which every good seaman feels with pitched biscuit to the huge grey and whiteanother good seaman when his seamanship is albatrosses when they leisurely folded theirunjustly impugned, wide double-jointed wings in a calm, andYou must not suppose that Jack was al- swam up to the side like tame ducks.


24 RUNNING AWAY TO SEA.But dirty weather soon set in, and the in his mouth; and though he expected to bepumping-which had been throughout the whirled off like a withered leaf, yet he had justvoyage a cause of grumbling-became more time for one thought, that stabbed him like afagging than ever ; as Jack, whose hands knife, about his mother and his sisters fromwere skinned by the ropes and his back stiff whom he had run away.with the bending, had good reason to know. But the Onyx did right herself when theyThe men no longer chanted- got the canvas off her, and was still afloatnext morning, when the sky was bright" They say, old man, yonr horse will die- again, and the zebra-striped Cape pigeonsThey say so--and they h/lntk so--"were flitting blithely over the subsiding sea.as the beam was jerked up and down. Masses of seaweed, too, were floating on theMutinous growls were the chorus now. The waves. The captain, however, obstinatelyway the skipper behaved in bad weather refused to follow the mate's advice to bearpuzzled the men. He would scarcely take up for Table Bay, and ordered out the boats.a stitch of canvas off the ship when she was " You're lobbing your owners, if you desertlying over so that her yards nearly dipped her, Captain Mitchell," said Mr. Munnens.into the water. "I'll stake my life we can take her into" It's my belief," Jack heard one of his Cape Town."friends say to another, "that the old man's "Obey orders, if you break owners, sir,"either mad, or else he's bribed to sink the growled the skipper.ship, and gets so drunk he forgets he'll go " Obey orders, and break underwriters, Cap-down in her. If Mr. Munnens would put the tain Mitchell-that's it, isn't it ?" answeredskipper in irons, I'd stand by him." the mate. " I won't leave her while she'llThe rowdies, however, although they did float-who'll stay with me?"grumble at the pumping, were on the Most of the men went over the side withskipper's side. He raved at them, too, the captain, but Mr. Croggan, and the car-sometimes, but he maintained no discipline, penter, and Jack, and three or four of theHe made very little fuss even when the mate men, stopped with Mr. Munnens; and aftertold him that the cargo had been broached, a very anxious day, Table Mountain stoodand a barrelful of spirit-bottles stolen. up clearly dark .against the sky, and theThe skipper was carrying on as usual one Onyx floundered past Robben Island, andday, although black, ragged clouds, like let go her anchor in Table Bay.dusty cobwebs, were fast mounting from all The underwriters made a handsome pre-sides of the horizon. The distant sea was sent to the mates and the men who hadbristled by the hurricane that was rushing stuck to the Onyx, when they got to heartowards the ship. of what had happened, since she had beenAs Mr. Croggan shouted, "Stand by the insured shamefully above her value. Per-royal halyards !" the royals flew in rags from haps the underwriters might have hadthe bolt-ropes, and the royal masts snapped something unpleasant to say to Captainlike twigs. The skipper, drunk as usual, Mitchell; but he and the men who wentcame reeling from his cabin, but Mr. with him never turned up again.Munnens rushed before him. A very different skipper from Captain"All hands on deck!" the mate bellowed, Mitchell took Jack home out of charity; butand his watch came tumbling up half-drunk, though he had been kindly treated, JackDown came the hail in lumps like jagged respectfully declined the captain's offer topebbles. Down, too, through the night- take him as an apprentice when they gotblack sky shot a great lump of lightning, and back to England. A brown, shabby littlesank like a seething mass of molten metal urchin was Jack when he reached home.into the black sea. Blue and pink and He was considerably ashamed of himself"yellow zigzags constantly scarred the sky, and as well as his shabiuiess, when his motherpeal after peal came the awful, overlapping and sisters rushed out to meet him; butthunder. Tacks and sheets doubled like they seemed so proud of his brownness thatwhip-lashes; the fiercely flapping canvas Jack grew proud of it too, and bragged ofmade a thunder of its own ; the thick main- his adventures, especially when he found thatyard was snapped in the slings as you might he was not to go back to Elm House.break a lath across your knee. The Onyx He is rather apt to give himself airs whenlay over so that it seemed impossible she nautical matters are discussed, on accountcould ever come up again. Woen Jack went of his extensive maritime experience ; but heup the weather-rigging-tauter than harp- has never gone back to sea-as a sailor.strings-behind two of his old friends, togive a hand in shortening sail, his heart was RICHARD ROWS


THE BOY WHO HAD NO MEMORY 25THE BOY WHO HAD NO MEMORY."44W ELL, Frank, how do you get on to see how soon you can manage it. As towith your holiday task ?" No memory, that's a complaint that a great"i Get on ? " replies Frank; " I don't get on many people'suffer from who might easily bea bit. It's an awful shame giving a fellow cured. Do you remember the old story ofany work in the holidays. Here have I been Eyes and No Eyes ? "fagging away at this long string of names "Yes, I do; but what has that to do withand dates for the last hour, and I can't say memory ?"it yet. I have no memory at all." " A great deal. ,Two boys-say you and"Well, my boy," said I, " holiday tasks Tom-of about equal age and ability, walkare rather a bore, no doubt, and rather down a green, country lane, or up Regentunfair, when 'a fellow works hard all the Street, on a sunny morning. One fellowhalf-year,' as you say; but as you have got sees a hundred curious and pleasant things,the Roman histoiy to do, the best thing is the other not five. But both have eyes, andboth can see clearly. Much in the same two fish were in colour, and size, and shape;fashion, two fellows in your class both have how the pool curved round on one side withmemories. One has been taught, or has a broad shallow pebbly beach, and how onlearned by practice, to use the power of the other side there was a bank of chalkystoring up facts in his mind, and recollecting mud beyond the bed of thick weeds?"them; the other has not. What one finds "And the thousand of caddis worms thateasy, the other finds very hard or impossi- we saw crawling about at the bottom of theble; though, at 'the time, both have got shallow! Oh yes, I remember; and weSmemories equally good, and equally fit for counted sixty-one red spots on the biggestwork. Do you remember, Frank, the great trout; and you showed me the two sorts ofpool below the Hatch, on the Clatford river, May-flies, and the reed warbler's nest, and thewhere I killed the two big trout last year ?" water-ousel,-and then we were so puzzled" Oh yes, quite well." by the fish all at once leaving off feeding in"You can remember how different the the afternoon, and suddenly beginning again,


26 THE BO Y WHO HAD NO MEMORY.as we came up the river. I can see that verses of the Psalms for the day; and, whengreat pool now, quite plainly, and watch the the time comes for singing, joining heartilyfish feeding; and I recollect that queer story in the verses out of 'Hymns Ancient andthe keeper told us about the two big trout Modern,' which are some hundreds in number.fighting,-charging each other like a couple " Ask that little girl, there, busy weaving aof rams--to settle which should be king of sash-line, how long she took to learn thethe run." whole of the one hundred and fifty Psalms."And how is it," said I, "that you can She will tell you about eighteen months;-recollect all these things so clearly and all done, too, not in the school-room, orexactly if you have no memory ?" while at work,-but after school-hours, while" Oh," replies Frank, " but trout-fishing is strolling about with a friend, who teachesa very different thing from Roman history, them to her a verse at a time, line by line,Of course, a fellow can recollect all about and makes her repeat it, verse by verse, untiltrout, and the chalk-stream, flies, and beetles, she has mastered the whole Psalm, and soand the river, because he likes them so much." on through the one hundred and fifty. And,"Just so: he likes them all, and puts his once learped, she never forgets them. If youheart into the work of storing them up in his doubt my word, try her, by giving her amind. The facts all fit into their right places, verse out of any one Psalm you know, and sheand he keeps them there safe and sound for will at once go on with that which follows,many a long day. And the very same machine to the end of the Psalm.-There, I told youhe uses to 'learn the history of the trout, so. Once she had no memory. Now, youthe names of the flies, beetles, and birds,- see what she has. There are fifty other girlsonly wants careful use, and plenty of oil and in this long work-room who can do whata little heart in the business, to serve equally she does so easily and so correctly.well for Roman history. Some day, Frank, " Gossipping old Bishop Burnet 1 tells usyou and I will have a talk about this long of a blind lady, a Miss Walkier, who had mas-story of names and dates again." tered five different languages, and knew by** heart all the Psalms, and the whole of theA few weeks after this we got back from New Testament; and Mr. Wilson, in histhe country to our own home at the Blind Biography, of a blind sailor, who had learnedSchool in St. George's Fields, where about the 'Navy List' straight through from be-one hundred and sixty poor blind children ginning to end.are taught to read and write and cipher, and "You smile, Frank, at this, I see,-butwork at a trade; all of which things they come now over to the other side of thelearn to do as nimbly and correctly as boys school, where the blind boys and men are atwith the sharpest eyes. work, and you shall see and hear for your-"Now, Frank," said I, "come along with self a man who can beat the sailor, if notme, and let us hunt up a few fellows who Miss Walkier.once had no memory,-like a boy I once met " Here we are in the mat shop, full of boysin the holidays,-but somehow or other have and men, all busily at work on cocoa-nutmanaged to learn by heart scores and hundreds matting: coarse mats for doorways, orof words and lines which would puzzle you coloured rugs of the daintiest kind. There,as much as the Roman history, at first, at the loom, is D. Butler."-"These blind children come to, us at all "Well, Butler, how are you? Busy asages, between ten and eighteen, and generally ever ? "knowing nothing more than the names of a few " Yes, sir; and quite well, thank you."letters; often unable to say even the Lord's " How does Milton get on ?"Prayer correctly, and without even a notion "Pretty well, sir; but the 'Paradise Re-of what arithmetic means. As to writing and gained is a deal harder than Paradisereading they look upon the whole thing Lost.'"as an impossibility. And yet more than " 'Paradise Regained I' have you beenninety out of a hundred learn to read fairly learning that?"with their fingers, and to emboss a letter on "Just finished two books, sir, in thethick paper which they can make out for holidays; and the 'Life of Milton,' which youthemselves, or a friend in the country can lent me, as well,-and most of the Notes."read in the usual way; and all of them, some " And can you really say the whole of thisearly and some late, wake up to the fact that by heart ? "they have got strong, clear, sharp memories. "Yes, sir, I think so. Will you try me?"Go into the chapel on Sunday morning: I shall be glad if you will, because I amyou will hear a hundred voices repeating going to repeat a book or two of the 'Para-not only all the responses, but the alternate i Travels, vol. i p. 218.


THE FIRST ALMOND-TREE. 27dise Lost' to the girls, and give them a are going on about him, and gives himself upsketch of the Life, with a Note or two. to this one work. It is this unwearied, earnestMr. M. (the matmaker) has the book, sir." application which, after all, wins the day.Milton was fetched in a trice; and we " Do not imagine for a moment that blindtried the blind man in half-a-dozen places; people have any wonderful or special apti-giving him a line taken at random, wherever tude for remembering things, or any unusualwe pleased, and he at once giving in reply the genius for steady work-except what practicelines that followed, as clearly and accurately and a strong desire to succeed bring withas if he read every word from a book. them. The surest sign of genius is, in fact,By working slowly, steadily, and carefully the power of giving your mind steadily to aon in his odds and ends of leisure time, and single object; and, in this sense, the old pro-going over the ground again and again, while verb comes true: 'An ounce of genius isat work, he had not only learned the "Paradise worth a pound of clever.' So, at last, theLost" by heart, but a very large portion of blind boy succeeds in learning by heart manyScripture, the whole of the Prayer Book and many a long page which puzzles hisPsalms, and a vast number of hymns,-to say friend with eyes; not because his powers ofnothing of Goldsmith's " Deserted Village," memory are keener or stronger than hisand other modern poetry! Very few per- friend's, but mainly because he gives timesons, even with sight, could ever accom- and labour to the work, and puts his heartplish such a holiday task, simply because few into it. Step by step, and little by little, hewould set to work for years with such inces- finds out the strength that is in him ; verysant, unwearied application, often by being thrown upon his own resources," Oh," says Frank, "blind people must and left almost alone to make the most ofhave extraordinary memories, that's the what he has.reason 'vhy they can do such things." " Take a few hints from the blind boy,"Yes," said I; "they have got extra- when he sets about learning by heart. Doordinary memories, simply because they put not attempt too much at a time. Go slowly.them to the right and the best use; and in Memory,' says a wise man, is like a purse:spite of all difficulties fight their way steadily if over-full that it cannot shut, all will dropon. And see what a blind boy's difficulties out.' As for facts and dates of history, try toare. Nearly every line he learns must be sift the chaff from the wheat, be content 'tofrom the voice of a friend; not a book can let the little fishes slip through the meshesbe looked at, not a note referred to; he has of the net, provided you save the big ones.'to rely solely and entirely on his own wits. Don't turn so good a servant as memoryBut watch the blind man as his friend reads into a slave; above all, never dream for ato him. See how intently he listens; he moment that you have 'No Memory.' Giveis now all ear, not a word, not a syllable it only fair play, fair exercise, and a willingescapes him. He cuts off every channel of heart, and some day you may rival Butler incommunication with the other things that gettingup a thousand lines of 'Paradise Lost.'"THE FIRST ALMOND-TREE.H EARKEN to the ancient fable that tells Perplexed and dreamy, she was pacing thethe origin of the fair almond-tree, sea-shore one summer evening, watching thewhich breaks into bloom long ere a leaf is wavelets as they rippled at her feet, andvisible upon its naked twigs. sparkled in diamond flashes in the light ofMany hundred years ago there reigned the setting sun.upon the shores of Thrace a young queen. "Dione," said the young queen to herShe was fair as day; her soft brown hair favourite handmaiden, " we shall have arippled far down her white neck, which storm to-morrow, mark my word. See thatlooked as though it had been born of snow and dark streak of red 'neath Phoebus' car, andkissed of roses. Yet the lovely Phyllis knew note the deceptive stillness of the water. Ah!little joy in her life, for it was lonely and would that storm, sunshine, or cold ever brokedestitute of love. Called early to fill her in upon the stillness of my life !" she sighed.father's throne, born to rule over rude war- "The night falls apace, let us returnlike men, in whose pursuits she felt no in- within," said Dione, who knew not how toterest, what wonder that restlessness reigned deal with her mistress when in these strangewithin her breast ? moods.


28 THE FIRST ALMOND-TREE.Phyllis retraced her steps mechanically, has stranded upon our shore, and the.,When she arrived at the grove of trees watchers are bringing a stranger in to thee.at the promontory that overlooks the wide- They found him weeping and lamenting his.sweeping bay, she stopped an instant to sad fate, asking if he were cast among bar-review the scene before it was hidden to her barians, or among a nation who honouredsight by the foliage, the eternal gods.""The weight of some unknown event Hardly had she done speaking than theoppresses me to-night, Dione. Oh shall I unknown himself entered. Flinging himselfever recall with sorrow this peaceful evening, down on the ground, he embraced the youngand my restless thoughts, glad if I could queen's knees, and besought her protection.have them in exchange for more bitter ones ? "I am a wanderer," he said, " shipwreckedRemind me of this eve, should that day ever upon my journey home to Attica; take pityarise." on me, fair queen, and grant me the rights of" May it never dawn, 0 queen !" hospitality."The fair beauty sighed again. "Perchance " You are welcome, stranger; rise. Amongit might be better if it did. Time will a god-fearing people you need dread no ill.reveal." Go, prepare a bath and fresh raiment for ourNext morn the queen's predictions were visitor; let a feast be spread and the wine beverified. The wind was blowing fiercely mixed. Then, when he has rested and re-from across the broad ocean, and the waves freshed himself, perchance he will tell us hiswere lashed to fury. Their angry thunder as name, country, and adventures."they broke upon the shore fell upon the The handmaidens did as they were bid,queen's ear, and made her shiver with dread, and Phyllis, once more alone with Dione, told"Ah Dione, how fearful it would be if any her to fetch forth her richest garmpnts, "forone were exposed to the water's rage and I must deck me in my best," she said, "tolost among these pitiless breakers. D)o you show honour to this handsome, stranger.not hear cries of distress? J thought some How stalwart he is, Dione; how tall andcaught my ear." manly, and yet withal, how fair and gentle !"It was the roar of the wind, 0 queen, Methinks he must have sprung from gods; Iand the soughing of the trees." have not seen such beauty in mortals ereThe women were silent for some time: now."Dione absorbed in her weaving; the young Some time later Phyllis entered the ban-queen, listless and thoughtful, lying on her queting hall, there to join her guest. Shecouch playing with her unbound hair. was looking more beautiful than ever. Her"Yet again, Dione, I thought to hear it. long hair was enwreathed with sweet scentedGo forth, I pray, and spy if any bark be flowers; the odour of delicious perfume wasstruggling with this boiling sea." wafted from the drapery that enfolded her." It cannot be, no vessel could live in such Golden bracelets beset with precious stonesa storm ; yet I obey." glittered on her slender arms, and on her"And you saw nothing?" demanded snow-white neck shone a band of gold.Phyllis, when Dione once more raised the These charms were not unperceived by theheavy curtain that overhung the doorway and shipwrecked man. Neither did he lose byentered the chamber. the change he had undergone; and Phyllis," Nothing save sea and cloud, my queen, as she compared him to the warriors that satSay, shall I divert your thoughts by song?" around the board, once more acknowledged" Ay, do." to herself that there was none among themThe gentle handmaiden pushed aside her that would bear comparison with him.loom, and drawing a stool to her mistress' When the meal was ended, aid a libationfeet, seated herself thereon, and sang a soft had been offered to Zeus, as the patron oflulling melody to the strains of the lyre. hospitality, the queen turned to her guest,Phyllis listened, first carelessly, then with who was seated at her right.attention. But ere the song had ended, she "Stranger, I pray thee tell us how thou.broke forth: camest to be stranded alone and friendless" Dione, there it is again, that cry of upon our shores."anguish. I command you, tell the watchers " Mighty Phyllis," he answered, "I amto look out: some mortal is in distress, I Demophoon, the son of Theseus. Attica, thatknow it." land of olive and honey, is my country. ButDione obeyed, amazed at the queen's I have been long absent, for I come from thestrange manner, siege of Troy, that proud city which theShe returned in a few minutes breathlessly. Hellenes have levelled to the dust for the" 0 queen, you heard aright: a bark crime of its son Paris, who broke the sacred


THE FIRST ALMOND-TREE. 29laws of hospitality. Returning thence a that the stranger would remain and wed themighty storm arose, my comrades were all lovely queen.drowned, and I alone survive. Such, 0 So it came to pass indeed. And thenqueen, is all I have to tell." there dawned for Demophoon weeks of all-Phyllis had listened attentively, her soft absorbing happiness. He thought of noughtlarge eyes bent compassionately upon tLe but Phyllis; absent from her side he knewspeaker. no pleasure, and she was equally glad in"The gods must love you, Demophoon," him.said she, " even though Poseidon be not thy " Dione," she said many and many a time,friend, for they have brought thee safely when her handmaiden was decking her proudunto our coasts. Wherefore behold in this beauty for the innumerable games and feastsa sign that thou hadst best remain among the marriage had called forth; "Dione, howus, nor think to regain thy native land- wrong I was that night before the storm TheSay, shall it not be so?" she continued, weight of an unknown event did oppress me,turning to the warriors. " See, is he not stal- but what a joyous one it has proved I"wart and fair, and should he not remain and Alas! Phyllis had spoken too soon.become a Thracian hero ? " When Demophoon had passed through theThe men shouted " Ay," because they saw first intoxicating effects of happiness, thetheir queen regarded the youth with favour; sense of duty awoke in him once more. Hebut many were secretly displeased and jea- knew he must return to seek out his father,lous at this marked p.eference shown for that he might reassure him of his safety.DUmophoon. In vain Phyllis sighed and entreated; inYet he only shook his head sadly at the vain she called him cruel, harsh, unkind, toflattering speech. think of venturing once more on the dan-"0 qu'een," he cried, " tempt me no fur- gerous sea, leaving her sorrowing behind.ther to stay with you. To be the meanest Demophoon was firm this time.watcher in your house, and daily to see your "My beloved Phyllis, it must be,"he said;god-like countenance, would be joy indeed "this parting'is no less hard for me than forfor mortal man. But duty recalls me to you. I shall return within a month's space.Athens: I am my father's only son, and heir I swear it, Phyllis, by the Styx and theto the throne of Attica. It were not well or eternal gods, whose aid and protection Iright if I never went back; but if I may take implore."advantage of your proffered friendship, aid Weeping bitterly, Phyllis saw him depart,me in my return, and I shall for ever remem- and watched his bark as it slipped frombet you and this land with gratitude." her view, feeling that her heart, her life, and"If you must go," said Phyllis, and her her joy went with it. Nothing diverted,brow clouded, " my men shall fit the stoutest nothing consoled her. Vainly did Dionebark for you, and fifty of my best oars shall strike the lute ; in vain did her warriors per-row you to your native shores." form manly games. The only comfort sheNext day, and the next, the storm still found was in Demophoon's oft-repeated pro-raged with unabated fury. and there was no mise that he would return at the expirationquestion as to the p ssibility of Demophoon's of a month.quitting Thrace. Meantime he had been con- The tender Phyllis counted the hours tillstantly with the queen, who had done all he could be back. At last, at last, after wearyin her power to make her guest's enforced waiting, the happy day was at I Ind.stay a pleasant one. Incessantly Phyllis ran to the shore, thatA dangerously pleasant one it proved to she might be the first to spy the boat andthe visitor, who when the sun shone out welcome her beloved on landing. She neverbrightly again, and the sea was once more for an instant doubted that he would come.calm, and they asked when it pleased him When night began to fall, and yet he had notto command the bark, felt that the image arrived, she would not credit that the day hadof the lovely Phyllis had sunk deep, deep indeed ended without bringing him. Herinto his heart, and that he could not bring eyes never closed that night; constantly shehimself to leave her. thought to catch the sound ofoars, to distin-He made an idle excuse to rest yet another guish his voice, and ere day had well dawnedday. The young queen perceived this, and the anxious queen was once more unquietlyher heart leaped within her. Perchance she pacing the sea-shore.could retain him near her, after all. And Again this day did not bring him, nor thewhen the next day came, and yet the next, next, nor the next.and still Demophoon could not tear himself Phyllis grew distracted and lost all hope ofaway, it began to be tacitly understood by all his return. It was useless that her hand-


30 THE FIRST ALMOND-TREE.maidens strove to comfort her. She was cer- for my darling's return, lest he yet come andtain, had he remained true, he would have I not know it."come through all obstacles of whatever kind. The gods, who loved her, granted her wish.All hope was now dead, and she had even Her soul passed into the form of a Dryad,ceased her visits to the shore, and became enclosed within the bark of aShe was pining her life away; she refused young tree, barren and leafless; unlike theall nourishment, and at last she died heart- laurels and olives that clad the same spot,broken at the neglect of him whom she had and were decked in evergreen garbs. There-loved so tenderly, fore all noticed the tree, and wondered at its" 0 eternal gods !" she had prayed when new and strange aspect.she felt life slipping fiom her hold, "grant The Thracians wept their lovely queenme yet one request. Let me not quit this for three days great mourning prevailed in theworld, but let my shade remain upon it, near to land.the promontory whence I have so often looked At daybreak on the fourth a light barquewas seen to round the promontory; bright loved. The smoke rose upwards and migledcoloured sails hung from its masts, and it with the trees on the promontory.showed the signs of joy. It held Demophoon, Was Phyllis sensible of his return and deepcome at last, detained by adverse winds and despair ? It must have been.storms from keeping his solemn promise to For as the fumes from the altar wreathed"his beloved. the leafless branches of the tree that enclosedWhen the sad news of her death was told her in its bark, it burst forth into one masshim, he was in despair, and his grief knew of tender rosy blossoms, covering the bareno bounds. He searched the whole palace twigs with a blushing wilderness of flowers.for her, he could not believe she was indeed Then Demophoon knew that his dearestdepartedfrom him. was become a Dryad, her home that tree;But when he became convinced that it knew too that she had forgiven him, andwas bitter truth, he bowed his head to inex- that death had wrought no change in herorable fate, and offered sacrifices upon the affections.sea-shore to appease the manes of his be- HELEN ZIMMERN.'


A MEMORY OF THE THAMES TUNNEL.BY VAGABUNDUS.W HILST I was wandering in the Dock known the worst, but so long as I possessedregion the other day, some boards a penny, I was still a "gentleman of limitedthat were new to me caught my eye-drab means," oppressed with the anxiety of makingboards stuck up here and there, and pointing cash go some way towards satisfying crav-with a black-seamed drab glove towards the ings. I wanted -something to eat, but IWapping station of the East London Rail- remembered also that I wanted somewhereway. I thought I should like to see how the to sleep. A penny was all that I couldThames Tunnel looked now that it has been make sure of as a provision for the rest ofconverted into a railway tunnel, and so I my earthly existence-if it lasted beyond theobeyed the pointing forefingers. But instead night; but how could I make that pennyof describing it in its present state, I will supply me with bed and board even for therather give a reminiscence of it as it was night? So far as I was aware, the " two-when I knew it first, penny rope" of the tramps' lodging-housesIt is no business of anybody's how it was in the neighbouring Mill Lane was thethat on the night in question I found myself cheapest sleeping accommodation that Iwithout a roof to cover me, and with pre- could procure for money. A penn'orth ofcisely one penny in my pocket. However food of any kind would be but a mouthfulit came about, that was the fact. On the for a hungry man, but if I spent all myother side of the world as well as this I penny on my supper to-night, what was I tohave once or twice found myself wandering do for a breakfast to-morrow? and, in theat night with even less in my pocket, but, so meantime, how, under any circumstances,far as my memory serves, I had never before, was I to get a night's lodging ?and4ave never since, been left when home- I paced up and down the palisaded pathless in possession of that exact amount. in dire perplexity. The only idea that IIt was in the palisaded path running be- could distinctly form was of the inexpressibletween the then frozen reservoirs of the Kent value of that penny. A hulking tramp reeledWater Company that I found myself, as out of a public-house at the bottom of Ra-winter's dusk was changing into winter's dark- vensbourne Hill, and came along the pathness, in possession of the capital I have named, on his way to his Mill Lane lodging-house.As I fingered it in my waistcoat pocket, the I envied him, and yet I suspected him.thought, keen as-the east wind, shot through Affluent as were his circumstances, probably,me, that that was all I had in the world to in comparison with mine, he might yet bedepend upon for bed and board. If I had covetous of my loose cash. I buttoned up myhad nothing at all, I do not think I should coat to the throat (two more buttons camehave felt so dismal. Then I should have off as I did so), and prepared to fight to the31


32 A MEMORY OF THE THAMES TUNNELdeath for my priceless penny. He merely river. The black dykes were frozen, or Ilurched up against me, however, and then might have got some nasty duckings, in spitegave me a beer-and-tobacco-scented inverted of the warning white finger-posts upon theirblessing for getting in his way. He disap- banks. The moon had come up, and waspeared in the frost-fog that was rising, and I trying hard to send its light through the frost-was again left to chew the cud of bitter fanies. fog, but very weak moonshine-and-vapourA very unpleasant place that dreary New was all that it could manage to mix. As ITown Deptford looked when I followed the passed the market-gardens, however, I couldtramp over the little water-works bridge. I make out the bony-stalked cabbages wiggeddid not follow him down darkMill Lane-dark with frozen snow, and in one of the maiket-in spite of the tantalising gleams which some gardens I saw an empty market-waggon. [of the lodging-house windows threw out upon saw also others high piled with cabbages, inthe frost-bound roadway. I wandered about readiness for their journey to Covent Gardenin that dim, squalid New Town, which or Spitalfields in the early morning. Thelooked as if it had been built seedy ready- full ones would have been softer to lie on,made to suit the circumstances of its melan- and more sheltering to lie against; but Icholy inhabitants. Hard-up as they were, knew that I should be disturbed long, longhowever, they were better off than I. Their before daybreak if I made my couch in orlandlords, at any rate, did not mean to turn near one of these, so I scrambled into thethem out that night; I saw blinks of fire- empty waggon. I found an old sack in it,light, and women and children coming home and two or three bruised cabbage leaves. Ifrom the chandler's with loaves, and red her- curled myself up in the sack, in the snuggestrings, and rashers of bacon partially wrapt corner of the waggon I could find; Iup in newspaper. Home where was my munched the bruised cabbage leaves for myhome? I had no fire to go to. I could not buy supper (boiled cauliflower stalk, I think, is asa loaf, and if I bought a roll or a red-herring nice as asparagus almost, but I cannot con-(which I should have had to eat without scientiously recommend uncooked cabbage-cooking), my fortune would be squandered. leaves), and then I tried hard to go to sleep.New Town Deptford soon became too I was tired enough, but to sleep I could notoppressive, and I rushed down into the get, and presently the faint moonlight fadedbrawling Broadway. The people standing quite away, and the wind awoke keener thanand passing loomed like phantoms through ever, and stinging hail rattled on my face,the fog. The street lamps, the shop lamps, and thick snow came down in flakes asthe flaring lights of the street-sellers smudged broad as crown pieces. If I had stayed in it,it with bilious blotches. One street-seller, the waggon would soon have become a whiteclapping one arm across his breast, was hearse. I had to get up and begin again myshouting at the top of his voice, as if that weary wanderings. Hither and thither Iwould warm him, " A penny a lot! a penny wandered, half blinded by the snow, and ata lot I" As I passed him he pushed into last found myself stumbling about in themy face a penholder, half a dozen pens, and quaint, dark, winding streets of Rotherhithe.a pen-wiper. " All that lot for a penny!" he It was nearly midnight as I went along oneshouted. " If it's the last penny you've got, of the narrow little lanes. The lower win-you'll buy 'em. Blowed if I think you've got dows of all the squat houses, except one,a penny," he growled, as I hurried past him. were shuttered. I stopped to look into theI hada penny, you know, but I was not going dimly-lighted little shop window. A billto spend it in that way. I could not eat the headed " Drowned-Ten Shillings Reward"pens, and roll myself up in the pen-wiper. lay upon a wooden tray full of marbles AnMore and more puzzled as to the best old man, who had been sitting in a ackmode of investing my large capital, I plodded room smoking over a cheerful little fire, laidon to the New Cross gate, and through it down his pipe as I stood looking in, andalong that dismal Old Kent Road.- I had came through the shop, and up its barge-started with a vague intention of walking on cabin-like steps into the street, to close histo London, but when I reached the canal- shutter. He eyed me suspiciously as Ibridge, the thought occurred to me that a moved on, and seemed to do all his fasten-penny would be of no more use to me in iig with anxiously ostentatious care. VeryLondon than elsewhere; and so I turned off lonely did I feel when I heard his top boltfrom the road, and wandered about purpose- shot behind me. I was altogether shut outlessly in the flat region ofrailway-arch, canal, then, in the cold, silent street. The winddyke, docks, rope-walk, timber-yard, taverns, had gone down again, but the soft snow wastea-gardens, marsh, and market-garden, that tailing laster than ever. I began to thinklies between Peckham New Town and the that it was useless ior me to walk any farther;


A MEMORY OF THE THAMES TUNNEL. 33that I might as well lie down and let the under an empty stall lay an old woman, asnow cover me up; but just then, on a little girl, and a smaller boy. They wereboard, on which a lamp shone direct, and pinched and ragged, but somehow they did notwhich the snow had not yet furred, I saw look like beggars. If they had been beggars," To the Thames Tunnel, gO." no doubt they would have been enjoyingThere, at any rate, the snow could not a far more comfortable night's lodging.reach me. I hurried on to the Rotherhithe " Well," I said to myself, " I fancied thitshaft, and invested all my property in the I was the only person in London that wouldpurchase of a night's shelter. " Bitter wea- have paid a penny to sleep in the Thamesther," said the old man who took my penny, Tunnel, but these poor things have done theblowing on his mittened fingers, as I passed same. The old womanan 't be fond of gin,through the turnstile. " I wish I was going or she would have spent the threepence onhome, like you." it, and left the'children to shift for themselvesDown, down, down the wearisome steps I as they could." I had felt quite Alone in thewound. Three men who were coming up world the minute before, but the sight ofon the other side were very merry, knocking these three sleepers linked me on to my kindone another's hats off, jumping on one again. They slept so peacefully, too, that Ianother's backs, and making the shaft echo grew ashamed of my gloomy forebodings.with the songs they howled. But when I There was I, who, at any rate, must be ablegot to the bottom there was perfect silence, ex- to do something or other for a living, grizz-cept the singing of the gas. The boarded-up ling, whilst that weak old woman and thoseright-hand arcade stretched along in mys- two little ones were sleeping as soundly as ifterious gloom. The left-hand arcade soon they had been lying on a swan's-down bed,ended in mysterious gloom, in spite of the gas beneath an eider-down quilt.jets that lighted its horseshoe-arched vista. I curled myself up beside my co-mates inIt was a queer bedroom, but I was most subfluvial exile, and once more tried to get tothankful to have reached it. Down there, at sleep. I chanced to lie down upon the littlefirst, the air felt quite, soft, after the cutting boy's foot, which he had drawn up under hisatmosphere from which I had descended. tattered clothes. He kicked it out, and feel-The comparative warmth made me feel ing the cold, began to toss and mutter; butsleepy, and I was besides dog-tired; but so when I had covered it up with the flap of mylong as I thought that there was any chance coat, he gave a sigh of satisfaction, and onceof anybody passing me, I did not like to lie more slept soundly. Tired as I was, it wasdown. Backwards and forwards between some time, after all, before I could get tothe Surrey and the Middlesex sides I paced, sleep. Now that I had got used to the tern-until I thought myfeet would drop off at the perature of the Tunnel, and, moreover, hadankles. When I saw any one coming, I stopped walking, I began to feel very coldhurried on as if I were as anxious to get out again; and then, although, of course, it wasof the Tunnel as they were. Very few people only fancy, I could not help fancying that Idid pass me-not more than three, I think : heard the water poppling over-head, anda thievish-looking young fellow, who scurried speculating as to the possibility of a heavyalong like a scared rat; a drunken man, who anchor plumping through our bedroom ceil-did not take the slightest notice of me, but ing, and letting in the Thames upon us.stopped to shake his fist at every gas-burner, Brick fo your sheets, clay for your blankets,and exclaim with sobs, smiling blandly all and a river for your counterpane-howeverthe while, " Well, really now, I shouldn't ha' tired you might be, you would think that athought it;" and a very stout old woman in queer bed the first time you tried it.a pilot jacket, and tugging along something At last, however, Ifell assound asleep as myheavy in a fish basket, who seemed to think curly-headed, barefooted, little unconsciousthat I was a thief, and threatened to knock comrade. I did not feel very grateful to himme down if I offered to molest her. when he awoke me about seven by a kick inI suppose it was about two in the morning the cheek. He kicked me back from a deli-when I arrived at the conclusion that at last I cious dream into a consciousness that I hadhad the Tunnel to myself, and prepared to passed the night in the Tunnel, and that Iturn in. had not a penny in the world. I started up"The next recess but two I come to I'll and stared at him he started up and staredtake," I said to myself. When I came to it, at me.I was greatly astonished to find that I had "Granny, here's a man," he shouted, shak-not the Tunnel to myself-that I must have ing the old woman by the gown* She startedpassed and repassed ever so many times a up, the little girl started up, and all three ofgroup there sleeping. Huddled together them stared at me.3


34 A MEMORY OF THE THAMES TUNNEL."Bitter cold, master," said the old woman, world but one another to care for them, andshivering, and putting her skinny arms round as if they were fond enough of one anotherthe youngsters as they snuggled up to her. not to trouble themselves much about otherIf I were "writing a story," I could give people's care.you, if not a true, at any rate a full and par- I ought to add that as we four sat up,ticular account of my strange bedfellows' rea- rubbing our eyes and chatting with clat-sons for sleeping in the Tunnel; but as I am tering teeth, some workmen came along fromonly relating an experience, I can merely say the Wapping side.that they looked as if they had no one in the "Poor beggars !" said one of them, as theystopped to look at us; "they look as if it and thirsty though I was, I could not bringwas hard lines with them, Jim. I s'pose myself to diminish my companions' breakfastthat's your mother, young man, and them's by taking a share of it. I felt somehow thatyourkids? Let's give'em a breakfast,.mates." it would be obtaining charity under falseAnd the good fellows subscribed halfpence pretences.for our refreshment at the nearest coffee- But you will understand now how it was"=stall. -M9 that I wanted to see the Thames Tunnel theI should have liked some warm coffee and other day, for the first time since I had sleptthick bread and butter, but cold and hungry in it.


---- -------------~.~-;~f=-.........~-i-dA ~ '"PGG' ATENONNA. Se ae 7


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PEGGY'S AFTERNOON NAP.T was a blazing afternoon in summer smoke beyond, where the dingy townwhen little Peggy Bevan staggered down huddled at the bottom of the long, bright-the shaggy mountain-side, with a great creel blue, sail-dotted bay. But the pits and thepiled high with fresh-cut grass upon her back. town were so far off that they only madeShe had thought that she would never be Cefn Madoc seem all the drowsier to littleable to toil up Cefn Madoc-the sun beat Peggy Bevan. The very railway at thedown so, and the creel pulled back so, and bottom of the mountain had nothing bustlingthe brown grass and the gray stones of the in it. The rails shone like gold in the sun-hillside were both so slippery; and now she shine, little blue butterflies were flutteringbegan to think that she could never reach dreamily over them, and a row of sleepythe valley beneath unless she rolled down sparrows stood on one of the up rails as ifinto it. There was not wind enough even to they were roosting. Peggy meant to ask forwave the pale-blue harebells. Lizards basked a drink at Evan Evans the pointsman's cot-on the hot, hoary boulders. The black-faced tage; but when she got there, she found thatlittle mountain-sheep lay panting in hollows no one was at home except Evan, and hethat gave them the merest fringe of shade, was lying asleep in his shirt-sleeves, with aThe black mountain ponies impatiently half-smoked pipe in his mouth, in the shadewhisked off the plaguing flies with their long of a little grove of hollyhocks that restedrusty, ragged, bur-buttoned tails. Not a single their heavy, claret-coloured blossoms on thebird was singing anywhere around. Now and thatch of the cottage as if they wanted tothen a rabbit slipped out of the patches of go to sleep too. So on poor thirsty littlefern and furze, or flung up its heels, as if it Peggy had to trudge with her creel of grasswere taking a header, as it plunged into them behind her, waddling like a crab covered withagain; but these were exceptionally restless shells and sea-weed. The proper crossingrabbits. The vast majority of their more was a bridge over the points about a hundredsensible comrades were napping in the coolest yards from the pointsman's cottage, butcorners of their burrows, postponing frolic Peggy was so tired with her long walk (anduntil the dew had begun to fall. All the she had still to climb up a good bit of thecountry seemed asleep in the sunshine-the mountain on the other side of the railwaybrown hills, the tiny green "parks," the before she got home) that she determined togoldening corn-patches, the clumps of dusky take the shortest cut. There was a gap intrees, the tumble-down straggling limestone the railway fence just at the bottom of Evan'swalls, the dogrose-wreathed lime-kilns, the garden, and through that she pushed hersloping stony bed of the dried-up river, the wearying load. This was why she wasmossy mottled bridge that spanned it like a carrying it: Her grandmother's cow, Spot,V turned upside down, the mouldering village was ill; and as Peggy had no brothers orchurches nodding over their coffin-shaped sisters, no father or mother-only a grand-flower-beds, the crumbling ivy-clad remnants mother, who was not quite as kind to theof the three old ruined castles, the box-like little girl as she might have been-Spot waslittle meeting-houses, the thatched white- Peggy's bosom friend. She herded Spot onwashed little cottages and farmhouses with the hill-side, and chopped up her furze andno gates to their farmyards. Everything potatoes for her, and put her arms roundlooked asleep, except far-off where the coal- Spot's neck and cuddled her, and talked topits raised their tall chimneys and gibbeted her in the dark little cow-house that joinedwheels, and blotched the country-side with on to the cottage. As soon as she wasboils of black rubbish; and, under the thicker allowed to milk Spot, Peggy thought that she37


38 PEGGY'S AFTERNOON NAP.would be perfectly happy. Spot's sweet the churchyard and not the church; and thenbreath seemed sweeter than violets to Peggy, the chapel turned into Llanrwst Castle, andand there was a white star on Spot's fawn- Granny was climbing up the ivy to catchcoloured face which Peggy used to kiss in a Spot, who was stretching her head over theway that seemed highly ridiculous to the creel on the very top of the castle, trying tocrabbed old grandmother, get out to eat the wallflowers. Granny hadBut now poor Spot was ill. She would almost climbed to the top, when the farriernot touch the coarse mountain-grass, and gave a jump out of his pew, where he hadmerely snuffed at the furze and potatoes. All been smoking his pipe in his shirt-sleeves,day long she stood with her head hanging and tugged at Granny's petticoats. Grannyover the half-door of the cow-house, every pulled down the ivy, and that pulled downnow and then giving a melancholy little low. the castle. Peggy could see it coming, butThe grandmother, who looked very much she could not move, though she was lyinglike Mother Hubbard in her scarlet whittle right under it. And yet she did not feeland spectacles and tall black hat, had said a afraid, because Spot was breathing in hercharm over Spot, but it had not done her face, and she was feeding Spot with holly-a mite of good. The farrier had promised hocks. Granny gave an awful scream andto come up from Llanrwst and have a look down came the castle in a cloud of dust, andat her, but in the meantime poor Spot with a thud that shook the ground and thun-starved, and Peggy was in deep distress. dered round the hills.So on this broiling summer afternoon she When Peggy awoke, her creel was knockedhad toiled to the gray cromlech on the other over, and her frock was out of gathers.side of Cefn Madoc, to cut the rich grass Evan Evans, looking very white and angry,which grew there round the Fairies' Well, was swinging her by the petticoats like a signthinking that it might tempt poor Spot to eat. of the Golden Fleece. His danger-flag layAnxious as she was to get back to her between the rails, with the staff snapped infriend, however, Peggy, when she had pushed two. The up express was rattling over hisher load on to the railway, and had scram- points; the engine-driver and stoker craningbled through the gap herself, could not help over the tender, as they looked back withstopping to enjoy the relief of lightened scared faces, and young Evan Evans wasshoulders. She was almost dead-beat, poor leaning on the switch. Most fortunately thelittle girl. The high piled grass was a tempt- pointsian's boy was with him when he sawmg pillow. Down, she sat for a minute, as Peggy lounging against the rail, just after heshe thought, on the rough ballasting, with had sighted the express train shooting, halfher arm on the grass, which was cool in spite smothered in black and white clouds, out ofof the baking it had got, and her heavy little the Llanrwst tunnel. Waving his flag, hehead on her aching little arm. had rushed down the line to the rescue, andAnd then, suddenly, Peggy was back at just saved Peggy. The off buffer of thethe Fairies' Well, and Spot was there too, engine nearly grazed him as he sprang acrossdnnking the clear, cold, shaded water, and the metals, and swung Peggy out of danger.wrenching up great mouthfuls of the juicy Evan was very much out of breath, and hegrass. But a spiteful little fairy climbed up was also very much out of temper; but forto the top of the cromlech, and pelted Spot all that he was a kind-hearted religious man,with hollyhocks; and the hollyhocks hurt, and when he had recovered his breath and hisfor they were hard as stones, and Spot began temper, he said in Welsh, " We ought bothto low as if she did not like it. So Peggy to thank God, my wench." And he helpedtried to drive away the fairy, but he jumped Peggy to put the grass back in her creel, andon to her back, and clasped his hands round when he knew why she had gathered it, heher neck so tight that she was nearly throt- called young Evan to help her carry it uptled. And then Peggy could not find Spot. the hill.The sheep and the ponies knew where she Granny scolded Peggy sadly because ofwas, but they would not tell; and a grimy the torn frock, but Peggy was consoled whentip-girl came along, with buskins on and a she saw how Spot enjoyed the Fairies' Wellred handkerchief tied round her head, and grass.filled the creel with coals, and said that She could not help thinking, however, thatPeggy must carry it across the sea to Ireland. it was rather hard that her friend should eatBut Peggy went into Llanrwst churchyard in- it so composedly, when it had so nearly coststead, only the Calvinistic Methodist Chapel, her her life.where Peggy went to Sunday-school, was in CHARLES CAMDEN.


ENGLISH GIRL IN FRENCH SCHOOL. 39THE ENGLISH GIRL IN THE FRENCH SCHOOL.BY THE AUTHOR OF "THE FRENCH DOLL.""WXHEN Ursula Swayne was fifteen, she ingly been fixed on her copybook, but shewas sent to a French school. Ursula had taken more than one sweeping furtivewas too much in the habit of dreaming or glance at the new arrival."mooning" to be able to realize everyday " For pity's sake look then at the Anglaise!"life, and so it happened that she surprised all she said to her right-hand neighbour. "Iher friends by the willingness she showed to -told thee, Sophie, when Mademoiselle Pragego so far from home and so entirely among brought her in to breakfast, I thought shestrangers. was just the sort of shy, awkward creature" I have never got comfortable with school- English girls must be; but look at her face,fellows yet," the shy girl said to herself. "In then, quick, and see how she is peacock-French stories the girls seem so delightful, so ing."full of heart and sentiment, and besides it Sophie looked up timidly; she had a darkwill be such a thorough change, and I am so freckled skin, a skin that nature had meanttired of everything being alike, and of course to be sallow, but which was as sunburnt asthey are not near so clever as I am, so I shall that of a haymaker; light greenish eyes, andget heaps of prizes." hair of a lifeless dull brown. Nobody couldShe had been a morning now at Madame help thinking Sophie de Visme a very plainHenry's school, and she had met no check to girl, and yet there was something in herher anticipations. shrinking manner, in her low gentle voice,Madame was a tall grey-haired lady, who more attractive than in dark-eyed, slender,had once been fair and was now the colour mocking Valerie.of brickdust. She smiled very graciously "She is timid," Sophie whispered; "andat Ursula, but there was a kind of hidden she looks ill."lightning in her transparent grey eyes sug- "Ah, bah! Timidl I don't believe in it.gestive of storms. Madame had only come in Thou wilt see presently. I say she is in-for an hour or so, had walked to the top of solent."the room with stately steps, while every one Valdrie had spoken rather loud, but sostood curtseying, and had then taken the fast that Ursula sitting opposite could not"analyse" of the elder girls-an analysis make out what she said; still her self-con-with such a hard name that Ursula felt sciousness guessed that she was the subjectexcited to know what it could be about; of discussion.difficulty always acted like a spur to this "Ah! but no !" Sophie spoke so eagerlyEnglish girl. She looked down the long that she forgot all caution. She raised herrow of brown holland frocks and smooth head from her copybook and looked atexquisitely-arranged heads of her com- Valdrie; "insolent is not the word. I seepanions. Madame Henry's was a large many things in her face, but not insolence."school, and every one dressed alike. "Taisez-vous, Mademoiselle " UrsulaScarcely any one looked at her. started. Madame Henry's voice came like" They don't stare as English girls do," thunder from the upper desks, and glancingsaid Ursula; "but perhaps that is because towards her the English girl saw that herwe're in class. Well, it's a comfort I have eyes were flaming with anger. " Made-nothing set me yet. I shall be able to get a moiselle Sophie de Visme, is it not then in-good look at them. Oh, I shall soon beat conceivable that you of all my pupils shouldthese near me at any rate Girls who spend draw down on yourself this reproach; you toso much time fiddling over their hair can't whom the instruction you receive is so im-have any brains; besides, isn't it always said portant-the means doubtless of your futureFrench people are vain and frivolous? and support? Whatwill your benevolent guardianfrivolous people are never clever or learned." say when he hears of your misconduct ? "Ursula had been stooping forward shyly Ursula shrank at first from looking at theover the desk at which she was placed; but culprit; her own spirit rose vehemently againstat this thought she drew herself up with a this public attack; she felt as if she could havesmile of self-complacency. shaken Madame Henry before her scholars:Sitting opposite to her, apparently intent but presently an irresistible fascination madeon writing a " cacographie" in the time her long to look across the table, and a sup-allowed for it, was a tall, slender, black- pressed sob took her eyes there. Sophie washaired girl; her long dark eyes had seem- crying; great drops were falling fast on herL.


40 THE ENGLISH GIRLcopybook; she looked uglier than ever. All "Valerie is right; the English girl is proud,Ursula's indignation turned against the sob- and she has not an amiable expression."bing girl. The girls soon went flocking into the court"What a mean-spirited baby! If any for a few minutes before "classe."governess were to insult me in that public Ursula looked round in dismay: there wasway, why I'd die before she should think I positively nothing to be seen but the green-minded it. What a horrid coward I" shuttered, whitewashed walls of the school-The bell-such a cracked, noisy, prolonged house, which surrounded the court on threesound-and then a scuffling of feet, a grating sides; a low wall, also whitewashed, made theof chairs as they were pushed back, a good fourth boundary; and in one corner stooddeal of flapping up and down of desks, and a pump with a stone trough beneath.in the midst of all a- " Mamma said I must try and send a sketch"Silence, Mesdemoiselles !" and Madame of the house or something," the girl thoughtHenry stood up, and, as it seemed to Ursula, dolefully, " but there's nothing but the pumpgabbled a prayer over very fast. Everybody to draw."crossed themselves, and then, two and two, She had travelled all night, and though shethe line of girls filed out through the folding- had been taken to a dormitory on her arrival,doors at the end of the room, curtseying to she had only gathered a general impressionMadame as they passed, that it was fresh and pleasant-looking, andThey came into a long bare room with that the pretty white basins were much tooa long narrow table and benches. Madame small to wash in.had stayed behind, but Mademoiselle Prage " Bonjour, Mademoiselle." Valerie hadand the other governesses tried to keep order come up to her, linked arm-in-arm withwhile the girls seated themselves, pretty blue-eyed Leonie. " Is it the first timeUrsula sighed. "It is not so home-like as you come in France, Mademoiselle?"an English school, after all. It seems like Valerie's elaborate politeness made Ursulaconvicts to be paraded in that marching desperately conscious of awkwardness; herfashion, just to come in and get lunch, for cheeks grew fiery red under the graciousthis can't be dinner, and I don't like my smiles of the two French girls.fellow-convict." "Yes, I thank you," she stammered outThe "fellow-convict" with whom Ursula in her limping French.had walked into the room was the unlucky She looked up, she felt they must be laugh-Sophie. Ursula would not look round at ing at her; but no, Valerie looked gravelyher; she sat eating bread and butter and polite, and Leonie smiled pleasantly.pears, feeling that she was undergoing a " We must tell you our names," she said;polite but keen scrutiny from two pairs of " you will not feel at home with us if we callopposite eyes,-the long dark sly eyes of you Mademoiselle, will you?" L.onie smiledValerie Dutemps, and the blue laughing yet more sweetly; she was pleased with theglances of Leonie Rendu. admiration she saw in the English girl's great"I shall like that pretty, good-tempered dark eyes. Like many another unattractivelooking girlopposite," thought Ursula. "She person, Ursula almost worshipped personalhas quite an English face, nothing of the beauty, and Leonie had a fair pretty faceskinny Frenchwoman about her. I daresay with soft blue eyes, and golden hair wavingshe's not clever, and I can help her with her round her high, narrow white forehead, aexercises, and we shall get on. I should rosebud mouth, and a small, very aquilinelike her for a friend. I must begin to talk to nose: it was more like a face painted onsome of the girls, or I shall never improve ivory than one exposed to the wear and tearmyself." of ordinary life." Mademoiselle !"' Ursula started at the "I am Leonie Rendu, and this is Valerielow, sweet voice, and turned round; she Dutemps, and you are, I think, Ursule ?"started again at finding Sophie's, eager green She spoke with such charming ease, witheyes fixed on her. "Pardonl but Made- so much frankness, and yet with suchmoiselle has dropped her handkerchief." grace, that Ursula was won out of her shyShe spoke so softly, she moved so like a reserve.cat, that Ursula disliked her more and " I am called Ursula," she smiled.more. "Ursula, ah ciel!" Valerie put both hands" Thank you," she said, gravely, and then to her ears.she put her head shyly on one side, and got "It must be Ursule," said Leonie, laugh-very red at the sound of her own accent ing; "we shall never arrive at pronouncing itafter Sophie's. rightly. Do you know what class you are toSop'lie shrunk back into her shell, be in, Ursule?"j


IN THE FRENCH SCHOOL. 41"I will tell you." Valdrie spoke quickly, accent. If I tell the professors that I don'tand drew Leonie with her as she moved understand the rules as they are given out, Iaway, "Julie, and F6licit6, and Zenaide, and shall be put in the second class, and thatVictoire-all go to-morrow, and if-Ursule," mocking Valerie will tiumph." Forhersensi-she made a sort of gulp at the name, "can tiveness had warned her of Valerie's jealousy.do the devoirs of the first class, why she will Valerie was vexed; Ursula's industry andmove up there with you and me and Sophie." determination to succeed made it necessaryUrsula stood where they had left her, with that she too should put out her strength anda proud smile on her face. "Do the'devoirs?' give up her careless, pleasureloving ways.That means the exercises," she said to herself. She grew almost to hate the pale, dark-eyedThe school bell rang, Madame came in girl who grew daily paler and thinner, andagain, and, when every one was seated, she always had a headache. But Ursula wasbegan to give a lesson in dictation, very happy. Life held a bright new charmUrsula's cheeks burned. She could write for her-a charm till now unknown. SheFrench correctly, she could speak it fairly, had fallen in love with L6onie Rendu.but she had never heard it spoken by natives. " If it were not for Valerie, I know LIonieHer master had lived so long in England, would be very fond of me. I wonder whyand had grown so accustomed to square his she always will come to spoil our talk, justaccents to suit English ears, that she felt like when I have got Leonie all to myself."a drowning creature as she strove to indivi- Sophie had made one more effort atdualize the words in Madame Henry's glib friendship, but Ursula remained cold andsentences. She did her best, but the room ungracious.seemed to go round with her, and as to "Sophie is so ugly, and I hate all ugliness.accents and niceties of that kind she had Leonie must have a beautiful soul withinnot a moment's thought for them. such a charming body.""However, none of the others can have Ursula had now been-a month at school.followed such rapid dictation as that," she Her progress had been marvellous, and hadthought. She was sitting between Sophie attracted the attention of the professors whoand Ldonie; Valerie sat opposite, between attended the school daily, as well as that ottwo sisters- hard-faced, red-cheeked girls, the superintendent, Madame Henry. Valdriewith eyes like black beads, and glittering grew more and more discontented. She waswhite teeth. idle and unprincipled, but she had too muchPresently Mademoiselle Prage came back self-love to give up her position to a girlwith the "dictd" books, younger than herself.Ursula grew crimson-tears gathered in It was a warm afternoon in May, buther eyes; she saw "40 " at the bottom of Ursula shivered as she stood beside Leonieher page, and she knew that meant correc- in the court.tions. She looked up and met Valerie's Some of the younger girls had formedmocking glance, themselves into a circle, and were singing"How many, Ursule? I have eight." La Boulang're at the top of their voices."Forty." Poor Ursula hung her head. Ursula put her hand to her forehead."Ah, you will stay in the second class; " Oh, what a noise !" she said.you cannot work with us yet. Is it not so, Leonie slid her arm round her waist andMademoiselle Prage ?" she said to the kissed her gently on both cheeks. "Yougoverness, who was distributing the copy- are so red to-day, and your cheeks burn.books. What is it, my dear friend?""We shall see," said Mademoiselle. But even Leonie's affection seemed toPoor Ursula Had she come to France worry Ursula. Just then Valerie came up.for this-to be despised by her equals, 'and "Imagine -the little Leroux is just takenset to learn with girls much. younger than off to the sick room with measles. Is it notherself; girls there would be no credit in a horror?"striving against! "The little Leroux!" Leonie untwinedNext morning came. To Ursula's surprise her arm from Ursula's waist, and drew awayand Val6rie's disgust, the English girl found from her shuddering. "I saw you kiss herherself in the first class; her schoolmistress this morning, Ursule, and I warned you thatthought that her mistakes were not caused her father had been a roturier."by ignorance or stupidity, and though Ursula "What has that to do with measles?" saidknew in her heart that the work given her Ursula crossly ; her head ached so she couldwas too hard for her, she worked away,un- not control her words.flinchingly. "I can't stay near you or talk to you:; it"It will be easier when I get used to the is quite possible you will have measles too.


42 THE ENGLISH GIRLIt is terrible, for it sometimes makes people But her visitor did not seem rebuffed.deaf, and their eyes are never so bright "I am so very glad to see you onceafter. Come away, Valerie." more, Ursule. I have so missed your face.A sore feeling crept over Ursula's heart, The class has not been the same, and I sobut she felt too sick and giddy to think, feared you were very ill."When the bell rang, and they all flocked in- Her voice softened, and Ursula fancieddoors, she was quite thankful to obey Made- tears sprang into her eyes.moiselle Prage's advice that she should go "Oh dear !" thought the English girl, "ifat once to the sick-room and lie down. she's going to be sentimental, I wish she'dgo. I hate scenes, and I can't sham- friend-Ursula had been very ill. There had ship all in a hurry. Oh if she were onlybeen much delirium in her illness, and the Leonie !"doctor told Madame Henry that the girl's " You knew I was ill, then?" Ursula spokebrain had been overtaxed, and that this, coldly.added to her very nervous temperament, Sophie blushed. "Yes," she said, gentlymust make her recovery tedious. "Ah A a, Mamzelle." Angdlique had been"Let her have as much indulgence and looking out of window resting her stout armsamusement as possible," he said. on the deep ledge. She turned her broadShe had been moved from the sick-room face over her shoulder, and looked at Sophie.into a bright, cheerful little bed-chamber. "Dame, but I forgot. You must makeAngelique her nurse, a broad, red-cheeked, excuse, Mamzelle Sophie. Tenez, Mamzelleblack-eyed Picarde, came up to her sofa Ursule Mees, I have three, four, five, mes-with a smile that seemed made up of sun- sages to give you from Mamzelle there."shine. She pointed to Sophie, who sat shrank up"Ah ga, Mees. Will you like to see a into herself at the foot of the invalid's sofa.visitor? Not Madame, or Mademoiselle " And I always forget. Ciel! there is soPrage, or one of the professor ladies; no, much to remember in illness besides mes-no, this is quite another affair." sages."Angdlique put both thumbs against her A vague, uneasy doubt stirred in Ursula'swaist, and spread her broad hands out over heart. She had so longed for any little tokenher hips; then she winked her black eyes at of remembrance from Leonie, but none hadthe sick girl reached her, and she had comforted hersel"A visitor !"-the colour flew into Ursula's by thinking that all her schoolfellows hadpale face-" It is not any one. from home, been forbidden to approach the sick-roomAngdlique?" for fear of infection, and that Leonie had"Dame l-no, no, Mees. There now, you been forbidden to seek her.have got as red as the sofa, and on no ac- " Thank you, Sophie."count are you to be excited. I thought to She tried to speak graciously, and she heldamuse you; and see, like an old ninny, I out her hand, but she longed to draw ithave made mischief instead. I will say to away again, when Sophie pressed it to hermy visitor, she can depart without seeing lips.you-it is only one of these young ladies." Aogdlique saw the weary look that came"You will do no such thing." into the invalid's face.Ursula had soon found out that Angelique, " Allons, Mamzelle Sophie, you must notindependent as she seemed, would submit stay long. You may come again if you like,to any amount of authority so Jong as she and you must be more amusing next time.was humoured. I can look at Mees, she expects you to do" Go and open the door and bring her in." something better. Allons."It was her dear Ldonie, she was sure it was. Sophie got up unwillingly. The wistfulShe had so often longed to see her. She look over her shoulder as she went out,felt excited with delight, touched Ursula through her dislike.Angdlique laughed, but she rolled off to " Angdlique !" she had sat silent for somethe door on her wide short feet, and admitted minutes, "did any of the others ?-didSophie de Visme. Mademoiselle Rendu' come and inquireUrsula was so sadly disappointed that she for me ?"could hardly keep from crying. She saw the "Is it Mamzelle Leonie ? Ah ca, Mees,look of eager delight in Sophie's eyes, but Mamzelle Leonie only thinks of people sheshe felt utterly unable to return it. Illness sees. For those who go out of her sight,"had made her irritable, and she could not Angdlique snapped her fingers contemp-help shrinking from Sophie's kisses on each tuously by way of expressing the place heldcheek. by the absent in Leonie's regard. "And,


IN THE FRENCH SCHOOL. 43'besides, in your case, Mees, it was not to be I know it will set my teeth on edge; so Iexpected--" know of how much worth is the love of Mam-"Why not ? I am her friend." Ursula zelle Leonie."spoke indignantly, "You don't know any- She paused, and looked at Ursula. Thething that goes on in class, Angelique." girl had turned away her face. Her heartAngelique grinned, and showed her white was so full, she felt choked.strong teeth almost from ear to ear. Then Angdlique had quickly seen how mattersshe winked slyly. stood between her charge and Sophie, and"Ah A a, Mees, there are things we know Ursula seemed to her cold and ungrateful.from their outside. I do not chew a lemon; She knew nothing of the girl's great lovePage 44.for Leonie, and she thought it would do her say they come to your bed and make gri-good to tell her the truth. She went on maces at you. Hein, Mees Ursule; but Ispeaking,-- had to hold you in bed. Well, every day"Madame has told the young ladies that you she wait always for me, and one day whenwere ill, and that no one must visit you till you are worst, she give me- " Hereshe gave permission. But the same evening Angdlique began to fumble first in oneMamzelle Sophie watches and waits for me pocket, then in another, and finally shein the passage leading to the kitchen, and pulled up her brown stuff skirt, and divedask me how you were, and send you her into a blue and white-striped petticoat be-love. Dame I could not give it you then. neath. "Voilt, Mees; it is a little rumpled."You were talking of two women, and you She placed a small, pink, three-cornered


44 ENGLISH GIRL IN FRENCH SCHOOL.note in one broad palm, and clapped the to look for Mamzelle Leonie. I say toother on it smartly, myself, 'What do I know?-I am only an"Tiens," she left off in a hurry, "and old bonne; it is possible Mees Ursule isMamzelle said I must be careful-did you right, and her friend may long to come tohear anything break, Mees?" her.' Well, Mees, I go in the court, and ISpite of her vexation, Ursula could not see Mamzelle Valerie and Mamzelle Leonie,help laughing at the sudden terror in Ange- who are kissing each other. I say, 'Mam-lique's broad good-humoured face. zelle Leonie, there is your sick friend, theShe opened the note; there were only these English mees, who desires extremely to seewords: " To Ursula, whom I love-always you, and you have heard Madame say thisyours, Sophie de Visme,"-and a half-blown morning-is it not so, Mamzelle?-thatChina rose, crushed flat, but still sweet and whoever likes may visit Mees Ursule.'"fragrant. Ursula sat listening eagerly.If Ursula had been well, or if there had "Well, Mees, Mamzelle Leonie has onlybeen any one present to give a ludicrous shaken her head-' Madame can say whataspect to Sophie's effusion, she would pro- she likes, but I am afraid of infection. Ibably have laughed at it. But illness had would not catch measles for all the world;'softened her. Angelique was looking out and Mamzelle Valerie kisses her, and says,of the window, and hot tears came raining 'Go along, Angelique; do you think such adown from the great dark eyes over the face as this can run such a risk?'"fading rosebud. "But measles don't disfigure," said Ursula."Am I never to be cured of my pride?" "I tell her so, Mees, and I say too Mam-whispered the girl's humbled heart. "I zelle Sophie has been to see you, and thenthought it was cured years ago, when I Mamzelle Leonie answers quite cross, Sophiesaved Aim6e from the bull. It was pride that and I are different people; I shall see Ursulemade me do work which I could not under- when she comes into school.' "stand, and Madame says I may be months Ursule sat silent a few minutes, then shebefore I can work hard again, even at French; said gently:and how proud I have been to Sophie." " I think Leonie is right; she and SophieAngelique turned round, and saw her are different people."crying. She stood a minute thinking, andthen she went down stairs. It is just a week since Sophie paid herWhen she brought up Ursula's supper, she first visit to the sick-room ; a warm Junelooked vexed and discontented, afternoon, Ursula is seated in a garden chair"What's the matter, Ang6lique? I never between a huge myrtle bush and the cluster-saw you look cross before." ing China roses that try to climb to Madame's"Alh a, Mees Ursule, if I tell, you will drawing-room window. A book lies open inbe sorry. I thought to give you a pleasure, her lap, but she is not reading-her eyesand it is not possible,-that is all. There are stray after Sophie.folks in the world with no more feeling than In a moment Sophie comes running acrossinsects." the garden with a bouquet of roses and"You had better tell me," said Ursula; mignonette, and, like a star in its midst, a"if you don't, I shall fancy something much pale passion-flower. Sophie throws herselfworse than the reality." on her knees, and points to the passion-Angelique heaved out a sound between a flower.sigh and a grunt, and then she crossed her "It is the first, the very first," she saysarms over her chest as if to keep in such breathlessly; "it came out on purpose forutterances. you, dearest.""Eh bien, Mees, I see you crying at Ursula bends down, and kisses her glowingMamzelle's letter, and I think, 'Poor Mees face.Ursule-she does not like Mamzelle deVisme, "Ah, Sophie, it is like your love, muchbut she wish for Mamzelle Leonie.' Well too good for me."then, Mamzelle, when one is ill I know it isgood to have all one desires, and I go quick KATHARINE S. MACQUOID.a


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CHESSY CHALK AND HER BABY.DPEOPLE are very hearty with one an- should not have cared about that, if the Goldother at the end of a voyage, and very Finder, after keeping us waiting for five weeks,civil at the beginning; but in the meantime, had only showed a little "go" when she didon board a passenger ship, everybody, as a get to sea. But ship after ship overhauledrule, quarrels with everybody else-quarrels, us, and it became a grim standing joke onand makes friends again, half a dozen times board that the Gold Finder would get toover. But Chessy Chalk and her baby never Port Phillip just when there was no morequarrelled with anybody, from the time the gold left to find. Under these circum-Gold Finder left the jetty of the London stances it is wonderful that even pretty,Docks to the time when she let go her bright-eyed Chessy and her plump baby-boyanchor in Hobson's Bay; and still more never got even a cross look. Most of thewonderful, nobody on board the Gold other children were voted little nuisances,Finder ever quarrelled with them. Chessy because they squalled so, and were alwaysand her baby, on the other hand, were getting under somebody's feet, just as if theyconstant pets with all the passengers, had been so many blind puppies; but evenofficers, and crew. Everybody on board their offended mothers did not seem to behad a kind look and word for them, and jealous of pretty, gentle Chessy. Who gavewas willing to do them a good turn. A her that name, or how we came to know thatcoarse, wild lot of both sexes, and a good she was called so, I cannot say; but when Imany grades, we had on board; for the joined the ship at Gravesend, the name wasGold Finder sailed for Melbourne some already public property, and its bearer aeighteen years ago, when people of all sorts general favourite. Baby's grandmother camewere making a mad rush out of England, off in a boat from the Terrace Pier, to givein the hope of becoming Rothschilds a week her little pet another last kiss.after landing in Australia; and eager as we " I want to see Mrs. Chalk," said the sob-were to reach the Golden Land, the Gold bing old lady, as she was helped over theFinder's rate, of sailing was not likely to side, and in an instant a score or two ofimprove our tempers. She had been ad- voices sang out-vertised-before she was off the stocks at "Pass the word for Chessy Chalk."Sunderland-"as that first-rate A i, Austra- Rough as the shouters were, they meantlian clipper, with unrivalled accommodation no rudeness. Although she was a matron,for passengers, to sail from the London Chessy looked such a mere girl that itDocks immediately," but she had been laid seemed absurd to call her MArs. Chalk. Thedown for the coal trade, had bows as bulgy baby had been christened Adolphus, after hisas the cheeks of the boy in the Spelling Book father, who had been in such a hurry to get towho was so fat that he could not see out of the gold-fields that he had rushed out in thehis eyes ; and when, on rare occasions, she first Australian ship in which he could securemade eight knots an hour, the skipper, who a single bunk; and Chessy was very fond ofhad been all his life before in the coasting calling the baby 'Dolphy. But the grown-upcoal trade, bragged about her "flying " If Adolphus was not respected on board theher accommodation for passengers was un- Gold Finder. Rough lot as we had on board,rivalled, I pity the people who sailed in other they thought it a shame that a man shouldvessels; but, cooped up though we were, we leave such a wife and child to come out byS 47


48 CHESS Y CHALK AND HER BABYthemselves amongst such a rough lot; and rally cantankerous womankind on board theso we always spoke of 'Dolphy as Chessy Gold Finder did not grudge the goldenChalk's baby. opinions which Chessy and her baby enjoyed.That baby really was a "remarkable child." The mother, like the baby, was really " good."I suppose it must have cried sometimes, but Of course, she was not perfect. Proper in allwhenever it made its appearance in public it points though she was, it is not uncharitablewas always either sound asleep, or else crow- to say that she felt a little pride in the defer-ing and capering, and smilingly shaking ence which her pretty face and figure andhands all round. Its fat, knuckle-dimpled ways won for her from all the men-folk, andlittle hands made rosy rings round the horny the envy which her bonny, daintily-kept babyfingers of many a heart-hardened ruffian; boy excited amongst her sister matrons. Butand yet the ruffians, though they grinned, she was really good, for all that. She didseemed to like the tender little touch whilst not pull long faces and make long sermons,it lasted, and never said a rude word to the and then go away and make spiteful speechesmother, and do sneaking tricks. It was very littleShe, like her child, was a really "re- that Chessy said in any way, but all she didmarkable character." We had a miserable say was cheerfully kind, and what she did-eight days between Gravesend and Ply- which was a good deal more-was of themouth: squally weather; sodden, lumbered same sort.decks; 'tween-decks littered with the muddy When we had taken the passengers who,shavings and tool-baskets of carpenters, with good reason, had shunned the Chan-still hammering away at uncompleted nel passage, on board at Plymouth, andbunks; make-shift meals as merry as were just outside the breakwater again, weMr. Sampson Brass thought Mr. Quilp's were overhauled by two boats. One broughtmoist picnic; a sulky crew, not yet shaken a man who had run away from his creditors;down into order, and only half recovered another brought officers to apprehend a manfrom the effects of parting glasses on shore; who had even better, or rather wocse, reasonpassengers, both cabin and intermediate, in to run away from his. He had hidden him-a state of damp dishabille and sea-sick self ever since he left the Thames as well asdespair the women, for the most part, he could, and had lain quiteperdu during ourlooking especially limp, draggle-tail, and stay at Plymouth; but amongst our motleytallow-faced scarecrows. And yet, even in ship's company there was a burly police-that dreary time, Chessy Chalk and her officer going out to Melbourne to apprehendbaby, on the few occasions on which they some runaway. Burly as he was, a fear ofdid make a public appearance, were cor- lynching kept him from publishing his errandparatively as neat as new pins. When the to his fellow-passengers; but I happen toother women temporarily recovered strength know'that, even when sea-sick, he had keptenough to talk, they wasted it in making his eyes open, and that esprit de corps ledpathetic appeals to the skipper, the cabin- him to give his brethren from the shore aboy-any one of the ship's company they quiet, a very quiet, hint as to where theircould get hold of-to be put ashore that quarry was stowed away. The poor scaredminute, or in angrily abusing their nearly wretch was hurried over the side as rapidlyequally helpless husbands for bringing them as possible by the anxious-looking captors,to sea, and still more angrily denouncing, as and their boat pulled off under a shower of"selfish pigs," the few bachelors who could maledictions and harder-hitting empty porter.still venture on a smoke. Chessy had no bottles.husband on board to abuse, but if she had Then, for the first time, it seemed to behad, I am sure she would not have abused generally known on board that the captivehim, even if he had looked of all men the had a wife and four children who were goingmost miserable-acting as sea-sick nurse to a out with us. They, of course, were not in-sea-sick wife and half a dozen sea-sick small eluded in the warrant, but were left to makechildren. When Chessy came out of her berth their lonely voyage to Melbourne, and landduring those drearyeight days, she busied her- there penniless and unprotected.self in doing as many quiet little kindnesses to At first, their condition evoked a great dealher muddled, melancholy neighbours as the of genuine pity on board; although, per-of course paramount claims of Master'Dolphy haps, in the majority of instances, the pitywould permit. But Master 'Dolpl:y was so for the police-captured scamp's belongingsexceptionally "good" a baby that these kind- was at least tinged with the fellow-feelingnesses amounted to a good deal; and it was that makes one wondrous kind. The poorowing to their remembrance of them, and to woman was assured that she and her littlethe frequent renewal of them, that the gene- ones would be well looked after on the voyage,


CHESSY CHALK AND HER BABY. 49and that a subscription should be got up when he didn't. Baby took a fancy to thefor them before they landed in the strange poor fellow also, but manifested it so de-country to which they were bound. Little, monstratively that Master 'Dolphy, in spiteif anything, came of the subscription. The of the sick man's remonstrances, was ofteniron was not hit whilst it was hot. And in sent away in charge of one of the volunteera week or so scarcely any one gave the lonely nursemaids. When the sick man could nofamily a thought except Chessy. The mother longer get on deck, Chessy and her babywas a poor, shiftless creature. She was com- still visited him. The male passengers' "sickpletely stunned by her misfortune, and, if it bay" was quite in the forepart of the ship,had not been for Chessy, she would have and to get to it Chessy had to traverse themoped all day in bed, and her children part of the 'tween decks roamed over bywould have come poorly off. But the first bison-hordes of wild bachelors; but Chessyvisit Chessy and her baby paid in the morn- was not afraid of them, and she had noing was to Mrs. Weston's berth, and,'Dolphy reason to be afraid. They would ceasebeing consigned, pro tem., to the care of the swearing, and joking, and quarrelling whenlittle Westons in turn, Chessy busied herself she went by, only stopping her to shakein putting, and rousing up Mrs. Weston to hands with the wonderful baby; and whilsthelp to put, the place and its inmates in she was in the sick bay, they would go onorder. She messed with the Westons also, deck that she might not be disturbedand her management made their mess the whilst she was doing what she could bothenvy of the 'tween decks. Chessy had some to alleviate the poor fellow's sufferingsprivate stores, but she did not confine them and to prepare him for his fast approach-to her own mess. Every child on board was ing end. She was in the sick bay whenher pensioner, and when people fell ill, the the sick man died, spasmodically clutchingtasty little dishes which Chessy concocted for her hand in the belief that it was histhem were far more highly appreciated than mother's. His big brother was too drunkthe "medical comforts" dispensed by the to be with him then, but the news of thedoctor. She would go and sit with women death suddenly sobered him. He sworetossing in their dark, close bunks, when that he would never get drunk again, andtheir husbands and children had left them that he would never forget Ch-'ssy's kindness.for the sake of the fresh air and bright The former part of his vow he forgot thesunshine to be enjoyed on deck. Some- very night after his brother's corpse had beentimes, as a special treat, she allowed her tilted into the sea. So long as it lay underpatients to have a minute's peep at baby, its flag-pall upon the cover of the long-boat,brought down for the purpose by the everybody on board was strangely quiet;volunteer nurse who then had him in and for a minute or two after the long sail-charge. Chessy had her pick of nurse- cloth bundle with a rusty iron ring at themaids, and so she had of all kinds of bottom had suddenly shot, with a splash ofservants. If the Westons had messed by silvery spray, into the blue, bright, heavingthemselves, they would have had to wait on wave, there was a still deeper hush on board.themselves, in spite of the loud promises of And then every moment people began tohelp which they received off Plymouth. But speak louder, and laughed again, and didwhen Chessy became their cateress, there was everything that they had done before. Butalways some one anxious to get her mess's though the big brother did get drunk againwater for her, draw its rations, and carry its that night, I do not think that, even whendishes to and from the galley. drunk, he forgot Chessy's kindness. OneChessy did not confine her Sister-of-Mercy night there was a fearful row in the singlecares to her own sex. There was a poor men's quarters, and the big brother was theyoung fellow on board who was going out to worst of them all. The women and theAustralia in a vain hope of escape from con- quieter men were shaking in their shoes, forsumption. He had a brother with him, a it looked as if the big brother meant tohuge healthy ruffian, who, nevertheless, was murder the man he had got down. Peoples.,metimes very kind to the sick man, but, were crying out "Shame," but Chessy didas a rule, left him pretty much to himself, something better than that. She handedChessy was like a sister to this poor fellow, baby over to the charge of the nearest avail-As long as he could get about, she helped able nurse, and made her way through tilehim up and down the steep ladder that led throng of excited menfolk up to the twoto the 'tween decks, and sat with him on fighters. Then she laid her little hand upondeck, making him as comfortable as she the two huge ones with which the bigcould, reading to him and talking to him brother was striving, in very cowardlywhen he liked it, and holding her tongue fashion, to throttle his antagonist on the4


0o TACKLING OLD EPHRAIM.floor, and told the great fellow that he ought be brought on deck again, he held a levee.to be ashamed of himself. He let go his Everybody on board came to be presentedhold, and looked for a moment as if he felt at his little court; and when he had droppedinclined to knock her down, but directly after- off to sleep upon his mother's lap, greatwards he did look ashamed of himself! rough fellows, both passengers dnd crew,"It was his fault, he aggravated me," the would stoop down as they passed to uncoverbig brother growled; "but I won't meddle his face that they might have a look at him.with him if it bothers you." And off he went They lifted his little shawl with a comicallyto his berth, like a whipped dog with his tail tender touch to be given by such rough fin-between his legs. gers, but the little amateur nursemaids whoWhen baby fell ill the doctor had so many were longing to have 'Dolphy lying on theirinquiries to answer in every part of the ship, laps, watched these bold proceedings withthat he had serious thoughts of pasting a bul- jealous severity, greatly wondering thatletin of the state of baby's health daily upon Chessy, though she lifted up her fingers andthe mainmast. If there's safety in a mere mul- said "Hush !" looked pleased rather thantitude of counsellors, Chessy need not have otherwise at having her baby peeped at byfelt alarmed about her little pet. For a pos- such rough fellows.session so precious to her and to us all, mere When I last saw Chessy and her baby theydoctor's advice-the doctor a bachelor, too were pulling away from the Gold Finder en-of course was not considered sufficient, route for Liardet's Beach, in charge of Adol-and amateur prescriptions of all kinds poured phus senior. In spite. of the poor opinionin upon Chessy from all quarters for her we had held of him, Adolphus senior hadlittle fellow's measles, hooping-cough, teeth- been waiting for his wife and child for aing, or whatever it was. One grave old week or two in Melbourne, and had boardedsailor, whose opinion was greatly respected the Gold Finder before her crew-those whoby his mates because he was a family man, had signed articles for the return voyage asadvised Chessy, in perfect good faith, to put well as the " shilling a mohth men "-hadpitch-plasters on the back and breast of had time to run away. Adolphus seniorMaster 'Dolphy, and to give him a good seemed so delighted at recovering possessionspoonful of brimstone and treacle every time of his two treasures, that we included him,he blubbered. "That was the way," the too, in the ringing cheer which everybodysailor said, "in which his old woman had on board gave to Chessy Chalk and her babygot all his young uns over their mulligrubs." as they were rowed ashore.When 'Dolphy had recovered sufficiently to EDWARD HOWE.-------TACKLING OLD EPHRAIM.AN INCIDENT ON SURVEY IN CALIFORNIA.BY THE AUTHOR OF "THE GREEN HAND."IN the year 1852, when things were at their scrub, chapparal, wild-corn or mustard-brake.busiest in the American Gold States, Each of us had a six-shooter in his belt, andI formed one of the chief Government sur- it may easily be conceived that when quail,veying-party engaged in laying out ground crested partridge, or white cranes were started,from San Francisco bay to the mountains or perhaps a black-tailed doe hiding to saveof the coast range. During that time there her fawn, or a couple of huge donkey-hares,were various opportunities of seeing Cali- or a puzzled young antelope, the sport atfornian life "in a way unknown to most who times tended to drop our duty to Govern-have described the country; and we en- ment out of view. Whatever our successjoyed a great variety of field-sport and wood- in the field,-which could not be muchcraft all along. Even round the bay, and with such tools, not to speak of the twothroughout the level land of the Contra sharp surveyors at our head,-a pretty goodCosta, or over the settled bottoms about San time could generally be had about camp atJose, game of every sort fairly swarmed leisure hours trapping, tracking, or fishing.during the spring season while we were oc- The creeks from the bay abounded in trout,cupied thereabouts. And a better test could mullet, and the finest salmon in the world,not well have been had of it than our survey- while moreover it might so happen that youchain, going ahead over everything, through hooked an alligator-terrapin or a snapping-


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TACKLING OLD EPHRAIM 53turtle, the play of which would have been a the end, remarkably like gold-sign, but quitecaution to a stay-at-home Britisher. Early of out of reach. What was more to the point,a morning the great wapiti-elks might have there was Grizzly Cafion, a dismal hollowbeen seen by the water-edge, come down of bush and scrub, running off the levelto feed and drink, with their legs and into a belt of immense redwoods that shotantlers showing like a newly-sprung grove against the sky. According to the Spanishthrough the fog: then there was the tree- vacqueroes we met with, it had been formerlygame, from sloths to racoons, going under noted as a spot where real grizzly bears usedthe general name of 'possum; the ground- to breed, though none had been heard ofvenison, such as porcupines, armadilloes, for years so far down, and the likelihoodand land-turtle; without mentioning the co- was that the Survey would make noyotes, burrowing squirrels, and no end of difference in that respect. However, theskunks and gophers. Out of the whole Spaniards were known to look uponof them we managed not only to enliven us with small favour ; and when theour spare time during the greater part of question came to be about interfering withthe summer, but to freshen the camp-fare a regular " Ephraim," as backwoodsmennot a little. called the grizzlies, it must be owned thereUltimately, however, our quarters were were few among us who considered it in ashifted much further inland, to rougher sporting light. Judge Tracey, the Surveyor,ground beyond San Mateo, under the spurs and our compassman, Mr. Higley, were theoft the hills; and what with the advance only members of the party who had been atof the season, together with the change the mines besides myself; they knew wellof locality to drier soil, almost everything how the case stood; in fact, that we werein the way of free live-stock seemed to much more likely to have to take to treehave gone, save where too shy to be got than a grizzly bear was, if we chanced toat. Plenty of Spanish cattle there were, to meet one. For my own part, I had neverbe sure, wild enough in all conscience to happened to see one, even when up the Yubabe looked upon as fair game, and bold river. Still, I cannot say I fell short as toenough too; but these we could not meddle this caution on the point; much less could Iwith. The only other creatures likely to be enter into the hunting view of it that wasseen, worth speaking of, were an occasional taken by one or two of our number.grey hill-wolf loping along and the bears, At the first occurrence that took place inboth brown and black, which left sufficient connexion, it so chanced that I was prin-signs of their vicinity, though much too cipally concerned. My part of the survey-shrewd to come athwart a party of Uncle ing duty was simply to carry "fore-chain,"Sam's men if they knew it. or take the line along for the bearings givenThe waggon and tents were at last settled by the surveyors, sticking in the measuring-down in a handy spot by the head of a pins as I went; while the hinder end wascreek from the hills. The one side com- taken by my friend Lettsom, a young manmanded a stretch of fine open savannah, from the North of England, who had joinedby which we had to work back toward the party with me. Neither of us could bethe Bay settlements; the other was more said to occupy a high post in the service asbroken ground, leading up to the pine- yet, but so far as our head-work went, frombarrens and redwood ranges. This latter passing the orders to keeping tally of thedistrict had to be finished off before we marks, the responsibility was all on my com-turned to the level, and that duty proved panion's shoulders. Indeed, setting aside hisquite as hard as it looked. Most parts we advantage in years and height, he seemed todrove across in most determined style, tear- have a natural turn for the business to whiching over thorny chapparal, through poison- I could not pretend. It was lucky for him,oak brush, and up streaks of rock. In parts however, on this occasion, that I took itit could not be cleared, even by the axe- easy when possible. We were rounding onemen's help, and had to be done by computa- of the stiff corners, too hard to get overtion. Some again was slumped in liberally, direct, and each made the best of his wayupon the averaging system, whatever the for the next bearing-point. Having sighted itfuture settlers might do with it. I found myself ahead of the rest, and satOne or two of the localities at hand were by down to light a pipe till they joined. I hadno means inviting to look at, by way of neigh- just struck a lucifer, when a rustling caughtbourhood, and they went by suitable names. my ear in the chapparal close by, and look-There was Guzman's Gulche, as dreary a rift ing over my shoulder I saw the upper halfinto the solid stone as one could wish of an immense bear, as he rose on end toto see, with a vein of quartz shining up at eye me from below. Neither he nor I


54 TACKLING OLD 'EPRAIM.uttered a sound, with the exception of a no account of them, and asked nothingslight snuffle on his part, as if the smell of better than to tackle a real Ephraim, if suchthe match were not to his liking. At the it actually was, which he much doubted.same time he put up a claw like a tree-root, The surveyors on coming up, however, con-at the end of a monstrous long foot, giving sidered I was in the right, and had donehis muzzle a fretful kind of rub, whilst our quite properly; nor was it long before aneyes met. A most particularly wicked little incident occurred to turn the laugh alto-one his was, as red as a live-coal; and not gether against Rufus himself.to speak of the great size of his head, there We had finished our measurements on thewas something so peculiar about his colour, hill-ground without further trouble of theneither black, brown, grey, nor yet grizzly, sort, and had put in the last angle-post inbut more of a steel-blue with a mildew over that direction; after which we were makingit, that I kept perfectly quiet, not so much our way back to camp for the night. Rufus,as moving a hand to my loaded revolver, who was our under-axeman, missed somestill less calling out to my companions be- article or other belonging to him, and re-hind. The lighted match, by the way, burnt turned to look for it near the post. Heme to the quick without being felt at the overtook us again in a speechless state,time. between hurry and fright, without his hat,The bear was undoubtedly a grizzly, and and his red hair bristling like fire. By hisa fullgrown one, but from what I heard account, when made out, he had seen aafterwards he must have been quite young. bear-cub of the most extraordinary size andPossibly he observed that the case was colour standing at the foot of the new-madesimilar in that respect on my side; at all mound, apparently gazing at the survey-events he dropped on his tracks again, keep- post in astonishment. Before he got withining uphill as before. By that time the men reach, it went close up, examined thecould bo heard on their way up in the same Government hieroglyphics most carefully,direction, crashing through the bush and then gave a yell and proceeded to claw atlaughing and talking like schoolboys. I the post as if resolved to have it up. Onknew that if my friend Lettsom caught sight this Rufus was of course running in, he said,of the beast, he was sure to fire, and being to make short work with the creature; butone of the best shots among us, not likely hearing sounds desperately like more of theto miss; so to prevent accidents I sung out family on the way down, he concluded toat last. "'Ware snake-a rattler!" I hailed, come off for help. Billy's story was ratherin a tone as like a whisper as circumstances salt in some respects, especially as he declaredwould allow; and that stopped all of them there must have been half-a-dozen of themat once. "Which way?" called Lettsom; coming down in Indian file; but if he could"don't lose sight of him-give us a chance!" be believed, the cub was neither of the blackI did not soon forget the bear's style of nor the brown breed; and at that time of thethking this noise. He reared on end again, afternoon no one was inclined to go back andlooking back at me, giving a low growl, and see. That there was some truth in the Mis-seeming to consider whether any affront was souri man's statement, appealed next morn-meant. In fact for a moment or two it was ing; for clawed down the angle-post was,doubtful if he would not come down like with marks in it which no ordinary bearthunder; but finding all quiet, he concluded could have made. A new post was put in,accordingly, and went off straight for the leaving further difficulties to be managed byredwoods, the first settler on the claim. Our sub-Wheni the party joined me, all was safe; sequent duty lay back again on the levelbut my story was not by any means toward San Mateo, where we thought nowell received. No sooner did they take more about such points. But we were notit in than they opened full cry against my to get off just so easily.behaviour in the matter; and the foremost Our special trouble on the low groundto disapprove was Fred Lettsom. Fred was, as formerly, with the wild Spanishhad notions as to sport that might have done cattle. These long-horned, little, dingy-well enough at home in Yorkshire, but would coloured savages were here worse thancertainly have been inconvenient to carry ever, herding over the rich virgin pasture,through California; though his worst luck and ready to charge at all and sundry, ifwas not to come in that shape, poor fellow, not mounted, the survey appearing beyondAmong the party was a lump of a red-haired all to rile them up. The flags on theMissouri lad, who rejoiced in the odd name measuring-pins set them fairly mad, andof Billy Rufus. He declared they saw so whoever chanced to wear a red shirt was,many b'ars of all sorts out west that he made particularly marked out, till at times they


TACKLING OLD EPHRAIM. 55quite stampeded us off the line, axemen nexion, at the same time had a touch of theincluded. Besides the strict orders against true nigger turn for "'possum," always tree-meddling with them seriously, there were ing and baiting for odd venison at everyalways enough of idle Spanish vacqueroes chance. There was rather a suspicionscouring about on the watch to pick up a amongst us that the pair occasionallypretext for complaints and lawsuits, which squared their differences behind backs, tothe Government of the new State could not the concocting of what Andy called a blind-then help attending to; though, so far as frijole; which in fact often proved tooconcerned our annoyance, the Spaniards good to be inquired into. Somehow thattook but little pains, seeming rather to evening the mess was not so successful; atrelish the sight. This was all very well all events there were sundry discontentedfor Judge Tracey, the Surveyor, who kept remarks, with a pretty plain allusion or twoa riding-horse, and got along comfortably to the prime fresh beef lying "ciched" atenough when using it. As for our compass- the moment within reach, under the big oakman, Mr. Higley, he could make shift with on the level. However, the night was dark,one of the mules; but one morning the and the spot some distance off; moreover,case was pushed just too far to be borne, the mouth of that ugly-named redwoodA shaggy-headed bull gave chase to Lettsom caion had to be passed on the way, andand me, and so far from being daunted, would after a stiff day's survey all hands seemedcertainly have finished one or the other before to think the treat not worth the pains.there was time to use our Colts, but for the The surveyors had no better fare than our-lucky neighhourhood of a clump of bush on selves; so it was just going to be made thethe open, with a large tree in the midst. We best of, with the prospect of a good pipe atthus dodged him, firing several shots after all the fire before turning in, when suddenly wewith very little effect, till the two axemen missed our Missouri axeman, Rufus, fromcame up to our help, and settled the busi- the mess. It turned out he had left beforeness. Both surveyors, of course, had ob- the talk commenced, and, as Billy neverserved what passed, and, though no Spaniards failed at his grub, this meant something incould have been within view at the time, Mr. his case. The truth was easy to guess, whenHigley rode up with decided instructions to we brought to mind his wistful looks behindbury the carcase carefully there and then, him that day. He had taken his tools alongturfing it up, and on no account meddling with him, after giving his knife a sly rub ofwith it further. This he waited to see done. the grindstone, and clearly intended securingThe work was then proceeded with as before some tit-bits for a late roast to his own cheek;for the rest of the day, during which some indeed, Billy was not the character to thinkmiles were completed; and, as usual, by of extra slices for his friends.sundown we got round to camp, which was He could not have been many minutesstill in the old place, gone, when, on listening after him behind theNothing more had been said of the bull tent, we could hear plain enough that thetill supper was serving up for the bell-tent, coyotes had been beforehand in the design,where the surveyors had their quarters, our evidently likely to save Billy some trouble atown meal being all ready at the fire, outside shovelling up. Then, in the midst of theirthe main-tent. Nor in fact did any one seem noise, off they scattered with a louder yellto have thought of it again, till the time came than before; close upon which we couldfor smelling that perpetual salt-pork, as we make out a loud note or two from our axe-could do through the best fry which our man's voice, apparently giving them a Mis-cook could turn out. To tell the truth, not souri war-whoop to quicken their flight. Itonly were camp-stores seldom varied after now occurred to our joky old teamster thatbeing so long off from the settlements, but the cook and he, both being fresh, mighteven Uncle Sam's chief staple had begun to give Master Bill a start in turn, as he wellget rather rusty for our taste, and that in deserved; namely, by setting off quietlyspite of every attempt to help it out on the across his tracks, on a nearer cut over thepart of our two camp-keeping hands, old open. The right bearings they at once gotTobin the teamster and little Andy the from us. Accordingly away they set at a goodcook, who made up the party. Andy was rate, the Malay first signifying for our bene-a Malay, and though clever at his own fit that the supper might perhaps not lose bywork, a perfect imp for skill at trapping, waiting a little, though the surveyors had gotsnaring, and decoying; while our worthy theirs served.teamster, who came out of New Orleans, By old Tobin's subsequent account, theyand was of course far above associating steered fair for the clump of bush, with thepleasantly with aught in the coloured con- big tree for a mark against the stars. They


56 TACKLING OLD EPHRAIM.soon got there; everything was dark inside, once more to scramble up, before he wasand all quiet except the pattering of the earth well down, and more than once he just nar-on the leaves where Billy's shovel seemed at rowly missed being gripped. The bear ap-work, with the. grating of his knife, appa- peared set on keeping cover within reachrently, as he fell closer to. Going up nearer, of him, where there was no mark for a shot;the teamster caught sight of him through the so that we had nothing for it but to fire thedusk, hard at it; there he was, sure enough, evi- brushwood to windward, which was cleverlydently never dreaming he had been followed, done by the Malay creeping in. Here ithodging up and down in the hole, and tug- was found we had brought matters to a head,ging and cutting away like a good one. and no mistake; for though our axeman ofTobin then made Andy wait, while he stole course succeeded in getting down on thesoftly in behind, flattening his hand to come safe side, the bear no sooner took the open,down sharp upon the fellow, and setting his than instead of giving chase to the mountedmouth for a suitable remark in Mr. Higley's surveyors, as calculated upon, he turned andstyle. At the same time he thought he heard charged us where we stood. It may easilysomething like a husky whisper from aloft, be believed I never forgot the sight; thewith a rustle out of the tree; and our worthy blaze of the scrub showing the old monsterteamster being as superstitious an old boy as as he tore along upon us, with the hoar-frostever was raised on the Mississippi, this "struck bristling from him, as it were, and hishim strange" at the moment, as he expressed swinish eye at red-heat.it. Rufus's manner of handling the meat had We had taken care to get the channel of acaused a horrid notion already, as if he began dry arroyo in our favour, but he came on liketo nuzzle at it in the raw; so, with a pretty a race-horse, and was over it in a twinkling,smart slap on his shoulder, Tobin commenced with the bullets of five six-chambered Coltsa speech of his own, by no means inferior to emptied at him, to no apparent effect save onwhat our compassman would have given, one fore-leg. Just as he was upon us in theoaths aside. The words stuck in his throat, dusk, we scattered right and left, some dodg-however, for he found himself turned round ing down the dark bed of the water-course.upon with a growl like thunder-his escape My friend Lettsom had still a bullet left, andbeing solely due to the depth of the hole, and seeing it was useless to run, he stood on thethe other's hands being full at the instant, bank as the bear dashed at him, then firedwith his jaws as well. It was no less than an close into the brute when rearing on end,enormous old grizzly that he had tackled in claw up, with his jaws about his very shoul-this fashion. As for poor Rufus, he was fast der. Down they went together into the ar-treed overhead, trying for breath to tell how royo-bed, the bear uppermost, but luckilymatters stood. Tobin fired one shot at losing hold for a moment or two in the reedyrandom as he bolted, tumbling over little bottom. Owing to his crippled fore-leg, too,Andy, who came off after him into camp. the brute did not nip poor Fred so quicklyThe first alarm among us, in fact, was such as must otherwise have been the case, butthat the Malay ran some risk of being shot kept searching, in a style that made theby mistake for the grizzly in pursuit. sedge fly like rags. Not a shot among usThe Judge and Mr. Higley got out their was ready, and the quickest-loaded wouldrifles, in addition to which they had it in their have been too late. Mr. Higley had left hispower to keep mounted on the occasion. mule, taken a steady aim, and hit the oldThey accordingly decided at length to go in a bear somewhere, yet without serious effect.body and see what could be done for getting He went on loading again as he ran up, forthe axeman off. The survey-duty for next it must be said of our compassman that heday was certainly much more to the point was not the character to flinch at such points,than any mere risk to Billy, or his night's no matter who might be concerned.comfort; and even then the whole object By this time, however, we did not even seelay in scaring the bear off, or at least draw- which was which in the shadow of the arroyo.ing it out for a sufficient time, while the The best we could have done was useless, hadMissouri man could get down to run. This it not been for the old Judge himself, whowas given him to understand, and proceed- came forcing his terrified mare right over theings were therefore tried on the cautious hollow; then he threw himself off, let hersystem. But whether the old bear was too go, and next moment was down in themuch bent on his night's meal, or had an eye arroyo, rifle in hand for the proper moment.to the tree besides for supplies, it proved He took the grizzly fair in the eye whendifficult to make him leave it at all on any just rising with Lettsorn in the hook of itsreasonable terms. Back he always would free fore-paw; a sure shot, that dropped thego again, growling savagely; Rufus having brute a dead weight a-top of the poor fellow,


PAUL AND JEAN. 57nearly squeezing the. last breath out of him. on the head-surveyor as a Southerner, withWe pulled him out to all appearance finished more temper than brains, he thought to tripby it, drenched in blood, with his clothes in up his heels with Government when thestrips. A little time, however, brought him Vigilance Committee rose into power shortlyto again, not seriously injured, though there afterwards; yet smart as Higley doubtlesswas more than one ugly rip. A score of bullets was, Judge Tracey showed himself able toat the least had been put into the bear, and steal a march upon him in that very respect.none of them signified till the last had smashed The old grizzly bear was a piece of gamehis skull. A cooler thing of the sort never such as rarely had fallen to the luck of anywas done than old Judge Tracey did on the surveying-party, or, for that matter, of anyoccasion, for he actually took care to put a hunter in the Gold State. Had the seasonfresh cap on his rifle before pulling trigger, been cooler, within reach of town or settle-If he had hung fire or missed the mark, ments, he would have been worth no smallnot only would all have been up with Lett- sum to us, taking meat and hide together,som, but with a few more of the United besides the showing parts ; his weight beingStates Survey. about that of a full-sized ox. As it was,The Judge's composition had been rather being in prime condition, and mostly nut-fedunderrated before, in regard to what he at that season, he furnished the staple of seve-could do if put to it. As to his title, it was ral days' provision in camp. As our groundwell known to have been derived merely subsequently led us from the redwoods, thefrom having taken a lead in the arrange- further adventures of the party did not turnment of Lynch cases at the Mines: but 'on any incidents of the same nature. It wasafter this he stood in a new light, which not the last grizzly that I saw tackled andsome of us were destined to see clearer killed during ten years in the country, notbefore being done with him. Mr. Higley, by a score at the least; some of whichthe compassman, in particular,--who was happened to cost a good deal more damageunderstoo'd to have been originally a school- to those concerned. But even allowing formaster at home in the "Granite State,"- the fact that this was the first in my expe-proved slower to take a hint on this point rience, I should say he was decidedly thethan he ought. Through his always looking hardest to manage of them all.PAUL AND JEAN.W HEN I was a little gill, I was never for my daughter Polly, that when she learnstired of reading a book, which has to read, she may know what Old England wasnow become quite old-fashioned, about "Our like before any railway went to Reading.Village " in Berkshire. Kind, good Miss This village where I write is a French vil-Mitford How many happy hours I spent lage, and so different to an English one, that Iwith her and her greyhound; with )the could never make you understand it by meremole-catchers and little Harry Grover; with description. But I can tell you somethingLady Mary H- "a professed tea-drinker" about the people. The greatest house is(and green tea too!), and Hopping Bob. called the chateau, or the castle, but it isTheir very names are warm to my heart, not in the least what we call a castle inNever was picture so full, so true, as these England. It has neither towers, nor a moat,stories of Three Mile Cross near Reading. nor a drawbridge, and it would not stand aThat was the name of Miss Mitford's village, siege of half an hour, even if all the shuttersIt still stands, of course; farms and cottages, were put up. It is a large, handsome whitethe forge and the inn, and the hedge where house, about 200 years old, with a beautifulMaster Tom pulled the papers off Fanny's sloping park, and an orangery where thefairings. But dear Miss Mitford is not orange-trees live in tubs, like Diogenes.there. She is gone where pretty Lizzie They are brought out every summer, andwent before, and the old French Abbn put like sentinels all along the broad terraceand Godmother, and the good old Judge, just underneath the house on the park-side.her father. They are all gone together; but There is also a sort of winter garden, withyou, dear children, can read about what they walks and parterres and a little pond, alldid in the world, if your mamma will ask covered over with glass; and a row of con-at her circulating library for the old brown servatories full of splendid flowers. Ourvolumes which I read some thirty years ago. windows look right over these, and weOr you can buy them in a bran new edition at always know when frost is expected inthe bookseller's. I have got them in keeping autumn by the lighting of the fires. This


58 PA UL AND JEAN.chateau is handsomer within than I can tell about the siege of Troy. It sounds very oddyou; such carpets and curtains and mirrors; in French rhyme; but everybody says it isand I am sure if you saw the place you extremely well done. This old gentlemanwould think nothing sad or uncomfortable sometimes gives great dinner-parties to acould come near it. But all the upholstery number of other old gentlemen, and thenin the world will .not keep out sorrow, and he has a great show of silver plate; and itso you will think when I tell you what takes the cook all day cooking, and thehappened here only fourteen months ago. Intendant all day scolding, before thingsThis chateau belongs to an old bachelor, are in order. The Intendant is somethingone of the most learned men in France. He like an English butl&r, and manages every-has just finished a translation of Homer, all thing in a great house.So one day in August, 1868, M. le Comte in Paris; but though the father and motherde X. had sent out fourteen invitations to were very fond of them, there was some onefourteen learned old gentlemen, who were they loved still more-their one little soncoming, some from Paris, which is an hour Paul, born so long after his sisters that heoff by rail, and some from neighbouring was still only a boy of eight years old. Hechateaux, and early in the morning of this lived at the chateau with his parents, andday the Intendant had a great deal to see went to school in the village.to, and his wife also, she being the house- So in the morning his father gave him akeeper. Now he and his wife were rather slice of bread and jam, and sent him out tooldish. They had two grown-up daughters play till lunch time. Paul set off, munch-who were married long since. One kept ing his tartine, and went past the dairy farmthe lodge of the park, and the other lived buildings, which are very handsome, and built


PA'UL -AND JEAN 59just like Swiss chalets. The dairywoman was generally hungry, everybody wonderedsaw him go by, and called to him to come where he could be. The dairy-woman saidand take a cup of new milk. She was very she had given him a cup of new milk at halffond of little Paul; as indeed were all the past eight, and the two mowers told of havingpeople about the place. Then Paul came sent him away eating his bread and jam, andtc a great sheet of grass, not exactly a lawn, one of them said he thought he had seennor yet a field, where a couple of men were little Paul talking to Etienne the gardener.mowing the August after-crop, they told Now Etienne was a married man, who livedhim to get out of the way of their scythes; in the village and went home to all hisand he went on, always eating his bread and meals; and as it was agreed by all presentjam, till he came to where a little boy of his that Paul must have gone home with him,own age, or a little older, was pulling up the stable-boy was sent round to fetch him;weeds. One of the gardeners was there too; but the stable-boy came back in ten minutes,but apparently he did not think little Jean and Etienne with him, who said that, so farvery necessary, for he made no objection to from having taken Paul home, he had notthe two little boys running off together, be- been with him for any time at all; but hadcause Paul said he wanted to play at horses, run off with little Jean the cobbler's son toNow Jean, I should tell you, was a year and play at horses. At this, Paul's mother, look-a half older than Paul. He was the son of a ing uneasy, said the boys must have gonedrunken cobbler in the village, whose family farther than they intended, down to the verywere all in dirt and rags, and very ill brought bottom of the park; and his father, layingup. Usually none but very respectable people down his knife and fork, left the head of thewere employed at the chateau, but Paul's table, and taking his hat went round to themother, who was a kind-hearted woman, had garden front. The park is not very large;taken pity on the wretched vagabond, and it took Paul's father about twenty minutes tohad got the gardener to give him some work. walk round it. The ground slopes from theThe hours went on that hot August morn- chateau into a deep wooded valley; onceing; M. le Comte de X. sat in his study, upon a time the trees were all planted inin a great wide dressing-gown, drinking cho- double semicircles, just as they were at thecolate out of a fine china cup; the Inten- king's palace at Marly. But M. le Comtedant put out all the silver for the great de X.'s father had had a great fancy fordinner; his wife looked up her maids all English planting and gardening, and so dur-over the house, and took the covers off the ing the last fifty years many thick tufts ofblue satin chairs of the best drawing-room. shrubs and quick-growing trees had beenThe dairy-woman pottered among her sweet- interspersed among the stately old rows ofsmelling pans; the two men finished their limes and chestnuts. Paul's father, gettingmowing and made little cocks of hay on the more and more uneasy, shouted as he wentshorn grass; the gardener tidied up his walk along, "Paul i Jean I Jean Paul! " But noand carried all his tools off in his brouette or answer came. He went up to several of thewheelbarrow and put them into a tool-house, thickets and struck at them with his stick,Just as he shut the door, the great breakfast thinking that the children might be pur-bell rang in the courtyard for the servants' posely hiding. So he made the round tillmeal. It was eleven o'clock, and fifteen indoor he came up again near the house, when heand outdoor servants came flocking together crossed the lawn near the Long Pond. Nowto eat eggs, and bouilli, and salad made of hard by the Long Pond (there were two otherscold vegetables chopped up with oil and in the grounds, all of them near the chateau)vinegar, and to drink thin red wine out of was a great tuft of pampas grass, its feather-long black bottles. ing spikes towering up above the leaves, and" Where's Paul?" said the Intendant's wife, as he came near it he thought he saw thesesettling her capeline straight, and hanging a feathery spikes trembling more than theygreat bunch of keys on a nail in her own need; for the day was very calm and hot.sitting-room. Paul's father, struck with a sudden hope,"I gave him a piece of bread and jam, hurried up and struck his stick vigorouslyand told him to go and play in the park," said into the tuft, saying somewhat angrily, "Paul,the Intendant. come out this instant; you are frightening" It's very odd the child does not come," your mother and behaving very badly. Yousaid the mother. Whereat the father went shall not have any breakfast, sir." As theto the garden front and called as loudly as he stick went poking into the pampas grass, adared, being afraid of disturbing his master, little voice gave a yell of dismay ; and Paul'sFive minutes passed, and no Paul made his father, plunging into the middle, pulled out,appearance, and as, like most little boys, he not Paul, but Jean A sickening fear came


60 PA UL AND JEAN.over the poor man's heart as he saw the little boy's wretched cowardice in not instantlyboy's frightened and scowling face-" Oh- coming to tell what had happened. Afteroh-h-h," howled Jean, twisting his ragged this everybody said that there must haveblouse in his dirty hands. been a quarrel between the two lads, andPaul's father, impetuous like his nation, that Jean had probably given Paul an uglyand terribly frightened by the child's expres- push. It was very sad to think of howsion, seized Jean and gave him a succession easily he might have been restored, even afterof shakes, saying, " Where's Paul ? where's he had fallen in, for there were three 'peoplePaul?" close by in the grounds, and if Jean hadJean, blubbering and sulky, tried to say even called out loud, they must have heardnothing; but cowed by the repetition of the him.shakes, he at last pointed to the Long Pond, So the matter remains somewhat of a mys-and muttered reluctantly, " There." tery to this hour." There !" said Paul's father, bursting into I am not going to make you miserable bya torrent of unintelligible words, and flinging describing the misery of those poor people.his arms into the air. He rushed to the pond, They tried all they could, by rubbing andand stood for an instant looking at its un- warming the poor little boy before the fire;ruffled depths; but he knew it was at least but nobody had any hope when they heardsix feet deep; and the banks were steep, and how long he had been in the water. Andhe himself a short stout man, far from young, when it was all in vain, they laid him on hisand with neither rope nor pole at hand. So little bed, and his mother and sisters streweddragging Jean with him, he ran panting and flowers over him. Two days after--for burialschoking to the house, where for a moment he take place much sooner in France than instood with his hand on his heart unable to England, and the time is fixed by law-Paulspeak. At last he said the word "pond," was carried in his coffin into the villageand pointing to Etienne, who had remained church; and after the prayers the coffin wasin the servants' hall, he fell in a heap on the borne to the grave-yard on the hill ; the oldfloor. His wife sprang towards him, quite cure walking in front and all the village fol-bewildered, poor woman, with her double lowing after. They laid him in a little gravefright; all the men and maids left their chairs close under an ivy-covered wall, where a babyand ran out calling for water, for ropes, for sister had been buried long ago. Her moundblankets ; and M. le Comte de X., astounded was planted over with white periwinkles, andat the noise, came out of his study, holding looked quite snowy.his pink cup of chocolate in one hand, and When all the servants went sadly back topushing his wig over his left ear with the the chateau, Paul's father and mother walkother. But while all this was going on, ing at their head, and crying sadly, theyEtienne, who had that excellent quality which found M. le Comte de X. telling thewe call presence of mind, ran quickly out of Maire of the village that Jean's father, thethe house to the shed where he kept his drunken cobbler, must be turned out of histools, and got a long strong rake. When the cottage and sent away. He was so apt toother servants, with M. le Comte de X. at quarrel and fight that it was not difficult totheir head, came flocking down to the pond, do this; and the Maire, a fat peasant pro-calling out for a pole, or for some one who prietor in a blouse (the village maires arecould dive, Etienne was already up to his generally like that in France), was promisingwaist in the water, where it was shallowest, it should be done. But who do you thinkand feeling about carefully with his rake. It put in a word ? It was poor Paul's mother;was not long before he touched the body of the kind woman, who said, " M. le Comte, Ipoor little Paul, and then Etienne plunged had rather nothing was done. My son lovedin under the water and brought him up in little Jean; and if he is sent away with thathis arms. The string with which he had drunken father, he will only go from bad toplayed at horses was still twisted round his worse."fingers, and dragged along the grass as he So Jean stayed; and for a long time towas carried into the house and laid before the come he was always sulky. But sometimeskitchen fire. When Jean was asked how he looked at Paul's mother as if he werelong Paul had been in the water, he said going to speak. I can hardly tell you whe-sulkily, "about two hours;" which reply ther the dreadful thing in which he wasmade M. le Comte de X. so angry, that somehow mixed up will, in the end, makeI am sorry to say he said a great many him repentant and be a better boy. But Ithings which he should not, though he had think so ; and I am sure Paul's mother de-reason to be terribly indignant at the serves that he should.BESSIE PARKES BELLOC.


A ._I ._ ._ ...--" MASTE EPHAI BINlP eS N 6"MASTER EPHRAIM BINES, JUNIOR." Pag 63i-e Pyc63


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MASTER EPHRAIM BINES, JUNIOR.BY A NATURAL PHILOSOPHER.EPHRAIM BINES was a jobbing gar- unceremoniously fling the cutting over thedener: an honest, hard-working, but garden wall, with the supercilious remark-very obstinate old fellow, and by no means "It's naught better than a stinkin', out-sweet-tempered. His Jim Crow hat had no landish weed-that's what that is, mum, who-jauntiness in it, but brooded on his grizzled ever give it to ye."head like a rusty, draggle-tailed raven. His It was in vain to attempt clandestineface was very much like a scowling knocker, planting of these aliens. Ephraim was sureand when he was in a very bad temper, he to find them out, in whatever secludedhad a habit of fingering his stubbly chin, as corners they might be concealed; and thenif he were feeling for the knocker-ring, down came his hoe upon them like a heads-There were sullen wrinkles in his velveteen man's axe. Competition might have takenwaistcoat and his corduroy breeches; his some of the conceit out of Master Ephraim,brown leather buskins frowned in every but there was no other jobbing gardener forbutton; and his heavy, tight-laced boots three or four miles round Sloefield, and sodescended on the earth with a solemnly Ephraim had completely at his mercy all theslow, elephant-like thud, which seemed to Sloefielders who owned gardens which theysay, " There, Ephraim Bines has put his could not keep in order themselves.foot down, and Ephraim Bines would like If Ephraim gave himself such airs into see the man that could make him move other people's places, it might be supposedit until he chooses to lift it up again." that he was monarch of all he surveyed in hisThe old ladies whose gardens he did up own home. And so he was to a large extent,stood in awe of Ephraim. They durst not for but still there was a tiny rebel there.their lives ask him to raise the vegetables Ephraim's meek-spirited little wife was dead,they wanted to be raised, or to arrange their but whilst she lived she would scarcely haveflower-beds as they wanted them to be dared to say that it was hot or cold, ifarranged. They were obliged to be content Ephraim had not said so before her. Hiswith just such flowers, and shrubs, and eldest daughter, Jemima, who kept house forfruit, and vegetables, as Ephraim chose to him, was almost as ill-tempered as her father,permit their gardens to provide them with, but she was afraid to vent her ill-temperIf interfered with in the slightest degree, upon him, saving it all for her sisters andEphraim would either shoulder his tools her brother. The second daughter, Kezia,(although half the lawn might still be un- was as meek-spirited as her mother hadmown), and march home in a huff; or else been. The youngest, Keren happuch,he would take his revenge in a massacre was a roguish little puss ; she greatlyof the innocents, ruthlessly tearing up and enjoyed mischief when somebody else didcutting down huge clumps of his offending it, but took precious good care not to getemployer's favourite flowers. Nothing an- into a scrape herself. It was little Ephraimnoyed Ephraim more than when friends who was the enfant terrible of the family; andof his employers made them presents of yet old Ephraim liked young Ephraim bettercuttings with which he was not familiar. If than any other of his children, and got quiteone of these botanical unwelcome little angry with Jemima when night after nightstrangers was produced in Ephraim's pre- she rushed to meet him with a fresh list ofsence, he would take it between his thumb her little brother's misdeeds. She had beenand finger, hold it at arm's length as if he obliged to give up spanking him on her owncould not bear the smell of it, sniff con- account, since latterly for every spank shetemptuously, snort indignantly, and then had received two vigorous kicks upon her63


64 MfASTER EPHRAIMf BINES, JUNIOR.shins. So, as she could not punish him her- by scratching his pencil down his slate, fas-self, she was very eager to get him floggings tening his class-fellows to their seats withfrom his father, and although old Ephraim, cobbler's wax; tilting up the infants' form.who was a staunch believer in "Spare the rod and sending all the poor little infants sprawl-and spoil the child," was often compelled by ing; flashing the sunlight, whef the cloudshis conscience, as he phrased it, to flog his broke, into Miss Mavor's face with a piece oflittle boy, he did not like the job. For one looking-glass; and firing potato-pellets at herthing, when little Ephraim was born, his spectacles out of a quill popgun. Whenmother had died; and, perhaps, old Ephraim, Ephraim did not choose to go to school, heremembering that he had not given his poor amused himself by tying the rusty kettles hewife the happiest of lives, would have liked picked out of the ditches to stray dogs' tails;to try to fancy that he was offering some scaring geese; cutting off donkeys' clogs; un-kind of amends by making much of her hasping meadow gates, that horses and cowslast child. For another thing, young might stray out into the road; driving them,Ephraim, in sullen obstinacy, and in tricks of when he could do so without being seen,manner, down even to the fingering of the into corn, and clover, and lucerne fields, andchin, was just old Ephraim in miniature; and grass left for cutting; and .gathering snailsthe father was proud of his likeness, by the half-gallon, to empty into the oldA very peculiar young gentleman was ladies' gardens which his father was so proudMaster Ephraim Bines, jun. Keren-happuch of because he was the real master of them;got all the fun out of the mischief that he and when the old ladies had their garden-did. Her brother in his wildest pranks gates painted, young Ephraim could not restlooked as grave as a judge. Unhasting, until he had bespattered the fresh paint withunresting, he was almost always (except when mud. In the dusky autumn evenings hehe was asleep) stolidly striving to annoy some gave runaway rings at the pear-shaped gate-one or other, as if from a sense of duty. In bell-pulls. He did the same in winter, too,short, Master Ephraim Bines, jun. was an and when the poor shivering little housemaid,insufferable little nuisance, who ought to have who had to leave the warm kitchen fire andbeen flogged about a dozen times a day. trip down the long cold gravel path, peepedHe kept quiet whilst his father was at out of the gate, and was looking about half-home, but old Ephraim generally went away frightened, bang came a snowball on herto wolk before his children had finished their cheek from Master Ephraim, who was hidingbreakfast, and then young Ephraim began round the corner. He tied cord across thehis day's labour. He scooped the sugar out village street in the evening, to trip peopleof Jemima's tea-cup when she was not look- up. He even had the impudence, one verying, and put wood-ashes in instead. He dark evening, to tie a string to the parsonagepeppered Kezia's and Keren-happuch's bread knocker, and le kept it going for nearly anand milk. He got under the table, and hour; once giving such a rat-a-tat-tat rightpinched his sisters all round with great im- over the heads of the servants, who werepartiality-except that he always gave Jemima standing in the porch on the look out for thethe hardest pinches. If he could manage to supposed runaway, that the housemaid wentgive the cloth a sly jerk, that brought the into hysterics, the fat cook fainted off asbreakfast things into Jemima's lap, or down dead as a stone on the doorsteps, and theupon the floor, Ephraim was satisfied with man-servant rushed into the vicar's studyhis morning's indoors performance, and went with a face as white as a sheet, and had toout to employ himself in open-air mischief drop into a chair, and clutch another by theuntil it was time to start for school. If not, back, before he could gasp out, " Oh, sir, ifhe busied himself in pulling the pins out of you please, sir, the front-door kndcker 'shis sisters' knitting, snipping their frocks on bewitched, sir."the sly into fire-paper patterns, and other All the mischief that Ephraim did not dosuch brotherly attentions. He was always at home or at school he tried to do upon theready to start for school with Keren-happuch. sly only telling Keren -happuch of theThey took their dinners with them, and so spiciest of his exploits. But, of course, heEphraim was free to spend the day as he was found out now and then, and at lastpleased. As a rule he played truant every every bit of mischief that was done in or nearfine day, but his sister told no tales, and, Sloefield was put down to little Ephraim.after a bit, the governess did not complain " That boy ain't born to be drownded," theeither. She was too glad to be rid of village people used to say. " You mark myEphraim's company, since, when at school, words-he'll come to the gallers as sure ashe was always spilling the ink over copy- his name's Ephraim. A professin' man likebooks; setting everybody's teeth on edge Master Bines ought to be ashamed of hisself


MASTER EPHRAIM BINES, JUNIOR. 65to let un have his own way as he do. Bines Ephraim. always drew himself up, as if tois none so easy with his gals." intimate that he was singing under protest;All this greatly scandalised old Ephraim, that in. his case, at any rate, the hymn waswho was a leading man at the little Sloefield mere poetry.chapel. He lectured, he thrashed young Of course, young Ephraim had long helpedEphraim more vigorously than ever; but all himself to forbidden fruit in his father's gar-without avail. den, but for long he graciously refrained fromWhat was to be done with a boy like this ? doing any wanton mischief in it. After aThe only one who seemed to have any in-, certain flogging, however, he got two molesfluence over him was his second sister, quiet, and turned them loose in the garden. Theysickly Kezia. It was not always that she burrowed into the soil almost as if they werecould exert it, but still sometimes she could diving in water, and in a week's time the trimget him to sit by her, and behave something beds and paths were pimpled everywhere withlike a Christian little boy, instead of an imp little mounds of earth. Poor old Ephraimpossessed. And it was Kezia who at last was alm, t beside himself, but at last hecured Ephraim of his monkey-tricks-so far managed to trap the moles, and hung themas he was evercured. on one of his lilac-trees. He raked theOld Ephraim had a nice bit of ground molehills smooth, readjusted the plantsattached to his cottage, out of which he which they had disturbed, and once morehad made at odd times a very cosy old- pottered about in his garden, before hefashioned garden. At the bottom there were went out to work, and when he camecucumber-frames and beehives, and a make- home from work, with great complacency.shift little greenhouse, with passion-flower His graceless little son, however, had an-growing over its brick end, and a vine, that other cross in store for him.bore very creditable little clusters of grapes, Old Ephraim had a dozen dahlias of whichpeeping, greenand purple, through the panes. he was very proud-the blooms were soA few fruit-trees were nailed against the walls regular and bright and velvety. He wantedlike spread-eagles; others, standard and es- to keep them in blossom during the winter,palier, and laburnum-trees, and white and so he potted the tubers in autumn and putpurple lilac-bushes, marked off great oblongs them into his little greenhouse. Next after-in the beds devoted to strawberries, rasp- noon Jemima saw Ephraim poking what sheberries, gooseberries, and currants; rhubarb thought were potatoes into the fire, andand celery and artichokes and asparagus; Keren-happuch looking on in high glee.peas, beans, potatoes, cabbages, and cauli- " Where did you get those potatoes, you badflowers; radishes and carrots and parsnips; boy ?" asked Jemima.cress, lettuces, leeks, onions, and shalots; "They ain't potatoes, Crossy," answeredparsley and fennel; spinach and mushrooms; Ephraim. " I wanted to see how bakedSand all kinds of fragrant herbs in sunny dahlia-roots would taste. Won't father bequarters. The flower-beds outside were very in a rage? They're his prime uns." Andnarrow, but they were crammed, according as he spoke, the shameless young varletto the season, with stocks, wallflowers, sweet- brandished the trowel with which he hadwilliam, Canterbury bells, pinks, picotees, scooped up the tubers.carnations, polyanthuses, columbine, monk's- At the risk of having her shins kicked,hood, flags, jonquils, daffodils, periwinkle, Jemima could not help boxing Ephraim'scrocuses, snowdrops, double daisies, roses ears and bundling him out of doors. As sheof all hues, lilies of the valley, white lilies, did so, up came old Ephraim, who had gottawny tiger-lilies, peonies, dahlias, marigolds, away from work earlier than usual, bringinglavender, ribes and honeysuckle and nastur- with him a saucer for one of his dahlia-potstiums and convolvuluses, that festooned the that was in want of it. Jemima soon toldtrees with blossom-spangled clusters, and her tale, little Ephraim standing by in doggedclaret- and sulphur- and rose-pink-bloomed silence, with his head down, and his hand uphollyhocks that nearly overtopped the trees, to his chin, just as his father had his. TheThe paths, as well as the flower-beds, were thrashing old Ephraim gave young Ephraimvery narrow, but not a weed was to be seen was so terrific that Kezia screamed and,in them. His garden was the only thing timid though she was, she rushed in betweenon earth that seemed to give old Ephraim her father and her brother. Her father shookunmixed satisfaction. When he had to join her off, and went on with the flogging. Thenin singing at the chapel- he marched little Ephraim to the shed, and"No foot of land do 1 posse locked him in without food for the night."No cottage in this wilderness, Old Ephraim little thought that any of hisA poor wayfaring man," daughters-least of all timid Kezia-would5


66 BUSH NEIGHBOURS.presume to solace theyoungrebel. But when too ill then to be scolded. The night beforethe old man and her sisters went to bed, had been frosty-the first autumn frost-andKezia made some excuse for staying up a Kezia had run out without putting anythingfew minutes. She had saved her s6p from on, and then had come back to a blanketlesssupper, and got a couple of blankets off her bed. For days her life was despaired of-forown bed. She took down the key of the weeks, for months, for a year and a half, sheshed from the dresser-hook on which it hung, was confined to her bed. I do not say thatand started for the shed with her supplies, during that long time little Ephraim never didSore, scared little Ephraim, sobbing in the any mischief, but he was an altered boy, anddark and cold, was greatly cheered by the would sit for hours in his sister's bedroom,bedclothes and the bread and milk. Kezia watching .her like a dog. I do not say thatstayed with him as long as she could-then he never did any mischief when Kezia gottucked him in, and locked him up once about again; but it was only a very littlemore. more than the amount that is natural even inOld Ephraim was very wrathful when he good boys-good boys outside book-covers.went to the shed in the morning, and found His sister's love for him and his love for histhe young criminal comfortably rolled up and sister did him more good than all his father'ssnoring in the blankets. But Kezia was lickings.BUSH NEIGHBOURS.CAPTAIN DAVENTRY was a military which two masters, in cap and gown, nodded"settler in Australia, in the old convict over their far-apart desks, and pretended totimes. When Mrs. Daventry, and her son teach Walter and another small boy, andWalter, and her maid Phoebe, went out from tried to fancy that they were preparing aEngland to join the captain on his grant, lanky hobbydehoy for the University. Mas-both mistress and maid thought they were ters, and hobbydehoy, and small boy, allnever to know what comfort was again-that half-envied Walter, in a drowsy kind of way,they were going, so to speak, to the world's when one morning he burst into that gloomyback-yard, in which all kinds of dirty rubbish old schoolroom to say good-bye. An hourwere shot. Walter would have preferred afterwards he was rattling out of the dreamyIndia or Canada; people teased him so little town along the Ipswich road, en routewhen they learnt that he was going to for London. The coachman was making his"Botany Bay"-asking him when he was leaders and the off-wheeler canter, the guardsentenced to transportation how many was tootle-tooing on his horn; the towns-years he had got-and a good many more people stood at their doors and the inn-gates,such silly questions, which they thought a sleepily watching the coach that had comegreat deal wittier than Walter did. Still, any from great Norwich and was going to stillchange was acceptable that would take him greater London, and sleepily waving theiraway from the dull little Norfolk town that hands to proud Walter, who had begged fornever seemed thoroughly awake, and its an outside place instead of being shut up indark, long, low-pitched grammar-school, in the stuffy inside with Mamma and Phoebe,


BUSH NEIGHBOURS. 67and an old gentleman who wore a bandana expected, and the little country houses thatunder his fur travelling cap, and got out for even then had begun to dot the south side ofrefreshment at every inn at which the coach the harbour were such darling little nests,stopped to change horses, munching ham- that both mistress and maid fell in love withsandwiches and drinking cold brandy-and- Sydney. Captain Daventry came on boardwater almost without intermission when the as the Atalanta let go her anchor in Sydneycoach was in motion. Walter had a much Cove. He was very brown, and he had apleasanter companion in the coachman, be- long curly beard. He was dressed morehind whom he sat, and who told him stories lightly than he would have been at home,about the gentlemen's seats they passed, and but still he was dressed, and like a gentle-gave him the biographies of all the horses, man. A horrid load was lifted from Mrs.and even let him hold the reins sometimes, Daventry's mind, since she had half given inwhen Mr. Jehu got down at a roadside house to Phoebe's belief that Master would onlyto deliver a parcel or drink a glass of ale. wear a bit of 'possum or kangaroo skin aboutWalter enjoyed the first part of the journey his loins, and that he would carry a spearexceedingly, but he was very tired and sleepy instead of a walking-stick. As for Walter, hebefore it was over. was very proud of the brown manly-lookingAs the coach swung through Mile End Papa whom he had not seen since he wasturnpike, the coachman woke him up with a almost a. baby.back thrust of the butt-end of his whip, and " Oh, Walter," cried Mrs. Daventry to hersaid, "Now, then, Squire, you can reckon husband, when the kissing was over, "Iyourself in London." Walter just opened his hope your farm is close by. I used to thinkheavy eyes, and then shut them again-not that they sent the convicts out here becausethinking much of the Great City, if that was it was a hideously ugly hole, but this is aLondon. By the time the coach got to its inn, love of a place."he was so sound asleep again that a waiter had " It's nicer to look at than to live in," theto carry him up to bed. The ride from Nor- captain answered. " What with convicts andfolk to London, however, was flying on eagles' emancipists, you'd soon be sick of living inwings compared with the voyage from London Sydney. No, my grant is some miles up-to Sydney. In those days the magnificent country. There's a nasty swarm of ticket-steamers and sailing clippers that now arrive of-leavers round it, but, of course, you'llalmost daily at or from Australia had not have nothing to do with them. And thenbeen dreamt of. At long intervals clumsy there are some good fellows of our sortold tubs of ships and barques sailed for the within reach-some of them married, too.far-off southern land, pottered about for What a time you've been I was down twomonths at sea, and at last turned up at the months ago looking out for you. It's quiteAntipodes, seemingly more through good by chance I'm down now. However, there'llluck than good management. The barque be room on the dray for your luggage, if youin which our party sailed was named the haven't brought out a ship-load, and we'llAtalanta. Walter had often read through the start home to-morrow, if one night will beproper names at the end of his Latin Dic- rest enough for you. I've been buying sometionary, and-_was greatly amused by the horses, and you and Walter can ride two ofbarque's flying name-when he found how she them,'and help me to drive the rest. You'll becrawled. She had to put in at Plymouth, better off than you were before you marriedLisbon, Bona Vista, and the Cape. She was me, old lady. You had only one horse then,just half a year in getting from the Nore to but I can give you your pick out of a dozenPort Jackson Heads. or two now. Of course Walter has learnt toOnce inside the Heads, however, even stick on a horse somehow, though you couldn'tMrs. Daventry and Phoebe picked up a little keep a pony for him ? The girl will have tospirit, and Walter was in ecstasies. Both learn to ride, too, if she wants to get aboutsky and water were so brightly blue, the up-country. In the meantime she can go upislands sprinkled on the water looked so on the dray. The bullock-driver is an as-pretty, and, though the trees seemed almost signed servant, but he's as true as steel, andas black as ink to English eyes, the rocky, that's more than I can say for some of thewooded shores, sweeping down to the little beggars I've got."coves and bays, beached with white sand But when the loaded dray was brought tothat shone like silver under the glowing sun, the inn-door next morning, with a chair on ithad a fairy-land-like look. Sydney then had for Phoebe, she had learnt that assigned ser-not the fine buildings it boasts of now, but vant meant convict, and refused at first tothe town was so much more civilized in ap- take her seat. She wasn't going to havepearance than Mrs. Daventry and Phoebe her throat cut with her eyes open, she-


68 BUSH NEIGHBOURS.screamed. The bullock-driver, Long Steve, potatoes in the kitchen garden. There waswas a good-tempered fellow, and did his a nice vineyard, which Walter mistook atbest to calm her. "Why, law bless ye, first for a field of currant-bushes; and in theMiss," he said, "I've got an old 'ooman orchard there were raspberries arid strawber-an' half a dozen kids. What call have I ries and mulberries, pears and pomegranates,got to do any harm to a pretty gal like figs and plums and loquats, oranges andyou!" But flattery was thrown away on lemons, peaches, apricots and nectarines, andPhoebe. She entreated her mistress not to gigantic rock and water melons. Walterleave her to the tender mercies of that thought of the scanty pennyworths of sourwicked-looking man, and made such a fuss apples that he used to get in Norfolk, andthat at Jast her master was obliged to say, for a week or two devastated the orchard and"Well, look here, Phoebe. If you don't go the vineyard like a 'possum or a flying-fox.in the dray, you must either stay in Sydney, As soon as it was known that Mrs. Daventryor walk, or ride one of the horses. Take had arrived, the Captain's friends and theiryour choice-which shall it be?" Phoebe wives rode over to Daventry Hall, and thenmounted the dray then, and though it was there was a round of dinners at the friends'night when she reached her journey's end, houses, and then the Captain gave dinnersshe was on quite good terms with Long in return, and both Mrs. Daventry andSteve when he helped her off the dray. She Phoebe were delighted with the gaiety. Buthad been talking to him for hours, half con- when things settled into everyday course, and,descendingly, half propitiatingly, thinking all as often happened, Captain Daventry wasthe time what a capital adventure it would be away from home for hours together, theyto relate in her first letter home. In that letter both began to fall back into their old dreadPhoebe made out that Long Steve had corn- of Australia. Mrs. Daventry had been proudmitted half a dozen murders, whereas the at first of having so many servants insidehonest fellow had never committed one. A and outside the house, but it was not plea-great many terrible scamps were sent out to sant to remember that all except PhoebeAustralia in the old convict times, but, mixed were convicts. Captain Daventry wasa, strictup with them, there were men who were far but not a severe master, and so he got onbetter fellows than many of the people left pretty well with his assigned servants, but inat home. all their faces-except Long Steve's and hisLate in theafternoon the Captain and his wife's-there was a shallow, time-servingparty reached his farm. " Oh, what a first- look, however cringingly civil they might be,rate broad!" Walter, fresh from Norfolk, ex- that was not reassuring.claimed, when the riders had mounted the Walter did not trouble himself about suchtop of the shore-hills, and were looking down things. He made friends after a fashion withon the lagoon which the farm fringed-a the men, and rode about with his father tolagoon with thickly-wooded banks, cleared look after the horses, cattle, and sheep; thehere and there, a little stream running into maize-paddock and the potato-fields ; theit at one end, and at the other a sandy bar clearers, the fencers, and the sawyers. Hisover which the sea was breaking, father soon let him go about by himself, andMrs. Daventry was delighted at first with then he was a proud and happy boy. He couldher new home. A pretty flower-garden scarcely believe that only a year ago he wassloped down to the lagoon, and the verandah stumbling through the irregular and defectiveof the snug one-story house of brick and verbs in that gloomy old Norfolk schoolroom.weatherboard was smothered in passion- Walter could leap logs now far better thanflower. The Captain had furnished the house he could conjugate Fio or Inquam then.as comfortably as he could for his wife, and Of course, his father or his mother gave himaltogether it seemed a much smarter, livelier lessons every now and then, but that was notplace than the dark old house in the dull, like regular school, you know. Long Stevegrass-grown side-street of the little Norfolk had taught him to crack a stock-whip, andtown where she had been economizing whilst Long Steve's wife had plaited him a cabbage-hir husband was first doing military duty, tree hat (in those days the country all roundand afterwards building this snug nest in New the lagoon was studded with cabbage-treeSouth Wales. There was no need, apparently, palms), and Walter used to gallop throughto economize now. Beef and mutton were the Bush like a Wild Huntsman on his ownthe commonest of things at Daventry Hall. three-parts blood chestnut Dragon-fly. Some-Cream, butter, eggs, honey, pigs, poultry, times he went out on ioot with his little gun,fish and game were all to be got, to almost and after a bit he managed to shoot wallabiesany extent,upon the premises. BesidesEnglish and kangaroo-rats, and quail and snipe, andvegetables, there were pumpkins 'and sweet bronze-wings, and parrots and cockatoos to


BUSH NEIGHBOURS. 69make pies of. Sometimes, too, he took his One day when the Captain and Waltergun out with him in the boat, and shot wild rode home they found Mrs. Daventry andduck, and now and then a black swan, on Phcebe almost dead with alarm. A party ofthe lagoon. In the lagoon and the little blacks had taken possession of the frontriver, moreover, he caught eels and schnap- verandah, on which they were jabberingpers, and guard fish, and so-called bream, and and gesticulating-rubbing their sides andmullet and trout, and delicious oysters. The poking their fingers down their throats.Captain was very proud of the way in which Poor Mrs. Daventry and her servant thoughthis little boy took to the colony, but Mrs. that these were signs that the blacks wantedDaventry was very anxious because he was to eat them, and therefore were ready to faintout so much alone, from fear. The Captain soon bundled thePage 72.black fellows off the verandah, but he made Captain for his kindness. Unfortunately,it a point of policy to be kind to them, and they had tasted his potatoes, and thoughtso he ordered the cook to supply them with them so nice that they twice saved him thetea and damper and mutton-chops. They trouble of digging up his crop, and onceate and drank until even they could eat and even scooped out and baked his seed-pota-drink no more, and then remarking, with toes. The Captain did not want to makegreat self-satisfaction, that they had "budgeree enemies of the darkies, but he was obligedbig belly," they drowsily tramped into the after that to give up supplying them withbush, and lay down in the sun to sleep off chops and damper, except when they hadtheir surfeit, fairly earned them by working for them.The blackfellows were not grateful to the Far worse thieves than the blackfellows,


70 BUSH NEIGHBOURS.however, persistently preyed on Daventry that his horse could only have strayed a littleHall. way into the Bush, and was sure to turn upAll the assigned servants, except Long soon. Mounted on another nag, Walter rodeSteve and his wife, were habitual thieves, about for days in search of his favourite, butThey did not get any wages for their work, never saw him more. Walter found outand so they thought themselves free to help something else, however. He was ridingthemselves to their master's property. So home very dispiritedly one evening, when hemany pounds of salt or fresh meat and flour, noticed Black Poley-as one of his father'sso much coarse brown sugar and inferior tea, shepherds who lived at an out-station wasand a little tobacco, were the rations served nicknamed, from the resemblance his headout to each man every week ; but there was bore to a hornless bullock's-mounting thegood living in the men's huts for all that. rise on the right of the gully in which WalterChina pigs, ducks, turkeys, &c., mysteriously was riding. Walter could not understanddisappeared. The men made out that they what Poley was doing there at that time ofhad wandered into the Bush, and been night, and having been made suspiciousdevoured by Bush beasts and birds, or else by the loss of his horse, he pressed afterstarved to death; but if Captain Daventry Poley as quietly as he could. By the timehad gone to the huts a little more frequently, he topped the ridge it was nearly dark, butinstead of trusting, as he did, to his overseer, he could make out Poley going down thethe savoury scent that often issued from them other side of the ridge, and another manwould have told him what had become of coming up to meet him. Walter was a bravehis poultry, &c. Walter noticed the savoury little fellow. He tied his horse to a tree,steam one evening, but the overseer said that and, slipping down the ridge, got withinhe had shot some wild ducks, and given them earshot of the two men, who were sitting,to the men. This overseer was a convict-a smoking and talking, on a fallen tree-trunk.smooth-faced, smooth-tongued rascal. He "Well, Poley, how many can you let mewas trusted to weigh out the rations, and the have this time?"men used to carry a good deal besides their Poley gave a gruff laugh, and answeredrations out of the store. The house servants, with an oath: " if I don't try it on witltoo, whenever they had a good opportunity, three score The cove is so jolly green, it'swould appropriate unguarded valuables, my belief he'll never miss 'em. I beganThey had no difficulty in disposing of them, with twos an' threes, an' now I've worked itsince all the assigned servants, except Long up to a score, an' I've al'ays got over theSteve and his wife, were in league with the cove somehow. What does sich as him knowticket-of-leave farmers round about. Most of about sheep an' farmin'? if I don'tthese ticket-of-leavers were a thieving, drunken try four score-good yows, too; so you mustlot. Some of them would reconvey their stand something handsome."Government grants for a keg of rum. As for "To-morrow morning then-at the oldconveyance of another kind-Pistol's-they place-Sal's Pannikin."did not rob one another, but gentlemen- " All right I'll work round there about ansettlers they considered fair game. Captain hour after sunrise."Daventry's bullocks found their way into the Then something was said about the over-ticket-of-leavers' beef casks. They stole his seer; but what, Walter could not make out.best horses; they clapped their brands on Not waiting to hear any more, he crept backhis best colts, fillies, and calves; they pas- to his horse, mounted, galloped home, andtured their own horses and cattle on his told his father what he had heard. At firstgrant; through the villany of his overseer the captain was going to consult with theand convict-shepherds, they robbed him of overseer, but one or two little things re-his sheep wholesale. They had even the cently had rather shaken his confidence inimpudence to steal Dragon-fly the overseer, and so he sent for Long" Why, Daventry," said one of the Cap- Steve instead. Long Steve knew Sal'stain's friends one day, " what made you sell Pannikin well. It was a lonely hollow inthat capital chestnut your little fellow used an unoccupied part of the Bush, and wasto ride? He fetched a good price, though, called Sal's because on its brink a Mrs.I believe." Sarah Mullins had once kept a most dis-"I didn't sell him," answered the Captain reputable sly drinking-house. Strange goingsmoodily " he was stolen. A nice lot of on had taken place there. At last the land-neighbours we've got; however, I think I've lady had been most brutally murdered inscared 'em for one while." her own house, and after that it was allowedWhen Dragn-fly was first missing, the to go to ruin, and had the reputation ofoverseer had comforted Walter by telling him being haunted.


BUSH NEIGHBOURS."What was the other man like, Master back as if he had been a child of four yearsWalter?" asked Long Steve. Walter could old. By the time Walter had obeyed theonly say that he talked very much as if he cooey and galloped down with the horses,had a hot potato in his mouth. " Oh, both thieves had their arms strongly boundthat's little Dick Green at the head of the behind them with green hide. With strips oflagoon," cried Long Steve, half disappointed the same they were fastened to the Captain'satnot having found a worthier foeman. "It's and Long Steve's stirrups, and then, drivinghard, Cap'en, if you an' me can't nab little the ewes before them, the three thief-takersDick Green an' the Poley." set out for home. As Long Steve had ex-"Would you like to go, Walter?" said pected, they found the rest of the flock onthe Captain. " I think it's only fair that you the other side of the ridge that sloped downshould see the fun." into Sal's Pannikin.Of course Walter wanted to go. So it The overseer turned as white as a sheetwas arranged that Steve should have tea and when his master rode up to Daventry Hallchops ready, and three horses saddled, at with his sheep and his prisoners, but neitherhis hut (which stood apart from the other Dick nor the Poley peached.men's), and call his master and Walter at Black Poley was sentenced to an awfulhalf-past two next morning. The Captain flogging before he was sent back to Sydney,thought it advisable to start thus early, in case and little Dick got ten years in a chain-the sheep-stealers should have changed their gang. The Captain thought now that hisminds after Walter left them, and agreed property would be safe for a while, but'heto meet at an earlier hour for safety's sake. was utterly mistaken. He had only weededWalter greatly enjoyed his early break- out two scoundrels whose places were almostfast by the wood fire in Long Steve's hut, instantly supplied by two at least as bad; heand the silent ride through the Bush-all had managed to focus the hatred of thethree armed. But when they had put up district on himself, and, moreover, just thentheir horses in Sal's ruined stables, and were Hook-handed Bill and his gang came oncrouching in Sal's roofless parlour, the adven- circuit, so to speak, to the country roundture did not seem quite so jolly to Walter. the lagoon. They had made their lastBut presently, while it was still quite dark, habitat rather too hot to hold them, anda light came dancing down the other side of with secure hiding-places in the range ofthe hollow. Long Steve sallied out to re- shore-hills, they promised themselves someconnoitre. When he came back, he said- rich raids on the gentlemen-settlers who were" Yes, it's little Dick, sure enough-busy dotted here and there around the lagoon.finishing off his brush-hurdles. He'll soon Hook-handed Bill was a bushranger, with-ha' done, and then you an' me, Cap'en, had out any of the redeeming qualities which abetter creep down to the fold, whilst it's yet certain set of story-tellers are so fond ofdark. Master Walter can stay here with the giving to robbers. He was a greedy, savagehorses, an' bring 'em down when we cooey. brute. Physically he was a left-handed giant,Oh, yes, Cap'en, he'll be safe enough. Neither who owed his sobriquet to the fact that heDick nor the Poley would set a foot in here had lost his right hand, and supplied itsif you'd give them a thousand pounds." place with a sharp hook. Horrid tales wereIn spite of this assurance, Walter wearied told of what that hook had done; "rippingof his lonely vigil, up " was Hook-handed Bill's favourite modeAt length the eastern sky brightened, the of murder. Burning alive in a bullock's hidelaughing-jackasses hooted out their hideously stood next in his estimation. It was said, too,hilarious morning chorus, and the sun came that he was in the habit of waylaying bullock-up, bronzing the scrub and the tree-tops. drivers on their way down to Sydney withWalter could see little Dick quite plainly their masters' wool, of shamming to be onnow. He was lying on the ground smoking the best of terms with them, and then murder-his pipe. Then came another weary watch, ing them wholesale in their sleep, afterwardsbut at last up started little Dick and went to disposing of the wool through the agency ofmeet Black Poley, who was coming down to some of his ticket-of-leave friends.the Pannikin with the stolen sheep. They Such a villain, with half-a-dozen followerswere all driven into the fold, and the two only not quite so bad as himself, was nothieves were quietly talking together when, pleasant Bush neighbour. Some of theas it seemed to Walter, from beneath their gentlemen-settlers sent their wives andvery feet the Captain and Long Steve jumped children into Sydney. All rode aboutup like Jacks-in-the-box. The Captain felled armed by day, and at night had their mostBlack Poley as if he had been indeed a valuable cattle driven into the stockyards,bullock; Long Steve laid little Dick on his and their favourite, horses into the stables,


72 B USH NEIGHBO URS.whilst their houses were turned into little come. A little after nine the convict house-forts. In spite of all precautions, the bush- servants went away to their huts, and Longrangers committed the most impudent rob- Steve carefully bolted the doors after them.beries, and though some of the gentlemen- Mrs. Daventry and Phcebe were persuadedsettlers assisted the police in hunting the to go to bed. The garrison of three sat inrobbers, no captures were made. silence-the Captain expecting every momentOne afternoon, when Walter was in a to hear the police ride up; Long Steve andlonely part of his father's grant, a huge, Walter, on the other hand, dreading the ar-shaggy-bearded, roughly-clad fellow sprang rival of the bushrangers. About ten a partyfrom behind a clump of trees, and seized of men were heard galloping up. "Therehim by the collar. The stranger's right they are!" cried the Captain, and beforearm had no hand, but brandished a sharp Long Steve could stop him, he had openedhook, and Walter thought that his last hour the front door and run down to the garden-was come. He was awfully frightened, but gate. "Why, What a time you've been,he tried not to seem so. " Let me say my Saunders," the Captain shouted to the sup-prayers first," said Walter. posed police-sergeant.Hookrhanded Bill gave a grin which was "Have we?" growled back a gruff voice.even more hideous than his habitual frown, "Well, we'll try to make up for lost time,as he answered, "Time enough, youngster, you-- !"I ain't a-goin' to kill you afore night. I Discovering his mistake, the Captain firedwant you to take a message to your his pistol at the speaker, and rushed back tofather. He's a deal too cocky for my taste, the house. A hailstorm of lead soon rattledis the Captain, flogging his men, and lagging on the weatherboards, and Mrs. Daventry andhis neighbours, and now he's been boasting Phoebe got up and rushed about like maniacs.that he'll take me dead or alive. Will he? The women's screams were not calculatedWe'll soon see who's master. I'll show him to improve the Captain and Long Steve'show much I care for his blowing. You aim, and though they had the advantagetake him Hook-handed Bill's compliments, of cover, and Walter to load for them,and tell him that I give him fair warning and of the moon which came up pre-that I mean to pay him a visit to-night, sently, seven to two are heavy odds. (Theand to half flog the life out of him and overseer and assigned servants said nexthis sneak of a, bullock-driver, and then to morning that they had been sound asleepstring 'em both up-an' you, too, you -one, indeed, had heard a little firing, butyoung spy!-an' to carry off the womenfolk thought that it was the Captain out duck-he's brought from Old England to look shooting !) I am afraid that the besiegersdown on their betters. There you be off, would have been the victors, had not a partyyoungster !" of the Captain's friends suddenly made theirAt first the Captain was inclined to treat appearance. They had been dining togetherthe bushranger's threat as mere bravado, about ten miles off, and a drunken convict"However," he added, "if the rascal does had let out in their hearing the intendedchoose to come, he could not have consulted attack on Daventry Hall. They had in-my convenience better. The police are stantly rushed to horse, and galloped the tencoming over to-night, Walter, my boy. We miles at racing speed. The bushrangersmeant to have given the bushrangers a hunt turned tail when the new-comers poured ato-morrow morning, but if they like to save volley into them. Five of the scoundrels,us the trouble, so much the better. Don't altogether, had been hit, but only one wassay anything to your mamma, but go and call taken. When this prisoner was escorted to theLong Steve." nearest police-barracks next day, the reasonThe bullock-driver was firmly convinced of the constables' non-appearance at Daventrythat Hook-handed Bill would keep his word, Hall the night before was discovered.and advised his master to begin his prepara- The escort were very much astonished totions at once, in case the bushrangers should find no sentinel at the barrack-gates. Theyhear from some of their scouts of the intended were still more astonished to find the sergeantpolice-visit, and resolve to rush the house and his men lashed down on the mess-roombefore the arrival of the constables. Ac- floor-all gagged, pinioned, and fettered.cordingly guns, pistols, ammunition, a sword, Hook-handed Bill had been fully aware ofa cutlass, and a bayonet were got in readi- the Captain's arrangements with the police,ness by the Captain not that he really and had taken them by surprise in their lonelybelieved that there would be any use for them barracks before he despatched his insolentthat night. The kitchen clock struck seven- message by Walter.eight-nine, and still the constables did not EDWARD HOWE.


THE CROWN IMPERIAL LILY.A GERMAN LEGEND.O NE of the most stately ornaments of our Now our Lord liked this shady spot at thegardens in summer is the Imperial foot of Mount Olivet. Often and often,Lily, whose tall slender stem supports its when He was wearied with the day's teach-crown of red drooping flowers, shaded by a ing, with exhorting the people to sin no more,central tuft of graceful emerald leaves. If but believe; when His tender heart bled foryou peep within the lovely bell you will our human woe, He would wend His sacredperceive at its base six drops of water, crystal feet to the grove of shadowy olive trees,clear. Remove them gently, similar ones and crossing the little bridge that spannedwill instantly appear; take them away again, the brook of Kedron, rest a while in thethey will come back as before. Whence do garden of Gethsemane.they spring? What are they? They cannot Jesus loved flowers. He saw in thembe dew, the flower's mouth is bent earthwards, " God's smile on the earth," and as He trodno heaven-dropt moisture could enter its bell- the winding paths of the enclosure, His eyeshaped cup. looked with benign pleasure on the manyListen, and I will tell you their story, bright blossoms growing around, that bentEighteen centuries ago, when our Lord their heads beneath His gaze in holy, reve-had taken unto His gracious self human form rent awe. So many a time had He passedand walked this earth, our Lily's aspect was below the grey olive boughs, and not un-not the same she presents to us to-day. Her frequently had He beheld with unfeignedflowers were then of a pure silvery white, and delight the pure crown of silvery bells whichthey stood upright, presenting their fair the Lily's stem held up to heaven.bosoms to the blue eye of heaven, and to The other flowers noticed this preference,the gaze and joy of men. The slender but they were not envious, nay, they weredrooping leaves above its coroneted head but too glad that one of their numberwere then indeed a protection for the tender could afford, if but the briefest pleasure, toflowers from the too boisterous play of the Him.elements, and not a mere futile ornament as "Lily," said the grave old Olive tree, whothey are now. Of the six tearlike drops there rarely condescended to conversation with anywas no sign. Still more than now was the but his fellow trees, and had never beforeLily a fair ornament in field or dell, and all addressed a plant so far beneath him in agethings named her beautiful. Thus lovely, and condition : " Lily, you are favoured abovepure, and innocent, she bloomed in spotless us all; the Master loves you; let me wish youglory in the garden of Gethsemane. joy of your beauty." And for once the stern,73


74 THE CROWN IMPERIAL LILYunapproachable tree meant what he spoke to your favour. You shall be the floral empress.an inferior being. See," she went on, turning her fragrant head"You are the most beautiful of our num- to the other flowers, "does not our sister bearber," spoke out the modest Violet from upon her all the insignia of royalty'? Behold,among her shading leaves, she carries her flowers crownwise around her"You are, you are," interrupted the forward stem. Hail, Empress; hail, Lily Imperial!"Jasmine, effectually preventing the Violet from "Hail, hail," exclaimed all the otheruttering another word; for she was shy, and plants.rarely nerved herself to the effort of speech. "Hail," gravely repeated the Olives."From this day forth," said the Rose, "I All was joy and gladness, no shade ofwill consider my queenly title as lowered in jealousy or strife broke on their peace. Asfor the Lily, she raised her head yet more and seek refreshment for His soul, to renewproudly heavenwards, expanded her silvery the daily battle with sin and unbelief. It wasbells more fully, and merely deigned to long before He paid His wonted attention toacknowledge her comrades' compliments by a the flowers around.condescending nod of her central crested Meantime a whole stream of thoughtsleaves, coursed through the Lily's head. She was theLate in the afternoon of that day on which most beautiful of all the garden's flowers; herthe flowers had chosen the silver white lily sisters had publicly proclaimed her so to-day;their empress, our Lord entered the garden. she felt very proud and glad. How proudHe was weary and sad, and had sought this and glad, how much her vanity was flattered,quiet solitude to commune with His Father, she would hardly have cared to own. But*


THE CROWN IMPERIAL LIL Y 75she would prove to them this evening that petulant tones. "I will show myself to thethey had not ill bestowed their honours, Lord in my utmost loveliness. That is mythat she knew how to support them with be- manner of worship."coming dignity. It was right and fitting the Jesus heard the words, and He advancedother flowers should bend before the Master, yet nearer. His look grew terrible in its awe-but it would not be rikht that she should inspiring reproof and admonishment. Hebow her head. She was above the others in spoke no word, uttered no sound, but re-rank; she must not be beheld prostrating her- mained standing before the flower in silentself together with them. No, to-day her reproof, His eye unremittingly fixed upon herpure white cups must boldly meet the wilful crown. Her resolution faded more andMaster's eye; and surely, she considered, more; her pride began to waver; she felt itwould not that give Him far more pleasure was a fruitless combat, endeavouring to resistthan if she merely showed Him her bent out- the power and command enforced by thoseward form, which was not near so fair as her heavenly eyes looking upon her for the firstpure inmost depths? Thus, while our Lord time without pleasure, but full of unmixedprayed, was the evil spirit of pride and pain.vanity reasoning within the Lily's breast. Slowly, slowly her white bells began toWhen He had ended His petition, He rose tremble under the Divine glance; still moreand began to pace beneath the olive trees, slowly she unbent their enforced rigidness,His eyes resting kindly upon the flowers, who over each flower-cup spread a dark red blushbent lowly before Him as He passed, and of shame, tears of repentance started into hersent upwards their choicest, richest perfumes. eyes, steadily and gradually each flower-cupWalking further He came to the spot where dropped its head earthwards, and soon thethe Lily grew in her imperial loveliness, and hitherto proud Lily stood with drooped, flame-as He drew nearer she stiffened her stem coloured bells, and sorrowful mien before theyet more rigidly, bore her bells more haughtily, Lord.and when Jesus stood before her, she made He had observed the whole change-theno movement of reverent recognition and fleeing forth of the evil spirit, the repentance,devotion, the act of remorse. He removed His fearfulNow our Lord knew what was passing in glance from the flower, and a milder expres-the flower's heart. He felt sad and turned sion returned to His gentle visage.away a while, hoping that the Lily might yet " Rest in peace, Lily. Sin no more," Heconquer the demon within her, and bow said, and passed on.before her Maker, to whom alone she owed When He had left the garden the otherher beauty. Yet no, when He resumed his flowers raised themselves from their pendantgaze her crowned head was still raised up- posture, and all of them assailed the Lily withwards, and a supreme indifference to His reproaches.presence spoke out of her whole bearing. "How couldst thou dare to be so proud?"Then the Lord came closer, and stood still they said. " Knowest thou not 'tis a fearfulbefore the plant. He fixed His clear grey sin? Oh thou whom we had crowned oureyes in pained wonder upon her. She felt empress to-day, how couldst thou shame usthe look, it shot like lightning through her thus before the Lord of Life, when justframe, but the demon of pride was active because of thy high estate thou oughtest towithin her, and she strove to hide her have been the first to humble thy head?"emotion. Many of the flowers wept bitter tears, andA reproving look came over the gentle could speak no further for sobs.face. Still no change in the upright bearing The Lily answered not a word; she whoof the Lily. A pained shade passed over the erewhile had dared the Lord. She was cowedclear eyes. The Lily felt her resolution and humiliated, her spirit broken. Silentlywavering, though she struggled with might she bore the reproofs of her companions;and main to remain in her proud posture, silently the taunts and jeers some less" Bend thy head, Lily," whispered the delicate-minded shrubs would utter. She feltother flowers, pained and grieved at this she had too well deserved all this; ay, andconduct. " Bend! Acknowledge thy Lord. far, far more. She continued to hang herCause Him no grief; He has enough to bear. head, the deep blush was still unfaded on herBend I" cheeks.But these expostulations only made the As she replied by not a word, the others atLily more self-willed, made her desire more length ceased their reproaches, and left herthan ever to display her superiority over her alone to her sad and bitter thoughts. Thecompanions. short Eastern night o'erspread the land with"I will not bend," she said half-aloud, in a veil of darkness, the moon's yellow rays


76 GIACOMO AND PALLIDINA; OR,flooded the garden, and her light played the flowers awoke and bloomed in newamong the grey-gr en olive boughs. The invigorated beauty. But the Lily showed theflowers rolled up their leaves, folded their smn a different sight than when he had lastpetals inwards and sought slumber; the beamed down upon her. She still stoodmonotonous sleepy nodding of the trees shame-coloured and tearful, her imperialabove singing their lullably. All was hushed crown bowed earthward, and never againand still, all save the Lily were at rest. She from that day forth did she lift pure silveralone of all that number was awake and rest- bells heavenward.less; she could not forget what had passed As for her children, the dark red blushwithin the day just dead; sorrow would not has not left their flowers ; the tears of repent-permit her to slumber; and when at last, after ance well ever new within their eyes; theythe moon had sunkand the Eastwas beginning bear about them unforgotten the stigma andto shadow forth a new era of light, sleep fell remembrance of their ancestor's wicked re-upon her eyelids, her rest was disturbed and bellion and pride. They have inherited herbroken. Several dreams coursed through her title of Empress tgo; but they bear it lowly,brain, and no plant more beautiful and proud inLight dawned once more; the sun glowed shape, more humble in mien, adorns ouragain in golden splendour over the garden; gardens than the Imperial Lily.HELEN ZIMMERN.GIACOMO AND PALLIDINA; OR, THE ITALIANBEGGARS.BY COUNTESS MARIE MONTEMERLI.I, which excited the pity of passers-by, but didTHE son of a beggar, I first saw the light not distress my mother, who often said toat Pisa. me, " Cry louder, Giacomo, louder; theIn Italy there are beggars of every descrip- ladies who pass us by don't hear thee."tion. There are shamming beggars, threaten- At nightfall we went back to our lodging,ing beggars, beggars halt and maimed, musical two tolerably clean rooms in the suburbs.beggars, poetical beggars, beggars who are None of our neighbours had any idea thatrich, and beggars who are poor, blaspheming we were beggars. My mother strictly forbadebeggars and praying beggars, reprobates and me to tell it, and always pretended to returnsaints. They encumber the streets, the roads, from her day's work. My father would habit-the approaches to hotels, churches, and public ually come in with his spade on his shoulder;buildings of every kind. But the cleverest and, indeed, he was employed in a garden forof them all, and those who carry on business several days in the week. But early in themost profitably, are the intimidating and the morning and late in the evening, on Sundays,devout. My father has belonged to both festivals, and market days, my father, too,these classes. At the time of my birth he begged.was known as II Stregone; now he is At night, when the door was shut, he satspoken of as The Saint. beside my mother, and the two counted upThe earliest years of my life were chiefly their money, putting the silver apart into aspent in my mother's arms. I was a sickly bag, that they kept hidden in their straw bed.child, and she, dying of decline. The first "What gate were you at this morning,words she taught me were-" Charity, please." Bastiano ?" my mother would ask.In summer I sat by her on the burn- "Porte al Prato. And didn't I send cursesing flags at church doors, or played with after those peasants who passed me by with-other little beggars; in winter, shivering on out an alms ? They would stand quite dumb-the marble pavements, I wept with cold, foundered, then turn back to give me all they1 The Sorcerer. could."


THE ITALIAN BEGGARS. 77"Are you never afraid that God may upon them. If you could know what a mindpunish you, Bastiano?" sighed my mother. I have to burst out laughing when they call"For what? why should He? words do me Strcgone!"no harm: and there is no fear of the peasants My mother was silent-silent and pensive.revenging themselves ; I defy them, they never Before she put me to bed she always made mecould know me again. I have my plaister say my prayers, and lit a good fire: "Warmover my eye, and I twist my mouth-you thyself, Giaconino mio; thou hast been soknow how. My dear soul, if I did not cold all the day long." It was but a shortfrighten them, they would never give me a prayer that she taught me, and I still say itfarthing." on waking and before falling asleep :-" My"That is true," acquiesced my mother. God, make me virtuous, gentle, patient; give"They are afraid of my casting a spell me health; give us our daily bread from thehand of such as take pity on us: whoever mother was brought to beg; my father, how-they be, rich or poor, good or bad, bless ever, used to say to her-them, I beseech Thee. I ask it in the name " My poor Lucia, thou art so feeble; ifand for the sake of our Lord Jesus Christ, there was hard work to do, thou never couldstThy Divine Son. Blessed Virgin Mary, all stand it. It is best to go on as we do."Saints, all Angels, pray for us. Amen." We had no relations at Pisa, but a fewOnce in bed I soon fell asleep, my eyes neighbours came to see us. My mother hadfixed to the last upon my mother, who sat a friend, a beggar like herself, named Teresa.there mending our clothes, while father sorted The priests knew her well, and often be-seeds for the gardeners, stowed an alms upon her.I never knew how it came about that my "What will you make of the little lad?"i


78 GIACOMO AND PALLIDINA; OR,they would ask. "Send him to some of farmers, and especially the farmers' wives,the asylums for children ; do not let him into bestowing liberal alms. He used to takebeg." me with him, but the long walks did meTo which she replied that she would do so harm, and I began to be lame, which en-by-and-by, when I was older, chanted my father.When I was between five and six there "They will see that thou art not fit tocame a very hard winter, work," he would say; "and I shall not be"You are going to be ill, Lucia," said my blamed for keeping thee back from it."father; "do stay at home." Having always been accustomed to hear"I " What can you be thinking of, Bastiano? my mother use gentle language and beg inHow can I remain at home with arms folded humble strain, it shocked me to listen to theand making nothing?" curses my father hurled out, and made me"You may sew." cry."I cannot bear sitting still, sewing. It "Silence, little fool!" he said; "you seekills me! You know it does." that I am doing what I do for your sake, and*"Then it is no use my talking," replied you must let me do it my own way."my father, dolefully; "I must just let thee I hated, too, going home in the evening.take thy own course." Teresa used to come in to light our fire andThe Tramontana1 was cutting, and it make our soup. My father, who was verysnowed. It was a perfect journey to get stingy, would give her a plateful of soupfrom our house to the church. One evening for her trouble. Sometimes we had so muchmy mother came in earlier than usual, went bread we did not know what to do with it;to bed, had a sharp illness, which did not last in which case we sold it to other beggars.long, and died. Meanwhile I was very dull; I never played,My childish sorrow was terrible. I sat and grew thinner and thinner.beside her without stirring till Teresa carried One day Teresa advised my father to enterme away by force. All day long I cried; into partnership with some mendicants whothen when evening came I contrived to made a very good thing of it. At first heescape, ran to our abode, got in without refused, afterwards thought it over, and webeing seen by any one, slipped myself under went to station ourselves with the rest onthe sheets to my mother's side, and there fell the Piazza del Duomo. Since I had lost myasleep. mother, all my notions were utterly changed:After anxiously looking for me, my father in. her lifetime everybody seemed good; sincesaw a slight movement beneath the covering her death the whole world seemed to haveof the corpse. Terrified in the extreme, he grown wicked. Formerly I had seen manyraised it, and there he found me. No one had smart ladies speak kindly to my mother, andthe cruelty to awake me; I stayed where I slip silver into her hand. I had noticedwas till break of day. priests and monks interested about herWhen I first awoke I had forgotten that my health. I had heard them speak to hermother was dead, and threw my arms around about the good God; and, besides, we hadher to kiss her as usual, but she was so cold always been in and about the church, wherethat I screamed out. My father called in bad people did not go. While with myTeresa, who carried me off and kept her eye father I was generally lounging about public-upon me all day. houses, hearing so many oaths and cursesThat evening when I returned I found the that I was beginning to use them myself,bed empty. My mother was under the earth and coming into contact with gamblers and-her sweet gentle face hidden from me for people who had no charity about them. Iever. was ill-treated- and laughed at. PeopleI wanted to run away, but my father held would cry out-me back. I was afraid of him, having always "Little idler! are you not ashamed ofbeen so much alone with my mother. I felt begging? Your mother must blush for you."that for me the world was empty, and fully "Alas," I sobbed, "I have no mother "believed, in my childish way, that henceforth She is dead."all would seem dead to me, my mother having "The young impostor! he says that todied. excite our compassion,-his mother is mostMy father, who had now no one to assist likely in the public-house !"him, came to the conclusion that begging Such speeches as these used to pain me sowould bring him in a better income than that I cried-oh, how I cried !-enough togardening. He took to leaving the town and have blinded myself. I repeat it-the wholegoing about in the country to frighten the world appeared to me to have grown wicked1 The north wind. since I had no mother.


THE ITALIAN BEGGARS. 79Teresa would, indeed, have mended up wicked place since I went about with Palli-our clothes if we had paid her. dina; and whether running across the Piazza" Bastiano," she would sometimes say, "do hand in hand, or playing at hide-and-seekgive me a few pence, and I'll put your things around the Batistero and the Leaning Tower,and the little lad's into order." we contrived to get plenty of amusement.But my father only replied, "For our One day when all were assembled as usual,business the dirtier and the more ragged we waiting for strangers and sight-seers, Tonino,are the better." a young cripple of our party, came up, drag-I was now seven years old, and for at ging himself on his crutches, and said-least twelve months I had gone about bare- "We shall have a bad day, Motherfooted. But when we entered into partner- Teresa!"ship with the Piazza band of beggars, a new "Why so, Tonino?"life began for me. The poor creatures "Why, because it rains; and rain, you see,thought I was pretty : always puts rich people out of sorts."" If he were less ragged, and well washed, " Why don't they buy fine weather, then ?"he would bring us in more money. His I asked.eyes are enough to ruin his soul, and that of " Ah, if there was any one clever enoughothers. Foreigners will think him so beauti- to sell fine weather, his fortune would soon beful, they will let him go close to them, and made," replied T6nino.he'll turn a fine penny for us." " I say, Momo," broke in Mother Teresa,Accordingly, Teresa was charged to put " don't you and Pallidina go far off; for if anyme to rights, which she did at the joint young ladies should come, you must go upexpense of the whole band, and I was set and beg of them smiling, and opening yourto beg with a little girl of about my own eyes as wide as you can."age, who was so delicate, so pale, and so " Has not that fellow got us lots of penny-pretty, that she had been surnamed Palli- pieces with those eyes of his?" exclaimeddina. She had an aunt a cripple, wlom they Tonino. " Mind you, Pallidina, that youseated every morning at a church door, and don't go and get any fatter; you would bethis woman hired out Pallidina to Mother good for nothing to us then."Teresa for a penny a day. "No fear of that," replied the little girl;This little girl and I were neither ragged "my aunt does not let me eat much; shenor dirty; we were always together, gave takes great care of me."ourselves out to be brother and sister, and "And quite right of her, too. Does shespoke the truth at all events when we said, ever beat thee ?"through our tears, that we were both mother- "I should think not; she is very good toless. me, only she likes me to look thin and sickly,It did me good to be with this child, who because we gain more that way."was kind and gentle as an angel. "Now, then, for your little low voice: how" Do not swear, Giacomo," she would say; does it go ?" said Mother Teresa."you make the good God angry; and, besides, The child at once began to whine out inthe ladies won't give you anything." the most lamentable way her appeal forPallidina was the first who had spoken to charity. The whole party burst out laughing.me about God since I had been an orphan. " I say, listen, do, to old Giacomo cough-I taught her the prayer my mother had ing himself to death under the porch yonder;taught me, and morning and evening we used he must have thought that you were beggingto go into the Duomo, and, kneeling on the in earnest," observed Tonino.floor in the Virgin's Chapel, repeat that "I have always told the old fool that byprayer. And very often the persons kneel- dint of pretending to be consumptive heing near would give us an alms without our would really break a blood-vessel one ofhaving asked them. these days," said Teresa." How pretty they are, those poor little And as for me, it suddenly broke in uponones-what loves of ,children!" they would me that we were all of us liars. This wascry. the first time I had ever had a thought of the" It is because we are good and pray to kind.God that they think us pretty," Pallidina " Look at Pietrina over there," called outaffirmed with sincerest conviction, and I Tonino; "is not she pretty, wrapped up inthought she was right, and used inwardly to those red rags, with her baby in her arms?say-" My mother, too, was very pretty, What a one she is to tell crams, always talk-because she prayed in the churches and at ing of her dying mother, and she never knewhome." her mother at all-and calling her son herThe world no longer seemed such a little brother."


So GIACOMO AND PALLIDINA; OR," We are all a poor soft set," sighed Mother Mother Teresa, and made over to her ourTeresa: pointing to my father, " Bastiano is money, which she divided most equitablythe only one of us who knows how to gain between us.money without any trouble. He is so dis- " It's only Pietrina and old Giacomo whogusting that he has but to get up and pre- have not chosen to enter into partnershiptend to follow people, and they'll throw him with us, and I don't think they have actedany amount; with his plaister over his eye, wisely," observed she.and that hideous mouth he twists, he's sure of "There's no telling," returned Tonind; "Ihis game-except, indeed, that two English have heard say that neither of them want forlords one day had the courage to go by and anything."give him nothing." "Nor do we want for anything either,""Ah, did not I laugh?" said Tonino. said my father; "except," he added, "that"Hush, hush, here is a carriage;" and at when I take off my plaister at night I feelonce old Teresa, Tonino, and two or three uncomfortable, I'm so used to it, and everymore, rushed up to the occupants and ob- now and then I am inclined to go on alltained a few coppers, fours.""Now for our turn, Momo," whispered "What a thing, to be sure, habit is!" ob-Pallidina. served Teresa; "if I were not to beg, I" No, mine," growled my father; and, drag- should think myself the idlest of creatures. Iging himself with great rapidity on his hands should find time hang very heavy."and knees, he lifted his distorted face towards "And to think," said my father, "thatthe strangers, and held out his dirty cap with- there should be fools who would have us goout a word, and three of the strangers look- into the poor-house I hope we shall nevering away dropped something into it. be reduced to that."Next came Pallidina. As for me, who had never before paid much" I have no mother, and I have had nothing attention to the general conversation, I wasto eat for two days, my good gentlemen, much struck with it on this occasion, and in'datemi un soldo se vi iace.' " the evening, when seated with Pallidina in the"The others have had it all," was the Duomo waiting for Benediction, I felt quitereply. sad. She inquired what ailed me.Pallidina hid her face and sobbed. "Here, "I am afraid we are great sinners," I re-poor child," said a passer-by, slipping a plied, "because we tell nothing but lies."silver coin into her hand. Pallidina duly " I don't know what you may do," returnedblessed her benefactor; then, drawing back, she, gravely, " but for my part I tell none."" Now, Momo," said she, "you go up to the " Yes, you do; when you are asked if I amSignorina." your brother, you say that I am."Accordingly, I ran and leaped and con- " That is not a lie-for, besides that I lovetrived to reach the church porch as soon as you like one, the old priest told me once thatthe young lady. I only looked at her, we were all brothers in Christ."smiled, and held out my hand without a word. " But is that true?""Oh, what an exquisite child!" she ex- "It must be true, Giacomo, when theclaimed. "Do look, mamma; how hand- Curato said so."some these Italians are. Have you any "Well, I am glad to be really your brother,pence?" I can tell you." I was indeed, and could" I have none left." hardly sleep for joy." Have you some small silver?" It requires a good deal of talent to makeThe mother turned back, and I was de- a successful beggar. No one understood thelighted to be as rich as Pallidina; between us art better than Pallidina. She seemed towe actually had a whole franc. Old Giacomo, read people's faces. "That poor lady willunder the porch, coughed himself black in give me something," she would say; "thatthe face, but he got nothing. ugly lady will not-she has a dog; peoplePietrina, standing at the entrance of the who have dogs do not like the poor. There'schurch, bent her head over her sleeping child that fat gentleman, you may try him-he isas the strangers went in, and so hid her face not charitable, but he'll give to get rid orfrom them. you. That young lady has new gloves on." Poor creature, she is ashamed to beg," it's no use asking her-it would spoil he!said the lady; "I really must get the cicerone gloves to open her purse. Look at that youngto change me a five-franc piece, and I'll give man speaking to a lady, he'll like her to seeher a trifle as we go out." him give alms-make haste, you will getWhile the party were admiring the interior something." I followed her injunctions, andof the church, we were all gathered round always succeeded.


THE ITALIAN BEGGARS. S8"Look merry," she would bid me, or some sick and some well. And, after all, it is" look sad, go and make that old miser abuse no great hardship to beg; it's a hundred timesyou well, and then the lady following him worse to be rich and wicked. I once heardwill be sure to give you a trille." Monsignore the Bishop say a thing I haveIn the summer we used to sit on the never forgotten-that it is harder for a rich-withered grass of the Piazza, and sing toge- man to get to heaven than for a camel to gother. Since I went about with Pallidina, I through a needle's eye."was no longer unhappy. That, however, was too much for me, andWe never missed a service or a musical I exclaimed, that he could not have meant amass. The beautiful dresses worn by the camel like those belonging to the dairy farms,priest, the flowers on the altar, the chanting, that brought milk on their backs every morn-the organ, the incense, the kneeling crowd, ing into the town.the great tapers that twinkled like stars, all "Yes, but it was one of those very camels,"these were a delight to us. Sometimes, too, she affirmed.we went up close to the theatre, to listen to "In that case," I argued, " there can bethe music, nothing but poor people in Paradise. How"Which do you like best?" Pallidina will they contrive to live there ?"would ask me, "the Opera or the music in "No fear, mio caro, I am quite sure thatthe Duomo?" those who have bestowed charity upon usTo which I answered that I liked the with all their hearts will be there, and thosechurch music best, but that perhaps that was pretty ladies, too, who put their hands, allbecause the operas sounded so faint heard sparkling with rings, before their faces tofrom the street. Pallidina, however, preferred hide their tears-oh, how often I have seenthe organ and church chants, because they that! ."were meant for the good God, and declared "What, you have secn ladies in silkthat, all lighted up of an evening, the church dresses crying ?"was like Paradise; and no wonder, since it "And in velvet dresses and in pink bon-was the road thither. nets, too, and their carriages were waiting forAs we had followed strangers and the them at the church door."cicerone about the Duomo times without "Somebody must have been dead athome,"number, we knew all the pictures quite well. I replied."That Virgin is by Andrea del Sarto-look, " Certainly not, Momo, for they were notMomo, how beautiful. The pulpit in the Batis- in mourning. I tell you that they had pinktero is by Nicolo Pisani. You know there is a bonnets."portrait of Nicolo Pisani in the Campo Santo." " They must have been ill, then.""So you have told me," &c. "No, they had their sorrows."We were also well up-but more especially " What sorrows can people who wantPallidina-in all the lions of the place: nothing have, Pallidina ?"knew the history of Ugolino and Archbishop "Dear Momo, it seems that in this world,Ruggiero; knew, too, about Republican Pisa, when people think you have got everything,and that it had been a seaport; and when we there is always something or other wanting.walked through the Duomo, my sister would So, you see, the good God is just, since Hepoint out the old lamp that hung in the great sends rich people such sorrows that all theirnave, and say : smart dresses and their fine palaces, and their" Don't forget, Momo, that that was what servants, and their carriages, cannot comfortfirst made Galileo think of the pendulum." them.""What was he a clock-maker ?" It must be a wonderful sorrow, indeed, I"No-lie was an astronomer." reflected, that would have made me cry in a" Are there pendulums in the stars, then ?" beautiful carriage, and wearing a gold chain"No, no! how silly you are. I don't and gold watch! I thought that it was soknow rightly how to explain it, but I will ask just and right of God to afflict the rich, thatSignor Carlino, the cicerone, the next time I actually thanked Him for it mentally iI meet him alone and he seems in a good From that time I was less unhappy, and inhumour." In this way Pallidinaused to keep church I liked to creep near the ladies whomy mind awake, and with her aid I learnt were the most beautifully dressed, and if Imore than any one would have imagined, saw them shed tears, I thought to myself,I remember once saying to her, " After all, " Nina is right; their tioublcs must be greaterit's very unjust that some should be rich and than ours," and I used to feel sorry for them.some poor." Another of our pleasures in church was to"There must be all kinds," she replied; touch the different textures worn by them-"you see, some are pretty and some ugly, satin, velvet, furs-and sometimes to feel with6


82 GIACOMO AND PALLIDINA; OR,our firger-points the softness of their white Her little child, whose name was Ettore,hands when they gave us alms. was by this time beginning to walk, and soI saw but little of my father, whom I feared pretty that it was thought he might fill myfar more than I loved. He was in the habit post when I outgrew it. I was very fond ofof getting up very early in the morning, and the little fellow. Pallidina and I often playedtaking a round in the country-this he did with him, and sometimes I used to beg withunknown to his partners, and whatever he him in my arms.gained he kept to himself. Of all strangers, the least affected by ourThe very poor are like the very rich- distress were English lords. I shall nevereither dreadfully miserly or extravagant and forget my father's rage one day that he hadthoughtless. I have often seen some of applied to an old lord with a long whitethem spend in one hour at the public- beard and military air. "Take pity, milord,house what it had taken them a week to upon a poor blind man, and the Lord wllgain; and I have seen others who would give you Paradise!"rather let bread get mouldy than give a " Paradise is not to be bought, my goodcrust to a poor hungry cripple at their man; and as to that, I don't see very welldoor. Great destitution and great wealth myself, but I have spectacles, and don't askhave alike a tendency to render men sel- you for anything."fish; they contract the heart. The more Much incensed, my father consigned I1hideous and filthy my father made him- Lordo to the bottomless pit, and wished himself, the more money he got and the more every conceivable misfortune.unfeeling he became. Me he would scold The gentleman, who understood Italian,or beat for the merest trifle. Pietrina, the stood still to listen, then replied, " The samepoor shy creature who used to sit at the to you." I do believe my father would havedoor of the cathedral, hiding her face over thrown stones at him but for Pietrina, whoher baby or leaning it back against a pillar, gravely said-closing her eyes the while-that silent, pretty " You do not beg like a Christian, Bas-girl took to befriending me and remonstrating tiano God will not protect you, and you dowith my father about me, which made him us harm rather than good. I know that thebetter. Pietrina seemed to have a good deal poor of Pisa have a very bad name; I haveof influence over him, much as Pallidina had often seen strangers point at us and say,over me. He would attend to all she said. 'Those are the most worthless beggars in" Do you know, Bastiano, that it is a sin Europe !' It makes me feel ashamed toagainst God to deceive kind-hearted souls see you all rush like a band of hungry dogsby pretending to have infirmities, and God upon their prey."will very likely punish you for it? For my " It's our way," returned Mother Teresa:part, you may observe, I say nothing, because "if we had your pretty face, we might takeI will not deceive good people. Formerly I it more quietly; but we are old and ugly,used to talk of my sick mother, but it was and at our age our only chance is to harassa sin, because it was not true, and now I people."never utter a word. I will not lie, I am " Nay, look at that poor little old woman,determined. I speak to God only, and He Mother Orgina, always beside the holy water.gives me my daily bread." She has done nothing all her life long but"Why don't you work, then, Pietrina?" pray to God and bless the passers-by, andwas the question sometimes put to her. everybody gives to her."" Because, like little Momo, I was brought " That's an exception," observed myup in the streets doing nothing. I cannot sew father. " I know how things stand, andneatly or turn to any work. My health has here, where everybody is full of superstition,got weakened by sitting still all day. I have there is more to be got by being, as I am,tried more than once to get work in a farm, a Stregone, than by merely exciting compas-but the work was too much for me, and I sion."had to leave and go into the hospital. I have Pallidina would often say to me, " I wouldoften asked ladies to take me, but they won't much rather work than do nothing."have beggars about their children. And then, " But why should one tire oneself whenyou see, there is always some reason in a one can get one's living so well without? Andperson's life for doing what they do." then, if you were to work, you would not be" Where is your husband, Pietrina? " asked with us, and you would never see me again."I one day. "That is just what prevents me, Momo,""I cannot tell you, my poor little man," she would reply.was her mournful reply; " and if I did, it Such conversations, however, saddened andwould do thee no good to know." made me thoughtful. After all, begging was


THE ITALIAN BEGGARS. 83not always pleasant. In summer-time the her inquiry, as soon as we met. At first Iheat of the Piazza was insupportable. The thought I would keep my fears to myself,.glare of the sun on the marble palaces almost but she pressed me so that I ended by con-blinded us. True we used always to seek fiding to her my misery at the prospect ofout a shady place for our siesta, but still having soon to go away.many of us had sore eyes; and then so "Oh, that will never be," said she; then,few people came in summer-it was our taking me by the hand, "Come along, wedead season. will go and perform a novena to our guardianFor some time back Pietrina used to talk angels, in order that they may never separatea good deal with my father of an evening, us;" and, hurrying into the church, we atand I often noticed her cry. Mother Teresa once began our novena. Never before hadand Tonino would laugh and say, "The I prayed with such fervour.widower is teasing Pietrina. It is four years Our novena was over, and my father hadnow since La Lucia died: no wonder he not returned. We begged a penny of Teresabegins to forget her." to get a taper to light before the altar of the"But Pietrina is married," I ventured to Blessed Virgin. Teresa was not generous,put in. and this request put her out of temper, but"And where is her husband?" sneered they. she did not dare to refuse us."You are very knowing if you find him." " Do you know, Pallidina, that my father"Perhaps he is dead." staying away so long makes me think he is" Oh, to be sure, it looks like it! Perhaps," settling down at Lucca, and will soon bemaliciously added Mother Teresa, "he has back to fetch me?"never been alive!" "I have prayed too much to the goodYears passed rapidly away. Pietrina's God, to Our Lord and his Blessed Mother,little one was about three, and I eleven, and to all saints and angels, for that toOne morning I had indeed a surprise, for happen," said Pallidina, with a confidentmy father not only did not put on his air. "And do you suppose Our Lady didplaister, but washed himself, combed his not see the taper we burnt before her thishair, brought out of a chest a white shirt, a morning, and that she will not entreat herjacket, and brown velveteen trousers, dressed Son for us ? For my part, I feel quite at ease."himself very neatly, went out, and returned The child's faith revived mine. So long aswith his beard shaved off. Then he gathered I was with her, I too believed that nothingall his money together, filled a bag with his could separate us ; but when Motherclothes, and said, " I shall be away for a few Teresa, after making my soup (of whichdays, Giacomo. I am going to Lucca to she ate half herself), went away and left meseek for work; if I succeed in finding any, alone in my wretched room, I would burstyou will come there to me." I did not into tears. I used constantly to fancy thatanswer him; he kissed me, a thing he never I heard my father turning the key in thedid, and went off. The idea of having to door, and to wake with a start, thinkingleave Pallidina made me cry frantically, that I heard him say, " Get up, Momo,"What is it, Momo ? what ails thee ?" was and let us be off to Lucca."Continued on next page.


84 GIACOMO AND PALLIDINA; OR,GIACOMO AND PALLIDINA; OR, THE ITALIANBEGGARS.BY COUNTESS MARIE MONTEMERLI.II. "Hold your tongue, Giacomo," saidTonino; "this has happened to many be-SO long a time passed without any tidings sides you-to me for one."of my father, that the rest of the Pallidina, who was standing by my side,beggars began to murmur. looked at me with an air of indignation:"Have you heard from Bastiano?" they "How can you cry like that? One mightwould ask. think you had lost everything on earth." No." Have you not got me 1 You see now that the"Are you quite sure it was to Lucca he holy angels did hear us, however, for sincewas going?" your father has left you, you will not have to"Yes, he told me so." go to Lucca, and we shall remain together.""He deceived thee, my child!" I did what I could to seem cheerful, but"That's impossible." with poor success."-Did he leave his money and his clothes " You are getting quite good for nothing,"behind him ?" our companions would say; " you don't bring" He took some away with him, but he us in half that you used to do. The fact is,must have left some behind." you have grown too big and you are too"You may bid good-bye to your father, dull, you don't interest strangers, you onlyGiacomo, and consider yourself an orphan, look like a great gawky vagabond."for younwill never see him again." As maybe supposed, such remarks did notSuch speecheq as these threw me into a raise my spirits.state of consternation that forbade my One evening on returning to go to bed Imaking any reply, but Pallidina whispered in found the door shut. " My father mustmy ear: have come back !" thought I, and my heart"Don't cry, Momo, if he has been cruel beat so I could hardly breathe. I knockedenough to forsake you, you will still have gently-no answer. Then I knocked mightthe same Father as I, the one to whom and main, but still no answer. Terrified, Iwe pray night and morning, the Father in ran off to Teresa, who gave me a very un-heaven." gracious reception.There was another disappearance, too, at " I can't get in," I said.this time, which gave rise to a great deal of "And what brings you here? Do youtalk among us. For several days Pietrina suppose I'm going to take a good-for-had not occupied her usual place at the door nothing like you in?oi the Duomo. It was supposed that she "Has my father returned, Teresa? Ouror her child must be ill, and at length door is shut."Pallidina and I, who were really fond of " You must be a fool, my boy, to supposeher, went to see what was wrong. Her that! Bastiano has not paid his rent; hisneighbours told us that one evening, when landlord heard that he was gone, so heshe had returned earlier than usual, they saw carried off the furniture and shut up thea man prowling about the yard, that the next room; and quite right he was, too."morning her attic was found empty, and that "Then I shall have no place to sleep in !"no one knew where she was. " A great wonder that i there are plentyWe carried back this fresh piece of news besides you who sleep in the streets."to Mother Teresa, who at once exclaimed Teresa's hardness prevented my sheddingthat to a dead certainty Pietrina had gone a tear.off to join my father. This was an inex- "I am hungry," I said; " I have had nopressible shock to me. supper.""And I-what is to become of me?" I "There is bread for thee-and now go offexclaimed. in God's name, and don't harass me.""You! you must take your chance! All that night I wandered through theThat does not trouble them much. They streets of Pisa half frantic-I lay on thehave cast thee off." parapet of the bridge, and felt so desolate"My father may, but Pietrina would never and miserable that once I was tempted todo such a thing," I replied, sobbing, drown myself, when, raising my eyes to


THE ITALIAN BEGGARS. 85heaven to utter my last prayer, and murmur- usual, the first to arrive on the Piazza, anding " Our Father," it recurred to me that we went together into the cathedral to sayGod wds Pallidina's Father too, and running our prayers.to the Piazza del Duomo I said my prayers " Now come and take me to your aunt,there, then lay down on the flags, and for for I want to speak to her," said I; and look-the last time a placid slumber closed my ing much surprised, but not uttering a remark,childish eyes, for on waking on the morrow she obeyed, and in a quarter of an hour weI felt myself an independent and responsible reached the Capella del Carmine, on thebeing-a child no longer, other side the Arno.Pallidina, always an early riser, was, as " Do you see that little old woman ? ThatPage 90.is myAunt Clotilde." Then, goingup to her, "I come," continued I, "to ask permis-"Aunt, here is my brother Momo, who has sion to work for you, and pray you to be sosomething to say to you." kind as to let me sleep on straw in the"What is it, my boy?" kindly inquired the passage at your door."old woman. The aunt reflected."You can do me a great kindness. My "There is the little loft where we put allfather has forsaken me." sorts of things," suggested Pallidina; "he" So I heard from the little girl." can sleep quite well there.""Yesterday my bed and all I had were " I agree with you then for a month, oncarried off. I am in the streets." trial," said Clotilde ; " I shall see how you" Oh, what joy!", cried Pallidina; "we can behave, and if I am satisfied you can stayhave him with us." on."


86 GIACOMO AND PALLIDINA; OR," Oh, I am so glad!" cried Pallidina; " that Cicerone, and then we will return to see myway he is sure to stay on all his life." poor aunt."After duly thanking Mother Clotilde, I " Where did your aunt keep her money?"said to Pallidina : inquired I with some anxiety."Go and beg at the dairy-farms. I won't " In her straw bed."have you any longer with Teresa, she is a " Depend upon it the woman who laid herheartless creature." out will have taken it.""And what are you going to do?" " Very likely, Momo, but I was too un-"I have got to speak to several people," happy to think about that."replied I, with much importance. "I have When we returned we could not see Clo-business on hand." tilde; she was in her coffin, and they were" Do kiss me, then," returned she, "for I just going to carry her away. Pallidina'snever was so happy in all my life as I am screams were heartrending, and I was into-day." despair. The landlord came, looked allOur joy was of short duration. The very about, but could not find a penny; conse-next morning I was awoke by Pallidina's cries. quently, he seized the poor furniture and Clo-Her aunt had died suddenly in the night. tilde's clothes to pay his rent, then closedIt is impossible to describe my despair, for the door upon us,-and there we were in themy sister and I were now utterly forsaken. street.The evening before I had had hopes of Rich people may wonder at such heart-finding some work; I had trusted to being lessness, but the poor get accustomed to it,recommended by old Clotilde, who was very and are not so much pained by it as mightrespectable and well known to the priests: be supposed. After all, those who let theirnow I had no one to whom to refer for a rooms to beggars lose more than they gain,character, for I knew that if Teresa were and unless they acted thus they, too, wouldquestioned she would say, "Little Giacomo, be ruined, and they are so accustomed toBastiano's son, is a good-for-nothing fellow, hear wails and entreaties that they cease toHis father is a vagabond, a stregone, and heed them. Ah, one must be poor oneselfeloped with a young girl." to learn how hard some can be to theThe neighbours ran off at once to the wretched, and how difficult it is now-a-daysCurato to get Clotilde buried at the expense to excite pity.of the parish. All day long we remained I saw that henceforth we should have acrying in the room of the deceased; when struggle to live at all, for when we informedevening came, Pallidina was so unhappy and Teresa that Clotilde was dead,and that neitherso afraid of staying with the old woman who Pallidina nor I had a roof over our heads,had come to lay her aunt out, that she and she put it to the band whether they were toI spent the night out of doors in praying undertake our support or not. There was aand crying, till, worn out, we both fell asleep discussion, and it was decided that we wereside by side, with the sky for a covering and both too big to interest the charitable, anda stone for a pillow, that it was better to get rid of us ; conse-As I opened my eyes, Pallidina threw her quently, we were forbidden to return to thearms round my neck. Piazza. Knowing that Teresa never recon-"Brother," she said, "I have no one but sidered a matter, I made no attempt to moveyou on earth ; promise never to forsake me." her, and merely said to Pallidina, " My dear," I swear it !" was my reply. there is nothing for it but to go away."" What are we to do ?" " No one knows us elsewhere, and we shall"I had hoped to get some work, sister; die of hunger," said she, mournfully; then,now it will be very difficult. The best plan, after ashort silence,she smiled upinto myface:I think, will be to go and beg as before, with " How foolish I am to be uneasy the goodthe rest." God is in other places besides the Piazza.""But now that your father is gone and my " Yes, my sister, He is everywhere."aunt is dead, they have no longer any engage- " However," she said, " I won't go awayment with us." without speaking to Signor Carlino, the Cice-"Well, then, we must beg on our own rone. I'll just see whether he is in theaccount. We have our friends who always church." Having found him, the poor littlegive to us." thing accosted him very humbly: " You can't"And where shall we lodge? Not at my see it, sir, because I have no black to putaunt's, I should be too much frightened." on, but I am in mourning, my aunt is dead."" Where we tan, then, Pallidina." " What's all this, fig/io/a mia ?" was the" To-day," she said, after a little thought, reply; " I never knew thav you had an aunt."" I shall go and speak to Signor Carlino, the " No, sir, she never came here because


THE ITALIAN BEGGARS. 87she was a cripple, but she always sat at the who did come were not going to say theirCapella del Carmine, and she is dead, and I prayers, but merely to amuse themselves, andam all alone in the world-that is," she they took little notice of the poor.added, " all alone with my brother." " I know what we must do," said Pal-" Ay, ay! a droll sort of relationship, lidina, after three or four hungry days andBastiano's son, eh?" said Signor Carlino, nights spent in the porches of houses or onlaughing. the pavement around churches; "I know," Si, Signor, his father has forsaken him; Momo, what we must take to : we must sing.but I am not so forsaken as he is, because I can sing quite well 'La Donna e mobile,'my aunt is in heaven, and she will pray for and 'Giovanottino che passi per la via;' andme, she was so fond of me;" and the child I shall learn more songs. We will go atburst into tears, night and listen at the doors of the theatres."The Cicerone was moved. " Well," said " And I know Giulia Gentille,' and 'Gari-he, " what are you going to do?" baldi's Hymn,' and a great many others."" I do not know, because Teresa says " Yes, yes, but we must get the words."that we are too big, and that she will have " Ah, as for that, we can put them in outnothing more to do with us." of our own heads."" Impossible !" That very evening we began to sing, and" It is too true, Signor Carlino, that we got more money than usual. By way ofare forbidden to return to the Piazza del showing off my voice, I screamed myselfDuomo, and that you will never see us again, hoarse.It grieves me, for I was so fond of coming to " Don't scream so," my sister would say;see you, for you never sent me away when I " do as I do, sing softly; people like thatasked alms from the rich people to whom better." However, on that point I wouldyou were showing the church. Oh, yes, and take no advice, and soon my voice went andI shall be sorry, too," said she with renewed I could sing no longer.grief, " to bid farewell to the Piazza, where I Pallidina was so grieved at this that shehave amused myself so well, and to this shed tears. " If you had believed what Ichurch, where I have so often prayed to said, we might have sung such pretty duets;God." 4 now what can we do?"" I will speak about it to M. le Curd," " If I had a fiddle I could accompany you."said Signor Carlino, and gave a penny to " But how get one? they are very dear,Pallidina, who returned charmed with her and you don't know how to play."expedition; and, moreover, some passers-by " Indeed I do; I've watched men playinggave us two other pennies. I, too, was much on the fiddle a hundred times. I could try,pleased, but Pallidina soon ruffled me by and I'm very sure that if I were only shown asaying, " We have got this money on Mother little I should soon do as well as others."Teresa's ground; we must take her half of it." But this prospect was too ambitious to beI told her that she was wrong, and, after realized, and had to be given up. No onemany remonstrances on my part, she came to would give me a fiddle.the conclusion that we need only give the Late at nights, when our old companionsold woman one penny and keep the other had left the Piazza, we sometimes stole backtwo for ourselves. Having done so, we re- there-a pleasure mingled with many regrets.turned a dozen times to have another look at " Look," my sister would say, " that wasthe Batistero, the Campo Santo, the Duomo, where your father sat, and it was against thatand the Leaning Tower; then went away, not door thatPietrina,who was so kind and pretty,knowing where to go and seek charity. The used to stand."municipality, which looks pretty well after " I am quite sure, sister," said I, " thatmale vagabonds and beggars, takes little she is not with my father, and that she mustnotice of women and none at all of children, be dead."No one troubled himself about us. " Very likely, my poor Momo, but whoWe were, however, terribly afraid of the knows ? God is good; perhaps she is verypolice. To be sent to prison was our night- happy, and has found her husband."mare: therefore, whenever we saw one of the By this time our clothes were falling toguardians of public safety, we used to put on a pieces. Pallidina would pick up all thegay demeanour, and, lest we should attract his needles and bits of thread she chanced toattention, sing away at the top of our voice, find, and make an attempt to mend themFinally we stationed ourselves on the Pro- early in the morning, hiding from me behindmenade, but it was only in the evening some large blocks of stone around a newpeople came there, and it was by no means building. It was there we kept our toiletteso profitable a place as the Piazza. Those apparatus-a rag with which we wiped our


88 GIACOMO AND PALLIDINA; OR,faces after washing them at the fountain, and " Stay, Pallidina," said I, with tears in mya large fish-bone with which we used to eyes.comb our hair. " Yes, I know I must, Momo, for fear ofMy sister used to wash my shirt and her despising what God's providence sends," saidown poor under-garment, and while so occu- she, sobbing; " and, besides, you know thatpied had nothing on her fragile little form but it is a sin to refuse work when it is offered."her wretched ragged gown. It was summer- "Don't cry, my children," said the miller'stime; in the evenings I bathed in the Arno. wife. She brought us bread and a great jugOur food was bread, fruit, and a little Salame; of milk, gave me five pence, spoke kindin short, with God's help we did not die of words, and accompanied me to the highwayhunger. Morning and evening we said our that I might not lose myself. A man wasprayers, and recommended ourselves to the sitting at a house door. " Wait a moment,Divine keeping. As we never dared return my boy," said the good woman: " I am goingto the Piazza in the daytime, we heard no- to ask the schoolmaster to be so good as tothing more of Signor Carlino. write down our name and address on a slipOne day I said to Pallidina, " Will you of paper for you; you might forget the way."come to Lucca? Perhaps we shall find my Mute through very gratitude, inwardly bless-father there." ing God, the madonna, and the saints, I left" How can we go so far?" she replied, my sister and her new mistress."With begging and singing one can get to "Come back soon, Momo," cried Pallidina,Rome itself." at the turn of the road. I took one last look," Then let us set off, Momo;" and without then the trees hid her from me. I kissed myhaving a single soul to whom to say good- hand to her shadow; then, trembling all over,bye, without leaving behind us in the populous sat on the ground and burst into tears.town one heart that cared for us or missed us, Ashamed of my weakness, " I am a man,"we bent our steps towards the Lucca gate I cried. "I must work, work as Pallidinaand found ourselves in the country, is going to do;" and with a strong effort IThe country was almost new to us; we ate rose and ran without stopping from the hillsthe blackberries on the hedges, and enjoyed into the valley.ourselves thoroughly ; when we got to a farm, When I got to Lucca, I looked out for myPallidina sang and I begged, father wherever beggars assembled, but noThere is far more charity in country places one could give me any tidings of such a man.than in towns. The farmers would ask us Then summoning all my courage, I went tomany questions, whence we came, where the police office and gave his name and de-we were going, and the good people could scription; but no one knew him; no one hadhardly believe in our utterly forsaken con- seen him. One of the policemen who helpeddition. One day, among the hills between me in my search took an interest in my case,Pisa and Lucca, in a wooded spot, surrounded and placed me with a brother of his whoby olives, vineyards, and chestnut-trees, we hired out hackney coaches-in the capacity ofcame upon a pretty brook, a small mill, and stable-boy. But first I asked and obtainedthe miller's cottage. leave to go and see my sister, and had the" How I should like to live here !" cried comfort of finding that she suited the miller'sPallidina; and the words were hardly spoken wife, and was herself better off than the poorwhen out came the miller's wife with a baby child had ever been before. "Momo," she said,in her arms. Coming up to us she put the "if only you were with me, there would notquestions to which we were now so used, and be a single thing for me to want." She wasthen, calling to her husband, said, " Look, dressed in a blue cotton frock with a linenLorenzo; this little girl is strong enough to apron, and had a handkerchief tied aboutclean the house, help me with the child, and her head. Never had I seen her look sotake the cow to the field." neat or pretty. The mountain air had given" Do take my brother too," implored Pal- her a colour, and her eyes shone like stars.lidina. The miller's wife kept me two days to" No," said the good woman, " he must go make me a little tidier in my dress; and onceto Lucca to look after his father; but there is more I had to leave my sister. She cameno reason you should have the journey. He alone with me as far as the high road. Onwill come and see you on his return. Just leaving I embraced her with my whole heart,now we have no need of but just such a young and she, standing under a tree garlandedgirl as you; by the time he comes back we with vines, lingered there, sobbing and wish-shall see whether you suit us and whether we ing me a good journey.suit you; if not, you can return to Pisa with I carried away her image in my heart, andyour brother." all my thoughts remained with her. Whatever


THE ITALIAN BEGGARS. 89I did was done in the hope of seeing her morning to night, and never tire. I shouldagain and rendering her happy. always have all that I think about to tellMy master treated me well, and sent me to thee of. Good-bye, brother.school. I learnt to read, write, and cipher. " Never forget to say your prayers for theI attended the catechising of the parish, and love of the good God, and for thy sister whoreceived my first communion. Having asked embraces as she loves thee.-PALLIDINA."the Curd to write to the priest of the village My delight on reading such a letter maywhere my sister was, requesting her to do the easily be imagined. It was really a blessingsame, I soon learned that she had fulfilled to have found such a mistress for my sisterthat duty, and that the first communion of as the miller's wife; and reflecting on theboth had taken place the same day. This greatness of God, and how we had beengave me untold delight. It seemed to be protected and preserved by Him, my thanks-another link binding me to that child. givings went up from a fervent heart.One day, as I was grooming my horses, I Time passed away. I was now seventeen,was surprised by having a letter placed in my and Pallidina was about a year younger. Shehand. All sorts of ideas flashed through my was still in.the same place, and her mistressbrain. Was the letter from my father, or treated her like a daughter. As for me, IPietrina? But who could have given my had been promoted from a stable-boy to aaddress? Was it from the miller? Was Palli- driver, and was so busy I could not getdina ill ? away. More than a year had elapsed sinceI opened it trembling, and read as fol- I had seen my sister.lows:- Having put by a little money, the idea of" MY DEAR MOMO,-You will indeed be taking it to her became so absorbing, that Isurprised, for this is my writing. I wanted was obliged to ask for a holiday, which myto surprise you, and so never told you that master at once gave me.M. the Cure and the schoolmaster have taken Well dressed, prosperous, a silver watcha fancy to me, and have taught me every- in my fob, and fifty francs in my pocket, Ithing almost they know. This is delightful, reached the mill. Pallidina's joy was ex-for it makes me more useful to my good treme, and her master and mistress seemedmistress, who is good as good bread. But, thoroughly glad to see me. I told them allindeed, to say the truth, everybody here is that had befallen me, and how much myfond of me, even the cow, and the hens, and position had been bettered, and in their pre-the pigeons who fly about me and eat out of sence made over my money to my sister.my hand. All the children are very nice, "Thank God, I want for nothing!" saidand they are company for me. It is so she; "you can keep it."pretty here of a morning when the sun rises, " Nay," I replied; "it is for thee that Iand the mill-wheel keeps beating the water, work."and the cock crows, and it is so fresh beneath " Well, my children," interposed the mil-the great trees. I go out with my piece of ler's wife; "give the money to my husband,castagnaccio,' and lead the cow to where the and he will put it into the savings' bank forgrass grows thickest in the fields; then I run you. If you go on placing all you can spareback through the olive-trees, and I think of there, it will bring you in a little by and by."you in the sunshine, in the shade, by the I spent three or four days at the mill. Thebrook, while feeding the poultry, while making miller had parted with his head boy, and saidthe polenta or the maize bread. I think to me:of thee, too, at evening, when the fire of "You should stay with us, Giacomo. Ourthorns crackles, and by the moonlight. And business prospers; I shall be able to affordI recall the times when we both slept out in you better wages than you get at Lucca, andthe streets, and say to myself: 'I was, with you are sure to be happy with your sister."my brother; I was very happy;' because As I could not leave my master the hack-you see, Momo, heat and chestnut flour ney-coach proprietor without due notice, Ibread, cold, rain, and hunger, all get for- asked for some delay; and two monthsgotten ; and the only part of our poor child- passed before I came to settle at the mill.hood which survives in my heart is the hap- I was very tall and strong for my age, andpiness of having been with thee. Come and looked more like twenty-five than seventeen.see me as soon as you can. This letter is The country air, however, made me still morevery long: I have taken three evenings to robust, and I became really a good work-write it. My mistress wonders what in man. Nothing tired me; accordingly, bythe world I can find to say to thee; but I the time I had been with him a year, mythink, Momo, that I could write to thee from master seemed to set great store by me.1 Chestnut bread. In spring-time it is good to be out of


90 GIACOMO AND PALLIDINA; OR,doors, and at evening I used to walk along and the silence was long unbroken. The sunthe wooded hills with my sister. But a in nearing the horizon left us in shadow. Mystrange revolution was going on within me love shone in my eyes. Pallidina seemedwhich made me dreadfully unhappy. I dis- deeply moved, her cheeks crimsoned, and hercovered that I was in love with Pallidina. hand was cold as snow in my grasp.I remembered what hitherto had hardly ever " I know your secret," she cried; " Signoroccurred to me, that she was my sister only Gesiu I understand it all My brother !in name, and thought it was a very sad case; You are no longer my brother!" And,for that if our master and mistress looked at hiding her face in her hands, that I might notus as lovers, instead of as brother and sister, see her emotion, she ran to fetch the children.they certainly would never keep me: we That evening between her and me not ashould be obliged to separate, and how could single other word was spoken.Pallidina endure that ? Alas I dating from that hour, our life was aThat evening I wandered alone under the very hard one, for while loving more thanolive-trees, and returned so distressed that ever, our sole aim was to avoid each other.my sister noticed it. Neither of us had the courage to disclose the"What ails thee, Momo?" asked she. secret of our hearts to our kind mistress."Nothing," replied I. From the summit of happiness we passed to"Why hide your troubles from me?" she such a state of suffering that I thinned visibly,went on, in her caressing voice. "Am I not and Pallidina was paler than her name. Theyour sister ?" and, coming closer, she laid her miller's wife noticed it to her. " It is only thehand on my shoulder, heat of the summer," she replied; and feelingI shuddered, herself blushing at this departure from truth," Leave me," was all I could say. she slipped away."See now, Momo," she gently insisted; *"can it be that I have vexed thee? If so," One evening, as I rode our mule on mykissing my forehead, "I beg thy pardon return from taking sacks of flour to a bakerfor it." in the district, I was perfectly absorbed in a"Oh, why are not you indeed my sister !" tumult of thought. I dwelt on Pallidina, onI exclaimed, pressing her hand to my lips; our childhood, on the vow we had madethen, abruptly rising, I dashed out of the never to forsake each other, and said tohouse, and only returned at supper-time; but myself that the only way to be happy was toI could eat nothing. marry, if Heaven would but send me someMy sister looked very sad, and her eyes one to tell the true state of the case to ourwere swollen as with crying. We talked on master and mistress. Night was coming on,indifferent subjects to the miller and his wife, and I fell into such a trance of prayer andand I went to bed in a state of extreme longing, as to take no notice whatever of theagitation, not knowing what my sister would way, and let the mule carry me where itthink of me. Night brings counsel. I made would; when suddenly it stumbled, and Iup my mind that I both ought and would found that the creature had taken a narrowconquer my feelings, path at a great height, on the border of aThe morning confirmed my good resolu- precipice.tions. I put on a cheerful air and worked I stopped for a moment to collect myself,manfully till nightfall. and, having looked round, struck into a thicketDuring the week I no longer walked with which would lead me to a road that I knew.my sister under the trees. She seemed very In the closest part of this thicket I fancied Isad, which made me remorseful; and on heard a groan, listened, and held my breathSunday we went as usual to mass together. then, dismounting, fastened the mule to a" Go, my children, and walk in the cool," tree,and made my wayin the direction whencesaid the miller's wife, when evening came; the sound came. A dark mass on the ground"and, her children accompanying us, we all met my view; drawing nearer, I saw that itwent together into the valley. The whole was an old man who lay on the earth, while acountry was out in flower. The fields, all boy of ten or twelve was sobbing beside him.covered with daisies and lilies, looked like a " Oh, whoever you may be, help, oh helpwondrous carpet. us!" said the child; "we have lost our way, and"Go, little ones, and gather nosegays," we have walked so far without eating that mysaid Pallidina to the children. Then, turning father has fallen down from weakness."to me: " Let us sit down here, Monmo; the " Come along with me, my good man,"air is so fresh, and it's all so beautiful." said I, going up to him.Outstretched on the grass at her feet, her " He's blind, he cannot see you-help menands in mine, I looked at her in silence, to raise him," implored the boy.


THE ITALIAN BEGGARS. 91I drew a bit of bread from my pocket. still kept asking, Where is he ? Do you see" First of all, my good man, eat this, and it him ?' No,' said I, but children are quickwill give you strength." walkers. He must have run-we shall find"May God bless and comfort you; may him fuither on.' Let us go back, Bastiano,He give you your heart's desire !" and look for your child !' she insisted; butAt that broken, subdued voice, those loving I declared that she must be crazy to talkand grateful words, I felt a thrill pass of returning to Pisa when she had heard thatthrough me, but the shade of the trees you had gone on in advance. 'If you arearound hid the face of the unfortunate man deceiving me, Bastiano, God will punish you,'from me. she said."With the child's help I got him up and on, " Dear Pietrina! Where is she?" asked I,he leaning his white head on my shoulder, interrupting my father.Just as I was about to lift him on to the "She is dead. She died two years ago atmule, a ray of moonlight shone on his fea- Pisa, during her last journey thither to looktures, and I sank to the earth, for thee." Here my father's voice sank, and" Oh, father father !" I cried, "it is you 1 he could not go on.it is you !" Our tears mingled. " How sad !" I exclaimed; "such a good" My poor child, my forsaken one !" sobbed woman !"my father, " is it possible that your heart can " She was an angel!" murmured my father.have forgiven me ?" The boy pressed my hand, and silently wept* for his lost mother.All violent emotions are succeeded by calm. My father resumed: "A few days afterMy father rode the mule, and we were making our arrival at Siena, Pietrina insisted uponour way together to the mill. The boy kept my going back to Pisa to look for thee. Ipressing my hand, and at last said to me in a only went as far as Turpoli, then returnedtone of reproach, " Have you nothing to say and assured her that I had made all in-to me? Do not you know that I am the quiries at Pisa, but that thou wert not there!Ettore of La Pietrina-do not you know that Ah, I am indeed a guilty man ......I am your brother?" I had procured work at Siena, and no" My brother !" I exclaimed, in bewilder- longer begged. One day Pietrina informedment. me that she was going herself to seek for" Yes, Ettore is indeed thy brother! How thee. She was away a week and returnedmany things I have to tell thee, Momo I" with mournful tidings. Signor Carlino hadbroke in my father. " It is more than twelve told her of the death of Clotilde, and howyears since Pietrina became my wife. I you were sent away from the company ofmarried her unknown to any one about beggars of the Piazza del Duomo, addingeighteen months after your poor mother's that he had spoken to the priests, who weredeath! Oh, I am very guilty !" he went on; anxious to assist you, but, after making in-" I frightened that young girl into marrying quiries for several days, was not able tome, by persuading her that if she refused I find you, everybody having lost trace of you.would pursue her with maledictions and I was already full of remorse," continuedthrow spells over her. It was a country Cure my father, "when a terrible affliction fellwho married us. 1 calculated that Pietrina upon me. I became blind! Pietrina waswould get more money by pretending to be too weak to work for our subsistence andforsaken than if she were known to be my that of our child. I had once more to be-wife. That is why she never came to live come a beggar. It is God's chastisement,'with us. I used to go to her late and early, she affirmed; 'had you not forsaken yourbut, being very fond of her, I became anxious son, the Lord would not have quenched theto change my locality and way of life, in light of your eyes!' A prey now to re-order to be constantly with her. She was morseful regrets, unable to believe that Godalways blaming me for being a beggar, and would ever forgive my crime, I made littleonly consented to follow me on condition Ettore lead me into a church, where I usedthat I should find work. Accordingly, I went to spend whole days on my knees, imploringoff to Siena; but as I did not want to be God's pardon, and beseeching Him to restorefollowed, I told thee I was bound for thee to me. When Pietrina saw me soLucca. One night I came back for Pietrina. wretched, she endeavoured to comfort me.' Where is Momo?' was her first question. I 'Now that you believe and pray, my poortold a most wicked falsehood, for which the Bastiano, you are saved, and one day orLord has duly punished me. He has gone other your son will be brought back toon before us, and is waiting on the road,' was you.' Determined to leave nothing undone,my reply. When we had fairly set out, she Pietrina set out once more on a journey of


92 MAY'S DREAM.inquiry, but no sooner had she reached Pisa one who might tell our dear master andthan she fell sick and died. When I heard mistress that Pallidina and I were not ithat, the sorrow of my heart was blacker brother and sister, and that we loved eachthan the night that veils my eyes! I other to distraction. You are here. Pleadthought, Giacomo, that I was going to die. for us, father."From that moment," continued my father, This much-dreaded revelation had noneto whom I listened in reverent silence, "I of the disastrous consequences I had ap-never had an hour of rest. I wandered prehended, for a few weeks later ourfrom town to town, village to village, with marriage was celebrated in the villagethis unfortunate boy, begging for tidings of chapel. Intoxicated with love and bliss, wethee as I begged my daily bread!" Then, returned to the mill, and continued to liveafter a long pause, " Have I sufficiently with the miller and his wife.expiated my sin for thee to forgive me? My father, who is now a holy man, is bentMy son my son forgive me !" upon begging as long as he lives. It is hisWhen my father had finished his narrative, proper calling, he says. Accordingly, heI told him all that had befallen us, and he goes every day-summer and winter alike-thanked a merciful Providence to seat himself on a stone by the wayside,Pallidina's joy on seeing my father was sending blessings after all passers-by, whetherunutterable. She could not take her eyes they give to him or not, and praying to Godaway from his white beard, his placid and without ceasing. He gains enough, poorvenerable countenance. " Oh, how beautiful man, not to be a burden to our good masterhe has become," said she, "now that he and mistress.loves the good God!" Ettore works under me at the mill.The miller and his wife were charitable Oh, yes Providence is great and good;souls; they received my father as a friend, the poorer we are, the better we know this."Ah, my prayer has been granted!" he At present my happiness with Pallidina iskept saying; "I have found the son I had too great to speak about! What can onelost!" say to others when one is fully blest, and"I, too, had put up a prayer, father," said every thought soars to heaven in thanks-I. "I implored Heaven to send us some giving to God!HOW MAY'S DREAM WAS PROVED TRUE.L ITTLE May Whittingham was just re- But May felt herself different in severalcovering from an illness. The doctor ways from what she was before she laysaid she had got through it wonderfully; and down in that long illness. She wouldhe smiled and kissed her in the sweetest pos- lie awake through the long hours ofsible manner when he came to see her now the night, and close her eyes so as tothat she was getting better. For a long while tempt her mamma into lying down onshe had only been allowed to sit up in bed; the couch beside her, and then sheand she used to feel as if her legs were run- would listen to the clock of St. Asaph'sning races, in spite of her being kept lying striking the hours, and think of the strangethere so still; and when the old doctor old stories she had heard before her illnessbrought the little hand looking-glass to let her came. What made her like so much to dosee how fast her cheeks were getting round this, was that everything came back to herand plump again, she could not help thinking different and much clearer, though oftenthat they were like the doctor's own, for he was mixed up with other things : what had hap-fresh and bright-looking, in spite of his white pened to her long ago and been quite for-hair; and although May knew that the doctor gotten would come back to her mind alonghad boys and girls of his own, and had long with the fairies and the giants and strangesince laid his wife in the grave beside the people she had begun to read about beforetwo children that died within a day or two she was taken ill. She would sometimes fallof each other when the fever was so bad, asleep just as the lamp's tiny light began toshe thought to herself she would prefer a fade before the dawn that came stealingsweetheart like him to one like little dark coldly through the window, and touchingJoe Benson they had teased her so much the spire of St. Asaph's, that glittered andabout, because he used always to give her the seemed to glide nearer and nearer to herflowers he brought frcm home. as she looked. She would gaze at the


MA Y'S DREAM. 93bright spire till she fell into a dream, and she could not refuse to grant the sick child'sin the morning she would try and try to wish, so she sat down beside the arm-chair;recollect it all, just as she was wont to do for though she would much rather havewith her lessons; and her mother would kept May quiet, as you can easy fancy awonder to herself what it could be that the mother desiring to do at such a time, stillchild was thinking about, and would be she had a notion that perhaps the speakingafraid to ask in case it was anything dis- might be a relief to her, as she found heragrepable, and the telling of it make her think-think-thinking so often now, andstill more uncomfortable. And May, who didn't know very well what to do with her.had a tender conscience, was not sure So May, by help of her mother's questionswhether it was quite right of her to hide and remarks, managed to tell her dream.such things from her mother; but then, Although she could not say how she gotwhen she tried to think it all over, it was there, she suddenly found herself in a greenso strange she was afraid she could never field with a little stream of water runningtell it half; and her dreams lay on her con- through it; and there was just one big brownscience and did not let her get better so cow in thefield, and the cow pursued her when-quickly as she might have done. But the ever she tried to run, and stood stock-stilldoctor had a notion of his own, and said when she stood, and looked at her with suchto May one day that the only thing for her strange black eyes, the breath all the Whilenow was to get to the country. The only coming out of her wide nostrils, like smoke.doctor who could do her the good she At last May made a great effort to run, andneeded lived there and nowhere else. the cow ran too, and suddenly she wasShe must rise for an hour or two the day nipped up into the arms of a strange man,after to get strong. So next day, when her who carried her till she fell asleep; andmother had lifted her into the arm-chair, so when she opened her eyes again, it seemednicely lined with pillows that it looked exactly as if there was nothing but sky all aroundlike a big nest in a tree, May was so over- her, and she was quite alone. She couldcome with joy that she cried, and when her neither rise nor cry out; but no soonermamma had dried her tears and kissed her, had the tears started to her eyes, than ashe felt she must tell about her dream. So man with a face very like Doctor Spurstowe's,she rather suddenly said- and a big head, but oh such a little man," Mamma, dear, was I ever across the sea you can't think, with a blue woollen shirtin a ship?" on, came to her and told her he had"What makes you think of that, child?" something to let her see. Then he wentsaid her mamma, rather taken aback at the away and came back in a little time, lead-sudden question. ing the brown cow in a chain, with a bright," Because I had such a strange dream, tlree-cornered spot on her forehead, some-and I feel sure, now I'm awake, that it must thing like the gold top of the spire; andbe very like something that happened once the man made her touch the cow's head,-very long ago, though I was just a baby so soft and sleek, with her hand, and thatat the time." moment both man and cow were gone, and"Everybody's dreams are like that some- a tall, pale-faced lady stood in their place,times, dear; but you shouldn't think about holding a little child in her arms, just ableit. The doctor says you are to get up every to walk, for there were shoes on the tinyday now, you know, and then you won't have feet. And the lady stooped down, andso much time for dreaming and thinking." after speaking very softly in May's ear"Oh, but I'm sure this is real, mamma, and kissing her, she made May kiss theand isn't like any other dream; and it has baby, and May saw now that it was verycome to me twice, and both times so much like herself; and suddenly she heard thealike, you wouldn't believe !" swish and swirl of water, and felt that she" Well, I hope it was a pleasant dream, was sailing on the sea; and there came aMay." great noise of feet, though she could see"Yes, it was pleasant," said May, with a nobody close to her. But looking roundslight pause over the word " pleasant;" "it at last she caught the brown cox's eyeswould have been delightful, if it hadn't been staring at her from the oppcsite side; andfor the brown cow." the little man with the big head rose up"The brown cow, May! I don't under- as if he had sprung out of nothing, andstand you." took her hand in his, and the cow rose"Well, mamma dear, come quite close to up with the baby laughing on its back, andme and sit down and listen and I'll tell you." all at once it went as if with a great plashMay's mamma was good and kind, and over the side, and at this little May awoke.


94 MAA Y'S DREAM.May's mother, as you may suppose, didn't " Well, dreams are sometimes very odd-.Iknow very well what to make of such a dream have had strange things come to me too,"as this. She only said- said her mamma; "but dreams are mostly" Ah, but when you get to the country, May, nonsense, so you mustn't think of it anyyou won't dream like that any more. Dreams more."come because you are so weak, you know." But May couldn't help thinking about it," But don't you think the dream means though she tried all she could. By and bysomething, mamma?" her mamma, who had gone to look after- ----___________________ '- *________________-things down-stairs, came and sat down beside In a week May and her mother and a ser-her again, and she began to tell May how in vant started for Devonshire. It was a long-a week's time, if she only kept well, they were ish journey ; but May had a nice corner into go into the country-to the place they had the carriage, made up with cushions for her;lived at long ago, though May would not and she was so delighted with what she sawmind of it. It was all green felds and thick out of the window, as the train swept along,woods there, and May would see so many that she did not weary very much. It wasthings to interest her, and have so much run- nearly evening before they got to the station,ning about, that she would not be troubled where there was a coach waiting for them.with dreams to make her think and brood May slept very soundly that night, and whenafterwards, she awoke in the morning the sun was shining


MA Y'S DREAM. 95in upon her. She only remembered she was of the vessel, at which May was so very muchin the country when she looked for the spire afraid that she cried whenever she was takenand couldn't find it; and when, instead of the upon deck : but one of the sailors, a veryticking of the clock, she heard the cows low- thick little man, spoke to her so kindly that sheing near by, and the hens cackling under her was quieted at last, and laughed when nursevery window; for she had been taken to a held her up to see the poor cattle, which mustfarm-house, which once belonged to her have felt so strange on the sea. And whenfather, and where she was born nearly seven May's mamma sat down beside her in theyears before. She had lived the first two afternoon and told her all this May said-years of her life there. When her mamma " I was sure the dream was real, mamma.in the next room heard May stirring, she Are all dreams real, like that one? and itwas soon beside her, and gave her some new must be real, you know, though I confusedmilk to drink, quite warm from the cow. the brown cow with the bull. I had forgotThen May rose and got her clothes put on. all about the fright in the field, of course."She asked her mother when the doctor would "Well, May, very often our most unplea-come, and her mother said that here they must sant dreams would be easily explained if wego to see the doctor instead of his coming to only knew a little more; at. any rate, now Isee them; for this doctor wasn't like town think of it, I am convinced your dream isdoctors, and made it a rule to see his patients just a confused recollection of what tookout of doors, if they were at all able to go. place five years ago, and it is very distinct,He was very strange in his ways, and did a too, when you come to think of it."great deal of his work in secret when people "And I would never had got to rememberwere not thinking of him at all. about the fright, if you and nurse and meMay was accordingly put into a perambu- hadn't come down here."lator, and the servant wheeled her through " No, it isn't very likely, child; but therione field and then another. When at last you see when we are oppressed with sad andthey had crossed a road and passed through a painful thoughts, whether they come to us atgate into a field lying on the slope of a little first in dreams or not, we should alwaysgentle valley, May grasped her mamma's believe that if we only saw a little more, orhand tight, and said excitedly- got to know some very little thing we don't"That is where I first saw the brown cow- know, we should find that it was foolish toyes, there," pointing down towards the water, trouble ourselves so much about them. YourAnd then her mother all at once remem- nature was craving for the fresh air, and thebered how when May was a little thing, just streams, and the green fields, and your imagi-begun to walk, the nurse had a pet cow that nation in sleep took you back to this place,she used often to take May out to see, and it the only country place you were in for anywas so fond of nurse that it would follow length of time, notwithstanding that every-her about in the field. And one day, when thing seemed so confused; and now that youJessie was patting her favourite "Brownie," have come to the very field where 'Brownie'the bull from the neighbouring farm had used to roam about, there is no fear, I think,broken loose, and had got into this field, and of unpleasant dreams of that kind coming tomade a rush at nurse, who snatched May up you any more."in her arms and ran, pursued by the bull, "No, mamma, I think not; but it was awhich would no doubt have seriously hurt strange dream: and wasn't it very strange toothem, had it not been that a labourer, for us to come downhere just to find it all out?"seeing the danger, got over the fence and "Yes, May, and that is the way we alwaystook May in his arms, and with his goad find things out; it looks as if it were all bydrove back the bull, while Jessie, as she con- chance, but God knows better, who graduallyfessed afterwards, stood trembling and cry- leads us so as to convince us that all is foring, now that she saw the bull driven back. our good, however strange and trying it mayThe man had taken the child in his arms, as seem to us."he felt this would be safest, because nurse " But we've forgot the doctor !" said May,in her fright might fall and hurt her. Not with the gravest of looks.very long after this, May's father and mother " Oh, no, the doctor saw you, though youleft the farm and went down to Scotland to didn't see him, child, and he says you willsee some of their friends before settling in soon be strong and big."London. They stayed there nearly two " He must be a very sharp doctor," saidmonths, and instead of returning by the May; "but I must watch him better nextrailway they took a fancy to sail in the time: I was so taken up about the dream!steamer as the weather was delightful. Yes, I suppose, that must have been it !"There were some cattle in the fore part RANDAL BEVAN.


96 THE TWO NESTS.THE TWO NESTS.THE old vicarage with its low, red gables with a foot-bridge, which leads to the villageand clustered chimneys nestles into half a mile off.the hillside in a perfect nosegay of lilacs, Dropped down thus in the midst of quietlaburnums, and laurel. It is girdled in with fields and the sweeps of woodland, all thetall elms, out of the midst of which rises the shyest birds and beasts about have their freeancient flint-built primitive little church, entrance and exit into the garden, and verywhile just below the hill runs a small river pleasant company they make. CorncrakesT Vcry in the fields below, nightjars are heard upon which one day this June some sharpin the hedgerows, white owls flit noiselessly young eyes detected the beginning of a nest.past the windows, and all the " tits" in It was most artistically swung to four of theEnglish ornithology seem to have their dwell- smaller twigs, skilfully twisted in with cordsing-places there, of grass, and the pouch of green mossThere is a large yew on the lawn whose sprinkled with lichen grew till it was nearlybranches hang low over the little terrace, six inches deep. The golden-crested wrens,


7HE TWO NESTS. 97its builders, tiniest and prettiest of our birds, thelong cablesof worsted which she had sewedwith their pert rapid motions, the father with to the laurel leaf round the boughs above,his bright yellow head, and the wife in her she drew up a little platform as it were forquieter dress, kept dashing in and out all the pouch to rest on, and made all good andday, to the great delight of the children, firm below.They are thought to be shy birds, but they The birds were watching us narrowly thechoose sometimes strangely public places for whole time. There was an anxious twitter-their nests, and show a wonderful confidence ing going on in the trees above, and twoin man. pair of tiny wings passed to and fro almostSoon after the building of "its pendent in our faces with a lamentable little cry.nest and procreant cradle" was finished, "Come in to breakfast," cried Frank insome curious little fingers had probed its vain, standing by with his hands in hisbottom and found that it was full of eggs. pockets, while little May, sitting on the grass"They're hardly bigger than peas, Annie, near, nursing the "poor babies," as she calledbut such lots of them; how ever will the them, rocked herself to and fro, and sung, orbaby birds find room to breathe?" rather chirped to them-The mother sat on undaunted by the con-tinual passing, or the very unwelcome atten- Are God Almigfty's cock and hen,"tions it received. We could see the brightglancing eyes, with an uneasy shake about while she vainly presented them with offer-the little head just peering over the edge of ings of deceased flies.the nest, but she had learnt not to stir, even "You must make haste, Annie, here's onewhen we stopped close under the tree. child dead already," said she, sorrowfullyI looked out one balmy early morning; looking into the hollow of her fat littlethe smell of the honeysuckles was strong in arms where she was trying to keep herthe air, the dew sparkling on the grass, infants warm." Hallo !" I heard, as Frank, who was home As soon as the mossy house was repaired,for the holidays, sauntered into the garden. the little morsels of life were dropped into" Oh dear, what a pity !" cried Annie in most it one by one, and we all retreated to thepitiful tones as she followed him. house to leave the coast clear.And there lay twelve of the smallest and There was a dead pause; nothing stirredugliest ot living things, all mouth, sprawling, but the wind and the leaves, and an unfeelingsome alive on the grass, and some on the white butterfly.gravel dead, amongst a litter of feathers and " You see," cried Frank, who was watchingmoss; the bottom of the nest had burst, with his mouth full at the open window.Whether the passing gardener's head (for Presently came a low despairing chirp ofit hung quite low enough to be touched) the deserted children out of the ne.t. "We'rehad shaken it, or whether the weight alone very cold and hungry," it said as plainly as ifof the mass of little life within had broken in words.through, no one could tell. And a swoop of bright little wings from" I wonder whether one couldn't sew up somewhere up in the air, glancing like a fire-the bottom?" said Annie, compassionately fly down into the nest, answered them. Thepicking up those of the horrid little monsters mother's heart was not proof against the cry,which were still alive, and making a nest for and her fears and doubts were evidently allthem in her handkerchief. " I think I could forgotten as she darted in.do it with a laurel leaf." All went on well after this; the young"What nonsense!" replied her brother; ones were voracious little things, and very"such a woman's notion-sew! and make much trouble they gave their parents to feedthe bird forsake to a dead certainty You them, but at length in their good time theydon't suppose she'd stand all that pulling were all reared and flew away.about of her nest and her young, do you? "I think Annie makes a nest very niceIt isn't the slightest use; you'd better try and comfortable," said little May, tellingand feed the birds." the story confidentially one day to her par-" I'm sure we never could rear them, wrens ticular friend and cousin George Markham,are so difficult to feed. We can but try the who had come back all the way from Indiaother way," said Annie. " May, dear, run on purpose to see her (at least he said so).and ask for some worsted and a worsted " Go and ask her whether she won't comeneedle-no, I'll go myself." and make a nest for me too," whisperedThen, collecting the scattered moss, she George in return, with a look across the walkgot up on a chair, and fitted it all carefully on to where Annie was standing a little apartayain to the bottom of the nest, then passing under the flickering snadows of the yew.7


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LIME'US AND PADDY. THE barge had been blue once, with a place; or rather, if they took the trouble to white streak running along her sides, think about the matter at all, I dare say they and a rim of red over that; but neither little thought a good many other places a great Limehouse (pronounced Lime'us on board the deal nicer than London. They couldn't Betsy) nor little Paddington could remember pick buttercups and daisies off the black, Betsy when she first put on those gay colours, sloppy London towing-paths, and they To them Betsy had always been a dear old couldn't make faces at themselves in the battered, dingy, dirty thing, with a little rusty water there, as they could in some parts of chimney sticking up astern like the horn on the country Betsy went to. They might ala caterpillar's tail. Paddington seems a funny most as well have tried to make faces in name for a little boy,-though that was brimstone and treacle. The barge in which shortened into Paddy on board the barge. they had been born, and lived all their lives, Limehouse is a still queerer name for a little was their only home. girl, even when shortened into Lime'us. The person in the world of most import"N. or M." wouldn't sound droller; indeed, ance to them after each other was Towzer, a good many little girls are called Em," the barge dog. He barked very fiercely, but you know. he would let them do what they liked with This is why the little barge children him, however fierce he was. were named in that funny way. Lime'us Next to Towzer in their estimation stood was born when Betsy was lying in Limetheir father and mother, known in their house Basin, and Paddy was born when circle of society as Black Bill and Carroty Betsy was lying in Paddington Basin. It Sal. Father and mother were also fierce was odd that both the children should have and good-humoured, but not so goodbeen born in London, for neither their father humoured as Towzer. They did not, like nor their mother was a Londoner, and him, reserve all their fierceness for people when Betsy came back from Limehouse or outside the barge. They were generally the City Road Basin, she glided away by very friendly with each other ;-(although you, canal and river to all kinds of far-off places, not being accustomed to the usages of barge Lime'us and Paddy, however, cared no more society, might not have thought so, if you for London than they did for any other had seen the funny ways and heard the 124



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The Baldwin Library Uniwility N. J. BARI LET r S' of m id ] BAntique & Modern S*Foriitd 1:OEKTO:E : ------------ft'~ia M~asS.



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I6 A NIGHT IN AN AFRICAN CRUISER. cease. Quickly succeeded a sudden jerk, I was carried upwards being enormous. At nearly wrenching my hands from their hold ; last, panting and exhausted, but with presence and with a velocity far exceeding that of the of mind still unimpaired, I emerged, and with descent, a roll of the ship in an opposite desperate haste-dreading the coming downdirection was dragging me into upper air. It wardroll-began again to clamber up the rope. required all my remaining strength to retain I succeeded in gaining a point about two my grasp, the opposing pressure of water as feet higher than my former position; another foot or two and .should be safe-already It has been averred that, of all deaths, had, several men slipped down the ropes, drowning is the most painless; nay, accordwhose hands nearly touched mine. I struging to some writers it is even agreeable: that, gled hard, but with all my efforts could not after a rapid review of past existence, the gain another inch--again the horrible downmind appears to '"babble of green fields," a ward motionrecommenced, and, while breathdelicious dreamy mistiness steals over the less from the last descent, again I was plunged senses, and the dying man gradually and beneath the water£ pleasantly glides ovLr the boundary which



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148 ABOUT PHILIP. ABOUT PHILIP. T was a hot sultry evening in August. city. Philip's room was at the top of the when Philip stood by the open window house, and looked over a small yard at the of his bedroom, leaning out, and thinking back, where stood two aspen poplar trees, before he went to bed. The house tha. whose leaves were always chattering to one Philip lived in was in one of the large quiet another about what they heard and saw in squares of London. It was not far from a the great world outside, for their topmost noisy road, but the square seemed always branches peeped over some stables, and could still, and its trees and quiet were very pleaalso stare into many of the neighbouring s.nt after the noise and bustle of the grea, house-windows. I do not know exactly why ;N~I L these trees grew there: it was certainly not grew up so that they might be a Kew Garfor their beauty's sake, because they were dens or a Bushey Park for the little black only green a fortnight in the year, and the sparrows that hopped about there. Poor rest of the time, out of compliment to the little things! they sorely needed a change from houses round about, put on their neighbours' the red chimney-pots and sooty house-roofs; dingy uniform. Perhaps they stood there to and on a hot night like this they must have keep the sun off Philip's mamma's drawingfound the cool branches very refieshing, room curtains; or there is another reason though the leaves were such noisy gossips. which I have just thought of, perhaps they Philip stood moodily at the window, with



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64 MfASTER EPHRAIMf BINES, JUNIOR. shins. So, as she could not punish him herby scratching his pencil down his slate, fasself, she was very eager to get him floggings tening his class-fellows to their seats with from his father, and although old Ephraim, cobbler's wax; tilting up the infants' form. who was a staunch believer in "Spare the rod and sending all the poor little infants sprawland spoil the child," was often compelled by ing; flashing the sunlight, whef the clouds his conscience, as he phrased it, to flog his broke, into Miss Mavor's face with a piece of little boy, he did not like the job. For one looking-glass; and firing potato-pellets at her thing, when little Ephraim was born, his spectacles out of a quill popgun. When mother had died; and, perhaps, old Ephraim, Ephraim did not choose to go to school, he remembering that he had not given his poor amused himself by tying the rusty kettles he wife the happiest of lives, would have liked picked out of the ditches to stray dogs' tails; to try to fancy that he was offering some scaring geese; cutting off donkeys' clogs; unkind of amends by making much of her hasping meadow gates, that horses and cows last child. For another thing, young might stray out into the road; driving them, Ephraim, in sullen obstinacy, and in tricks of when he could do so without being seen, manner, down even to the fingering of the into corn, and clover, and lucerne fields, and chin, was just old Ephraim in miniature; and grass left for cutting; and .gathering snails the father was proud of his likeness, by the half-gallon, to empty into the old A very peculiar young gentleman was ladies' gardens which his father was so proud Master Ephraim Bines, jun. Keren-happuch of because he was the real master of them; got all the fun out of the mischief that he and when the old ladies had their gardendid. Her brother in his wildest pranks gates painted, young Ephraim could not rest looked as grave as a judge. Unhasting, until he had bespattered the fresh paint with unresting, he was almost always (except when mud. In the dusky autumn evenings he he was asleep) stolidly striving to annoy some gave runaway rings at the pear-shaped gateone or other, as if from a sense of duty. In bell-pulls. He did the same in winter, too, short, Master Ephraim Bines, jun. was an and when the poor shivering little housemaid, insufferable little nuisance, who ought to have who had to leave the warm kitchen fire and been flogged about a dozen times a day. trip down the long cold gravel path, peeped He kept quiet whilst his father was at out of the gate, and was looking about halfhome, but old Ephraim generally went away frightened, bang came a snowball on her to wolk before his children had finished their cheek from Master Ephraim, who was hiding breakfast, and then young Ephraim began round the corner. He tied cord across the his day's labour. He scooped the sugar out village street in the evening, to trip people of Jemima's tea-cup when she was not lookup. He even had the impudence, one very ing, and put wood-ashes in instead. He dark evening, to tie a string to the parsonage peppered Kezia's and Keren-happuch's bread knocker, and le kept it going for nearly an and milk. He got under the table, and hour; once giving such a rat-a-tat-tat right pinched his sisters all round with great imover the heads of the servants, who were partiality-except that he always gave Jemima standing in the porch on the look out for the the hardest pinches. If he could manage to supposed runaway, that the housemaid went give the cloth a sly jerk, that brought the into hysterics, the fat cook fainted off as breakfast things into Jemima's lap, or down dead as a stone on the doorsteps, and the upon the floor, Ephraim was satisfied with man-servant rushed into the vicar's study his morning's indoors performance, and went with a face as white as a sheet, and had to out to employ himself in open-air mischief drop into a chair, and clutch another by the until it was time to start for school. If not, back, before he could gasp out, Oh, sir, if he busied himself in pulling the pins out of you please, sir, the front-door kndcker 's his sisters' knitting, snipping their frocks on bewitched, sir." the sly into fire-paper patterns, and other All the mischief that Ephraim did not do such brotherly attentions. He was always at home or at school he tried to do upon the ready to start for school with Keren-happuch. sly -only telling Keren -happuch of the They took their dinners with them, and so spiciest of his exploits. But, of course, he Ephraim was free to spend the day as he was found out now and then, and at last pleased. As a rule he played truant every every bit of mischief that was done in or near fine day, but his sister told no tales, and, Sloefield was put down to little Ephraim. after a bit, the governess did not complain That boy ain't born to be drownded," the either. She was too glad to be rid of village people used to say. You mark my Ephraim's company, since, when at school, words-he'll come to the gallers as sure as he was always spilling the ink over copyhis name's Ephraim. A professin' man like books; setting everybody's teeth on edge Master Bines ought to be ashamed of hisself



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TWO STORIES. z37 get it fresh from the fountain-head, while the A Danish rag could never talk like that; Dane cooks up a mawkish, wishy-washy sort no!" said the Dane. It is not our nature: of a lingo." I know myself; and all our rags are like me. The rags talked, and rags are rags all the We are so good-natured, so unassuming. world over; they are thought nothing of exWe only think too little of ourselves. Not cept in the dust-heap. that we gain much by our modesty: but I do I am Norse," said the Norwegian; "and like it; I consider it quite charming. Still when I have said I am Norse, I guess I have I am perfectly aware of my own good qualisaid enough. I am firm of fibre, like the ties, I assure you, but I don't talk about granite rocks of old Norway. The land them: nobody shall ever bring such a there has a constitution, just like free Amecharge against me. I am gentle and comrica. It sets my fibres tickling to think of plaisant; bear everything patiently, spite what I am, and to ring out my thoughts in nobody, and speak good of all men-though words of the real old grit." there is not much good to be said of But we have a complete literature," said other people; but that is their business. I the Danish rag; do you understand what can afford to smile at it, I feel myself so that is?" superior." "Understand !" repeated the Norwegian: Have done with this flat-land drivel; it "oh this flat-land creature shall I give him turns me sick," said the Norwegian, caught a a hoist up-hill, and a Northern Light or two, puff of wind, and fluttered away from his clout as he is? When the Norway sun has own heap on to another. thawed the ice, then come lubberly Danish Paper they both became, and, as chance hulks, bringing us butter and cheese, a right would have it, the Norwegian rag became a noble cargo; and they bring, too, by way of sheet on which a Norseman wrote a trueballast, the Danish literature. We don't love letter to a Danish girl; and the Danish want it. One can do without stale beer in a rag became the manuscript for a Danish land of sparkling springs, and up yonder is a ode in honour of Norway's strength and natural well that was never bored; no, nor beauty. yet puffed into European notice by newsSomething good there may come even of mongers, confederate jobbers, and bookrags, when they are once out of the dustmaking tourists in foreign parts. I speak heap, and the change has been made in free from the bottom of my lungs, and the favour of truth and beauty: they keep up a Dane must get used to the free sound; and good understanding between us, and in that so he will some day, in his Scandinavian there is a blessing. clamber up our proud mountain land-that The story is done. It is rather pretty. primary knob of the universe !" and offensive to nobody except to Rags. II.-WHAT THE WHOLE FAMILY SAID. W HAT did the whole family say? Well, "Oh it is so beautiful to live !" said the listen now first to what the little Marie little Marie. "Godfather said that .was the said. most beautiful fairy tale." It was the little Marie's birthday,-the most In the room next her were both her beautiful of all days, she thought. All her brothers; they were big boys, one of them small girl-friends and boy-friends came to nine years old, and the other eleven. They play with her, and she wore her finest frock: thought. it beautiful to live too, to live in this had been given to her by Grandmother, their way; not to be babies like Marie, but who was now with the good God; but Grandthorough-going schoolboys; to get their high mother had cut it, and made it herself before mark in class, to fight their schoolfellows, and she went up into the bright beautiful heavens, like them all the better for it; to skate in the The table in Marie's room was shining with winter, and ride velocipedes in summer; to presents: there was the prettiest little kitchen, read of baronial castles, with drawbridges with all the belongings of a kitchen; and a -and dungeons, and to read of discoveries in doll that could twist its eyes, and cry "ugh!" Central Africa. On this subject, though, one when you pinched its stomach; ah i and of the boys had a misgiving-that all might there was a picture-book too, full of the be discovered before he was grown a man; prettiest stories, to be read when somebody then he was to go out on adventures. Life could read. But it was more beautiful than is the most beautiful fairy tale, said Godfather, all the stories in the world to live to see and one takes a part in it oneself. many birthdays. It was on the parlour-floor these children



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A NIGH] IN AN AFRICAN CRUISER. 17 separates life from death I cannot sayof her cargo. Attracted b: the scent, these such may possibly have been the case with monsters of the deep follow in the wake of many-but my own experience of the sensaslave-ships, accompanying them across the tions of drowning, extending even to the Atlantic, and becoming the tloatinggraves of verge of absolute unconsciousness, is far many a victim to the horrors of the Middle different. The agony of this second immerPassage. sion was almost insupportable. As in the On boarding and taking possession, the first instance, I sank slowly, then after a prize proved to be the Aventureiro, a fine momentary pause was dragged violently upyacht-like schooner, carrying one long swivel wards, the resisting body of water clinging gun amidships. Small need was there to to me as if loth to lose its prey. Once more inquire of her sullen commander whether my face reached the surface ; I gave a deep the cargo was lawful or contraband," and gasp for breath. But nature had been too our sailors at once proceeded to open the heavily tried. A loud booming in my ears closely-covered hatchways. On removing -flashes of light before my eyes-and I them a dense steaming mist of foul sickening knew no more ....air ascended from the slave-deck below ; and When consciousness returned, I was in my three hundred unhappy beings of both sexes own cabin, the assistant-surgeon bending were discovered lying down, their feet over the bed. Although too feeble for conmanacled to long iron bars placed fore and versation, I could understand from him that aft" throughout the ship. From this piteous my rescue had been effected by the men writhing mass of humanity arose strange who had descended the rope ; they had seized voices and shouts of joy, as the irons were my hands just as insensibility was unlocking unloosed and the fact of their deliverance their grasp. He also informed me that, condawned upon their minds. Half the numtrary to all expectation, the shock expeber were brought on deck to breathe the rienced by the surgeon was likely to prove purer atmosphere, and the rest, unfettered, beneficial-that, all fever having left him, he roamed about at will below. was now sleeping calmly and peaceably. The crew of the slaver, twenty-four in With strict injunctions to follow so good an all, were transferred to the Pantaloon, and example, I was left to my repose. a lieutenant and party of men detailed to In these southern latitudes no soft interconvey the prize to Sierra Leone. Before vening twilight exists; the change from parting company, however, an exciting scene obscure night to glaring broiling day is of plunder was enacted; officers and sailors almost instantaneous. No sooner did' day keenly searching after comestibles whichbreak on the following morning, and the sun although articles of daily consumption on appear, than all eyes were anxiously engaged shore-were luxuries to men shut up for sweeping the horizon in hopes of encountermonths in an African cruiser. ing the lost slaver. Fifty voices quickly exTins of preserved meats, sardines, potted claimed, There she is!" and there indeed, salmon and lobster, boxes of crystallized not two miles off, was the luckless vessel, sugar, raisins, potatoes, butter, wine, and which even the tornado had failed to save, bottled pale ale rewarded the laughing plunThe sea was calm; not a ripple disturbed its derers; and were passed into the ship under glassy smoothness as it gently heaved in the the very eye of the slave-captain, who, as long low swell which prevailed. It was evihe leaned over the side, muttered the not dent to the crew of the slave-ship that no inappropriate word, Ladrones! Soon, chance of escape remained; although armed, however, his face cleared up, and ejaculating they were no match for the English cruiser. "Fortuna de la guerra!" he smoked his Soon a Brazilian ensign fluttered up to her paper cheroot with calmness, consoled doubtmasthead, waved there for a moment, and less by the recollection of former successful then slowly and reluctantly descended, in. trips; for slave-traders confess that if only token of surrender. one vessel out of four escapes, they are amply Our boats, well manned and armed, now repaid. pulled towards the prize, pasing through And now, all arrangements being comsome dozens of empty wine and ale bottles plete, the prize-crew gave a hearty farewell recently thrown overboard, demonstrating cheer as the Aventureiro, with England's flag that the slave-crew had begun to drown their of liberty waving at the peak, bore away to sorrows in the good liquor the cabin stores the westward, a cheer returned as heartily by afforded, determined it should not be wasted their comrades in the Pantaloon, as that down the throats of their, captors. Lazily vessel's head was once more turned towards floating also close to the vessel were several her cruising ground. large sharks, showing too clearly the nature S. W. SADLER. 2



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60 PA UL AND JEAN. over the poor man's heart as he saw the little boy's wretched cowardice in not instantly boy's frightened and scowling face-" Ohcoming to tell what had happened. After oh-h-h," howled Jean, twisting his ragged this everybody said that there must have blouse in his dirty hands. been a quarrel between the two lads, and Paul's father, impetuous like his nation, that Jean had probably given Paul an ugly and terribly frightened by the child's exprespush. It was very sad to think of how sion, seized Jean and gave him a succession easily he might have been restored, even after of shakes, saying, Where's Paul ? where's he had fallen in, for there were three 'people Paul?" close by in the grounds, and if Jean had Jean, blubbering and sulky, tried to say even called out loud, they must have heard nothing; but cowed by the repetition of the him. shakes, he at last pointed to the Long Pond, So the matter remains somewhat of a mysand muttered reluctantly, There." tery to this hour. There !" said Paul's father, bursting into I am not going to make you miserable by a torrent of unintelligible words, and flinging describing the misery of those poor people. his arms into the air. He rushed to the pond, They tried all they could, by rubbing and and stood for an instant looking at its unwarming the poor little boy before the fire; ruffled depths; but he knew it was at least but nobody had any hope when they heard six feet deep; and the banks were steep, and how long he had been in the water. And he himself a short stout man, far from young, when it was all in vain, they laid him on his and with neither rope nor pole at hand. So little bed, and his mother and sisters strewed dragging Jean with him, he ran panting and flowers over him. Two days after--for burials choking to the house, where for a moment he take place much sooner in France than in stood with his hand on his heart unable to England, and the time is fixed by law-Paul speak. At last he said the word "pond," was carried in his coffin into the village and pointing to Etienne, who had remained church; and after the prayers the coffin was in the servants' hall, he fell in a heap on the borne to the grave-yard on the hill ; the old floor. His wife sprang towards him, quite cure walking in front and all the village folbewildered, poor woman, with her double lowing after. They laid him in a little grave fright; all the men and maids left their chairs close under an ivy-covered wall, where a baby and ran out calling for water, for ropes, for sister had been buried long ago. Her mound blankets ; and M. le Comte de X., astounded was planted over with white periwinkles, and at the noise, came out of his study, holding looked quite snowy. his pink cup of chocolate in one hand, and When all the servants went sadly back to pushing his wig over his left ear with the the chateau, Paul's father and mother walk other. But while all this was going on, ing at their head, and crying sadly, they Etienne, who had that excellent quality which found M. le Comte de X. telling the we call presence of mind, ran quickly out of Maire of the village that Jean's father, the the house to the shed where he kept his drunken cobbler, must be turned out of his tools, and got a long strong rake. When the cottage and sent away. He was so apt to other servants, with M. le Comte de X. at quarrel and fight that it was not difficult to their head, came flocking down to the pond, do this; and the Maire, a fat peasant procalling out for a pole, or for some one who prietor in a blouse (the village maires are could dive, Etienne was already up to his generally like that in France), was promising waist in the water, where it was shallowest, it should be done. But who do you think and feeling about carefully with his rake. It put in a word ? It was poor Paul's mother; was not long before he touched the body of the kind woman, who said, M. le Comte, I poor little Paul, and then Etienne plunged had rather nothing was done. My son loved in under the water and brought him up in little Jean; and if he is sent away with that his arms. The string with which he had drunken father, he will only go from bad to played at horses was still twisted round his worse." fingers, and dragged along the grass as he So Jean stayed; and for a long time to was carried into the house and laid before the come he was always sulky. But sometimes kitchen fire. When Jean was asked how he looked at Paul's mother as if he were long Paul had been in the water, he said going to speak. I can hardly tell you whesulkily, "about two hours;" which reply ther the dreadful thing in which he was made M. le Comte de X. so angry, that somehow mixed up will, in the end, make I am sorry to say he said a great many him repentant and be a better boy. But I things which he should not, though he had think so ; and I am sure Paul's mother dereason to be terribly indignant at the serves that he should. BESSIE PARKES BELLOC.





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S13o THE LAST NEWS OF THE FAIRIES. THE LAST NEWS OF THE FAIRIES. BY THE AUTHOR OF "JOHN HALIFAX, GENTLEMAN." HE last news of but have nearly forgotten it now. Still, T th e Fairies! prick up my ears like an old horse at sound And very reliof the hunt, whenever there is the slightest able news too, reference to what is called folk-lore. upon evidence Many a time, when I was a child, I used as good as one to think how delightful it would be to catch can get with a fairy-a little creature no bigger than a regard to most doll, only alive-quite alive, fill of pranks doubtful things. and pretty ways. How enchanting to play Not so very late with it, and talk to it, and cuddle it! Only neither--not it might not understand cuddling; and S much more than whether it would be able to converse with me half a century in plain English, or would talk unintelligible old. That is, it fairy language, was a point on which I never can be little could satisfy my mind. It did not matter S more than much, as I never caught my fairy. But I thirty years certainly should have set a trap for it, or gone since the perendless wanderings about the woods and -/^ son who saw moors in search of it, had I ever heard the the fairies told story, or the two stories, which I am about to the story of his tell to you; though of course I do not expect seeing them to you to believe them. the person who My informant was, as I have said, a middletold me--then aged man, whom I met last summer in Yorka boy, and now shire. I shall not give his name-lest he only a middlemight not like it, or like to be considered reaged man. A sponsible for my version of the story, though I man, too, whose havegiven it as accuratelyas I could remember. truthfulness and Therefore I shall merely call him John." honesty are proOne day John came to tea: and capital verbial in the company he was ;-self-educated, and very village where he well educated too, for what I suppose would m : ---- lives-which I be called "one of the working classes." As do not intend if the upper" classes did not work hard S..-to particularize enough also sometimes i Highly intelligent more than by by nature, with a strong shrewd Yorkshire saying it was the West Riding of Yorkshire. wit, and a way of expressing himself that at I myself have always had a lurking belief once said what he meant to say in the best in fairies. There is an Italian proverb, Se manner possible. No attempt whatever at non e vero Ž ben trezato: which means, freely "showing off," or appearing other than he translated-" If it isn't true it ought to be." was-: an intensely honest man, whose word And I still think, that if there are not fairies, was his bond, and whose judgment might be it would be very nice if there were to be. fairly trusted on all points where he had had Such as the fairy godmother of Cinderella, an opportunity of forming it. Modest-rather and the pretty harmless creatures of the Midretiring than not-yet with plenty of selfsummer Night's Dream-Oberon, Titania, respect: and a quiet conviction that "A man's and Puck. Or the Queen of Fairies who a man for a' that." Such is the sort of man carried away Thomas the Rhymer and the whose society I like-be his rank in life what young Tamlane, as we read of in old it may. And I can truly say that though I Scotch ballads. Or the brownies and the have spent many a pleasant evening with the pixies, the cobolds and the gnomes, the Neck celebrated men of the earth, I never spent a and the Undine-all those various elves of pleasanter than with my friend John. water, earth, and under the earth, with which Towards the close of it, after he had been the fairy mythology of different nations makes giving us endless stories about the habits and us acquainted. I was well read in it once, manners of the last generation in the village



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14 A NIGHIT INA AN FRICAN CRUISER. the strange hail being plainly seen on the a charnel-house, passed over-a few big drops line of the horizon, and the distance between of rain splashed upon the deck. Then closed the Pantaloon and her prey rapidly lessenround the ship the arch of the storm-cloud; ing. and with a mighty roar, lashing the water "Clear away the gun forward and give into foam, the tornado swept down upon us. her a blank cartridge," was an order obeyed Notwithstanding all our precautions, the as soon as given. The long thirty-two first shock threw the Pantaloon nearly on her pounder bellowed forth, and the flash beam-ends; for a few moments of painful illumined momentarily the excited faces on suspense she remained in that position, then deck. As the report died away, all eyes were suddenly righting-all her timbers groaning bent on the chase to discover if she obeyed --gradually yielded to her helm. Immediate that authoritative signal to "heave to;" but danger was now over, it being only necessary her white sails stillgleamedin the moonlight, to keep the ship driving before the wind and she pursued her course regardless of the until the storm should subside. The officers, mandate. This perseverance in attempting released from their deepest anxiety, were to escape gave good assurance that we were now able to note-some even to enjoy-the in pursuit of a slave-ship. Many of the crew magnificent spectacle of an African tornado. began already in imagination to spend their In that roaring wind and deafening thunder prize-money; the Kroomen especially were no man could hear his fellow speak, or in chuckling with delight, for the very day prethe thick darkness see the rope to which he ceding, at their earnest request-made in clung or the deck whereon he stood, save consequence of no slaver having been seen when. the blinding lightning at quick recurfor some months-the figure-head of the ring intervals disclosed the wild scene around Pantaloon (a capital reproduction of the wellhim. known personage in the pantomime) had had Two hours passed thus, and the fury of his spectacles repainted,. "to make him see the tornado began to decrease, when-with better." a simultaneous crash of thunder-the lightThe proverbial "slip between cup and ning struck our foremast. On reaching the lip" had, however, yet to be illustrated. The deck the electric fluid was first attracted by guns having been again loaded, this time the chain cable, along which it ran hissing with shot, the gunner was standing, lanyard until, reaching the quarter-deck,. it leaped in hand, awaiting the order to fire, when the with a loud report to the nearest gun, flashcaptain's attention was attracted by the flaping from gun to gun until it plunged into the ping of the sails-which hitherto had kept water astern, the old helmsman as it passed full-against the masts; the land wind had him ducking his head as he would to an suddenly subsided, and a hot stifling calm enemy's shot. Happily no 'one was seriously succeeded. On looking round he discovered hurt, although some men standing round the in one quarter of the horizon the small cloud, mast were partially stunned. The thunder literally as a man's hand, which to experinow ceased, and the wind fell. Quitting my enced eyes betokens the quick approach of station on the forecastle, I joined the officers a tornado; and he knew well that, if one of on the quarter-deck, where we congratulated these awful tropical storms struck the ship' ourselves that the elements had done their while all sail was set, nothing but the loss of worst, and speculated on the chances of the her masts could save her. morning light gladdening our eyes with a No time now to think of aught but the safety view of the lost slaver. In all probability, of the ship. Hands shorten sail! Quick, though, the tornado had either capsized or men,-quick,.-for your lives! shouted the driven her far beyond our reach. captain. The crew, aware of the danger, It being now midnight, I was stepping, worked well; sail after sail was taken in, until, wearily enough, towards the companioninstead of a cloud of canvas, the cruiser ladder, intending to go below, when I was showed nothing aloft but the clear tracery of met by an officer who rushed violently up spars and rigging; In time, and only just tke ladder and attempted to pass me. Rein time, was the work completed, the ship cognizing our surgeon-who was suffering made snug and the men down from aloft, from a severe attack of yellow fever-I Meanwhile the cloud had rapidly increased attempted to stop him, but, tearing himself in volume un'til now it overspread half the from my grasp with the strength of delirium, horizon, the remainder of the heavens being he forced his way overboard. yet bright and clear. The dead silence of Giving orders to the boatswain's mate to expectation was broken by a low growl of call away the lifeboat's crew, I sprang aft. thunder. One breath ot wind, cold as from and let go the life-buoy. The portfire SA fact attached to the apparatus blazed up, and by





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RUNNING A WAY TO SEA. 19 would only give a grating creak that made shirts, low-waisted breeches, and long-quarJack shiver-it obstinately refused to turn. tered pumps. Some of them had their trowWith a wrench that almost put his wrists sers braced up almost to their arm-pits, andout of joint, Jack twisted it round. A moworse still-instead of hailing him with a ment afterwards he had lifted the latch, and What cheer, messmate?" some of them was running down to the great gates, leaping gave Jack a shove, and swore at him, if he over the shadows of the trees that stretched happened to stumble against them, as he out gaunt black arms, as if they wanted to caught his foot in the great iron mooringtrip him up or catch him by the ankle. rings, or groped his way under and over the Jack had expected that he would have to gangways, chains, and hawsers that everyclamber over the great gates, but-hooray! where stopped the way. Some of the mates, -the little door in one of them had been to be sure, had gilt bands round their caps, left unlocked, and was idly swinging backand gilt buttons on their blue coats, but the wards and forwards in the breeze. Jack had greasy, white-seamed uniforms had a very time to turn round and shake his fist at the shabby-genteel look, and Jack did not like rusty old bell that wouldn't ring him up to see sailors quill-driving on the other side to work before breakfast; and then he of the little tables at which the cargoes were plunged into the outside moonlight and being checked off. felt free, although he still ran on as if the However, there were the ships, at any rate, whole pack of his tormentors were after him. some of them with bunting flying, or a loose It was easy enough for him to find his way sail bellying out, or sailors' clothes hung up into London-he had only to follow his nose to dry-real big ships from all parts of the -but it was a good while before he could world. When Jack thought of the pure sea find his way to the Docks." When he to which they were accustomed, he wondered asked his way to them, people said, What that they did not fidget in the stagnant, docks, you young silly ?" and others told him muddy-green dock-water. But some of the to go to such-a-street, and turn down suchships did not smell very sweet; unpleasant another-street, and anybody would tell him whiffs came from them of bilge-water, perthere; but Jack didn't know where such-aspiring sheepskins, and putrid horns .and street and such-another-street were, any more hides. than he knew where the Docks were. But I needn't go in a ship that carries When he reached Ratcliff Highway at nasty things like those," thought Jack; "I've last, and threaded his way through the throng plenty to pick from." of greasy, ragged, unshaven labourers still He made up his mind, for one thing, that waiting to be hired outside the gates, the he wouldn't go in a steamer, or in a blistered, London Docks were in full swing of business, rusty, old-fashioned sailing tub, with a bow as The bustle pleased Jack at first. Men were broad as its stem, and its gray, ragged righewing sugar hogsheads open with great ging all in a tangle. At last he found a craft axes, white coopers were hammering away at just to his taste, with a clipper-bow, and casks, blue custom-house officers were gauging raking masts, and gilt stars on the catheads, casks, men were trundling casks, casks in and bright brass belaying pins, and deck as thousands stood along the quays. Dangling white as milk, and ropes coiled down on it from top-floors of the tall warehouses, and like Catherine-wheels. A placard lashed on over the mine-like holds of the ships, boxes, to her shrouds announced that she was bound barrels, crates, bales, hogsheads, and huge for Hong Kong, and "the East" was just bundles of hides and sheepskins, and skeins where Jack wanted to go to. So he went up of jangling iron bars, were everywhere going to some men who were swinging on a stage, up or down. Tea-chests were being shot painting the clipper's sides, and said, as knowinto lighters, like boys sliding down a hill. ingly as he could, Can you tell me if this There was a smell, too, here of sugar, there ship is in want of a hand?" of tobacco, and yonder of vinegar, or drugs, Can't say, sir," answered one of the men or brandy-and everywhere of tar-that with a grin; better ask the mate. There somehow sharpened Jack's desire to be a he stands by the gangway." sailor. But he soon felt half disappointed; If you please, sir, I want to go to sea," nobody in the Docks looked jolly. The said Jack to the mate, very respectfully. men who were crying "Heave-heave".Do you? Go back home, you little fooL" heave altogether!" as they strained at the Ship after ship he tried with no better sucwinches, looked far more like depressed dustcess, and what that mate said was quite polite men than dashing mariners. Even the real compared with the answers Jack got from sailors had nothing rollicking about them. some of the mates and captains. Where They hadn't broad turnover collars to their ,there were men on board, too, they made fun



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48 CHESS Y CHALK AND HER BABY themselves amongst such a rough lot; and rally cantankerous womankind on board the so we always spoke of 'Dolphy as Chessy Gold Finder did not grudge the golden Chalk's baby. opinions which Chessy and her baby enjoyed. That baby really was a "remarkable child." The mother, like the baby, was really good." I suppose it must have cried sometimes, but Of course, she was not perfect. Proper in all whenever it made its appearance in public it points though she was, it is not uncharitable was always either sound asleep, or else crowto say that she felt a little pride in the defering and capering, and smilingly shaking ence which her pretty face and figure and hands all round. Its fat, knuckle-dimpled ways won for her from all the men-folk, and little hands made rosy rings round the horny the envy which her bonny, daintily-kept baby fingers of many a heart-hardened ruffian; boy excited amongst her sister matrons. But and yet the ruffians, though they grinned, she was really good, for all that. She did seemed to like the tender little touch whilst not pull long faces and make long sermons, it lasted, and never said a rude word to the and then go away and make spiteful speeches mother, and do sneaking tricks. It was very little She, like her child, was a really "rethat Chessy said in any way, but all she did markable character." We had a miserable say was cheerfully kind, and what she dideight days between Gravesend and Plywhich was a good deal more-was of the mouth: squally weather; sodden, lumbered same sort. decks; 'tween-decks littered with the muddy When we had taken the passengers who, shavings and tool-baskets of carpenters, with good reason, had shunned the Chanstill hammering away at uncompleted nel passage, on board at Plymouth, and bunks; make-shift meals as merry as were just outside the breakwater again, we Mr. Sampson Brass thought Mr. Quilp's were overhauled by two boats. One brought moist picnic; a sulky crew, not yet shaken a man who had run away from his creditors; down into order, and only half recovered another brought officers to apprehend a man from the effects of parting glasses on shore; who had even better, or rather wocse, reason passengers, both cabin and intermediate, in to run away from his. He had hidden hima state of damp dishabille and sea-sick self ever since he left the Thames as well as despair -the women, for the most part, he could, and had lain quiteperdu during our looking especially limp, draggle-tail, and stay at Plymouth; but amongst our motley tallow-faced scarecrows. And yet, even in ship's company there was a burly policethat dreary time, Chessy Chalk and her officer going out to Melbourne to apprehend baby, on the few occasions on which they some runaway. Burly as he was, a fear of did make a public appearance, were corlynching kept him from publishing his errand paratively as neat as new pins. When the to his fellow-passengers; but I happen to other women temporarily recovered strength know'that, even when sea-sick, he had kept enough to talk, they wasted it in making his eyes open, and that esprit de corps led pathetic appeals to the skipper, the cabinhim to give his brethren from the shore a boy-any one of the ship's company they quiet, a very quiet, hint as to where their could get hold of-to be put ashore that quarry was stowed away. The poor scared minute, or in angrily abusing their nearly wretch was hurried over the side as rapidly equally helpless husbands for bringing them as possible by the anxious-looking captors, to sea, and still more angrily denouncing, as and their boat pulled off under a shower of "selfish pigs," the few bachelors who could maledictions and harder-hitting empty porter. still venture on a smoke. Chessy had no bottles. husband on board to abuse, but if she had Then, for the first time, it seemed to be had, I am sure she would not have abused generally known on board that the captive him, even if he had looked of all men the had a wife and four children who were going most miserable-acting as sea-sick nurse to a out with us. They, of course, were not insea-sick wife and half a dozen sea-sick small eluded in the warrant, but were left to make children. When Chessy came out of her berth their lonely voyage to Melbourne, and land during those drearyeight days, she busied herthere penniless and unprotected. self in doing as many quiet little kindnesses to At first, their condition evoked a great deal her muddled, melancholy neighbours as the of genuine pity on board; although, perof course paramount claims of Master'Dolphy haps, in the majority of instances, the pity would permit. But Master 'Dolpl:y was so for the police-captured scamp's belongings exceptionally "good" a baby that these kindwas at least tinged with the fellow-feeling nesses amounted to a good deal; and it was that makes one wondrous kind. The poor owing to their remembrance of them, and to woman was assured that she and her little the frequent renewal of them, that the geneones would be well looked after on the voyage,



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DAPPLE 'S OPINIOVNS. :47 you, Snap and I understand each other. I care. I should be very sorry, for, though he know that he could never dream of being isn't much company, he is so very respectful. rude, and he knows that I shan't be offended When he comes to the stable door, he always by his pranks--he only plays them to amuse gives a mew to ask if he may come in. If me. Snap hears him, he rushes at him, and wants To go through life smoothly, there is to worry him like a rat; but Curate spits and nothing like being distinctly conscious of swears and scratches, and as soon as he's your superiority to the animals you come in got the chance, up he climbs to the top of contact with. If you're doubtful about it, the rack, and makes a bridge of his back, of course they'll take advantage, and even, and swells out his tail, and growls at Snap perhaps, when they don't mean anything like a small thunder-cloud. rude, you'll be sure to fancy that they do. But Snap hates Tilburina almost worse I'm afraid I wasn't'ds 'firm as I ought to than he hates Curate. Tilly is a tabby pussy have been with the plum-pudding dog, or he of the softer sex; she's as fat as butter. certainly would never have given himself Tilly is almost too familiar for my taste, but such ridiculous airs. then she is so very fond of me that I can Snap, now, is a very different kind of dog. scarcely feel offended. Her feelings get the He'll do anything he can to oblige me, withbetter of her, and so I don't blame her but out making any merit of it-you'd fancy he her gender. Curate would as soon think of was doing it just to please himself.. We've jumping down Snap's throat as. of jumping got rats in the stable, and he knows I don't on to my back; but that is Tilly's favourite like them. It isn't pleasant to feel them place. She leaps into the manger, and routing in the straw, and running over your scrambles into the rack, and then down she back, when you're lying down of a night, or comes on my haunches, and there she lies trying to run up your legs when you're taking purring like a tea-kettle, if Snap doesn't a nap standing; and then they eat my corn, happen to be in the way; but if he's there, and make what they don't eat smell nasty. she makes faces at him, and puts out her Well, Snap knows I hate rats, and he'll watch tongue at him, and then she washes herself by the holes for an hour and more, and when with her tongue, as if she'd forgotten that a rat slips out, Snap's down upon him like a there was such a being as Snap in existence; shot, and breaks his neck almost before he and poor Snap goes almost wild. Up he has time to squeak; and then Snap lugs him jumps, tumbling heels over head, and barking about, shaking him for his impudence in as if he'd bark his heart out, but Tilly takes bothering me, and looks as delighted as if no notice. She's safe, she knows, and so she he had only done it for his own amusement, goes on licking herself in a quiet way, that He's a very worthy young dog, is Snap-the must be provoking to Snap. only fault I have to find with him is that he I wish my friends could agree better, but is almost too fond of me. He gets so jealous it's natural they should all want to be first if I take the least notice of my other two favourites with me. I'm a handsome, highhumble friends in the stable, bred 'horse, I know, with Godolphin Arab One of them Jim calls Curate. He's a blood in me, though Jim does laugh at my black cat with a white breast, and awfully long head and my podgy barrel, and says thin. He eats flies and black beetles, and he's as much of an Arab as I am-and so I he'll die of consumption, if he doesn't take must take the consequences. RICHARD ROWE.



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MfAR Y AND KA TIE. "Why don't you come and sit by me?" ing the cool draught and the sight of ite asked Mary. shady li't'e back garden, down which she It doesn't seem kind-the grave doesn't could see the good woman going with her belong to us." jug. The bottom wall of the back garden Why, who said it did? What are you was a bank of red earth and rock. Brambles talking about, Katie ?" and ferns grew on it. A silver birch-stem "I should like you or Mamma or Papa to twisted itself out of one cranny; out cf come and sit on my grave; it would seem as another, that had been widened and squaredl if I was in bed, and you'd come up stairs to a little, trickled clear cold water. The talk to me; but I don't think I should like woman picked a dock-leaf, made a spout of any one I didn't know to come." it, and soon came back with a jugful ot ice" Well, you are a queer child, Katie," said cold water. Katie thought her big mugful of Mary; but she, too, after that sat still for a few it was the most delicious drink she had ever minutes. The churchyard was a very quiet tasted ; but though it had cooled her so at place. One of the Rectory bedroom-windows, first, she was astonished to find that in a peeping through the limes that divided the minute or too she felt hotter than before. churchyard from the Rectory garden, was the "You don't look well, Miss; you'd better only sign of a house in sight. There was an stop and rest a bit longer," said the woman. old sun-dial over the old church clock. When Whilst Katie was resting, Mary ran out the clock had struck the hour, they could into the garden, and having noticed a littlhear a hum in the ivy-covered old tower for wood at the bottom of the field on the othlr "ever so long" afterwards. Little birds side of the garden fence, she ran back to inchirped in the ivy; rooks cawed sleepily as quire whethertherewere anyblackberrics there. they flew about the churchyard elms. A "Tain't blackberryin' time, Miss." superannuated blind white horse lay in the Well, but may people go in there ?" shade of the black yew tree; and Mary and Oh, yes, them may go as likes, but there Katie sat quite silent in the midst of the warm ain't much to see, and if you're going that green graves and hoary tottering gravestones, way, you'd better take care you don't go too But Mary soon grew tired of this. Now nigh the Witch's Pool." then, Katie, you must get up. Mamma said What's that? asked Mary. I was not to let you sit on the grass too long." A nasty, black, deep pool o' water down As they were going out of the graveyard, at the bottom t'other side o' the woodKatie turned round to look at it once more. nobody don't know how deep it is. If you "Oh, that is a pretty place," she said. was once to fall in, nobody could get ye out." "When I die, I should like to be buried "But why is it called the Witc.is Pool ?" there-just where I was sitting." asked Katie. I wish, Katie, you wouldn't be so gloomy. "I don't know, my dear. They do say You take all the fun out of everything. Aunt that if you chucks a stone in, the number o' Annie says that it's wicked, besides being silly, bubbles as comes up will show you how many to talk about dying before your time like that. years you's lived, and has got to live. I Ain't you thirsty?-l am. Let's go and see don't believe that. I never tried it, but if I if we can get a drink of water somewhere." was to, I 'ont believe there'd be fifty-three They passed the pound, and the cage, and bubbles come up-no less, let alone no a roadside cart-lodge without seeing any cotmore-and that's my age, if I was to die tages, but the road swept round sharply at this minute. If you're going a.nywheres neir the cart-lodge, and just beyond they came the pcol, mind you don't let your little si "er, upon three or four old gabled cottages, leanpretty dear, get too near the edge, M bis." ing forward as if they had nodded in their "Oh, I'll take care of her," answered sleep. A water-butt stood beside the porch Mary. We are much obliged to you for the of one of them, and in front of it, just off nice water." And the little girls went through the road, there was a well. So the liitle girls the cottage-garden, and out through the gate tripped up to the open door of the cottage, into the field, and so into the little wood. andMary asked for water. Katie felt that the sight of the pool would "Surely, Miss," said the good woman of frighten her, and yet she had a strange longthe house. Well's dry, and the water in ing to see it; and Mary, though she didn't the butt ain't fit to drink; but I'll fetch ye care anythirg about the bubbles story, thought some from the spring if ye'll step in and set that as there was nothing eLe to see, she down a bit. The little gal seems tired-she might as well have a look at a pool so deep don't look strong Set ye down, my dear." that nobody knew how deep it was. The back door was also open, and Katie They soon found their waydown to the pool. seated herself between the two doors, enjoyA little sunlight had strag led in upon it, but



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GOOD STORIES FOR YOUNG PEOPLE. BY POPULAR AUTHORS. SELECTED FROM GOOD WORDS FOR THE YOUNG." WITH NUMEROUS ILLUSTRATIONS. PHILADELPHIA J. B. LIPPINCOTT AND CO. 1871.



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" LIME'US AND PADDY." .See page 124.*



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ABO UT PHILIP. 1 5 as he did how impossible it was for him to (he was now playing with its lock) a change exert himself now, and they were wondering of clothes, a few pet books, his toy schooner, how much more room he would take if he if the mast would shut in, his writing-case, went on growing during generation after and a few other odd things, and then if he generation. This talk," he said, "may do were to leave home, and soon after write a .me good. It is a good deed, for I meant to letter back to them at home, and be able to warn you off the island, and I need not have tell them that he had saved a life, or helped spoken at all, but let you go further inland, to win a battle, or perhaps been one of the and eaten our fruit, and slept in our enchanted first to discover a new land Then his air, and then you too would have had to work thoughts became actions, and Philip did put or grow. Do you think, boy, that my length into his satchel a few clothes. The mast of is less than when you first saw me? the schooner would stick out beyond the top David did not know what to answer, for of the bag, so the schooner had to be left, though he despised the giant, he could not and a small tool-box went instead. Then help pitying him, and he did not like to tell there was another moment of listening at the him that he could see no difference; so he window, and Philip opened his door, and said nothing, but turned away, and began began to move slowly down-stairs. T'he stairs weeding a large bed of beautiful flowers that would creak so, that he was obliged to stop grew near. The giant sighed deeply again, and take his boots off. He did not like and in a more sleepy manner still beckoned doing this at all, for it made him feel as if he David nearer to him. "Fly, boy, fly this were sneaking, and anything like sneaking place." Then his eyes closed, and once more went very much against his conscience. every inch of the big giant was sleeping. However, he had made up his mind to go; so Then Uncle Kit told how David, after barefooted and slowly he at last reached the thinking a little with himself, did leave the bottom of the stairs, and was at the parlourisland,-not that he was lazy, and feared to door. Just then he heard a jingle of glasses, grow, though after he had got on board the and knew that it was Mary bringing up the wreck again he did stretch out his arms to supper-tray; so with a bound he was halfsee if his coat-sleeves were shorter,-but beway up the flight again, and then he sat cause the island puzzled him, and his father down on the stairs as near as he could to the was a Scotchman and cautious, and David bottom without being seen. He saw the felt sure that he should be more comfortable girl bustling in and out to lay the supper, he on his lonely wreck than on an island where heard the clatter of the knives and forks, there was even a chance of his hair turning and, waiting impatiently, he rested his head red. The rest of Uncle Kit's tale was soon against the balustrade, determining to stay told, though of course David had some more there until the parlour door was shut again. strange adventures before he found himself But he could not help noticing how cheerful again amongst his own friends. It was the the small supper-party was, and he heard his first part of the tale that Philip was thinking father's voice speaking,-" Ah, my boy, about this hot August night. His uncle had Philip my boy, Philip." Those three words said that he told the tale for the sake of the were equal to the humming whisper of the moral, and Philip knew that he meant the world, the moral of the tale of the enchanted moral particularly for him, and Philip was island, the expected glory of the letter home, wondering if his uncle was right. Those three words made Philip's eyes smart, I dare say that you have often heard peoand made Philip run up-stairs, not creep this ple talk about the hum of the world; but time, to unpack his satchel and hurry into bed. have you ever listened to it ? Put your head Do not think, though, my dear little out of your window some evening, when all friends, that this was the end of Philip's sad close to you is still, and then in the distance, feelings, or the end of his longings for great if you live in or near a great city, you will deeds. No, but from that evening he underhear a sound, as if all the people in it were stood better the last word of that beautiful speaking to you at once in a whisper. verse: Philip heard this whisper, a whisper of three Let us then be up and doing, millions of people,-for, you know, he lived in With a heart for any fate, London,-and it almost seemed to him as a till achieviarn still o wuin" voice inviting him to come too, and with ever so slight a movement of his lips to add He learnt, also, in after years to labour, to the murmur, and believe me he lived a long life in deeds Then this fancy changed into thoughts, as well as in years; and, believe me too, and he thought what a grand thing it would that as he grew older, his hair turned white, be if he could put into his school-satchel not red. G. CROCKFORD.



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A NIGHT IN AN AFRICAN CRUISER. 13 At the sound of voices on the lawn, she sat encouraged Mimi to spend the play-hours up and clung to me. with me, but just at the same time I was It is only Mrs. Smith, dear." summoned home to be bridesmaid to my Then I will go to her." Mimi slid down eldest sister. to the ground, and walked away with the I stayed away a week. I shall never forget most charming little self-possessed air. I my first sight of Mimi when I went back to followed her. I wanted to see how it would Mrs. Smith's. She stood waiting for me at all end. the gate, so pale and thin, her eyes looked Madame," the child curtsied, if you larger than ever, with great hollows under please I wish to be sent to Mamma tothem. morrow. I do not wish to learn English." I am so, so glad you are come," she put Mrs. Smith looked at Miss Pearson, the both arms round my neck when I kissed her head governess, and smiled; then she stroked little white face, "but I am going home." Mimi s hair. I looked surprised. "Come in," she said in My dear, your mamma would be disher little old-fashioned courteous way; "sit pleased if you went back to her. What has down, Mademoiselle, and I will tell you. Yes, been happening, Miss Tyrrel?" I am going; the doctor says I am to go, and I told Mimi's story as well as I could, and he says I have a hard heart not to love my I was surprised at Mrs. Smith's troubled face; schoolfellows. Mademoiselle, do you think but probably her experience had taught her I have a so hard heart ? I love you, and I what would be the end of Mimi's school love them too, if they would leave me; but life. I cannot love to be their plaything, and to It was vain to remonstrate with Rose, and make them always laugh." Amy, and the rest. They said it was all The little creature quivered from head to nonsense ; they were not going to alter ways foot. There was no use in reasoning with which had no harm in them, to suit the Mimi, in endeavouring to show her that if Frenchified whims of a little doll like Mimi ; she would try to learn endurance, Rose and still for a day or two the child was left in Amy, and the rest, might in turn learn forpeace, and then Amy's restraint gave way, bearance. She was too ill to be lectured. and she treated Mimi like a baby again. The It was as impossible for her highly-wrought child seldom resisted, but there was a heartnature to understand that real feeling and sick impatience on her face, very painful to tenderness may lie hidden under a rough see, and I noticed that she grew pale and had manner, as it was for Rose and Amy to little appetite for her meals. .understand her sensitiveness. Mrs. Smith wrote to Madame de ChampShe went home next day, and when the Louis, but the answer was, that Mimi must girls saw how she cried and clung to me at learn English, and that the.more she was left parting, I think they believed that Mimi was to her playfellows the sooner this would be not quite the doll they had so persistently accomplished. Till this letter came I had called her. KATHARINE S. MACQUOID. A NIGHT IN AN AFRICAN CRUISER. Q AIL ho !" The cheering cry from the eagerly trying to discover the chase, which -masthead aroused the slumbering was as yet visible to no eyes except those of watch of Her Majesty's brig Pantaloon, and the Krooman at the masthead who had first dispelled the waking dreams in which I, the reported the strange sail. As a coloured officer of the watch, was indulging, man's power of vision in the night-time is We were cruising-looking out for slavers generally superior to that of a white person, -off the mouth of the Congo; and as a the suspense was endured for nearly a pleasant change in the middle of the rainy quarter of an hour, but at length the captain, season, the night was starlight. Sending word fearing lest the anticipated prize should prove to the captain, I made all sail on the ship, a myth, hailed in dialect suited to the Krooand in a few minutes our spars were covered man, King Tom i You sure you see him ?" with canvas, and the brig gliding through "Yes, captain, him live out dere," replied the smooth water under the influence of a the individual bearing the regal cognomen, land wind which had just sprung up. pointing right ahead. In a few more minutes Our men clustered forward in the bows, the good faith of King Tom was verified,



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28 THE FIRST ALMOND-TREE. Phyllis retraced her steps mechanically, has stranded upon our shore, and the., When she arrived at the grove of trees watchers are bringing a stranger in to thee. at the promontory that overlooks the wideThey found him weeping and lamenting his. sweeping bay, she stopped an instant to sad fate, asking if he were cast among barreview the scene before it was hidden to her barians, or among a nation who honoured sight by the foliage, the eternal gods." "The weight of some unknown event Hardly had she done speaking than the oppresses me to-night, Dione. Oh shall I unknown himself entered. Flinging himself ever recall with sorrow this peaceful evening, down on the ground, he embraced the young and my restless thoughts, glad if I could queen's knees, and besought her protection. have them in exchange for more bitter ones ? "I am a wanderer," he said, shipwrecked Remind me of this eve, should that day ever upon my journey home to Attica; take pity arise." on me, fair queen, and grant me the rights of May it never dawn, 0 queen !" hospitality." The fair beauty sighed again. "Perchance You are welcome, stranger; rise. Among it might be better if it did. Time will a god-fearing people you need dread no ill. reveal." Go, prepare a bath and fresh raiment for our Next morn the queen's predictions were visitor; let a feast be spread and the wine be verified. The wind was blowing fiercely mixed. Then, when he has rested and refrom across the broad ocean, and the waves freshed himself, perchance he will tell us his were lashed to fury. Their angry thunder as name, country, and adventures." they broke upon the shore fell upon the The handmaidens did as they were bid, queen's ear, and made her shiver with dread, and Phyllis, once more alone with Dione, told "Ah Dione, how fearful it would be if any her to fetch forth her richest garmpnts, "for one were exposed to the water's rage and I must deck me in my best," she said, "to lost among these pitiless breakers. D)o you show honour to this handsome, stranger. not hear cries of distress? J thought some How stalwart he is, Dione; how tall and caught my ear." manly, and yet withal, how fair and gentle "It was the roar of the wind, 0 queen, Methinks he must have sprung from gods; I and the soughing of the trees." have not seen such beauty in mortals ere The women were silent for some time: now." Dione absorbed in her weaving; the young Some time later Phyllis entered the banqueen, listless and thoughtful, lying on her queting hall, there to join her guest. She couch playing with her unbound hair. was looking more beautiful than ever. Her "Yet again, Dione, I thought to hear it. long hair was enwreathed with sweet scented Go forth, I pray, and spy if any bark be flowers; the odour of delicious perfume was struggling with this boiling sea." wafted from the drapery that enfolded her. It cannot be, no vessel could live in such Golden bracelets beset with precious stones a storm ; yet I obey." glittered on her slender arms, and on her "And you saw nothing?" demanded snow-white neck shone a band of gold. Phyllis, when Dione once more raised the These charms were not unperceived by the heavy curtain that overhung the doorway and shipwrecked man. Neither did he lose by entered the chamber. the change he had undergone; and Phyllis, Nothing save sea and cloud, my queen, as she compared him to the warriors that sat Say, shall I divert your thoughts by song?" around the board, once more acknowledged Ay, do." to herself that there was none among them The gentle handmaiden pushed aside her that would bear comparison with him. loom, and drawing a stool to her mistress' When the meal was ended, aid a libation feet, seated herself thereon, and sang a soft had been offered to Zeus, as the patron of lulling melody to the strains of the lyre. hospitality, the queen turned to her guest, Phyllis listened, first carelessly, then with who was seated at her right. attention. But ere the song had ended, she "Stranger, I pray thee tell us how thou. broke forth: camest to be stranded alone and friendless Dione, there it is again, that cry of upon our shores." anguish. I command you, tell the watchers Mighty Phyllis," he answered, "I am to look out: some mortal is in distress, I Demophoon, the son of Theseus. Attica, that know it." land of olive and honey, is my country. But Dione obeyed, amazed at the queen's I have been long absent, for I come from the strange manner, siege of Troy, that proud city which the She returned in a few minutes breathlessly. Hellenes have levelled to the dust for the 0 queen, you heard aright: a bark crime of its son Paris, who broke the sacred



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BUSH NEIGHBOURS. 67 and an old gentleman who wore a bandana expected, and the little country houses that under his fur travelling cap, and got out for even then had begun to dot the south side of refreshment at every inn at which the coach the harbour were such darling little nests, stopped to change horses, munching hamthat both mistress and maid fell in love with sandwiches and drinking cold brandy-andSydney. Captain Daventry came on board water almost without intermission when the as the Atalanta let go her anchor in Sydney coach was in motion. Walter had a much Cove. He was very brown, and he had a pleasanter companion in the coachman, belong curly beard. He was dressed more hind whom he sat, and who told him stories lightly than he would have been at home, about the gentlemen's seats they passed, and but still he was dressed, and like a gentlegave him the biographies of all the horses, man. A horrid load was lifted from Mrs. and even let him hold the reins sometimes, Daventry's mind, since she had half given in when Mr. Jehu got down at a roadside house to Phoebe's belief that Master would only to deliver a parcel or drink a glass of ale. wear a bit of 'possum or kangaroo skin about Walter enjoyed the first part of the journey his loins, and that he would carry a spear exceedingly, but he was very tired and sleepy instead of a walking-stick. As for Walter, he before it was over. was very proud of the brown manly-looking As the coach swung through Mile End Papa whom he had not seen since he was turnpike, the coachman woke him up with a almost a. baby. back thrust of the butt-end of his whip, and Oh, Walter," cried Mrs. Daventry to her said, "Now, then, Squire, you can reckon husband, when the kissing was over, "I yourself in London." Walter just opened his hope your farm is close by. I used to think heavy eyes, and then shut them again-not that they sent the convicts out here because thinking much of the Great City, if that was it was a hideously ugly hole, but this is a London. By the time the coach got to its inn, love of a place." he was so sound asleep again that a waiter had It's nicer to look at than to live in," the to carry him up to bed. The ride from Norcaptain answered. What with convicts and folk to London, however, was flying on eagles' emancipists, you'd soon be sick of living in wings compared with the voyage from London Sydney. No, my grant is some miles upto Sydney. In those days the magnificent country. There's a nasty swarm of ticketsteamers and sailing clippers that now arrive of-leavers round it, but, of course, you'll almost daily at or from Australia had not have nothing to do with them. And then been dreamt of. At long intervals clumsy there are some good fellows of our sort old tubs of ships and barques sailed for the within reach-some of them married, too. far-off southern land, pottered about for What a time you've been I was down two months at sea, and at last turned up at the months ago looking out for you. It's quite Antipodes, seemingly more through good by chance I'm down now. However, there'll luck than good management. The barque be room on the dray for your luggage, if you in which our party sailed was named the haven't brought out a ship-load, and we'll Atalanta. Walter had often read through the start home to-morrow, if one night will be proper names at the end of his Latin Dicrest enough for you. I've been buying some tionary, and-_was greatly amused by the horses, and you and Walter can ride two of barque's flying name-when he found how she them,'and help me to drive the rest. You'll be crawled. She had to put in at Plymouth, better off than you were before you married Lisbon, Bona Vista, and the Cape. She was me, old lady. You had only one horse then, just half a year in getting from the Nore to but I can give you your pick out of a dozen Port Jackson Heads. or two now. Of course Walter has learnt to Once inside the Heads, however, even stick on a horse somehow, though you couldn't Mrs. Daventry and Phoebe picked up a little keep a pony for him ? The girl will have to spirit, and Walter was in ecstasies. Both learn to ride, too, if she wants to get about sky and water were so brightly blue, the up-country. In the meantime she can go up islands sprinkled on the water looked so on the dray. The bullock-driver is an aspretty, and, though the trees seemed almost signed servant, but he's as true as steel, and as black as ink to English eyes, the rocky, that's more than I can say for some of the wooded shores, sweeping down to the little beggars I've got." coves and bays, beached with white sand But when the loaded dray was brought to that shone like silver under the glowing sun, the inn-door next morning, with a chair on it had a fairy-land-like look. Sydney then had for Phoebe, she had learnt that assigned sernot the fine buildings it boasts of now, but vant meant convict, and refused at first to the town was so much more civilized in aptake her seat. She wasn't going to have pearance than Mrs. Daventry and Phoebe her throat cut with her eyes open, she-



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20 R UNNING A WA Y TO SEA. of him ; told him that they had got a monkey ears with his clenched fists. The first mate, already, and disagreeable things of that kind; Mr. Munnens, was not much better tempered and one sulky old black cook dabbed a dirty than the skipper. The carpenter and two or dishclout into his face, and threatened to send three of the foremast men were hearty fellows, a bucket of water over him, if he didn't make but the rest of the crew were blackguards. tracks, tarnation slick out of his galley. Jack Off Margate the pilot insisted on bringing did not try an American ship again after that. up, although the skipper wanted to crack on. Just as he was giving up hope, Jack got When Jack looked at the Margate lamps, his ship, twinkling through the rushing rain, and over A red-faced man came reeling down to a the wild black waters, he almost wished himboat that was waiting to pull him to a ship self back at Elm House. How he longed which was being warped out of dock. He to be at home I The watch were clustered overheard. Jack speaking to a captain, and round the galley, out of which the howling sang out, Want to go to sea, eh? Come wind blew a long line of red sparks; the rest along wi' me.; I want a boy, an' one's as of the men were under cover in the foregood as another." castle; Mr. Croggan, swathed in oilskins, was Jack did not much like the look of the tramping to and fro upon the poop; but man, but he was ashamed to hold back. He Jack, wet to the skin, was shivering, waiting scrambled down into the boat, and presently for orders, outside the door of the cabin in was scrambling up the side of the Onyx, 960 which the skipper, and the first mate, and the tons, bound for Port Natal. The Onyx was pilot were taking their grog. Every now and not A i, and she didn't carry "a cow and an then a damp sheep dangling on the gallows experienced surgeon." As soon as the capcame thump against Jack's face, and lonetain got on board, he tumbled into his cabin liness had so taken the pluck out of him, that to sleep off his drink. Jack enjoyed the bustle he felt half inclined to cry. There was of the river as they were being towed down nothing dignified in his distresses. He had to Gravesend, but felt rather uncomfortable found out that he was nobody on board; because no one gave him anything to do. that if he had a moment to spare from the If you please, sir, I've come on board captain's work, he was at the beck and call to work," he said to the second mate. of everybody, and would be expected to do Oh, have you? Where did you sign all the dirtiest jobs. As he thought of what articles? I thought you was the skipper's he had already done, he grew sick again; kid. Don't distress yourself, he'll find you and because he was hanging over the side, plenty to do; we've none too many hands instead of waiting to receive the captain's on board. Make yourself happy whilst you orders to fetch some more hot water from can; it's a poor soul that never rejoices." the galley, he got another hiding. Poor This was the nearest approach to his idea Jack did not teel much like the gallant cap of sailors' talk which Jack had heard, and tain of the flying, fighting Arethusa," when his heart warmed accordingly to Mr. Croggan. he crept into the dog-kennel of a bunk that When the Onyx brought, up for the night at had been assigned him, together with a few Gravesend, he asked Mr. Croggan where he rough slop-clothes that had been thrown at was to turn in-Jack was just going to say his head, as a bare bone might be pitched to "go to bed," but remembered the proper a mangy, stray, mongrel cur. The next phrase in time. morning the cable parted, the remnant frao" Why, where did you put your chest?" ment thumping against the bows with a dull asked Mr. Croggan; and when he learnt thud, distinguishable even in the roaring of how Jack had come to sea, he gave a long the storm. The ship swung round, and whistle, and said, "You-poor-little-devil; floundered broadside towards the land. Seawhy, what a born idiot you must be !" sick Jack almost hoped that she might drive Jack slept that night on the floor of the ashore. Sea-sick as he was, he could not deck-house, which the second mate and the help seeing and wondering at the same hope carpenter shared, and thought himself very in the halt-drunken skipper's eyes. But the lucky to get such shelter, for the rain thumped pilot, and the mates, and the men rushed down on the roof like marbles. The next forward like race-horses; another cable was morning the Onyx took her pilot, weighed paid out, and the Onyx was brought up in anchor, and beat out to sea. Captain water just deep enough to float her. Mitchell came on deck in the vile temper What are you skulking for there, you which was "his usual," as the Scotch say, young lubber?" was Captain Mitchell's Te unless when stupified by drink. Deum, and Jack received his thank-offer"Why didn't you bring me my coffee?" ing in a rope's-ending. The skipper swore he growled to Jack, and then he boxed Jack's fiercely at the luggers that swooped down



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IN THE FRENCH SCHOOL. 43' besides, in your case, Mees, it was not to be I know it will set my teeth on edge; so I expected--" know of how much worth is the love of Mam"Why not ? I am her friend." Ursula zelle Leonie." spoke indignantly, "You don't know anyShe paused, and looked at Ursula. The thing that goes on in class, Angelique." girl had turned away her face. Her heart Angelique grinned, and showed her white was so full, she felt choked. strong teeth almost from ear to ear. Then Angdlique had quickly seen how matters she winked slyly. stood between her charge and Sophie, and "Ah A a, Mees, there are things we know Ursula seemed to her cold and ungrateful. from their outside. I do not chew a lemon; She knew nothing of the girl's great love Page 44. for Leonie, and she thought it would do her say they come to your bed and make grigood to tell her the truth. She went on maces at you. Hein, Mees Ursule; but I speaking,-had to hold you in bed. Well, every day "Madame has told the young ladies that you she wait always for me, and one day when were ill, and that no one must visit you till you are worst, she give me" Here she gave permission. But the same evening Angdlique began to fumble first in one Mamzelle Sophie watches and waits for me pocket, then in another, and finally she in the passage leading to the kitchen, and pulled up her brown stuff skirt, and dived ask me how you were, and send you her into a blue and white-striped petticoat belove. Dame I could not give it you then. neath. "Voilt, Mees; it is a little rumpled." You were talking of two women, and you She placed a small, pink, three-cornered



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BUSH NEIGHBOURS. "What was the other man like, Master back as if he had been a child of four years Walter?" asked Long Steve. Walter could old. By the time Walter had obeyed the only say that he talked very much as if he cooey and galloped down with the horses, had a hot potato in his mouth. Oh, both thieves had their arms strongly bound that's little Dick Green at the head of the behind them with green hide. With strips of lagoon," cried Long Steve, half disappointed the same they were fastened to the Captain's atnot having found a worthier foeman. "It's and Long Steve's stirrups, and then, driving hard, Cap'en, if you an' me can't nab little the ewes before them, the three thief-takers Dick Green an' the Poley." set out for home. As Long Steve had ex"Would you like to go, Walter?" said pected, they found the rest of the flock on the Captain. I think it's only fair that you the other side of the ridge that sloped down should see the fun." into Sal's Pannikin. Of course Walter wanted to go. So it The overseer turned as white as a sheet was arranged that Steve should have tea and when his master rode up to Daventry Hall chops ready, and three horses saddled, at with his sheep and his prisoners, but neither his hut (which stood apart from the other Dick nor the Poley peached. men's), and call his master and Walter at Black Poley was sentenced to an awful half-past two next morning. The Captain flogging before he was sent back to Sydney, thought it advisable to start thus early, in case and little Dick got ten years in a chainthe sheep-stealers should have changed their gang. The Captain thought now that his minds after Walter left them, and agreed property would be safe for a while, but'he to meet at an earlier hour for safety's sake. was utterly mistaken. He had only weeded Walter greatly enjoyed his early breakout two scoundrels whose places were almost fast by the wood fire in Long Steve's hut, instantly supplied by two at least as bad; he and the silent ride through the Bush-all had managed to focus the hatred of the three armed. But when they had put up district on himself, and, moreover, just then their horses in Sal's ruined stables, and were Hook-handed Bill and his gang came on crouching in Sal's roofless parlour, the advencircuit, so to speak, to the country round ture did not seem quite so jolly to Walter. the lagoon. They had made their last But presently, while it was still quite dark, habitat rather too hot to hold them, and a light came dancing down the other side of with secure hiding-places in the range of the hollow. Long Steve sallied out to reshore-hills, they promised themselves some connoitre. When he came back, he saidrich raids on the gentlemen-settlers who were Yes, it's little Dick, sure enough-busy dotted here and there around the lagoon. finishing off his brush-hurdles. He'll soon Hook-handed Bill was a bushranger, withha' done, and then you an' me, Cap'en, had out any of the redeeming qualities which a better creep down to the fold, whilst it's yet certain set of story-tellers are so fond of dark. Master Walter can stay here with the giving to robbers. He was a greedy, savage horses, an' bring 'em down when we cooey. brute. Physically he was a left-handed giant, Oh, yes, Cap'en, he'll be safe enough. Neither who owed his sobriquet to the fact that he Dick nor the Poley would set a foot in here had lost his right hand, and supplied its if you'd give them a thousand pounds." place with a sharp hook. Horrid tales were In spite of this assurance, Walter wearied told of what that hook had done; "ripping of his lonely vigil, up was Hook-handed Bill's favourite mode At length the eastern sky brightened, the of murder. Burning alive in a bullock's hide laughing-jackasses hooted out their hideously stood next in his estimation. It was said, too, hilarious morning chorus, and the sun came that he was in the habit of waylaying bullockup, bronzing the scrub and the tree-tops. drivers on their way down to Sydney with Walter could see little Dick quite plainly their masters' wool, of shamming to be on now. He was lying on the ground smoking the best of terms with them, and then murderhis pipe. Then came another weary watch, ing them wholesale in their sleep, afterwards but at last up started little Dick and went to disposing of the wool through the agency of meet Black Poley, who was coming down to some of his ticket-of-leave friends. the Pannikin with the stolen sheep. They Such a villain, with half-a-dozen followers were all driven into the fold, and the two only not quite so bad as himself, was no thieves were quietly talking together when, pleasant Bush neighbour. Some of the as it seemed to Walter, from beneath their gentlemen-settlers sent their wives and very feet the Captain and Long Steve jumped children into Sydney. All rode about up like Jacks-in-the-box. The Captain felled armed by day, and at night had their most Black Poley as if he had been indeed a valuable cattle driven into the stockyards, bullock; Long Steve laid little Dick on his and their favourite, horses into the stables,



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THE FRENCH DOLL. 9 always shake down best when they are left she knows exactly how we are each of us to themselves ?" dressed; I felt her look me all over-such Mrs. Smith smiled; she often smiled at insolence in the little monkey !" me when I argued. Rose was tall and very awkward; her face "Not always," she said, and she went flushed while she spoke; in her heart away. she envied the French child's easy selfI wrote on, and forgot all about the little possession. French girl. I smiled. "What is the child's name?" I was the only parlour-boarder then, and I Emilie de Champ-Louis, but she is to be lunched at the school-girls' dinner, called Mimi. Isn't it a silly name?" said I noticed to-day that the girls did not rush Ursula Swayne-the clever girl of the school, off to croquet as they usually did when they though she was only a younger one. left the dining-room. They stood gathered "I think Mimi is a pretty name," I said; in a little crowd on the lawn, in eager dis" and it is easy for you all to pronounce ;"cussion. here I saw a universal smile of derision"Some nonsense or other," I thought. "but Rose, when you have lived abroad a I had forgotten the expected arrival of the little you will notice at once the marked French child, and I rather looked down distinction between French children and on school-girls, and considered myself a English ones : they are never shy-at least woman beside them, and I had put "The they never seem so-because they have no Magic Ring" in my pocket, and was thirsting false shame." to be alone in a snug summer-house, behind I thought myself very kind in thus enlightthe shrubbery. I am quite sure anybody ening Rose. She only burst out laughing. who is reading "The Magic Ring" for the "Oh, Miss Tyrrel, you are qbite wrong, first time at seventeen will know how I felt, quite; the French are false altogether, they and how very trifling and ridiculous the ideas have no sincerity. I wish you joy of your of the little crowd of school-girls seemed French doll.-Come along, girls." to me. The girls as a matter of course echoed I sat down, and found my place, and then Rose's laughter, and followed her to the such a buzz of excitement reached, me that croquet-ground.. my indifference was stirred. I forgot all about "The Magic Ring." "Perhaps some one is hurt," thought I, Poor little Mimi! I'm afraid she won't and I went to a gap in the shrubbery which be happy. How prejudiced these children shut off the summer-house from the lawn. are. I shall go in to school-room tea this The buzz had suddenly hushe'd, the girls evening, and see how they treat her." stood still, looking towards the house and at By fits and starts I was popular in the Mrs. Smith, who came from it leading a little school-room, and occasionally I condegirl by the hand. scended to drink a cup of tea with the girls A little girl! a little monkey I thought her before dinner. in that first glance. I could not make out I suppose Mrs. Smith had accepted my her face, but she looked exactly like one of rebuff as final. She did not try again to the children one sees in a fashion-bookinterest me in little Mimi. from her fanciful hat to her high tasselled How very quiet they are," thought I, at black morocco boots. the door of a pleasant bow-windowed room "And Mrs. Smith wants me to act showlooking on the garden. This was a sort of w man to a little conceited puppet like that indoor play-place, a room where consultaNo, re illy that sort of thing is quite out of tions were held about charades and croquetmy line." matches, where the chief amusements were Mrs. Smith and her charge went back to hatched and planned, and here the girls the house again, and just as the girls were always assembled before the bell summoned rushing off to croquet they spied me out. them to tea. "Oh Miss Tyrrel, did you ever?" I opened the door and stood still, looking Isn't she a little stuck-up thing ?" at the group in the middle of the room. "I tell you what"-Rose Watson was Rose Watson leaned against the wall with head-girl this half, and was as much inclined half-closed eyes in disgusted silence; Ursula to plume herself on her new position as Swayne held back with a half-amused smile some others are on their new clothes-" she's on her clever flexible mouth, but the rest nothing but a doll; she has no more feeling in clustered closely round the little French her than dolls have. Why, a new girl is always girl. shy, but that mite of a creature held up her She looked simple enough now, so far as head and looked at us all round: I believe dress went, in her little foulard frock and



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"MARY AND KATIE." See page S.



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IIo KEEPING THE "CORNUCOPIA." ready to shoot for herself anywhere, but on day; the regular sea-breeze then of course this occasion she appears not to have intercame in, which obliged her to wait till it should fered. The Alcalde lost no time on Mr. fall toward sundown, with the turn of the Malloch's behalf; and the brewer having evening tide. stated that he had come out solely for the That day Captain Simmerall required purpose in question, he was on the point of me to take him ashore in the boat, during being sentenced to imprisonment, when it which, in his usual kindly manner, he gave turned out that he had the choice of a me notice that the Cornucopia was fixed to heavy fine, which he paid, and got his sail early that week. He had not been able liberty. Everybody knew his name from to let me know sooner, and busy as we were, the labels on the pale ale bottles; and his he then gave me the afternoon to look about popularity during the rest of the day was me in town. As nothing suitable turned up, I something extraordinary. The feeling was made the best of my way out of the streets, certainly strong against Mr. Malloch, but in more than good time to get aboard this was nothing compared with what leadaccording to regulation, which was always ing Vigilance-men -would drop in regard to before work knocked off in the ship at sunhim and similar influential citizens, if once down. In this respect I never failed to be the movement got carried out. punctual; and as to the boat, it was invaComing ashore one day shortly after, riably left at one or other of the public I was more than surprised by the next wherrying-points. Through the various shifts news on the Vigilance side. The statement I was put to at getting aboard or ashore, I had was, that Mr. Malloch had lately shown a come to prefer sculling to paddling. Once disposition to break with the corrupt party the turn of the wrist was got it came in power, and join the reform cause; at all so easy in the bay that now I never carried events it was understood that he had sent in more than a single oar; and would scarce his nanie the previous night, not only with a have hesitated to leave the Cornucopia's handsome subscription, but engaging to bring skiff at any hour, seeing that not one man in further supporters. Many among those in a score could do anything with it, if so engaged were perfectly wild at the idea; and inclined. When I came down there that afterfor my part I must say it quite bewildered noon, the wharves were busier than before. me at the time. The majority of the leading It was still broad daylight, and there was a men, however, seem to have thought it was crowd at the points to look out at the brig that just what they required. Before another was to sail shortly. Boats of all kinds were night passed, Mr. Malloch's name was given coming and going, some in connexion with out as being on the committee; and it eviher, but others to various parts of the harbour. dently brought weight with it. The chances, As I took my oar to push off, a respectable moreover, were, that if they managed to put seafaring man hurried along in a somewhat off a few days longer till the harvest was groggy state, anxious to get aboard the Queen finished across the Bay, it would help to of the South, where it seemed he had shipped, decide Colonel Rigg as to coming over. but overstayed himself. And immediately My term aboard the Cornucopia was then after, came another man in similar case, to all drawing to an end. Preparations for sailing appearance a returned digger, claiming to were pushed forward, a sufficient crew sehave secured a passage in the brig, and cured, and more passage-berths applied for willing to pay any amount to be taken out. than could be given. None of the passenEvery boat was engaged nearer hand, leavgers, however, were allowed quarters in the ing the two in their plight. One of the ship beforehand, except one steerage paswatermen, seeing that I was alongside, called senger, an old acquaintance of the steward's, me, as my direction lay in the exact quarter. who was going home in bad health. He was The consequence was that I could not avoid always ready to be useful, and afraid of making the offer to meet some of the returnnothing. The captain or the new chief mate wherries from the anchorage, though I at now generally slept on board likewise. We once said that I did not take fares, and rehad plenty of neighbours, too, the next vessel quired no payment whatever. The sailor, up roadstead being a timber-barque that had after seeing me, was clearly less eager about just anchored, with the officers on the watch joining the brig. However, it was evident to keep her crew from running before she that the other man was desirous to secure hauled in, while outside of us was a good-sized a passage in the brig, and much cut-up about passenger brig, the Queen of the South, just the likelihood of missing her. He caught ready to leave for the Sandwich Isles and at my offer directly, giving a glance fron Van Diemen's Land. The brig after all me to the boat, and saying something aT missed the forenoon ebb when it made next to payment, as he sat down in the stern-



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A MEMORY OF THE THAMES TUNNEL. BY VAGABUNDUS. W HILST I was wandering in the Dock known the worst, but so long as I possessed region the other day, some boards a penny, I was still a "gentleman of limited that were new to me caught my eye-drab means," oppressed with the anxiety of making boards stuck up here and there, and pointing cash go some way towards satisfying cravwith a black-seamed drab glove towards the ings. I wanted -something to eat, but I Wapping station of the East London Railremembered also that I wanted somewhere way. I thought I should like to see how the to sleep. A penny was all that I could Thames Tunnel looked now that it has been make sure of as a provision for the rest of converted into a railway tunnel, and so I my earthly existence-if it lasted beyond the obeyed the pointing forefingers. But instead night; but how could I make that penny of describing it in its present state, I will supply me with bed and board even for the rather give a reminiscence of it as it was night? So far as I was aware, the twowhen I knew it first, penny rope" of the tramps' lodging-houses It is no business of anybody's how it was in the neighbouring Mill Lane was the that on the night in question I found myself cheapest sleeping accommodation that I without a roof to cover me, and with precould procure for money. A penn'orth of cisely one penny in my pocket. However food of any kind would be but a mouthful it came about, that was the fact. On the for a hungry man, but if I spent all my other side of the world as well as this I penny on my supper to-night, what was I to have once or twice found myself wandering do for a breakfast to-morrow? and, in the at night with even less in my pocket, but, so meantime, how, under any circumstances, far as my memory serves, I had never before, was I to get a night's lodging ? and4ave never since, been left when homeI paced up and down the palisaded path less in possession of that exact amount. in dire perplexity. The only idea that I It was in the palisaded path running becould distinctly form was of the inexpressible tween the then frozen reservoirs of the Kent value of that penny. A hulking tramp reeled Water Company that I found myself, as out of a public-house at the bottom of Rawinter's dusk was changing into winter's darkvensbourne Hill, and came along the path ness, in possession of the capital I have named, on his way to his Mill Lane lodging-house. As I fingered it in my waistcoat pocket, the I envied him, and yet I suspected him. thought, keen as-the east wind, shot through Affluent as were his circumstances, probably, me, that that was all I had in the world to in comparison with mine, he might yet be depend upon for bed and board. If I had covetous of my loose cash. I buttoned up my had nothing at all, I do not think I should coat to the throat (two more buttons came have felt so dismal. Then I should have off as I did so), and prepared to fight to the 31



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152 URSULA SWAYNE'S TROUBLE. URSULA SWAYNE'S TROUBLE. BY THE AUTHOR OF "THE FRENCH DOLL" URSULA SWAYNE'S face was not pieathis humbled, tear-stained face was that of the sant to look at as she came home from proud, uncourteous pupil who made such her French lesson on Saturday afternoon. It strangely clever but intolerably insolent was not a pretty face, but its intelligence comments on his teaching. made it remarkable; and usually the frank, "Yes, madame," he had said to Mrs. open expression of the eyes and mouth Smith, the young ladies are charming, made it pleasing too. so amiable, so bien ilevies, except Mees Now the straight, well-cut brows were conUrsule : and yet, for ten years, she is of an tracted, the under-lip was so pinched upintelligence quite remarkable; but she has wards that the corners of the mouth drooped, not a heart." and a sort of restless quiver in the long, dark And the polite Frenchman went his way eyelashes gave warning that the poor little quite unconscious of the tempest he had troubled heart belonging to the pale, brownraised, or of the vanity he had fed; for eyed child had hard work just then to keep Ursula's trouble was not only because the the tears from springing, faultless exercise at which she had worked When she reached the small house her so resolutely had been given back to her father lived in, she went straight up-stairs, with a bien, Mademoiselle" said in the threw her books and hat on her bed, and master's gravest tones, but that Mary Halthen stood pushing some straggling hairs off ket, the silliest, least clever girl at Mrs. her forehead. Smith's, should be almost always the object Ursula did not go to regular school-only of Monsieur Jeanneton's warm praise. twice a week for French lessons. She had There was a strange under-current of a singular aptitude for languages, a good generosity in Ursula. She hated herself memory, and showed intelligence as well as even for the passing thought. diligence in preparing her exercises, and yet "Why should I grudge Mary praise? She she had come away from Mrs. Smith's cannot do her exercises, but she is a good school with a troubled, sorrowful face. sort of girl enough." I hate Monsieur Jeanneton ;"-and there Lully, are you never coming down? was something very like a stamp on the bare Do make haste." wooden floor as she spoke-"and yet I A boy about two years older than Ursula* would rather do lessons for him than any shouted this from the bottom of the stairs. one; he is so clever; he knows exactly what is "What do you want, Willie ? I suppose I difficult, and shows where it comes and why may have time to wash my hands and take it is difficult; he is so different from Miss Grey. off my things ?" Miss Grey Why, when I ask her to explain, "That's right, fire up, young un I don't she only makes things more confused : she think French agrees with you, Lul, you are says, 'Well, I'm sure I don't know; it also precious cross when you come home. Are ways has been so; you ask too many you coming to play cricket with Fred and questions, Ursula;' but then-" the child me, or aren't you? Just say Yes or No." paused an instant reflectively-" Miss Grey Ursula's heart was very full now. is an idiot. I could teach just as well as If I'm cross you can't want me, so I say she does, poor silly thing. Yes, Monsieur No." Jeanneton is very, very, very clever, but he "All right, cross-patch;" and Willie ran is unjust, and I hate people to be unjust; of off to join his eldest brother. course, I do my lessons as well as I can; I Ursula's heart seemed bursting. She could don't choose to be beaten; but he has a spite not stay in-doors. She wanted to get into the against me, or--" air away from every one. The colour rose up to her forehead, and She stood at the glass door leading into tears came along with it, crimsoning and the garden. She did not want to fall in swelling the slender throbbing throat, till with her brothers; but they were not to be they forced away the pride that had held seen on the lawn. them back. Ursula sat down, and, hiding At the end of the lawn came the kitchenher face in her hands, had an unrestrained garden, fenced out of sight by a thick sobbing-fit. shrubbery, and beyond this again was a Poor little wounded heart! Monsieur field; on one side of the field was a bit ot Jeanneton would scarcely have believed that waste ground, with a good-sized hillock in



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CONTENTS. PAGE MARY AND KATIE....................................................By Charles Camden. 5 THE FRENCH DOLL.............................................. By Katharine S. Macquoid. 8 A NIGHT IN AN AFRICAN CRUISER.................................... By S. W. Sadler. 13 RUNNING AWAY TO SEA................................................By Richard Rowe. 18 THE BOY WHO HAD NO MEMORY.................................................... 25 THE FIRST ALMOND-TREE................................. .......... By Helen Zimmern. 27 A MEMORY OF THE THAMES TUNNEL.............................................. 31 PEGGY'S AFTERNOON NAP...........................................By Charles Camden. 37 THE ENGLISH GIRL IN THE FRENCH SCHOOL .............By Katharine S. Macquoid. 39 CHESSY CHALK AND HER BABY......................................By Edward Howe. 47 TACKLING OLD EPHRAIM.............................................................. 50 PAUL AND JEAN......................................................By Bessie P. Belloc. 57 MASTER EPHRAIM JONES, JR......................................................... 63 BUSH NEIGHBOURS....................................................By Edward Howe. 66 THE CROWN IMPERIAL LILY..........................................By Helen Zimmern. 73 GIACOMO AND PALLIDINA; OR, THE ITALIAN BEGGARS .......................... 76 HOW MAY'S DREAM WAS PROVED TRUE........................... By Randall Bevan. 92 THE TWO NESTS ..................................................... ........ ... 96 THE RIDE ON THE CLIFF...........................................By Charles Camden. 98 KEEPING THE "CORNUCOPIA"........................................................ 102 YARNS.............................................................By a Young Sea-Captain. 116 LIME'US AND PADDY ............................................ By Charles Camden. 124 THE LAST NEWS OF THE FAIRIES..................................... By Miss Mulock. 130 TWO STORIES................................................. By Hans Christian Andersen. 134 THE SWALLOW-WORT................................................By Helen Zimmern. 139 DAPPLE'S OPINIONS....................................................By Richard Rowe. 144 ABOUT PHILIP............................................................By G. Crockford. 148 URSULA SWAYNE'S TROUBLE..................................By Katharine S. Macquoid. 152 JACK AND JANE.............................. ...............................By Richard Rowe. 159 COME TO THE WOODS. A POEM...................................................... 162 AUNT ANNIE'S STORY ABOUT JAMAICA............................. By Lady Barker. 162



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156 URSULA SWAYNE'S TROUBLE. so suddenly alarmed the school-girls. The only one; and she has no mother now, bull had been half hidden till now in the dry poor little angel, and you have saved her ditch beneath the hedge which separated the for me." two fields. Mary loosed Aimde's hand and "No, monsieur," said Ursula, "you saved ran past in wild terror, us both ; I only tried. Monsieur," she said, Come, Ursula, come; she will not move, so simply and earnestly that the tears rose in I tell you." Monsieur Jeanneton's eyes, you are giving Mary cried out loud in her frantic fear, me more praise than I deserve now; why and the bull, disturbed by the sound, turned did not you praise me when I really did slowly round from the gate and faced Ursula. deserve it?" Ursula was a great reader: I cannot tell He rose up and looked at her, but he did whether stories of people who had faced wild not answer her at once. Presently he looked animals came to her mind; or whether the at Mrs. Swayne. Help that dwells in every little Christian Madame,"-he bowed,-" in your prechild mastered her fear; I can only tell you sence it is not my business to give advice what she did. She caught up little Aimee to Mees Ursule, and yet my heart is so full in her arms, and moved slowly away. The of love for her that I seem to feel a fatherly bull followed, and gave another deep, dull right in her to-day. My dear child," he said, roar. and he took Ursula's little hand in both his, Ursula looked on towards the unfastened to-day you have shown me for the first gate,-how far it was, and the bull was not time your true nature, and I confess that all four yards behind her! She knew by instinct this while I have been judging you wrongly; that if she ran the bull would run too, and but it has not been fault of mine. People would overtake her in an instant, laden as are judged by the temper they show; life is she was. She took a few more steps, and not made up of large things, my child; you then she stopped again, for Aimee grew may perhaps never again have the occasion heavier and heavier; the bull stopped too, given you to save another of God's creatures and, lowering his head, gave another roar. by your own self-denial, but in the little "Only God can save us now!" burst from things of which daily life is made you may Ursula's lips. do this every hour if you will. My good Once more she slowly retreated, always little friend, I cannot believe that your own keeping one side towards the bull; he foltongue and your own temper are not as lowed more quickly, and his eyes looked worthy of conquest as the sullen, roaring fierce and red. bull." Aimee began to cry. Ursula put her hand over her eyes, as if Hush, darling," Ursula said firmly, to shut out the remembrance, and she "we're quite "safe." She stood still, exshivered violently. hausted. This time she felt sure the bull She must sleep, madame, and-" Monwould not spare; his angry, prolonged roar sieur Jeanneton bent down and whispered seemed her doom. to Mrs. Srtayne-"she must not be left Something brushed by her, and then she alone." felt Aimee taken from her arms, and the Monsieur Jeanneton was right. whole field went round and round. Ursula passed a fevered, delirious night, Ah, mon Dieu!" was all she heard, and and some days went by before she was she was lilted off the ground by a strong arm, allowed to return to her lessons. A habit which has grown little by little is When Ursula opened her eyes, she found only rooted out little by little; and Ursula, herself in the drawing-room at Mrs. Smith's, though she tried in earnest, had often to lying on a sofa; her mother sat by her; but repent of cross words and looks and deeds. Monsieur Jeanneton was there too, on his But never towards Monsieur Jeanneton; he knees, holding one of her hands. was her friend now as well as her master; She opened her eyes widely at this sight. he often walked home with her from school, "Ah, Mees Ursule, what must I say to satisfying her ardent thirst for knowledge you? You are a brave, heroic little girl, and from his own stores of reading I owe to you an eternal gratitude;" and the Ah, monsieur," she said one day long Frenchman bent down and kissed her on afterwards, as she parted from him at her both cheeks, father's door, "how much sunshine would Ursula felt strangely tired; she could not have been hidden from my life if I had answer, but she looked up gratefuly and not been frightened by the bull!" began to cry. KATHARINE S. MACQUOID. That was my child, my little girlmy



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GOOD STORIES FOR YOUNG PEOPLE. MARY AND KATIE. ", TOW then, Katie, we'll go somewhere lower windows, and a row of plump pigeons SNo else," said Mary; and Katie, as usual, cooing sleepily on the ridge of the thatched obeyed her elder sister. roof. Two men thrashing old corn in the Mary and Katie were two little town-girls barn brought down their swinging flails with who had been sent to spend a fortnight at a a monotonous thud-thud, but Katie called it farmhouse, for health's sake; or rather, timid, "blunt music." One of the flails, too, indreamy little Katie had been sent into the terested her. She could see the -man who country in the hope that she might borrow a wielded the other, working away in his blue little bloom from the dog-roses, and a little shirt and corduroy breeches with his loosened springiness from the fresh meadow-breezes; braces dangling from them; but this flail and bustling, unromantic Mary had been sent went up and down as if it did so of its own-acwith her that she might not feel lonely, and cord, because the man who was using it stood that she might be forced to run about. The farther back than the other man ; and theresisters had been sitting in a little green lumfore Katie had been watching its mysterious ber-yard between the barn and the high, appearances and disappearances with a curistraggling hedge that bordered the winding osity which was half-frightened but still very road which led up to the farmhouse. A pleasant. Katie could have sat on the crooked broken old waggon-wheel leaned against the little tree-trunk all day, but Mary had soon greyandgreen, warped weatherboards of theold tired of the little lumber-yard. Come along, barn. A gnarled old tree sprawled its rustling Katie," she said-very pleased to find what leaves over the gabled, moss-patched thatch, she thought her duty tally with her own Two or three brown hens and a cream-coloured wishes. "Come along, Katie; you know cock were scratching and clucking in the green Mamma said that I was not to let you l.mope." little yaAi. Amongst its other lumber was a They scrambled through ahole in the hedge, mossy, crooked little tree-trunk, and on this and went along the winding road. But Katie the little girls had been seated-Katie ensoon wanted to sit down again. She was joying the sunny quiet only broken by lulling tired, for one thing; and for another, it was sounds. The barndoors were open on both not so necessary for her enjoyment as it was sides, so the little girls could see through for Mary's to be always moving on or doing to the strawyard beyond, in which purple and something." She leaned back against the plumpudding pigs were basking, brown spargrassy hedge-bank, and looked at the solitary rows hopping, and black "beasts" and the oak drooping its scalloped leaves over the silver-tailed, silver-maned chestnut colt pullgreen corn in the middle of the opposite field, ing green food out of a grey, roofed rack in and looked so pleased that Mary looked at it sociable silence; and beyond the strawyard, too-but when Mary found that she had only the low-pitched, yellow-washed farmhouse, a tree in the middle of a corn-field to look at,, with its tiny,,paled strip of garden in front, the she could not help saying rather testily, Why, tall hollyhocks blinding the leaden-latticed Katie, what a goose you are-I thought there 5





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32 A MEMORY OF THE THAMES TUNNEL death for my priceless penny. He merely river. The black dykes were frozen, or I lurched up against me, however, and then might have got some nasty duckings, in spite gave me a beer-and-tobacco-scented inverted of the warning white finger-posts upon their blessing for getting in his way. He disapbanks. The moon had come up, and was peared in the frost-fog that was rising, and I trying hard to send its light through the frostwas again left to chew the cud of bitter fanies. fog, but very weak moonshine-and-vapour A very unpleasant place that dreary New was all that it could manage to mix. As I Town Deptford looked when I followed the passed the market-gardens, however, I could tramp over the little water-works bridge. I make out the bony-stalked cabbages wigged did not follow him down darkMill Lane-dark with frozen snow, and in one of the maiketin spite of the tantalising gleams which some gardens I saw an empty market-waggon. [ of the lodging-house windows threw out upon saw also others high piled with cabbages, in the frost-bound roadway. I wandered about readiness for their journey to Covent Garden in that dim, squalid New Town, which or Spitalfields in the early morning. The looked as if it had been built seedy readyfull ones would have been softer to lie on, made to suit the circumstances of its melanand more sheltering to lie against; but I choly inhabitants. Hard-up as they were, knew that I should be disturbed long, long however, they were better off than I. Their before daybreak if I made my couch in or landlords, at any rate, did not mean to turn near one of these, so I scrambled into the them out that night; I saw blinks of fireempty waggon. I found an old sack in it, light, and women and children coming home and two or three bruised cabbage leaves. I from the chandler's with loaves, and red hercurled myself up in the sack, in the snuggest rings, and rashers of bacon partially wrapt corner of the waggon I could find; I up in newspaper. Home where was my munched the bruised cabbage leaves for my home? I had no fire to go to. I could not buy supper (boiled cauliflower stalk, I think, is as a loaf, and if I bought a roll or a red-herring nice as asparagus almost, but I cannot con(which I should have had to eat without scientiously recommend uncooked cabbagecooking), my fortune would be squandered. leaves), and then I tried hard to go to sleep. New Town Deptford soon became too I was tired enough, but to sleep I could not oppressive, and I rushed down into the get, and presently the faint moonlight faded brawling Broadway. The people standing quite away, and the wind awoke keener than and passing loomed like phantoms through ever, and stinging hail rattled on my face, the fog. The street lamps, the shop lamps, and thick snow came down in flakes as the flaring lights of the street-sellers smudged broad as crown pieces. If I had stayed in it, it with bilious blotches. One street-seller, the waggon would soon have become a white clapping one arm across his breast, was hearse. I had to get up and begin again my shouting at the top of his voice, as if that weary wanderings. Hither and thither I would warm him, A penny a lot! a penny wandered, half blinded by the snow, and at a lot I" As I passed him he pushed into last found myself stumbling about in the my face a penholder, half a dozen pens, and quaint, dark, winding streets of Rotherhithe. a pen-wiper. All that lot for a penny!" he It was nearly midnight as I went along one shouted. If it's the last penny you've got, of the narrow little lanes. The lower winyou'll buy 'em. Blowed if I think you've got dows of all the squat houses, except one, a penny," he growled, as I hurried past him. were shuttered. I stopped to look into the I hada penny, you know, but I was not going dimly-lighted little shop window. A bill to spend it in that way. I could not eat the headed Drowned-Ten Shillings Reward" pens, and roll myself up in the pen-wiper. lay upon a wooden tray full of marbles An More and more puzzled as to the best old man, who had been sitting in a ack mode of investing my large capital, I plodded room smoking over a cheerful little fire, laid on to the New Cross gate, and through it down his pipe as I stood looking in, and along that dismal Old Kent Road.I had came through the shop, and up its bargestarted with a vague intention of walking on cabin-like steps into the street, to close his to London, but when I reached the canalshutter. He eyed me suspiciously as I bridge, the thought occurred to me that a moved on, and seemed to do all his fastenpenny would be of no more use to me in iig with anxiously ostentatious care. Very London than elsewhere; and so I turned off lonely did I feel when I heard his top bolt from the road, and wandered about purposeshot behind me. I was altogether shut out lessly in the flat region ofrailway-arch, canal, then, in the cold, silent street. The wind dyke, docks, rope-walk, timber-yard, taverns, had gone down again, but the soft snow was tea-gardens, marsh, and market-garden, that tailing laster than ever. I began to think lies between Peckham New Town and the that it was useless ior me to walk any farther;



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MASTER EPHRAIM BINES, JUNIOR. BY A NATURAL PHILOSOPHER. EPHRAIM BINES was a jobbing garunceremoniously fling the cutting over the dener: an honest, hard-working, but garden wall, with the supercilious remarkvery obstinate old fellow, and by no means "It's naught better than a stinkin', outsweet-tempered. His Jim Crow hat had no landish weed-that's what that is, mum, whojauntiness in it, but brooded on his grizzled ever give it to ye." head like a rusty, draggle-tailed raven. His It was in vain to attempt clandestine face was very much like a scowling knocker, planting of these aliens. Ephraim was sure and when he was in a very bad temper, he to find them out, in whatever secluded had a habit of fingering his stubbly chin, as corners they might be concealed; and then if he were feeling for the knocker-ring, down came his hoe upon them like a headsThere were sullen wrinkles in his velveteen man's axe. Competition might have taken waistcoat and his corduroy breeches; his some of the conceit out of Master Ephraim, brown leather buskins frowned in every but there was no other jobbing gardener for button; and his heavy, tight-laced boots three or four miles round Sloefield, and so descended on the earth with a solemnly Ephraim had completely at his mercy all the slow, elephant-like thud, which seemed to Sloefielders who owned gardens which they say, There, Ephraim Bines has put his could not keep in order themselves. foot down, and Ephraim Bines would like If Ephraim gave himself such airs in to see the man that could make him move other people's places, it might be supposed it until he chooses to lift it up again." that he was monarch of all he surveyed in his The old ladies whose gardens he did up own home. And so he was to a large extent, stood in awe of Ephraim. They durst not for but still there was a tiny rebel there. their lives ask him to raise the vegetables Ephraim's meek-spirited little wife was dead, they wanted to be raised, or to arrange their but whilst she lived she would scarcely have flower-beds as they wanted them to be dared to say that it was hot or cold, if arranged. They were obliged to be content Ephraim had not said so before her. His with just such flowers, and shrubs, and eldest daughter, Jemima, who kept house for fruit, and vegetables, as Ephraim chose to him, was almost as ill-tempered as her father, permit their gardens to provide them with, but she was afraid to vent her ill-temper If interfered with in the slightest degree, upon him, saving it all for her sisters and Ephraim would either shoulder his tools her brother. The second daughter, Kezia, (although half the lawn might still be unwas as meek-spirited as her mother had mown), and march home in a huff; or else been. The youngest, Keren -happuch, he would take his revenge in a massacre was a roguish little puss ; she greatly of the innocents, ruthlessly tearing up and enjoyed mischief when somebody else did cutting down huge clumps of his offending it, but took precious good care not to get employer's favourite flowers. Nothing aninto a scrape herself. It was little Ephraim noyed Ephraim more than when friends who was the enfant terrible of the family; and of his employers made them presents of yet old Ephraim liked young Ephraim better cuttings with which he was not familiar. If than any other of his children, and got quite one of these botanical unwelcome little angry with Jemima when night after night strangers was produced in Ephraim's preshe rushed to meet him with a fresh list of sence, he would take it between his thumb her little brother's misdeeds. She had been and finger, hold it at arm's length as if he obliged to give up spanking him on her own could not bear the smell of it, sniff conaccount, since latterly for every spank she temptuously, snort indignantly, and then had received two vigorous kicks upon her 63



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150o ABOUT PHILIP. then Uncle Kit, breaking the stillness, said, It seemed to him that he had climbed up the "I will tell you a tale." And the tale which least inhabited part of the island, for he he told Philip was still thinking about, as he could see a great number of people moving leant moodily on the window-sill. It was a about among the handsome streets more invery short one, and, as Uncle Kit said, was land; while near him, though there were not to be believed for a moment. He said, some of the largest buildings, he could see too, looking at Philip, he only told it to them no one. He noticed, too, that these large for the sake of the moral. buildings, though grandly built, looked very It was about a boy named David, who had desolate and uncomfortable, and as if no been shipwrecked, and who had been the care had been taken with them. He:was only one saved from a crew of thirty hands, going to walk on further, when a sight startled It had been a fearful night for this boy David, him so much that he felt almost inclined to for the storm had come on in the darkness, jump back into the sea once more. On the and increased so quickly, and with so much grass outside one of the biggest houses was fury, that the captain and men soon saw that stretched a man-a giant, perhaps, I ought to a miracle alone could save their little craft, say--a giant so long that David thought that The boats were not seaworthy, or the crew there was no end to him. This giant lay were too frightened to use them, and David quite still, as if asleep, and David wondered saw the men, as a great fear came upon them, if he could get away without being noticed. jump overboard, and thus seek themselves the No, the movement in the grass disturbed very death they were dreading. He himself him; he raised his head, and in a sleepy was too frightened at the white foam and the voice called out to the sailor-boy. Davidangry growling of the waves to follow them, for he was really brave-went up to him, but he knelt quite still, grasping the mast, and the giant asked him where he came from, while his limbs felt as if they were bound and who he was. These questions answered, with iron chains, so impossible it seemed for David grew pluckier, put questions too, and him to rise, or to let go his hold. Hours at last, in a hesitating tone, asked, "How passed-hours so long and dreary; but at long are you?" The giant answered him-I last day broke, and gradually, as it grew forget the exact length, but it was very long; lighter, the sea became calmer. David and he told him, too, many strange things raised himself, looked about, and then shut about the island. That the people on it did his eyes with a shudder; for he, the weakest not die of years, but of deeds, and that to of the crew, was alone,-alone, on that blackdie was looked upon as their one great wish, looking sea. Alone in a black-looking world "for the life on this island," said the giant, he might have thought; for as he looked "we only count as an apprenticeship, as an enround, the clouds on every side seemed trance to the life afterwards to come." The joined to the sea, and the small stormgiant then, with a great effort, changed his stripped wreck he was on appeared the position; and then he told David that some centre of a dismal globe. Then Uncle Kit men lived a long life before they were twenty, told them how miserably David passed several whilst others, like himself, were mere babies, days in his prison, the ship, and that one though really hundreds of years old. Then morning he discovered in the S.W. horihe said that the hardest part was that, as time zon a green line, which he at once recogwent on, without deeds, the men grew taller nised as land. Whether the wreck had and taller. "You will find those that are drifted to it, or it had arisen in the night, active small and lithe, and with glossy black David never knew, but it was there on the hair, while each day that I lie here I grow third morning after the storm. Then David longer and longer, and my hair, instead of with great joy soon found a plank, and strapturning white, as I have heard that it does ping himself to it, managed to paddle to the from old age in some countries, turns redder green line, and found it to be high cliffs, and redder." And the poor giant sighed covered with moss and weeds, while great deeply, while David asked why he did not get trees grew on the edge, and dipped their up and work, for perhaps he might then either branches into the water. The cliffs were so die or grow shorter. The giant answered that high that David almost gave up the idea of that was another hard part of the life on this ever getting to the top; however, with the island, for the longer a man kept idle the help of the strong weeds and the trees, he more difficult it was for him to work, and that did reach it at last, and then he felt very now it had become almost impossible for thankful for what he found there. Instead him even to rise. The people here, he told' of the wild desert he had expected, there David, were beginning to think him a public' was a beautiful city before him, with houses nuisance, and were discussing what they" grander -than he had seen even in London. coulddo with him, for they kiew as well



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40 THE ENGLISH GIRL copybook; she looked uglier than ever. All "Valerie is right; the English girl is proud, Ursula's indignation turned against the soband she has not an amiable expression." bing girl. The girls soon went flocking into the court "What a mean-spirited baby! If any for a few minutes before "classe." governess were to insult me in that public Ursula looked round in dismay: there was way, why I'd die before she should think I positively nothing to be seen but the greenminded it. What a horrid coward I" shuttered, whitewashed walls of the schoolThe bell-such a cracked, noisy, prolonged house, which surrounded the court on three sound-and then a scuffling of feet, a grating sides; a low wall, also whitewashed, made the of chairs as they were pushed back, a good fourth boundary; and in one corner stood deal of flapping up and down of desks, and a pump with a stone trough beneath. in the midst of all a" Mamma said I must try and send a sketch "Silence, Mesdemoiselles !" and Madame of the house or something," the girl thought Henry stood up, and, as it seemed to Ursula, dolefully, but there's nothing but the pump gabbled a prayer over very fast. Everybody to draw." crossed themselves, and then, two and two, She had travelled all night, and though she the line of girls filed out through the foldinghad been taken to a dormitory on her arrival, doors at the end of the room, curtseying to she had only gathered a general impression Madame as they passed, that it was fresh and pleasant-looking, and They came into a long bare room with that the pretty white basins were much too a long narrow table and benches. Madame small to wash in. had stayed behind, but Mademoiselle Prage Bonjour, Mademoiselle." Valerie had and the other governesses tried to keep order come up to her, linked arm-in-arm with while the girls seated themselves, pretty blue-eyed Leonie. Is it the first time Ursula sighed. "It is not so home-like as you come in France, Mademoiselle?" an English school, after all. It seems like Valerie's elaborate politeness made Ursula convicts to be paraded in that marching desperately conscious of awkwardness; her fashion, just to come in and get lunch, for cheeks grew fiery red under the gracious this can't be dinner, and I don't like my smiles of the two French girls. fellow-convict." "Yes, I thank you," she stammered out The "fellow-convict" with whom Ursula in her limping French. had walked into the room was the unlucky She looked up, she felt they must be laughSophie. Ursula would not look round at ing at her; but no, Valerie looked gravely her; she sat eating bread and butter and polite, and Leonie smiled pleasantly. pears, feeling that she was undergoing a We must tell you our names," she said; polite but keen scrutiny from two pairs of you will not feel at home with us if we call opposite eyes,-the long dark sly eyes of you Mademoiselle, will you?" L.onie smiled Valerie Dutemps, and the blue laughing yet more sweetly; she was pleased with the glances of Leonie Rendu. admiration she saw in the English girl's great "I shall like that pretty, good-tempered dark eyes. Like many another unattractive looking girlopposite," thought Ursula. "She person, Ursula almost worshipped personal has quite an English face, nothing of the beauty, and Leonie had a fair pretty face skinny Frenchwoman about her. I daresay with soft blue eyes, and golden hair waving she's not clever, and I can help her with her round her high, narrow white forehead, a exercises, and we shall get on. I should rosebud mouth, and a small, very aquiline like her for a friend. I must begin to talk to nose: it was more like a face painted on some of the girls, or I shall never improve ivory than one exposed to the wear and tear myself." of ordinary life. Mademoiselle !"' Ursula started at the "I am Leonie Rendu, and this is Valerie low, sweet voice, and turned round; she Dutemps, and you are, I think, Ursule ?" started again at finding Sophie's, eager green She spoke with such charming ease, with eyes fixed on her. "Pardonl but Madeso much frankness, and yet with such moiselle has dropped her handkerchief." grace, that Ursula was won out of her shy She spoke so softly, she moved so like a reserve. cat, that Ursula disliked her more and I am called Ursula," she smiled. more. "Ursula, ah ciel!" Valerie put both hands Thank you," she said, gravely, and then to her ears. she put her head shyly on one side, and got "It must be Ursule," said Leonie, laughvery red at the sound of her own accent ing; "we shall never arrive at pronouncing it after Sophie's. rightly. Do you know what class you are to Sop'lie shrunk back into her shell, be in, Ursule?" j



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Pi THE RIDE ON THE CLIFF." See Page 98, Se Pge98



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74 THE CROWN IMPERIAL LILY unapproachable tree meant what he spoke to your favour. You shall be the floral empress. an inferior being. See," she went on, turning her fragrant head "You are the most beautiful of our numto the other flowers, "does not our sister bear ber," spoke out the modest Violet from upon her all the insignia of royalty'? Behold, among her shading leaves, she carries her flowers crownwise around her "You are, you are," interrupted the forward stem. Hail, Empress; hail, Lily Imperial!" Jasmine, effectually preventing the Violet from "Hail, hail," exclaimed all the other uttering another word; for she was shy, and plants. rarely nerved herself to the effort of speech. "Hail," gravely repeated the Olives. "From this day forth," said the Rose, "I All was joy and gladness, no shade of will consider my queenly title as lowered in jealousy or strife broke on their peace. As for the Lily, she raised her head yet more and seek refreshment for His soul, to renew proudly heavenwards, expanded her silvery the daily battle with sin and unbelief. It was bells more fully, and merely deigned to long before He paid His wonted attention to acknowledge her comrades' compliments by a the flowers around. condescending nod of her central crested Meantime a whole stream of thoughts leaves, coursed through the Lily's head. She was the Late in the afternoon of that day on which most beautiful of all the garden's flowers; her the flowers had chosen the silver white lily sisters had publicly proclaimed her so to-day; their empress, our Lord entered the garden. she felt very proud and glad. How proud He was weary and sad, and had sought this and glad, how much her vanity was flattered, quiet solitude to commune with His Father, she would hardly have cared to own. But



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THE SWALLO W-UORT 143 this? {ou see I am exact. It is my habit they wished to do anything for her, they to be so in everything. I do not wish you might sing of this matter in all lands, extolling to mistake the flower owing to any carelessher wisdom and sagacity. ness on my part. You comprehend?" Which the swallows did, mother and son, Quite," said the swallow, who was getting praising the owl's wisdom and the flower's very anxious, what with the lateness of the virtue. They told their tale so well that from hour, and her child alone; and would this be henceforth if aught ailed the eyes of swallows a remedy after all? "Go on, I beg." they would seek the wondrous healing herb. Well," proceeded the owl, "as I said, the Wherefore men called it the Swallow-wort flowers are yellow, the leaves bluish green. when they beheld how these birds congreIt grows about two feet high, and has a thick gated around it, and they call it so to this juice of dull orange hue very acrid and day. noxious. This you must extract by piercing Autumn came once more upon the earth; the plant with your beak. Apply it on the mother and son prepared for their migration eyes of your little one, and after two or three to Egypt. The son felt full of eager longing such applications you will probably find he to behold a new land, fresh scenes; the will see as well as you or I; for, from what mother wondered sadly and lovingly if she you tell me of the nature of his blindness, I should meet her mate on the banks of the do not hold it to be incurable. Now you Nile, to whom in spite of all his unkindness can go; I wish to begin my hunt. You may she yet clung tenderly. So, with different return again after a few nights to tell me the hopes and fears, they set off on their journey, result. Good-bye." The owl was setting forth and the children said : on her midnight rambles. "Winter is coming again, for there go the "One thing more," pleaded the swallow, birds. And Christmas will come soon, and "and I go, full of gratitude and love to you." the snow, and then they'll come back. Good" Bother that," gruffly answered the owl. bye, swallows, come again soon," they cried, "What is it ? Quick !" as they saw them wing off in shoals. "Will the flower die if I take its juice?" They had not fled far ere the mother, The swallow had grown so compassionate looking down to earth, beheld a bird in the now, she could not bear to hurt the meanest claws of their arch-enemy-the vicious cat. thing. Look at that poor swallow, my child," "Not if you take the juice from the leaves she said. "Stay for me, I will try and rescue and are careful. Why do you bother yourself him," and she fluttered to earth. But it was about that? Be glad if it cures your child, in vain she strove to save the poor bird,-in Once more good-bye," and the owl flew off. whom, on nearer approach, she recognised The poor mother could hardly await the her mate,-hard though she struggled with morning, and with the first ray of daylight all her tiny might. The cat had already given she sought the wall, and found, exactly as him the mortal blow, and, seeing another the owl had described, the herb that was to bird so close within her reach, sprang upon heal her little one. Carefully she detached it, cruelly wounding the poor mother with a leaf with her beak, and gathering up the her claws. juice that dropped therefrom, flew upwards "Adieu, my child, my little one," she with it to her nest, and laid it on the young chirped in her death-throes to the bird that one's eyes. Towards evening the little bird hovered above, awestruck by the scene. "Fly complained of something hurting its eyes: it to Africa with your fellows; fly away and was the light. The swallow's heart leaped be happy. I have found your father, and for joy, the juice was evidently doing its am at peace. The monster who has murwork. Next day, and again the next, she dered him has killed me also; we die together. sought the sight-restoring plant, and on the Go, little one," she said, as her son seemed fourth day after this her little son could bear wavering in his resolution. the daylight without pain, and was eagerly And he flew on, on; over the heaving sea, questioning his mother about the various over the desert, over the palm-trees, over objects he could behold from out the nest. the glistening Nile; far, far into the sunny A few days later and the mother once more wastes of Africa, where all was life and gladtaught her son how to fly. Their first journey ness, and where he nearly forgot his distant was to the owl to testify their gratitude, and English home among the vine-leaves, but to show the good results of her advice. But never his tender mother. the owl only grunted that she was glad to As for Pussie, she had not enjoyed so hear it; of course she had been right, as ample a meal for many a long day. usual She wished they would not tease her HELEN ZIMMERN. with thanks; she hated them. If, by the bye,



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THE ITALIAN BEGGARS. 89 I did was done in the hope of seeing her morning to night, and never tire. I should again and rendering her happy. always have all that I think about to tell My master treated me well, and sent me to thee of. Good-bye, brother. school. I learnt to read, write, and cipher. Never forget to say your prayers for the I attended the catechising of the parish, and love of the good God, and for thy sister who received my first communion. Having asked embraces as she loves thee.-PALLIDINA." the Curd to write to the priest of the village My delight on reading such a letter may where my sister was, requesting her to do the easily be imagined. It was really a blessing same, I soon learned that she had fulfilled to have found such a mistress for my sister that duty, and that the first communion of as the miller's wife; and reflecting on the both had taken place the same day. This greatness of God, and how we had been gave me untold delight. It seemed to be protected and preserved by Him, my thanksanother link binding me to that child. givings went up from a fervent heart. One day, as I was grooming my horses, I Time passed away. I was now seventeen, was surprised by having a letter placed in my and Pallidina was about a year younger. She hand. All sorts of ideas flashed through my was still in.the same place, and her mistress brain. Was the letter from my father, or treated her like a daughter. As for me, I Pietrina? But who could have given my had been promoted from a stable-boy to a address? Was it from the miller? Was Pallidriver, and was so busy I could not get dina ill ? away. More than a year had elapsed since I opened it trembling, and read as folI had seen my sister. lows:Having put by a little money, the idea of MY DEAR MOMO,-You will indeed be taking it to her became so absorbing, that I surprised, for this is my writing. I wanted was obliged to ask for a holiday, which my to surprise you, and so never told you that master at once gave me. M. the Cure and the schoolmaster have taken Well dressed, prosperous, a silver watch a fancy to me, and have taught me everyin my fob, and fifty francs in my pocket, I thing almost they know. This is delightful, reached the mill. Pallidina's joy was exfor it makes me more useful to my good treme, and her master and mistress seemed mistress, who is good as good bread. But, thoroughly glad to see me. I told them all indeed, to say the truth, everybody here is that had befallen me, and how much my fond of me, even the cow, and the hens, and position had been bettered, and in their prethe pigeons who fly about me and eat out of sence made over my money to my sister. my hand. All the children are very nice, "Thank God, I want for nothing!" said and they are company for me. It is so she; "you can keep it." pretty here of a morning when the sun rises, Nay," I replied; "it is for thee that I and the mill-wheel keeps beating the water, work." and the cock crows, and it is so fresh beneath Well, my children," interposed the milthe great trees. I go out with my piece of ler's wife; "give the money to my husband, castagnaccio,' and lead the cow to where the and he will put it into the savings' bank for grass grows thickest in the fields; then I run you. If you go on placing all you can spare back through the olive-trees, and I think of there, it will bring you in a little by and by." you in the sunshine, in the shade, by the I spent three or four days at the mill. The brook, while feeding the poultry, while making miller had parted with his head boy, and said the polenta or the maize bread. I think to me: of thee, too, at evening, when the fire of "You should stay with us, Giacomo. Our thorns crackles, and by the moonlight. And business prospers; I shall be able to afford I recall the times when we both slept out in you better wages than you get at Lucca, and the streets, and say to myself: 'I was, with you are sure to be happy with your sister." my brother; I was very happy;' because As I could not leave my master the hackyou see, Momo, heat and chestnut flour ney-coach proprietor without due notice, I bread, cold, rain, and hunger, all get forasked for some delay; and two months gotten ; and the only part of our poor childpassed before I came to settle at the mill. hood which survives in my heart is the hapI was very tall and strong for my age, and piness of having been with thee. Come and looked more like twenty-five than seventeen. see me as soon as you can. This letter is The country air, however, made me still more very long: I have taken three evenings to robust, and I became really a good workwrite it. My mistress wonders what in man. Nothing tired me; accordingly, by the world I can find to say to thee; but I the time I had been with him a year, my think, Momo, that I could write to thee from master seemed to set great store by me. 1Chestnut bread. In spring-time it is good to be out of



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io6 KEEPING THE "CORNUCOPIA." to engage, and being relieved from charge of course been lodged securely in town, but at the barque a day or two after, at once shifted night the hatches and poop-cabin doors were my quarters to the Cornucopia at her new all padlocked, and the keys brought up into berth. The treatment in every respect was the round-house amidships. We both slept handsome, as was generally the case with there, in the quarters for the crew, with a thorough American employers in California, sufficiency of loaded arms at .hand, and the the Southerners in particular. Everything dog lying out on deck close by. The other in the way of plate or other valuables had of vessels at anchor kept us in heart, with a clear space round each ;and the Government from King. From morning to sundown, steamers and sloop-of-war lay right opposite in fact, there was quite a stir; riggers being in the Bight of Sousolito, across the end of always out at some of the vessels, and gear the island, so that the very sentries could be or stores coming, whilst Captain Simmerall heard. Then the armed boat-rowing harbouroccasionally brought visitors with him, or guard would generally pass us one way or intending passengers. Most of those were the other, never failing to get a challenge well known in town, some being connected



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r6o JACK AND JANE. ever, it started up, rolling Jane over into "Brothers' Kiln." Over their hard cider the ferns. It looked this way and that, tremin the public-house, and round the cottage bling like an aspen leaf, and then away it fire, the lowlanders had often told the story galloped, giving Jack, who had tried to throw of that haunted kiln. Jane knew the story his arms round it, a kick in the stomach with well, and the fear of passing the unholy its hind hoofs that sent him sprawling on to place was the worst of her terrors in the Jane. Jane laughed so that Jack got quite Quarries. The legend ran that two brothers, sulky. But he brightened up again before who worked a quarry in partnership, had they got home, because he had made Jane quarrelled at the kiln, and fought; that the once more cling to him as her protector. elder had struck down the other, and finding He had tried to frighten her at the Pixies' that he was dead, had thrown the corpse into Bowl, showing her the very hole, at the bottom the burning lime, and then spread abroad a of a mossy stone on one side of the heathery report that his brother had fled the country. hollow, through which the fairies tumbled out The girl about whom they had quarrelled, by moonlight. But the sun was then shining and who was to have become the younger brightly down on the little hollow, blue brother's wife, was at last persuaded by the butterflies were flitting over the heather, and elder brother to marry him instead. He yellow-banded bees were buzzing and burying made her believe that it was to escape from themselves in the pink and purple blossoms, her that his brother had fled. But on the Except for the buzziog of the bees, and now anniversary of the murder, her husband's and then a faint rustle of the grass and wickedness was revealed to the wife in a heather as a lazy breath of wind sighed over dream. She awoke screaming, and when her it, the hot hollow was somewhat eerily quiet, husband started up, had accused him of his and Jane looked rather shyly at the dark, crime, and threatened to denounce him. He deep, narrow Pixies' Gate," down which a attempted to murder her, and she rushed bright-eyed lizard, that had been basking from the cottage. Her husband overtook sentry outside, slipt noiselessly as soon as her on the rising ground above the kiln, and Jane and Jack drew near, as if it were going in her desperation she leaped into it; and to tell the fairies that their domain had been as she did so, the dark form of the younger invaded ; but the sun was still so high, and brother sprang out and dragged the elder in. everything around looked so bright and calm, All this nonsensical story poor little Jane that Jack did notsucceed in frightening Jane implicitly believed, and so did scores of as he had hoped, and, therefore, continued grown-up persons in those parts: never sulky. troubling themselves to ak! how any one but Coming home from the moor in the the three people concerned could have known lingering summer dusk, however, they had anything about the matter, if the story had to pass, where the moor begins to slope been true. down towards the low-lying lands, through The silly story went on to say that when a district that had a very bad name. The the hot lime into which the wife leaped, and hill-side was pitted with quarries and the husband was dragged, had grown cold, no dotted with lime-kilns, and the tumbledown fire had ever again burnt in the Brothers' hovels of lime-burners and squatters. The Kiln; but that any one who approached it people who lived up there were a different after dusk could see the ghosts of the wife race from those who lived lower down. They and the younger brother chasing the ghost of were a very wild lot, each doing what seemed the husband round and round the kilngood in his own eyes. There was a longmouth. standing feud between the highlanders and You will understand, therefore, poor little lowlanders; and if Jack had not wandered Jane's fright when Jack suddenly whispered, farther on the moor than he had intended, "There's the Brothers' Kiln !" Though he he would not have come home by night had often looked at it from a distance by day, through "the Quarries." He gave as wide and so knew it well even in the dark, he had a berth as he could to the cottage and had no notion that they were so near to it, kiln lights that twinkled and glowed, not and was almost as frightened as Jane. cheerfully, but threateningly on the hillside; It stood a good way apart from any other meanwhile whispering to Jane awful stories kiln, rising dark against the faint light that about the babies that the lime-burners stole still lingered in the western sky. The witherand boiled and ate, &c. ing dog-rose bushes that wreathed the kiln There was one kiln that Jack was spescratched the pale patch of light with their cially anxious to avoid, because the most black brambles. Bats zigzagged noiselessly ferocious lime-burners themselves were half about the kiln, almost brushing the children's afraid of it even by daylight. This was the faces as they swooped past them. Jack and



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"JACK AND JANE." Seepage I5q.



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$r:? irXIf r,



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ABOUT JAMAICA. 167 ill, and the moment she could bear the voyage pale pink silk petticoats, over which were Papa sent her, Jessie, nurse, and me back to muslin pelisses-I remember mine had a England, where we remained till I was grown frill round my waist!-pink drawn silk bonup into a tall young lady of sixteen, when we nets (hats had never been heard of for little returned to Jamaica and spent two very happy girls), very big, hot, and uncomfortable, tied years there. Another time I intend to tell tightly under our chins, muslin trousers with you all about our pets and the sort of life lace and work round our ankles, and pink we led; but before I finish for the present I silk boots Fancy running about the grass think I n ist add one great piece of naughtiin pink silk boots i However, nurse proness which I committed before we left Janounced that we looked very nice indeed, maica with Aunt Nelly. The curious part and I tried hard to believe her, though I of the story is that I had no intention of had great doubts on the subject. We were being naughty, nor any idea that my experiparticularly told by her not to go off the ment would have been better left untried, smooth gravelled walks (on account of these To make you understand how the idea horrid boots); so we considered that we were came into my head I must explain that I strictly keeping within the limits of the law was very tall for my age, whilst Jessie was when we followed a narrow path which led extremely short. She was always longing us round rather to the back of the house, and wishing to be as tall as I was, and among thick shrubs. Here we stopped to asking everybody if they did not think she examine a deep hole which had just been was growing bigger; but still she remained a made for a large plant. There was a wateringlittle fat dot of a thing, whilst my nurse pot full up to the brim standing temptingly declared that my frocks had to be let down near it, and also a spade. I cannot rean inch every week. I was very sorry that collect what led to the subject, except that Jessie remained so small, and helped her to hardly an hour ever passed without an allurethedy the defect upon every opportunity, sion to it, but I remember Jessie peering I had already got into trouble for abstracting into the hole and saying wistfully, Oh I a pot of pomade from Mamma's dressingwish I could grow like the plants!" Imcase. I hid it under my pillow, and as soon mediately I felt a strong conviction that at as nurse had taken away the light at night, last we had hit upon the only way to improve slipped out of my little bed, felt my way to her tiny stature; so I said eagerly, "Well, I Jessie's crib, and, with her full consent and don't see why you shouldn't, if only you approbation, rubbed her all over from her could be planted : but perhaps nurse might head to her feet with pink pomatum. I not like the trouble of digging the hole, or leave you to imagine the state of the sheets, of watering you afterwards." These were &c. in the morning. When I was brought the only objections which occurred to me; up for judgment and sentence before the and when Jessie timidly said, I wonder if authorities, my only defence was that I had that hole is big enough for me?" I immeheard Papa say, a day or two before, speakdiately felt that it would be absolutely wrong ing of this wonderful pomatum, "Why, I to miss such an opportunity of trying an believe it would make even little Dot grow." experiment, so I urged her to get in. She This was quite enough to determine me to did not want much persuasion, but jumped try the effect on her. However, I was only down into the hole-I think I see her lectured and dismissed without any punishpretty little anxious face now, peeping out m-ent, but unfortunately with the idea more from the frightful heavy bonnet-cap of bows firmly rooted than ever in my silly little head of ribbon and net which framed it. I asked that it was my duty as well as my earnest her how she felt, and she said it was very wish to devise some way of helping Jessie to cool to her feet; so I directly made up my grow taller, mind to carry out the idea thoroughly, and It must have been several weeks after this assured her, as if I knew it to be a fact, that failure that, upon the occasion of a large was the first symptom of growth, and I garden-party in the afternoon, Jessie and I proceeded to tilt the big watering-pot with found ourselves wandering about the grounds all my strength (for I could not possibly lift of a friend's house, in our best frocks, waiting it), until a stream began to trickle down for the arrival of some other children who upon the pink silk boots. Jessie said, with were to play with us. We believed ourselves a little gasp, half of fright, "It's very cool to be very smart indeed; and so we were for and nice, but I'm afraid nurse won't like it those days : but I think if we saw two little on account of my boots;" so I comforted girls dressed in the same way playing in the her by assurances that when nurse saw how square now, in exactly our costume, we should tall she had grown she would not mind it. think they looked very odd. We had on very As soon as the water had all been poured in,



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90 GIACOMO AND PALLIDINA; OR, doors, and at evening I used to walk along and the silence was long unbroken. The sun the wooded hills with my sister. But a in nearing the horizon left us in shadow. My strange revolution was going on within me love shone in my eyes. Pallidina seemed which made me dreadfully unhappy. I disdeeply moved, her cheeks crimsoned, and her covered that I was in love with Pallidina. hand was cold as snow in my grasp. I remembered what hitherto had hardly ever I know your secret," she cried; Signor occurred to me, that she was my sister only Gesiu I understand it all My brother in name, and thought it was a very sad case; You are no longer my brother!" And, for that if our master and mistress looked at hiding her face in her hands, that I might not us as lovers, instead of as brother and sister, see her emotion, she ran to fetch the children. they certainly would never keep me: we That evening between her and me not a should be obliged to separate, and how could single other word was spoken. Pallidina endure that ? Alas I dating from that hour, our life was a That evening I wandered alone under the very hard one, for while loving more than olive-trees, and returned so distressed that ever, our sole aim was to avoid each other. my sister noticed it. Neither of us had the courage to disclose the "What ails thee, Momo?" asked she. secret of our hearts to our kind mistress. "Nothing," replied I. From the summit of happiness we passed to "Why hide your troubles from me?" she such a state of suffering that I thinned visibly, went on, in her caressing voice. "Am I not and Pallidina was paler than her name. The your sister ?" and, coming closer, she laid her miller's wife noticed it to her. It is only the hand on my shoulder, heat of the summer," she replied; and feeling I shuddered, herself blushing at this departure from truth, Leave me," was all I could say. she slipped away. "See now, Momo," she gently insisted; * "can it be that I have vexed thee? If so," One evening, as I rode our mule on my kissing my forehead, "I beg thy pardon return from taking sacks of flour to a baker for it." in the district, I was perfectly absorbed in a "Oh, why are not you indeed my sister !" tumult of thought. I dwelt on Pallidina, on I exclaimed, pressing her hand to my lips; our childhood, on the vow we had made then, abruptly rising, I dashed out of the never to forsake each other, and said to house, and only returned at supper-time; but myself that the only way to be happy was to I could eat nothing. marry, if Heaven would but send me some My sister looked very sad, and her eyes one to tell the true state of the case to our were swollen as with crying. We talked on master and mistress. Night was coming on, indifferent subjects to the miller and his wife, and I fell into such a trance of prayer and and I went to bed in a state of extreme longing, as to take no notice whatever of the agitation, not knowing what my sister would way, and let the mule carry me where it think of me. Night brings counsel. I made would; when suddenly it stumbled, and I up my mind that I both ought and would found that the creature had taken a narrow conquer my feelings, path at a great height, on the border of a The morning confirmed my good resoluprecipice. tions. I put on a cheerful air and worked I stopped for a moment to collect myself, manfully till nightfall. and, having looked round, struck into a thicket During the week I no longer walked with which would lead me to a road that I knew. my sister under the trees. She seemed very In the closest part of this thicket I fancied I sad, which made me remorseful; and on heard a groan, listened, and held my breath Sunday we went as usual to mass together. then, dismounting, fastened the mule to a Go, my children, and walk in the cool," tree,and made my wayin the direction whence said the miller's wife, when evening came; the sound came. A dark mass on the ground "and, her children accompanying us, we all met my view; drawing nearer, I saw that it went together into the valley. The whole was an old man who lay on the earth, while a country was out in flower. The fields, all boy of ten or twelve was sobbing beside him. covered with daisies and lilies, looked like a Oh, whoever you may be, help, oh help wondrous carpet. us!" said the child; "we have lost our way, and "Go, little ones, and gather nosegays," we have walked so far without eating that my said Pallidina to the children. Then, turning father has fallen down from weakness." to me: Let us sit down here, Monmo; the Come along with me, my good man," air is so fresh, and it's all so beautiful." said I, going up to him. Outstretched on the grass at her feet, her He's blind, he cannot see you-help me nands in mine, I looked at her in silence, to raise him," implored the boy.



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92 MAY'S DREAM. inquiry, but no sooner had she reached Pisa one who might tell our dear master and than she fell sick and died. When I heard mistress that Pallidina and I were not i that, the sorrow of my heart was blacker brother and sister, and that we loved each than the night that veils my eyes! I other to distraction. You are here. Plead thought, Giacomo, that I was going to die. for us, father." From that moment," continued my father, This much-dreaded revelation had none to whom I listened in reverent silence, "I of the disastrous consequences I had apnever had an hour of rest. I wandered prehended, for a few weeks later our from town to town, village to village, with marriage was celebrated in the village this unfortunate boy, begging for tidings of chapel. Intoxicated with love and bliss, we thee as I begged my daily bread!" Then, returned to the mill, and continued to live after a long pause, Have I sufficiently with the miller and his wife. expiated my sin for thee to forgive me? My father, who is now a holy man, is bent My son my son forgive me !" upon begging as long as he lives. It is his When my father had finished his narrative, proper calling, he says. Accordingly, he I told him all that had befallen us, and he goes every day-summer and winter alikethanked a merciful Providence to seat himself on a stone by the wayside, Pallidina's joy on seeing my father was sending blessings after all passers-by, whether unutterable. She could not take her eyes they give to him or not, and praying to God away from his white beard, his placid and without ceasing. He gains enough, poor venerable countenance. Oh, how beautiful man, not to be a burden to our good master he has become," said she, "now that he and mistress. loves the good God!" Ettore works under me at the mill. The miller and his wife were charitable Oh, yes Providence is great and good; souls; they received my father as a friend, the poorer we are, the better we know this. "Ah, my prayer has been granted!" he At present my happiness with Pallidina is kept saying; "I have found the son I had too great to speak about! What can one lost!" say to others when one is fully blest, and "I, too, had put up a prayer, father," said every thought soars to heaven in thanksI. "I implored Heaven to send us some giving to God! HOW MAY'S DREAM WAS PROVED TRUE. L ITTLE May Whittingham was just reBut May felt herself different in several covering from an illness. The doctor ways from what she was before she lay said she had got through it wonderfully; and down in that long illness. She would he smiled and kissed her in the sweetest poslie awake through the long hours of sible manner when he came to see her now the night, and close her eyes so as to that she was getting better. For a long while tempt her mamma into lying down on she had only been allowed to sit up in bed; the couch beside her, and then she and she used to feel as if her legs were runwould listen to the clock of St. Asaph's ning races, in spite of her being kept lying striking the hours, and think of the strange there so still; and when the old doctor old stories she had heard before her illness brought the little hand looking-glass to let her came. What made her like so much to do see how fast her cheeks were getting round this, was that everything came back to her and plump again, she could not help thinking different and much clearer, though often that they were like the doctor's own, for he was mixed up with other things : what had hapfresh and bright-looking, in spite of his white pened to her long ago and been quite forhair; and although May knew that the doctor gotten would come back to her mind along had boys and girls of his own, and had long with the fairies and the giants and strange since laid his wife in the grave beside the people she had begun to read about before two children that died within a day or two she was taken ill. She would sometimes fall of each other when the fever was so bad, asleep just as the lamp's tiny light began to she thought to herself she would prefer a fade before the dawn that came stealing sweetheart like him to one like little dark coldly through the window, and touching Joe Benson they had teased her so much the spire of St. Asaph's, that glittered and about, because he used always to give her the seemed to glide nearer and nearer to her flowers he brought frcm home. as she looked. She would gaze at the





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82 GIACOMO AND PALLIDINA; OR, our firger-points the softness of their white Her little child, whose name was Ettore, hands when they gave us alms. was by this time beginning to walk, and so I saw but little of my father, whom I feared pretty that it was thought he might fill my far more than I loved. He was in the habit post when I outgrew it. I was very fond of of getting up very early in the morning, and the little fellow. Pallidina and I often played taking a round in the country-this he did with him, and sometimes I used to beg with unknown to his partners, and whatever he him in my arms. gained he kept to himself. Of all strangers, the least affected by our The very poor are like the very richdistress were English lords. I shall never either dreadfully miserly or extravagant and forget my father's rage one day that he had thoughtless. I have often seen some of applied to an old lord with a long white them spend in one hour at the publicbeard and military air. "Take pity, milord, house what it had taken them a week to upon a poor blind man, and the Lord wll gain; and I have seen others who would give you Paradise!" rather let bread get mouldy than give a Paradise is not to be bought, my good crust to a poor hungry cripple at their man; and as to that, I don't see very well door. Great destitution and great wealth myself, but I have spectacles, and don't ask have alike a tendency to render men selyou for anything." fish; they contract the heart. The more Much incensed, my father consigned I1 hideous and filthy my father made himLordo to the bottomless pit, and wished him self, the more money he got and the more every conceivable misfortune. unfeeling he became. Me he would scold The gentleman, who understood Italian, or beat for the merest trifle. Pietrina, the stood still to listen, then replied, The same poor shy creature who used to sit at the to you." I do believe my father would have door of the cathedral, hiding her face over thrown stones at him but for Pietrina, who her baby or leaning it back against a pillar, gravely saidclosing her eyes the while-that silent, pretty You do not beg like a Christian, Basgirl took to befriending me and remonstrating tiano God will not protect you, and you do with my father about me, which made him us harm rather than good. I know that the better. Pietrina seemed to have a good deal poor of Pisa have a very bad name; I have of influence over him, much as Pallidina had often seen strangers point at us and say, over me. He would attend to all she said. 'Those are the most worthless beggars in Do you know, Bastiano, that it is a sin Europe !' It makes me feel ashamed to against God to deceive kind-hearted souls see you all rush like a band of hungry dogs by pretending to have infirmities, and God upon their prey." will very likely punish you for it? For my It's our way," returned Mother Teresa: part, you may observe, I say nothing, because "if we had your pretty face, we might take I will not deceive good people. Formerly I it more quietly; but we are old and ugly, used to talk of my sick mother, but it was and at our age our only chance is to harass a sin, because it was not true, and now I people." never utter a word. I will not lie, I am Nay, look at that poor little old woman, determined. I speak to God only, and He Mother Orgina, always beside the holy water. gives me my daily bread." She has done nothing all her life long but "Why don't you work, then, Pietrina?" pray to God and bless the passers-by, and was the question sometimes put to her. everybody gives to her." Because, like little Momo, I was brought That's an exception," observed my up in the streets doing nothing. I cannot sew father. I know how things stand, and neatly or turn to any work. My health has here, where everybody is full of superstition, got weakened by sitting still all day. I have there is more to be got by being, as I am, tried more than once to get work in a farm, a Stregone, than by merely exciting compasbut the work was too much for me, and I sion." had to leave and go into the hospital. I have Pallidina would often say to me, I would often asked ladies to take me, but they won't much rather work than do nothing." have beggars about their children. And then, But why should one tire oneself when you see, there is always some reason in a one can get one's living so well without? And person's life for doing what they do." then, if you were to work, you would not be Where is your husband, Pietrina? asked with us, and you would never see me again." I one day. "That is just what prevents me, Momo," "I cannot tell you, my poor little man," she would reply. was her mournful reply; and if I did, it Such conversations, however, saddened and would do thee no good to know." made me thoughtful. After all, begging was



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122 YARNS. hung by a long piece of spun yarn from the 'ship had shortened sail with main-yardt foreyard-arm, and he is a proud man who squared, a boat was lowered to attend the' succeeds in smashing it. bathers, and the boatswain's mates piped:, On fine evenings we anxiously watched "hands to bathe." In a few moments there' the flag-ship, hoping for the signal to bathe: would be hundreds of men in the water when this was made the Fleet came to the swimming, rolling, and splashing like a wind together, and hove-to; as soon as each school of porpoises: one is seen diving head first from the fore-yard, another from the men come scrambling inboard, the the chains, while the cautious or timid slide attendant boats are hbisted up, the yards down a rope's end or Jacob's ladder. Now are trimmed, sail is made, and the Fleet we hear a general shout of laughter as a proceeds on its way. hapless wight intending to take a header and These were the good old days; I was cleave the water like an arrow, comes down always told then that "the service had gone with a loud clap like a soup-plate. When to the dogs since pepper and mustard were the signal is again made, the bugles sound, served' out." I oeten hear now that the



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42 THE ENGLISH GIRL It is terrible, for it sometimes makes people But her visitor did not seem rebuffed. deaf, and their eyes are never so bright "I am so very glad to see you once after. Come away, Valerie." more, Ursule. I have so missed your face. A sore feeling crept over Ursula's heart, The class has not been the same, and I so but she felt too sick and giddy to think, feared you were very ill." When the bell rang, and they all flocked inHer voice softened, and Ursula fancied doors, she was quite thankful to obey Madetears sprang into her eyes. moiselle Prage's advice that she should go "Oh dear !" thought the English girl, "if at once to the sick-room and lie down. she's going to be sentimental, I wish she'd go. I hate scenes, and I can't shamfriendUrsula had been very ill. There had ship all in a hurry. Oh if she were only been much delirium in her illness, and the Leonie !" doctor told Madame Henry that the girl's You knew I was ill, then?" Ursula spoke brain had been overtaxed, and that this, coldly. added to her very nervous temperament, Sophie blushed. "Yes," she said, gently must make her recovery tedious. "Ah A a, Mamzelle." Angdlique had been "Let her have as much indulgence and looking out of window resting her stout arms amusement as possible," he said. on the deep ledge. She turned her broad She had been moved from the sick-room face over her shoulder, and looked at Sophie. into a bright, cheerful little bed-chamber. "Dame, but I forgot. You must make Angelique her nurse, a broad, red-cheeked, excuse, Mamzelle Sophie. Tenez, Mamzelle black-eyed Picarde, came up to her sofa Ursule Mees, I have three, four, five, meswith a smile that seemed made up of sunsages to give you from Mamzelle there." shine. She pointed to Sophie, who sat shrank up "Ah ga, Mees. Will you like to see a into herself at the foot of the invalid's sofa. visitor? Not Madame, or Mademoiselle And I always forget. Ciel! there is so Prage, or one of the professor ladies; no, much to remember in illness besides mesno, this is quite another affair." sages." Angdlique put both thumbs against her A vague, uneasy doubt stirred in Ursula's waist, and spread her broad hands out over heart. She had so longed for any little token her hips; then she winked her black eyes at of remembrance from Leonie, but none had the sick girl reached her, and she had comforted hersel "A visitor !"-the colour flew into Ursula's by thinking that all her schoolfellows had pale face-" It is not any one. from home, been forbidden to approach the sick-room Angdlique?" for fear of infection, and that Leonie had "Dame l-no, no, Mees. There now, you been forbidden to seek her. have got as red as the sofa, and on no ac" Thank you, Sophie." count are you to be excited. I thought to She tried to speak graciously, and she held amuse you; and see, like an old ninny, I out her hand, but she longed to draw it have made mischief instead. I will say to away again, when Sophie pressed it to her my visitor, she can depart without seeing lips. you-it is only one of these young ladies." Aogdlique saw the weary look that came "You will do no such thing." into the invalid's face. Ursula had soon found out that Angelique, Allons, Mamzelle Sophie, you must not independent as she seemed, would submit stay long. You may come again if you like, to any amount of authority so Jong as she and you must be more amusing next time. was humoured. I can look at Mees, she expects you to do Go and open the door and bring her in." something better. Allons." It was her dear Ldonie, she was sure it was. Sophie got up unwillingly. The wistful She had so often longed to see her. She look over her shoulder as she went out, felt excited with delight, touched Ursula through her dislike. Angdlique laughed, but she rolled off to Angdlique !" she had sat silent for some the door on her wide short feet, and admitted minutes, "did any of the others ?-did Sophie de Visme. Mademoiselle Rendu' come and inquire Ursula was so sadly disappointed that she for me ?" could hardly keep from crying. She saw the "Is it Mamzelle Leonie ? Ah ca, Mees, look of eager delight in Sophie's eyes, but Mamzelle Leonie only thinks of people she she felt utterly unable to return it. Illness sees. For those who go out of her sight," had made her irritable, and she could not Angdlique snapped her fingers contemphelp shrinking from Sophie's kisses on each tuously by way of expressing the place held cheek. by the absent in Leonie's regard. "And,



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"RUNNING AWAY TO SEA." See Page 23



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173 ABOUT JAMAICA. snakes in old stone walls, for'they shed them pain, I fear. Her mate became still more every year, and the roughness of the stones fierce and untameable, and we were afraid to helps the snake to pull its skin neatly off its let him out of his large cage lest he should head, turning it inside out like a glove. We share his wife's fate. He ate well and generally found them quite perfect and unseemed healthy, but very restless and misebroken; in this state they were very pretty, rable, and we could only keep him alive pure white, the little scales glistening in the for three or four months. light with all the colours of the rainbow, just I must tell you how we got our owls. as if they were made of the thinnest fibre of One of the spare rooms had a large open mother-of-pearl, and even the places where the hearth in it which was generally covered up snake's eyes had been were perfect little circles, by a board, and against this was placed a But now I must come .back to the pets. chest of drawers, as the fireplace was neither The tortoises were very quiet, but not very ornamental nor useful, for it was never cold amusing protLis; they lived in a little pond enough to make a fire really necessary, even with some rock-work in the middle for shelter on the high table-land in the middle' of from the sun. They were no bigger than halfJamaica, where we spent our summers. crowns when we first got them, and they grew However, after a week of heavy rain, Jessie very slowly. We used to feed them twice a and I took it into our heads that we should day with raw meat cut up into very fine pieces; like to have a fire in this particular room. at our whistle the tortoises would leave the I really believe our only reason was a wish shelter of their rocks and come paddling to see a blaze again, it was so long since we slowly towards us, looking out carefully for had enjoyed one; and as some visitors were danger; if anything alarmed them they would coming in a few days, we pretended to be draw in their queer little heads, tuck up very anxious lest the room might have got their fins, or rather feet, and sink down to the damp during the late rains. Nothing was bottom of the pond; but we generally took easier than to have some sweet-scented chips care not to frighten them in any way, and brought and some great dry logs of cedar, they would eat their dinners very leisurely off which made a delicious pertume, and Jessie the point of a pin. They all disappeared in and I rejoiced in a splendid fire, though time, and as we never could find any trace of we were obliged to have all the windows their bodies, we fancied they must have conopen on account of the heat, and the fire trived to escape and make their way to some was never replenished. We soon left the of the very large reservoirs which were in the room, and one of the housemaids, who paddocks for the cows and horses to drink looked in on passing, thought the fire was from, as there was no river near. quite out, as she could only see a heap of Then we had owls and hawks, and once white feathery ashes, so she carefully rewe had a beautiful pair of Egrets given to us. placed the board and moved the chest of We did not know what these birds were at drawers back again to its place against it. first, as no one had ever seen any like them, In a short time the house was filled with and it was only by hunting through the picthe most unpleasant odour; we all began ture-books about birds that we discovered hunting about for the cause, and although their likeness under that name. They were we tracked the smell to this spare room, it flying overhead when some tiresome person never occurred to us to have the board rewho happened to have a gun in his hand moved again until Mamma appeared on the shot at them, wounding the female, who scene and immediately had it taken away. fluttered to the ground, and her mate would I don't know which was the worst, the sight not desert her, and was easily captured. or the smell. The great draught caused by They were exquisitely beautiful, though putting up the board must have carried with fierce, wild natures. Their legs were some of the light ashes which were not quite bright red and rather long, but their plumage extinguisied up to the top of the chimney, was very peculiar -milk-white, and the where a whole colony of owls had built their feathers which composed their tails and nests for years past. The twigs and straw their large crests or top-knots were fluffy, were soon ablaze, and as the bottom of the like ma-about or the down of the eidernests gave way, the young owls came tumduck. We fed them on raw meat at the bling down the chimney to meet a lingering risk of having our eyes pecked out, and our death on the hot bricks of the hearth. fingers were soon covered with wounds, but There were owls in every stage of roasting; we bravely persevered, and tried all the some quite dead, and others struggling surgical art we possessed to heal the poor among the hot ashes. They were more broken wing of the female, but she only hideous to look at than you can imagine, lingered a few days, and then died in great for, at its best, a young owl is a frightful



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TACKLING OLD EPHRAIM 53 turtle, the play of which would have been a the end, remarkably like gold-sign, but quite caution to a stay-at-home Britisher. Early of out of reach. What was more to the point, a morning the great wapiti-elks might have there was Grizzly Cafion, a dismal hollow been seen by the water-edge, come down of bush and scrub, running off the level to feed and drink, with their legs and into a belt of immense redwoods that shot antlers showing like a newly-sprung grove against the sky. According to the Spanish through the fog: then there was the treevacqueroes we met with, it had been formerly game, from sloths to racoons, going under noted as a spot where real grizzly bears used the general name of 'possum; the groundto breed, though none had been heard of venison, such as porcupines, armadilloes, for years so far down, and the likelihood and land-turtle; without mentioning the cowas that the Survey would make no yotes, burrowing squirrels, and no end of difference in that respect. However, the skunks and gophers. Out of the whole Spaniards were known to look upon of them we managed not only to enliven us with small favour ; and when the our spare time during the greater part of question came to be about interfering with the summer, but to freshen the camp-fare a regular Ephraim," as backwoodsmen not a little. called the grizzlies, it must be owned there Ultimately, however, our quarters were were few among us who considered it in a shifted much further inland, to rougher sporting light. Judge Tracey, the Surveyor, ground beyond San Mateo, under the spurs and our compassman, Mr. Higley, were the oft the hills; and what with the advance only members of the party who had been at of the season, together with the change the mines besides myself; they knew well of locality to drier soil, almost everything how the case stood; in fact, that we were in the way of free live-stock seemed to much more likely to have to take to tree have gone, save where too shy to be got than a grizzly bear was, if we chanced to at. Plenty of Spanish cattle there were, to meet one. For my own part, I had never be sure, wild enough in all conscience to happened to see one, even when up the Yuba be looked upon as fair game, and bold river. Still, I cannot say I fell short as to enough too; but these we could not meddle this caution on the point; much less could I with. The only other creatures likely to be enter into the hunting view of it that was seen, worth speaking of, were an occasional taken by one or two of our number. grey hill-wolf loping along and the bears, At the first occurrence that took place in both brown and black, which left sufficient connexion, it so chanced that I was prinsigns of their vicinity, though much too cipally concerned. My part of the surveyshrewd to come athwart a party of Uncle ing duty was simply to carry "fore-chain," Sam's men if they knew it. or take the line along for the bearings given The waggon and tents were at last settled by the surveyors, sticking in the measuringdown in a handy spot by the head of a pins as I went; while the hinder end was creek from the hills. The one side comtaken by my friend Lettsom, a young man manded a stretch of fine open savannah, from the North of England, who had joined by which we had to work back toward the party with me. Neither of us could be the Bay settlements; the other was more said to occupy a high post in the service as broken ground, leading up to the pineyet, but so far as our head-work went, from barrens and redwood ranges. This latter passing the orders to keeping tally of the district had to be finished off before we marks, the responsibility was all on my comturned to the level, and that duty proved panion's shoulders. Indeed, setting aside his quite as hard as it looked. Most parts we advantage in years and height, he seemed to drove across in most determined style, tearhave a natural turn for the business to which ing over thorny chapparal, through poisonI could not pretend. It was lucky for him, oak brush, and up streaks of rock. In parts however, on this occasion, that I took it it could not be cleared, even by the axeeasy when possible. We were rounding one men's help, and had to be done by computaof the stiff corners, too hard to get over tion. Some again was slumped in liberally, direct, and each made the best of his way upon the averaging system, whatever the for the next bearing-point. Having sighted it future settlers might do with it. I found myself ahead of the rest, and sat One or two of the localities at hand were by down to light a pipe till they joined. I had no means inviting to look at, by way of neighjust struck a lucifer, when a rustling caught bourhood, and they went by suitable names. my ear in the chapparal close by, and lookThere was Guzman's Gulche, as dreary a rift ing over my shoulder I saw the upper half into the solid stone as one could wish of an immense bear, as he rose on end to to see, with a vein of quartz shining up at eye me from below. Neither he nor I



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YARNS. 123 service has gone to the dogs since something watch, and found my duty would begin that or another has happened: but my informant night, from midnight till 4 A.M. At twelve always takes care to fix some date that shall o'clock I came on deck; my watchmates not include himself. It was my good fortune were friendly enough, and at once proposed to enter the service just before pepper and that we should make some coffee. With the mustard became part of the daily rations; so, senior midshipman of the watch I went down you see, I really am a salt of the olden time. to the gunroom: "Now,".said he, "you bring The good old days had their charms certainly, the spoons and the coffee, and I'll bring the and there is some truth in the lament: cups and saucers." I thought it very con"When sailors fed on mouldy bread siderate of him to offer to carry the fragile And lumps of rusty pork, china; and so it afterwards proved. We made No Frenchman dared his nose to show our coffee successfully, and at four o'clock Between the Downs and Cork: went to bed again. The next morning at But now that Jack gets beef and greens, And next his skin wears flannel, seven I was washing in the cockpit in scant We've not an ironclad to show apparel, when the senior mate of the mess In plight to keep the Channel." came forward with a dog-whip. "Which of One afternoon, when we were sailing in you youngsters was it took silver spoons out line of battle, with a steady breeze, the signal of the mess last night ? I innocently conwas hoisted for the Fleet to heave-to; we fessed that I had: he then slowly and careanxiously watched the flag-ship to see the fully explained to me that it was contrary cause of the stoppage, when to my astonishto the rules of the mess, and that I must ment I saw my own name flying at her not forget it: he emphasized his remarks mast-heads; the Admiral had recollected a and pointed his observations with repeated request I made a short time before to be cuts of his dog-whip, and so, you see, I have transferred to another ship, and this was not forgotten it unto this day. the signal that my request was granted. Making coffee in the night-watches was I had forgotten all about it, and thought one of the principal employments of the that the Admiral had so too, and was not in youngsters. Sometimes we had "conjurors" the least prepared. Of course, it became to make it in; but as a conjuror only made a now a point of honour for my captain to little at a time, and as the spirits of wine for show how smart he could be in obeying the lamp was expensive, we oftener lighted a the signal: you may suppose he was not small fire in a corner of the galley-range, and particularly well pleas.d at my wishing to made it in a saucepan. The cook did not go, and did not think what my feelings always approve of having his saucepans were likely to be: indeed, I never heard dirtied: one night, when I went as usual to that a midshipman was allowed to have feelmake coffee, I found he had locked up ings. I rushed down to pack my things everything except a frying-pan. I went to up; there was my proverbial midshipman'sthe mate of the watch, and told him : his chest, "everything uppermost, and nothing memorable answer was, "Youngster, if you at hand;" my messmates did what they don't make some coffee, you'll be licked." could to help me, jumping on the lid when With a heavy heart and a shallow fryingit hopelessly gaped; a cutter was lowered pan I set about my task, and at last sucand manned; in ten minutes my chest was ceeded in producing a smoked infusion of hoisted out, and with all my worldly goods coffee-grounds. I brought it on deck to I was pulling towards my new home. From the -midshipmen of the watch, who were every ship telescopes were levelled at me to surreptitiously smoking their cigars between discover what belonged to this name which the boom-boats: they desired me to keep it had been advertised as the reason of delayto hot till they had finished their smoke. In the whole Fleet: for the moment 1 knew and vain I pleaded that coffee would not retain felt what it was to have greatness thrust on its caloric in a coverless frying-pan : If it me ; but in a few minutes my chest was again gets cold you'll be licked," was the answer. swinging in the air, myself and my traps were I will not linger over the harrowing details; passed on board my new ship, and in half an it did get cold, and those prophetic words hour the Fleet had made sail again. Of course were literally fulfilled. 1 left a great many things behind; some I did These are some of my ".Professional Renot get back for weeks, others I am still in collections of Seamanisip and Discipline," to search of; some chocolate and a silver tork borrow the title of a well-kinown book. These I at once abandoned all hope of. are some of the incidents of life in that MediIt was dreary enough to find myself terranean Fleet, whose like we ne'er shall see suddenly dropped into a new world -among again, and whose softly-pensive career was perfect strangers; I was at once put into a rudely broken in upon by the Russian War.



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134 TWO STORIES. them plainly, only he was quite certain they "Are they?" said John, too civil to laugh, were all dressed in green, just the same but evidently a good deal amused. "Well, colour as the turnip-leaves. ma'am, I don't tell you any more than I've He crept cautiously forward, and peered heard-and I warned you that I only heard it through the bars of the gate, hiding himsecondhand-not like William Butterfield's self as much as he could the while. But story. I suppose all wise and clever people unfortunately he leant too heavily on the top would say that both stories were great nonrail; and though he had fastened the gate sense, and that it was impossible there could himself overnight, and it looked as if it were be such things as fairies." fastened still, as soon as he touched it it "Impossible is a large word, John, more swung open with a great bang, and he fell than many people have a right to use." right flat with his face in. the mud. John agreed to this, and unconsciously put Then, whirr !-whirr I off went the little into his broadJYorkshire the same sentiment men, like innumerable coveys of partridges, which Shakespeare puts into the mouth of When Henry got up, he could not see a Hamlet: single one of them ; and strange to say, There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, though he searched up and down the rows of Than are dreamed of in your philosophy." turnips in every direction, he could not "But still," he added, "if fairies are not find any of their hoes. Such tiny hoes and impossible, I can't say they're very likely. yet the turnips were hoed up as well as he And I never saw them myself, nor knew any could have done them himself. And the one who did see them except William Butterlittle people seemed so busy and so merry; field. But he was a puzzle, I confess. You it was a sight which, though it only lasted a see, ma'am, when an honest man, whose minute or two, he declared he never forgot. word you have no reason to doubt, looks you Unlike William Butterfield, he went and in the face and tells you he has really seen told it immediately to everybody he knew; so and so, it's rather hard to look him in the and if he had not been such an exceedingly face back again and tell him he hasn't." respectable man, all would have been set "Very hard," I acknowledged; "nor, perdown at once to a mere drunkard's fancy. haps, is it always quite necessary. But, As it was, he was very much laughed at: John, to come to the point, what do you people thought he was not quite right in his yourself think about the matter ?" head, or that his brains had "gone wool"The matter of fairies?" repeated John, gathering." But he stuck steadily to his cautiously, and evidently not liking to comstory; and never went hoeing turnips again mit himself too much either way. But being without a full conviction that, if he got up hard pressed, he took the only course open early enough, he should be sure to see the to a man of his good common sense-clever fairy farm-labourers. And when he never enough to feel that there may be things did see them, he still persisted-if the turnips beyond him, and honest enough to allow were particularly green or well grown-that this, while still not giving in to any foolish the little men, with their little hoes, must credulity. "Well,"answered John, at length have been there in the night. -giving the wisest answer that the wisest "And they only did good, and never man alive can give about many thingsharm?" I asked. "None of the turnips "Well, ma'am, all I can say is, I really don't were missing? for fairies are great thieves, know." you know." Which is my opinion too on the subject. TWO STORIES. FROM HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN. I.-THE RAGS. AT the door of a paper-mill stood heaps way; rank Danish was the one, and rank of dust and rubbish, piled up into stacks; Norse the other; and there was likely to be they had been gathered far and wide, and some fun between the two, as any expeevery rag in them had a tale to tell, and told rienced Dane or Norseman could tell you. it too; but we cannot listen to them all. They understood each other well enough, Some of the rags were home-born, others though the two languages were as differentcame from foreign lands. Here now was a so the Norwegian said-as French and HeDanish rag, 1)ing close to a rag from Norbrew. We go to the hill-side for ours, and



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7HE TWO NESTS. 97 its builders, tiniest and prettiest of our birds, thelong cablesof worsted which she had sewed with their pert rapid motions, the father with to the laurel leaf round the boughs above, his bright yellow head, and the wife in her she drew up a little platform as it were for quieter dress, kept dashing in and out all the pouch to rest on, and made all good and day, to the great delight of the children, firm below. They are thought to be shy birds, but they The birds were watching us narrowly the choose sometimes strangely public places for whole time. There was an anxious twittertheir nests, and show a wonderful confidence ing going on in the trees above, and two in man. pair of tiny wings passed to and fro almost Soon after the building of "its pendent in our faces with a lamentable little cry. nest and procreant cradle" was finished, "Come in to breakfast," cried Frank in some curious little fingers had probed its vain, standing by with his hands in his bottom and found that it was full of eggs. pockets, while little May, sitting on the grass "They're hardly bigger than peas, Annie, near, nursing the "poor babies," as she called but such lots of them; how ever will the them, rocked herself to and fro, and sung, or baby birds find room to breathe?" rather chirped to themThe mother sat on undaunted by the continual passing, or the very unwelcome attenAre God Almigfty's cock and hen," tions it received. We could see the bright glancing eyes, with an uneasy shake about while she vainly presented them with offerthe little head just peering over the edge of ings of deceased flies. the nest, but she had learnt not to stir, even "You must make haste, Annie, here's one when we stopped close under the tree. child dead already," said she, sorrowfully I looked out one balmy early morning; looking into the hollow of her fat little the smell of the honeysuckles was strong in arms where she was trying to keep her the air, the dew sparkling on the grass, infants warm. Hallo !" I heard, as Frank, who was home As soon as the mossy house was repaired, for the holidays, sauntered into the garden. the little morsels of life were dropped into Oh dear, what a pity !" cried Annie in most it one by one, and we all retreated to the pitiful tones as she followed him. house to leave the coast clear. And there lay twelve of the smallest and There was a dead pause; nothing stirred ugliest ot living things, all mouth, sprawling, but the wind and the leaves, and an unfeeling some alive on the grass, and some on the white butterfly. gravel dead, amongst a litter of feathers and You see," cried Frank, who was watching moss; the bottom of the nest had burst, with his mouth full at the open window. Whether the passing gardener's head (for Presently came a low despairing chirp of it hung quite low enough to be touched) the deserted children out of the ne.t. "We're had shaken it, or whether the weight alone very cold and hungry," it said as plainly as if of the mass of little life within had broken in words. through, no one could tell. And a swoop of bright little wings from I wonder whether one couldn't sew up somewhere up in the air, glancing like a firethe bottom?" said Annie, compassionately fly down into the nest, answered them. The picking up those of the horrid little monsters mother's heart was not proof against the cry, which were still alive, and making a nest for and her fears and doubts were evidently all them in her handkerchief. I think I could forgotten as she darted in. do it with a laurel leaf." All went on well after this; the young "What nonsense!" replied her brother; ones were voracious little things, and very "such a woman's notion-sew! and make much trouble they gave their parents to feed the bird forsake to a dead certainty You them, but at length in their good time they don't suppose she'd stand all that pulling were all reared and flew away. about of her nest and her young, do you? "I think Annie makes a nest very nice It isn't the slightest use; you'd better try and comfortable," said little May, telling and feed the birds." the story confidentially one day to her par" I'm sure we never could rear them, wrens ticular friend and cousin George Markham, are so difficult to feed. We can but try the who had come back all the way from India other way," said Annie. May, dear, run on purpose to see her (at least he said so). and ask for some worsted and a worsted Go and ask her whether she won't come needle-no, I'll go myself." and make a nest for me too," whispered Then, collecting the scattered moss, she George in return, with a look across the walk got up on a chair, and fitted it all carefully on to where Annie was standing a little apart ayain to the bottom of the nest, then passing under the flickering snadows of the yew. 7



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PAUL AND JEAN. 57 nearly squeezing the. last breath out of him. on the head-surveyor as a Southerner, with We pulled him out to all appearance finished more temper than brains, he thought to trip by it, drenched in blood, with his clothes in up his heels with Government when the strips. A little time, however, brought him Vigilance Committee rose into power shortly to again, not seriously injured, though there afterwards; yet smart as Higley doubtless was more than one ugly rip. A score of bullets was, Judge Tracey showed himself able to at the least had been put into the bear, and steal a march upon him in that very respect. none of them signified till the last had smashed The old grizzly bear was a piece of game his skull. A cooler thing of the sort never such as rarely had fallen to the luck of any was done than old Judge Tracey did on the surveying-party, or, for that matter, of any occasion, for he actually took care to put a hunter in the Gold State. Had the season fresh cap on his rifle before pulling trigger, been cooler, within reach of town or settleIf he had hung fire or missed the mark, ments, he would have been worth no small not only would all have been up with Lettsum to us, taking meat and hide together, som, but with a few more of the United besides the showing parts ; his weight being States Survey. about that of a full-sized ox. As it was, The Judge's composition had been rather being in prime condition, and mostly nut-fed underrated before, in regard to what he at that season, he furnished the staple of sevecould do if put to it. As to his title, it was ral days' provision in camp. As our ground well known to have been derived merely subsequently led us from the redwoods, the from having taken a lead in the arrangefurther adventures of the party did not turn ment of Lynch cases at the Mines: but 'on any incidents of the same nature. It was after this he stood in a new light, which not the last grizzly that I saw tackled and some of us were destined to see clearer killed during ten years in the country, not before being done with him. Mr. Higley, by a score at the least; some of which the compassman, in particular,--who was happened to cost a good deal more damage understoo'd to have been originally a schoolto those concerned. But even allowing for master at home in the "Granite State,"the fact that this was the first in my expeproved slower to take a hint on this point rience, I should say he was decidedly the than he ought. Through his always looking hardest to manage of them all. PAUL AND JEAN. W HEN I was a little gill, I was never for my daughter Polly, that when she learns tired of reading a book, which has to read, she may know what Old England was now become quite old-fashioned, about "Our like before any railway went to Reading. Village in Berkshire. Kind, good Miss This village where I write is a French vilMitford How many happy hours I spent lage, and so different to an English one, that I with her and her greyhound; with )the could never make you understand it by mere mole-catchers and little Harry Grover; with description. But I can tell you something Lady Mary H, "a professed tea-drinker" about the people. The greatest house is (and green tea too!), and Hopping Bob. called the chateau, or the castle, but it is Their very names are warm to my heart, not in the least what we call a castle in Never was picture so full, so true, as these England. It has neither towers, nor a moat, stories of Three Mile Cross near Reading. nor a drawbridge, and it would not stand a That was the name of Miss Mitford's village, siege of half an hour, even if all the shutters It still stands, of course; farms and cottages, were put up. It is a large, handsome white the forge and the inn, and the hedge where house, about 200 years old, with a beautiful Master Tom pulled the papers off Fanny's sloping park, and an orangery where the fairings. But dear Miss Mitford is not orange-trees live in tubs, like Diogenes. there. She is gone where pretty Lizzie They are brought out every summer, and went before, and the old French Abbn put like sentinels all along the broad terrace and Godmother, and the good old Judge, just underneath the house on the park-side. her father. They are all gone together; but There is also a sort of winter garden, with you, dear children, can read about what they walks and parterres and a little pond, all did in the world, if your mamma will ask covered over with glass; and a row of conat her circulating library for the old brown servatories full of splendid flowers. Our volumes which I read some thirty years ago. windows look right over these, and we Or you can buy them in a bran new edition at always know when frost is expected in the bookseller's. I have got them in keeping autumn by the lighting of the fires. This



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ABOUT JAMAICA. 163 for they are never allowed to go out except appointment. It was the year that slavery very early in the morning and late in the was abolished: I am always glad to think it afternoon, on account of the hot sun, which was done away with before I knew anything would probably give them fever, or even kill about the country; and the negroes, as I saw them. them, were only a good-humoured happy race When I first remember Jamaica, we for ever laughing and singing. had been there only a few months. My The "we" I have spoken of above indear mother was too delicate to live in cluded, besides Mamma and Papa, a young England during the winter, and my father aunt of whom we children were excessively had been fortunate enough to obtain what fond, an English nurse, my sister, and myself. was in those days an excellent Government Jessie was about four years old, the prettiest little fairy imaginable, and the idol and pet of the day, but unfortunately it lasted only of every one. I am sorry to say I was very a short while; I used to envy the servants ugly, tall, thin, and sallow, and a regular their regular duties, and whenever I read in tomboy, besides being the most mischievous little books of children being obliged to child in the world. I did not mean to be work hard for their parents, I thought it naughty, but it seemed so dreadful to be must be much happier than having nothing always told to be quiet. No one ever to do, which was my constant complairit. thought of finding me any occupation, and, Our nurse could not at all understand this as I was forced to seek it for myself, ceaseless activity, and often drew a mortispending my time in a series of scrapes, I fying contrast between me and gentle, pretty am afraid I did not choose proper employlittle Jessie, whom she declared. was "a born ments. Lesson hour was the happiest part lady," implying that I was just the reverse.



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38 PEGGY'S AFTERNOON NAP. would be perfectly happy. Spot's sweet the churchyard and not the church; and then breath seemed sweeter than violets to Peggy, the chapel turned into Llanrwst Castle, and and there was a white star on Spot's fawnGranny was climbing up the ivy to catch coloured face which Peggy used to kiss in a Spot, who was stretching her head over the way that seemed highly ridiculous to the creel on the very top of the castle, trying to crabbed old grandmother, get out to eat the wallflowers. Granny had But now poor Spot was ill. She would almost climbed to the top, when the farrier not touch the coarse mountain-grass, and gave a jump out of his pew, where he had merely snuffed at the furze and potatoes. All been smoking his pipe in his shirt-sleeves, day long she stood with her head hanging and tugged at Granny's petticoats. Granny over the half-door of the cow-house, every pulled down the ivy, and that pulled down now and then giving a melancholy little low. the castle. Peggy could see it coming, but The grandmother, who looked very much she could not move, though she was lying like Mother Hubbard in her scarlet whittle right under it. And yet she did not feel and spectacles and tall black hat, had said a afraid, because Spot was breathing in her charm over Spot, but it had not done her face, and she was feeding Spot with hollya mite of good. The farrier had promised hocks. Granny gave an awful scream and to come up from Llanrwst and have a look down came the castle in a cloud of dust, and at her, but in the meantime poor Spot with a thud that shook the ground and thunstarved, and Peggy was in deep distress. dered round the hills. So on this broiling summer afternoon she When Peggy awoke, her creel was knocked had toiled to the gray cromlech on the other over, and her frock was out of gathers. side of Cefn Madoc, to cut the rich grass Evan Evans, looking very white and angry, which grew there round the Fairies' Well, was swinging her by the petticoats like a sign thinking that it might tempt poor Spot to eat. of the Golden Fleece. His danger-flag lay Anxious as she was to get back to her between the rails, with the staff snapped in friend, however, Peggy, when she had pushed two. The up express was rattling over his her load on to the railway, and had scrampoints; the engine-driver and stoker craning bled through the gap herself, could not help over the tender, as they looked back with stopping to enjoy the relief of lightened scared faces, and young Evan Evans was shoulders. She was almost dead-beat, poor leaning on the switch. Most fortunately the little girl. The high piled grass was a temptpointsian's boy was with him when he saw mg pillow. Down, she sat for a minute, as Peggy lounging against the rail, just after he she thought, on the rough ballasting, with had sighted the express train shooting, half her arm on the grass, which was cool in spite smothered in black and white clouds, out of of the baking it had got, and her heavy little the Llanrwst tunnel. Waving his flag, he head on her aching little arm. had rushed down the line to the rescue, and And then, suddenly, Peggy was back at just saved Peggy. The off buffer of the the Fairies' Well, and Spot was there too, engine nearly grazed him as he sprang across dnnking the clear, cold, shaded water, and the metals, and swung Peggy out of danger. wrenching up great mouthfuls of the juicy Evan was very much out of breath, and he grass. But a spiteful little fairy climbed up was also very much out of temper; but for to the top of the cromlech, and pelted Spot all that he was a kind-hearted religious man, with hollyhocks; and the hollyhocks hurt, and when he had recovered his breath and his for they were hard as stones, and Spot began temper, he said in Welsh, We ought both to low as if she did not like it. So Peggy to thank God, my wench." And he helped tried to drive away the fairy, but he jumped Peggy to put the grass back in her creel, and on to her back, and clasped his hands round when he knew why she had gathered it, he her neck so tight that she was nearly throtcalled young Evan to help her carry it up tled. And then Peggy could not find Spot. the hill. The sheep and the ponies knew where she Granny scolded Peggy sadly because of was, but they would not tell; and a grimy the torn frock, but Peggy was consoled when tip-girl came along, with buskins on and a she saw how Spot enjoyed the Fairies' Well red handkerchief tied round her head, and grass. filled the creel with coals, and said that She could not help thinking, however, that Peggy must carry it across the sea to Ireland. it was rather hard that her friend should eat But Peggy went into Llanrwst churchyard init so composedly, when it had so nearly cost stead, only the Calvinistic Methodist Chapel, her her life. where Peggy went to Sunday-school, was in CHARLES CAMDEN.



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CHESSY CHALK AND HER BABY. DPEOPLE are very hearty with one anshould not have cared about that, if the Gold other at the end of a voyage, and very Finder, after keeping us waiting for five weeks, civil at the beginning; but in the meantime, had only showed a little "go" when she did on board a passenger ship, everybody, as a get to sea. But ship after ship overhauled rule, quarrels with everybody else-quarrels, us, and it became a grim standing joke on and makes friends again, half a dozen times board that the Gold Finder would get to over. But Chessy Chalk and her baby never Port Phillip just when there was no more quarrelled with anybody, from the time the gold left to find. Under these circumGold Finder left the jetty of the London stances it is wonderful that even pretty, Docks to the time when she let go her bright-eyed Chessy and her plump baby-boy anchor in Hobson's Bay; and still more never got even a cross look. Most of the wonderful, nobody on board the Gold other children were voted little nuisances, Finder ever quarrelled with them. Chessy because they squalled so, and were always and her baby, on the other hand, were getting under somebody's feet, just as if they constant pets with all the passengers, had been so many blind puppies; but even officers, and crew. Everybody on board their offended mothers did not seem to be had a kind look and word for them, and jealous of pretty, gentle Chessy. Who gave was willing to do them a good turn. A her that name, or how we came to know that coarse, wild lot of both sexes, and a good she was called so, I cannot say; but when I many grades, we had on board; for the joined the ship at Gravesend, the name was Gold Finder sailed for Melbourne some already public property, and its bearer a eighteen years ago, when people of all sorts general favourite. Baby's grandmother came were making a mad rush out of England, off in a boat from the Terrace Pier, to give in the hope of becoming Rothschilds a week her little pet another last kiss. after landing in Australia; and eager as we I want to see Mrs. Chalk," said the sobwere to reach the Golden Land, the Gold bing old lady, as she was helped over the Finder's rate, of sailing was not likely to side, and in an instant a score or two of improve our tempers. She had been advoices sang outvertised-before she was off the stocks at "Pass the word for Chessy Chalk." Sunderland-"as that first-rate A i, AustraRough as the shouters were, they meant lian clipper, with unrivalled accommodation no rudeness. Although she was a matron, for passengers, to sail from the London Chessy looked such a mere girl that it Docks immediately," but she had been laid seemed absurd to call her MArs. Chalk. The down for the coal trade, had bows as bulgy baby had been christened Adolphus, after his as the cheeks of the boy in the Spelling Book father, who had been in such a hurry to get to who was so fat that he could not see out of the gold-fields that he had rushed out in the his eyes ; and when, on rare occasions, she first Australian ship in which he could secure made eight knots an hour, the skipper, who a single bunk; and Chessy was very fond of had been all his life before in the coasting calling the baby 'Dolphy. But the grown-up coal trade, bragged about her "flying If Adolphus was not respected on board the her accommodation for passengers was unGold Finder. Rough lot as we had on board, rivalled, I pity the people who sailed in other they thought it a shame that a man should vessels; but, cooped up though we were, we leave such a wife and child to come out by S 47



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44 ENGLISH GIRL IN FRENCH SCHOOL. note in one broad palm, and clapped the to look for Mamzelle Leonie. I say to other on it smartly, myself, 'What do I know?-I am only an "Tiens," she left off in a hurry, "and old bonne; it is possible Mees Ursule is Mamzelle said I must be careful-did you right, and her friend may long to come to hear anything break, Mees?" her.' Well, Mees, I go in the court, and I Spite of her vexation, Ursula could not see Mamzelle Valerie and Mamzelle Leonie, help laughing at the sudden terror in Angewho are kissing each other. I say, 'Mamlique's broad good-humoured face. zelle Leonie, there is your sick friend, the She opened the note; there were only these English mees, who desires extremely to see words: To Ursula, whom I love-always you, and you have heard Madame say this yours, Sophie de Visme,"-and a half-blown morning-is it not so, Mamzelle?-that China rose, crushed flat, but still sweet and whoever likes may visit Mees Ursule.'" fragrant. Ursula sat listening eagerly. If Ursula had been well, or if there had "Well, Mees, Mamzelle Leonie has only been any one present to give a ludicrous shaken her head-' Madame can say what aspect to Sophie's effusion, she would proshe likes, but I am afraid of infection. I bably have laughed at it. But illness had would not catch measles for all the world;' softened her. Angelique was looking out and Mamzelle Valerie kisses her, and says, of the window, and hot tears came raining 'Go along, Angelique; do you think such a down from the great dark eyes over the face as this can run such a risk?'" fading rosebud. "But measles don't disfigure," said Ursula. "Am I never to be cured of my pride?" "I tell her so, Mees, and I say too Mamwhispered the girl's humbled heart. "I zelle Sophie has been to see you, and then thought it was cured years ago, when I Mamzelle Leonie answers quite cross, Sophie saved Aim6e from the bull. It was pride that and I are different people; I shall see Ursule made me do work which I could not underwhen she comes into school.' stand, and Madame says I may be months Ursule sat silent a few minutes, then she before I can work hard again, even at French; said gently: and how proud I have been to Sophie." I think Leonie is right; she and Sophie Angelique turned round, and saw her are different people." crying. She stood a minute thinking, and then she went down stairs. It is just a week since Sophie paid her When she brought up Ursula's supper, she first visit to the sick-room ; a warm June looked vexed and discontented, afternoon, Ursula is seated in a garden chair "What's the matter, Ang6lique? I never between a huge myrtle bush and the clustersaw you look cross before." ing China roses that try to climb to Madame's "Alh a, Mees Ursule, if I tell, you will drawing-room window. A book lies open in be sorry. I thought to give you a pleasure, her lap, but she is not reading-her eyes and it is not possible,-that is all. There are stray after Sophie. folks in the world with no more feeling than In a moment Sophie comes running across insects." the garden with a bouquet of roses and "You had better tell me," said Ursula; mignonette, and, like a star in its midst, a "if you don't, I shall fancy something much pale passion-flower. Sophie throws herself worse than the reality." on her knees, and points to the passionAngelique heaved out a sound between a flower. sigh and a grunt, and then she crossed her "It is the first, the very first," she says arms over her chest as if to keep in such breathlessly; "it came out on purpose for utterances. you, dearest." "Eh bien, Mees, I see you crying at Ursula bends down, and kisses her glowing Mamzelle's letter, and I think, 'Poor Mees face. Ursule-she does not like Mamzelle deVisme, "Ah, Sophie, it is like your love, much but she wish for Mamzelle Leonie.' Well too good for me." then, Mamzelle, when one is ill I know it is good to have all one desires, and I go quick KATHARINE S. MACQUOID. a



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"114 KEEPING THE "CORNUCOPIA." plenty to keep charge of her; my arrangeAlcalde himself, not to speak of others, if hd, ments being already nearly made to leave had found the disturbance rather harder t0s with a party for the mines, including King, put down. who was rather troubl-some to put up long Next day being Sunday, everything wasgl in town. In these circumstances I was in no much as usual toward the harbour in the morn: : anxiety to stay, mixed up as I was with the ing. Numbers of people were out in that;,,, thing; and, seeing that no harm had been direction, of course along the wharf and oil done to them, neither were Captain Simmerall the piers, while very little work was goingnor his people. One morning it turned out on. The crowd was immense where the; that the Cornucopia had quietly gone off; Panama steamers came in; the excitement after that I considered it unnecessary to be got evident here, though no mail had been, particular about my address in town, and so expected that day. On a sudden there was got dropped out of sight without much a small flag sent up at the funnel-head of a trouble. The authorities did not seem to ferry-boat from Oakland, and another went' take it to heart. No one knew when Whiup next moment at the street-corner. The taker was to be executed, nor what would truth flashed on me at once; and I had not be done with the other. The excitement long to wait before making sure. A perfect throughout the town grew worse than ever, whoop of triumph began to run into town, and on the afternoon of Saturday, the 23d bringing out crowds upon crowds till the August, the storm fairly burst, rush on the pier got tremendous. Colonel In the midst of the hubbub the fire-bells Rigg had let his crops stand for that day, commenced ringing, which showed that the it being a half-holiday with most people at regular night-men had begun to join; the any rate, and was coming to town after all. semaphores toward the Bay and Fort were cut The news spread like wildfire, and as the down, preventing notice to the Government steamer touched the pier, a carriage-and-four force, while all communication by the streets came dashing out to meet it, ready to bring had been stopped beforehand. A Vigilance him without delay to the Plaza. This was watch had been kept on the jail, so that apparently scarce.to his taste, as he was not none of the three prisoners had had a chance the man to make much ceremony; but we o' escape; and the attack was then made on had a better view of him and his five sons a sudden. Colonel Duggins, the Alcalde, in consequence. They were all head and however, again showed himself too much for shoulders above most in the crowd-regular those at the head. It proved that he had backwood stuff, too, with rifles to match. had soldiers from Fort Montgomery hanging Two committee-men followed, who had gone about all day, who were now got together in over to him during the night; and one of a twinkling. And besides these he had a them, as I could almost have guessed beforefo-ce of rowdies and Irish collecting behind hand, was Mr. Malloch. The whole number the Custom-house, as well as a couple of were got into the carriage, and next minute field-pieces ready inside. The whole of this they were rattling into town, after which the then came along at a rush, cleared the street, rush behind fairly swept one along. and not only rescued the three men in the This time it was a very different affair. act of being carried off for the committeeThe main attempts at resistance soon gave rooms, but captured various of the active way before the. popular side. A few shots ringleaders as State criminals. The Governor were exchanged in the by-streets, and the and the Alcade then began to talk. very Alcalde had made a stand about the jail, higa about carrying out the State laws, tellwith some of the Irish Custom-house ing the committee they were known, even men and desperate rowdies who struck at mentioning some by name, who were advised him. The soldiers at his orders made a to look out; among these, I believe, was Mr. firm charge to clear Washington Street, Malloch. Colonel Duggins stated, whether which they certainly did. But the Vigilance tiuly or not, that the United States vessels in people had now been too sharp for them, the bight had been warned in good time; and and down they came midway in a body, fallthat at the first rocket he sent up, they would ing flat over what was called a hair-barricade, bring their broadsides to bear, while the prepared for the occasion. They were marines and blue-jackets would come ashore then disarmed and secured with ease; the in force. The plain fact n as, that the whole governor had by that time been captured, movement had got quashed so far. If the and the Alcalde's turn came to give in. The authorities had only not made too sure, but most unpleasant accident of the business now brought round the ships as alleged, Vigilance took place. Colonel Rigg still sat in the migilt perhaps have been heard of no more; carriage, giving directions to his sons and at any rate it would have been better for the others, among whom was Mr. Malloch seek-



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I02 KEEPING THE "CORNUCOPIA." KEEPING THE "CORNUCOPIA:" A PASSAGE OF CALIFORNIAN ADVENTURE. BY THE AUTHOR OF "THE GREEN HAND." MMEDIATELY on landing at San Frantarpaulin shed, which were packed choke-full cisco, early in the spring of 1851, when of goods, to say nothing of the heaps which yet a boy, I entered the office of a most were outside. In regard to convenience for respectable leading firm in the city, Macansh a junior clerk's duties, I could not have had it and Malloch. They were chiefly connected if ever so inclined. Even young Mr. Malloch with the European trade. Mr. Macansh had had to settle himself away upon the top been long in the country, before the gold disof a clearing made for the purpose, under coveries were made; and the character he a skylight, with the books to himself,, bore in the State may be judged by the fact and his ice-jug with a straw in it, handy that he acted as British Consul. He was, to the sample-cases of various liquors conbesides, much respected by the Spanish mersigned to us. This was a quarter he had chants and others, though not perhaps so much tolerably well to himself; indeed he was so by the Americans. The junior partner, Mr. somewhat jealous of being disturbed over Malloch, on the other hand, was considered to his figures, and certainly the last thing to my have made more way among the latter; indeed taste would have been to meddle with Mr. in the opinion of most States people he was Oswald. He had a sort of eye I always felt decidedly "smart," and would rise to a high inclined to be cautious of. It was yellow, position. He always called himself Scotch, but like a dog's, and when he observed me at all, he had come hither from New Zealand. which he did not often appear to do, it someHis wife and son were living in town with how made me feel like a dog as well. him at the Parker House, then the leading There was one thing which before long hotel on the Plaza. The belief was that Mrs. obtained me some degree of notice on the Malloch had Maori blood in her veins by young man's part. He had a beautiful little one side or other, and that she had formerly Spanish mare ofhis own, ofthepinta or piebald been on the stage. Whether this was so or sort, which is valued among the Spaniards; not, she was acknowledged to look a perfect and if there was anything alive in particular lady. She led the style in dress, and held that he had a fondness for, it was Juanita. her own in every way at the Parker, alRoom or none, she had to be kept at hand though the greater part of the real ladies on the premises, mostly getting put up in a in San Francisco at that time boarded in close corner of the store-shed, with neither the hotel, and the rest would most likely light nor aught else suitable. The goods have done the same had there been room. and the filly were none the better for being The son, Mr. Oswald, who took a part together, and she had a fair variety to choose in the office-work of the firm, was also a from; while as to foddering her, if it was remarkably fine-looking young man, about neglected, she could generally manage to twenty at most; with rather a deep comhelp herself in the dark; plaited Leghorn plexion, no doubt, but little more so than straw, grass hats from Manilla, or fine India various young Southeiners about town. He mattings-it was quite the same to her, and, was an only child, I believe, and Mrs. Malconsidering what fools some of the consigners loch certainly looked proud of him. His father, must have been, it could signify little to at the same time, though not a man to let his them. They sent the things on commission, feelings get the better of him, took the young whether wanted or not, and often enough to fellow's attendance on business very easily. lie on our hands. In regard to exercise, The truth was, Mr. Oswald rarely failed to turn Juanita had too much of it at times, but it up at some time of the day, perhaps a little was chiefly after sundown ; at other times she "seedy," but still able to do the chief part had none. I had been well accustomed to a of the counting-house work, in particular the pony myself, and being brought up with the foreign correspondence. He wrote a beautiful run of farmers' horses besides, I took some hand, and knew something of languages, trouble in-attending to the poor beast, which Spanish more especially. The worst that young Mr. Malloch soon began to take as a could be said against him was that he kept matter of course. He not only soon came rather too much company in the young rowdy to expect it in the coolest possible style, but quarter; still there was no good reason to seemed to intend making me answerable if find fault so far as the firm was concerned, anything went wrong with the mare. The premises of Macansh and Malloch Meanwhile, I did not at all dislike the consisted of a large wooden-frame house and warehouse business. One of my duties was



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IS RUNNING A WAY TO SEA. RUNNING AWAY TO SEA. "1NOT very long ago a little chap ran away and with your gold epaulettes, and sword from school to go to sea. I chance (hacked like a saw), and a baker's dozen of to know almost exactly how he felt, and all medals on ? that happened to him; so I can give a true, Not a hundred miles from one of the as well as a full and particular account of his suburbs of London, there used to be-peradventures. But as it might hurt his feelings haps there is still, and so I cannot give its if I were to give his right name, we will call whereabouts more plainly-a Boys' School, him Jack Sprat. which Jack declares to have been the beastJack's notion was that all sailors were liest hole that ever called itself a school." jolly fellows, who led very jolly lives. They Outside its wall, from week's end to week's might have dangers to encounter, but, if they end, the little chaps were scarcely ever allowed were wrecked, they were almost sure to get to go, except on Sundays; when the school back to England somehow, or if they didn't, was marched, two and two, like Noah's ark to have beautiful desert islands waiting for beasts and birds, to church. Now this conthem, which was even better. And then finement was one thing which Jack did not their life was so unlike school-so free-andrelish; and, for another thing, he had not easy. There were such chances in it, too. been accustomed to be knocked about at You might begin as cabin-boy in a merchantother people's pleasure. Accordingly, to seman (hadn't Captain Cook, and Sir Cloucure liberty, the sagacious Jack made up his desley Shovel, and ever so many of the mind to turn cabin-boy. famous fellows, been cabin-boys either in the He resisted the blandishments of the merchant-service or the navy ?), but then you basket-woman, and saved up two weeks' mightbe the first of a crew of twenty gallant pocket-money. The eventful morning came British tars to board a pirate, and haul down at length, and Jack woke early in the autumn the black flag with its death's-head and crossmoonlight. All the other fellows in the long bones, the said pirate being manned by three dormitory were sound asleep. He felt rather hundred bearded ruffians, black, brown, and scared, but as he was, he said his prayers before renegade-white, and carrying thirty long brass he crept out of the room. Perhaps he hurried guns, which your ship had fought for five them over rather, and, perhaps, he did not feel hours, muzzle to muzzle, with a rusty little bit quite sure that boys who were running away of an iron cannon, suddenly remembered and had any business to say prayers; but still he did dragged out from under the longboat; and say them, partly from habit, and partly because then, before you could say Jack Robinson, he felt that people who were going to sea could you might find yourself, cadet,-midshipman, not make sure for a moment what would -first lieutenant,-captain, of a dashing frihappen to them. Then he went out of the gate, sink or capture two French first-rates, room on tiptoe, carrying the shoes which and half-a-dozen corvettes in single combat, he had smuggled up to bed the night before, and take no end of American clippers. How instead of pushing them into his pigeon-hole the Portsmouth bells would ring when it was in the shoe-rack to be cleaned; and stole known that the flying, fighting Arethusa almost as silently as a shadow down the stairs. had anchored at Spithead with a kite-tail of Boards would creak, though, when he was fresh prizes under her stern! The Mayor passing the bedroom doors he dreaded most; and corporation would come down to weland he had to make a rush past the tall old come her heroic young captain, when he clock on the last landing. "Tick-tick, ticklanded, for the first time during his brief but tick," it said. "I'm awake-I've been awake eventful life at sea, upon his native soil. all night. I know what's going on, if every Mamma would not be sorry then that he had one else is asleep." run away from school; and wouldn't the In the hall Jack put on his shoes, and girls "-sisters, and cousins, and all the rest prepared to tackle the front door. There of them that you used to lark with under the were two bolts to shoot back, and a bar to mistletoe-envy the one that had hold of take down, and a chain to unsnack, and your sound arm (one arm, of course, would then a huge key to turn. Jack almost be in a sling, but sure to get quite well the tumbled off the tottering scaffolding of hall, week after next), when you walked to church chairs, &c. he constructed to reach the top the first Sunday after you got home, in your bolt; but all the obstacles except the lock cocked hat, and blue coat, and white trowsers, were overcome at last. The key for a time 0



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THE BOYS' GLOBE LIBRARY OF TRAVEL AND ADVENTURE. LIBE RA-jLLY I TTSTA.TED. BY POPULAR AUTHORS. FI:RST SERIES. VOL. I. THE HISTORY OF SANDFORD AND MERTON. With six Steel Plates printed in colors. VOL. II. THE ADVENTURES OF ROBINSON CRUSOE. With six Steel Plates printed in colors. VOL. III. THE ARABIAN NIGHTS' ENTERTAINMENTS. With six Steel Plates printed in colors. VOL. IV. THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. With six Steel Plates printed in colors. SECON D SE RIES VOL. I. PICTURES OF HEROES AND LESSONS FROM THEIR LIVES. Illustrated. VOL. II. FORTY-FOUR YEARS OF A HUNTER'S LIFE. Being Reminiscences of a Maryland Hunter. Liberally illustrated. VOL. III. FIGHTING THE FLAMES. A Tale of the Fire Brigade. By R. M. BALLANTYNE. Illustrated. VOL. IV. OLD DECCAN DAYS. Hindoo Fairy Legends Current in Southern India. By M. FRERE. Illustrated. TIrI ID S ERIES. VOL. I. DEEP DOWN. A Tale of the Cornish Mines. By R. M. BALLANTYNE. Illustrated. VOL. II. ERLING THE BOLD. A Tale of the Norse Sea-Kings. By R. M. BALLANTYNE. VOL. III. CAST UP BY THE SEA. A Tale. By SIR SAMUEL WHITE BAKER. Liberally illustrated. VOL. IV. THE RIFLE AND THE HOUND IN CEYLON. Hunting Scenes and Adventures. By SIR SAMUEL WHITE BAKER. Illustrated. 12mo. Handsomely bound in fine cloth, uniform style, 4 vols., in a neat box, $6 the set, or the single volumes $1.50 each. For sale by all Booksellers, or will be sent by mail, postage free, on receipt of price. Published by J. B. LIPPINCOTT & CO., 715 and 717 Market St., Philadelphia.



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THE BOY WHO HAD NO MEMORY 25 THE BOY WHO HAD NO MEMORY. "44W ELL, Frank, how do you get on to see how soon you can manage it. As to with your holiday task ?" No memory, that's a complaint that a great "i Get on ? replies Frank; I don't get on many people'suffer from who might easily be a bit. It's an awful shame giving a fellow cured. Do you remember the old story of any work in the holidays. Here have I been Eyes and No Eyes ? fagging away at this long string of names "Yes, I do; but what has that to do with and dates for the last hour, and I can't say memory ?" it yet. I have no memory at all." A great deal. ,Two boys-say you and "Well, my boy," said I, holiday tasks Tom-of about equal age and ability, walk are rather a bore, no doubt, and rather down a green, country lane, or up Regent unfair, when 'a fellow works hard all the Street, on a sunny morning. One fellow half-year,' as you say; but as you have got sees a hundred curious and pleasant things, the Roman histoiy to do, the best thing is the other not five. But both have eyes, and both can see clearly. Much in the same two fish were in colour, and size, and shape; fashion, two fellows in your class both have how the pool curved round on one side with memories. One has been taught, or has a broad shallow pebbly beach, and how on learned by practice, to use the power of the other side there was a bank of chalky storing up facts in his mind, and recollecting mud beyond the bed of thick weeds?" them; the other has not. What one finds "And the thousand of caddis worms that easy, the other finds very hard or impossiwe saw crawling about at the bottom of the ble; though, at 'the time, both have got shallow! Oh yes, I remember; and we Smemories equally good, and equally fit for counted sixty-one red spots on the biggest work. Do you remember, Frank, the great trout; and you showed me the two sorts of pool below the Hatch, on the Clatford river, May-flies, and the reed warbler's nest, and the where I killed the two big trout last year ?" water-ousel,-and then we were so puzzled Oh yes, quite well." by the fish all at once leaving off feeding in "You can remember how different the the afternoon, and suddenly beginning again,



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---------------~.~-;~f=-.........~ -i-d A ~ "PGG' ATENONNA. Se ae 7



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76 GIACOMO AND PALLIDINA; OR, flooded the garden, and her light played the flowers awoke and bloomed in new among the grey-gr en olive boughs. The invigorated beauty. But the Lily showed the flowers rolled up their leaves, folded their smn a different sight than when he had last petals inwards and sought slumber; the beamed down upon her. She still stood monotonous sleepy nodding of the trees shame-coloured and tearful, her imperial above singing their lullably. All was hushed crown bowed earthward, and never again and still, all save the Lily were at rest. She from that day forth did she lift pure silver alone of all that number was awake and restbells heavenward. less; she could not forget what had passed As for her children, the dark red blush within the day just dead; sorrow would not has not left their flowers ; the tears of repentpermit her to slumber; and when at last, after ance well ever new within their eyes; they the moon had sunkand the Eastwas beginning bear about them unforgotten the stigma and to shadow forth a new era of light, sleep fell remembrance of their ancestor's wicked reupon her eyelids, her rest was disturbed and bellion and pride. They have inherited her broken. Several dreams coursed through her title of Empress tgo; but they bear it lowly, brain, and no plant more beautiful and proud in Light dawned once more; the sun glowed shape, more humble in mien, adorns our again in golden splendour over the garden; gardens than the Imperial Lily. HELEN ZIMMERN. GIACOMO AND PALLIDINA; OR, THE ITALIAN BEGGARS. BY COUNTESS MARIE MONTEMERLI. I, which excited the pity of passers-by, but did THE son of a beggar, I first saw the light not distress my mother, who often said to at Pisa. me, Cry louder, Giacomo, louder; the In Italy there are beggars of every descripladies who pass us by don't hear thee." tion. There are shamming beggars, threatenAt nightfall we went back to our lodging, ing beggars, beggars halt and maimed, musical two tolerably clean rooms in the suburbs. beggars, poetical beggars, beggars who are None of our neighbours had any idea that rich, and beggars who are poor, blaspheming we were beggars. My mother strictly forbade beggars and praying beggars, reprobates and me to tell it, and always pretended to return saints. They encumber the streets, the roads, from her day's work. My father would habitthe approaches to hotels, churches, and public ually come in with his spade on his shoulder; buildings of every kind. But the cleverest and, indeed, he was employed in a garden for of them all, and those who carry on business several days in the week. But early in the most profitably, are the intimidating and the morning and late in the evening, on Sundays, devout. My father has belonged to both festivals, and market days, my father, too, these classes. At the time of my birth he begged. was known as II Stregone; now he is At night, when the door was shut, he sat spoken of as The Saint. beside my mother, and the two counted up The earliest years of my life were chiefly their money, putting the silver apart into a spent in my mother's arms. I was a sickly bag, that they kept hidden in their straw bed. child, and she, dying of decline. The first "What gate were you at this morning, words she taught me were-" Charity, please." Bastiano ?" my mother would ask. In summer I sat by her on the burn"Porte al Prato. And didn't I send curses ing flags at church doors, or played with after those peasants who passed me by withother little beggars; in winter, shivering on out an alms ? They would stand quite dumbthe marble pavements, I wept with cold, foundered, then turn back to give me all they 1 The Sorcerer. could."



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34 A MEMORY OF THE THAMES TUNNEL. "Bitter cold, master," said the old woman, world but one another to care for them, and shivering, and putting her skinny arms round as if they were fond enough of one another the youngsters as they snuggled up to her. not to trouble themselves much about other If I were "writing a story," I could give people's care. you, if not a true, at any rate a full and parI ought to add that as we four sat up, ticular account of my strange bedfellows' rearubbing our eyes and chatting with clatsons for sleeping in the Tunnel; but as I am tering teeth, some workmen came along from only relating an experience, I can merely say the Wapping side. that they looked as if they had no one in the "Poor beggars !" said one of them, as they stopped to look at us; "they look as if it and thirsty though I was, I could not bring was hard lines with them, Jim. I s'pose myself to diminish my companions' breakfast that's your mother, young man, and them's by taking a share of it. I felt somehow that yourkids? Let's give'em a breakfast,.mates." it would be obtaining charity under false And the good fellows subscribed halfpence pretences. for our refreshment at the nearest coffeeBut you will understand now how it was "=stall. -M9 that I wanted to see the Thames Tunnel the I should have liked some warm coffee and other day, for the first time since I had slept thick bread and butter, but cold and hungry in it.



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A NIGHT IN AN AFRICAN CRUISER. r5 its light the form of the doctor was visible, of the rest in my own little cabin, which a floaing rapidly astern. Not a moment was few moments more would bring. But not to be lost, and divesting myself of coat and easily were these enjoyments to be gainedwaistcoat, I was quickly in the water at his not yet were the dangers of this eventful night side. Being a good swimmer, there was passed. little difficulty in supporting him; the shock As we neared the ship it became perceptiof the plunge had apparently restored his ble that she was rolling heavily in the trough senses, for he recognized me, and feebly of the sea, and that the act of getting on syllabled my name. A few strokes brougat board and hoisting up the boat would be a us to the life-buoy, and resting my feet 'on perilous one. Nothing, however, could be the lower part under water, one arm clinging gained by delay,'so seizing what appeared to to the upper rod, and the other round the be a favourable moment, during a temporary waist of my friend, I awaited with impatience lull ii. the ship's motion, we pulled up alongthe approach of succour from the ship. The side. Just as the boat cadme abreast of the situation was by no means agr eable; the halfgangway, we rose on the crest of an immense drowned man soon lost the little consciouswave: a crowd of men were on deck ready ness that remained, and hung a dead werht to assist us, and into their outstretched arms on my arm. The recent tornado had occawe litcrally threw the insensible form oi the sioned a heavy sea; and, though the lifedoctor. Two of our men also leaped on the buoy-bore our weight well, yet frequently the deck and were safe, but the danger to us waves, dashing over our faces, half-choked who still remained was imminent. Our boat me. I was also myself much weakened, sank with the receding wave, the ship at the having only lately recovered from an attack same time rolling heavily over to starboard, of yellow fever; and as the light at the away from us. With the return roll would Pantaloon's masthead dimmed and faded come the danger. In vain with desperate to my eye as we drifted more and more efforts we tried with oars to force the boat from the ship, so also fainter and more away from her dangerous proximity. Closer faint waned my hopes of deliverance. Thq and closer yet the power of attraction pressed portfire was quickly burning out, already its her to the ship's side. The return roll came. brilliancy had much lessened, and the fine I looked up, saw the heavy dark mass descendvolume of light it had at first given was ing remorseless upon our heads; then a crash, dwindling into a fitful gushing of sparks, as a cry of agony-a few struggling, breathless in a badly-prepared schoolboy's squib. I moments in the dark depths; and I was knew well that, if the light should intdeed go floating, halt-stunned, but unhurt, on the out entirely, the boat sent to our aid would surface, amidst oars and fragments of the row in vain quest of such a speck as the lifewrecked boat. One poor fellow, whose buoy; when morning broke it might'be disdeath-shriek we had heard, hid sunk to rise covered, but long before that time my exno more, but the others were swinaling behausted arms would have loosened their hold, side me uninjured. and our bodies found the sailor's grave. And now the safest way of regaining the With despair in my heart I gazed upwards ship had to be considered. The 'falls," or at the portfire, which now suddenly shot ropes by which the lost boat had been forth an expiring gleam-tinting with a blue lowered, were hanging from the. projecting unearthly glare the closed eyes and senseless davits, their ends trailing in the water some form of my companion: and then all was six or eight feet from the side ; and to climb darkness. But, even at that moment, I heard up by their assistance was an easy mode of the welcome sound of the measured beat of escape for trained sailors. oars. Gathering all my strength, I hailed; S,\imming therefore to these ropes, I the hail was answered cheerily by many directed my men to go up first, and soon strong voices, and guided by my shout the had the satisfaction of seeing them all safely boat discovered our position. Soon friendly on board, the ship at this time being tolerably hands grasped us, and in another minute I steady. Then grasping the falls I began my was safely seated in the boat, with the doctor, own ascent hand over hand. Scaicely had still unconscious, by my side. my feet left the water, however, when the The boat's crew gave way cheerily for the rolling motion once more commenced. As brig, towing the life-buoy astern. Overhead the ship inclined gradually over, my feet the sky was clearing, the stars again shone again touched the surface ; still I descended out; and as the black form of our floating until the waters closed over my head, and then home once more became visible-her hull lower and lower yet-clinging the while to looming large in the obscurity of night-I the rope as my only chance of ultimate safety revelled in anticipation of the comforts and -until at length I telt the downward motion



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70 BUSH NEIGHBOURS. however, persistently preyed on Daventry that his horse could only have strayed a little Hall. way into the Bush, and was sure to turn up All the assigned servants, except Long soon. Mounted on another nag, Walter rode Steve and his wife, were habitual thieves, about for days in search of his favourite, but They did not get any wages for their work, never saw him more. Walter found out and so they thought themselves free to help something else, however. He was riding themselves to their master's property. So home very dispiritedly one evening, when he many pounds of salt or fresh meat and flour, noticed Black Poley-as one of his father's so much coarse brown sugar and inferior tea, shepherds who lived at an out-station was and a little tobacco, were the rations served nicknamed, from the resemblance his head out to each man every week ; but there was bore to a hornless bullock's-mounting the good living in the men's huts for all that. rise on the right of the gully in which Walter China pigs, ducks, turkeys, &c., mysteriously was riding. Walter could not understand disappeared. The men made out that they what Poley was doing there at that time of had wandered into the Bush, and been night, and having been made suspicious devoured by Bush beasts and birds, or else by the loss of his horse, he pressed after starved to death; but if Captain Daventry Poley as quietly as he could. By the time had gone to the huts a little more frequently, he topped the ridge it was nearly dark, but instead of trusting, as he did, to his overseer, he could make out Poley going down the the savoury scent that often issued from them other side of the ridge, and another man would have told him what had become of coming up to meet him. Walter was a brave his poultry, &c. Walter noticed the savoury little fellow. He tied his horse to a tree, steam one evening, but the overseer said that and, slipping down the ridge, got within he had shot some wild ducks, and given them earshot of the two men, who were sitting, to the men. This overseer was a convict-a smoking and talking, on a fallen tree-trunk. smooth-faced, smooth-tongued rascal. He "Well, Poley, how many can you let me was trusted to weigh out the rations, and the have this time?" men used to carry a good deal besides their Poley gave a gruff laugh, and answered rations out of the store. The house servants, with an oath: -if I don't try it on witl too, whenever they had a good opportunity, three score The cove is so jolly green, it's would appropriate unguarded valuables, my belief he'll never miss 'em. I began They had no difficulty in disposing of them, with twos an' threes, an' now I've worked it since all the assigned servants, except Long up to a score, an' I've al'ays got over the Steve and his wife, were in league with the cove somehow. What does sich as him know ticket-of-leave farmers round about. Most of about sheep an' farmin'? -if I don't these ticket-of-leavers were a thieving, drunken try four score-good yows, too; so you must lot. Some of them would reconvey their stand something handsome." Government grants for a keg of rum. As for "To-morrow morning then-at the old conveyance of another kind-Pistol's-they place-Sal's Pannikin." did not rob one another, but gentlemen" All right I'll work round there about an settlers they considered fair game. Captain hour after sunrise." Daventry's bullocks found their way into the Then something was said about the overticket-of-leavers' beef casks. They stole his seer; but what, Walter could not make out. best horses; they clapped their brands on Not waiting to hear any more, he crept back his best colts, fillies, and calves; they pasto his horse, mounted, galloped home, and tured their own horses and cattle on his told his father what he had heard. At first grant; through the villany of his overseer the captain was going to consult with the and convict-shepherds, they robbed him of overseer, but one or two little things rehis sheep wholesale. They had even the cently had rather shaken his confidence in impudence to steal Dragon-fly the overseer, and so he sent for Long Why, Daventry," said one of the CapSteve instead. Long Steve knew Sal's tain's friends one day, what made you sell Pannikin well. It was a lonely hollow in that capital chestnut your little fellow used an unoccupied part of the Bush, and was to ride? He fetched a good price, though, called Sal's because on its brink a Mrs. I believe." Sarah Mullins had once kept a most dis"I didn't sell him," answered the Captain reputable sly drinking-house. Strange goings moodily he was stolen. A nice lot of on had taken place there. At last the landneighbours we've got; however, I think I've lady had been most brutally murdered in scared 'em for one while." her own house, and after that it was allowed When Dragn-fly was first missing, the to go to ruin, and had the reputation of overseer had comforted Walter by telling him being haunted.



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68 BUSH NEIGHBOURS. screamed. The bullock-driver, Long Steve, potatoes in the kitchen garden. There was was a good-tempered fellow, and did his a nice vineyard, which Walter mistook at best to calm her. "Why, law bless ye, first for a field of currant-bushes; and in the Miss," he said, "I've got an old 'ooman orchard there were raspberries arid strawberan' half a dozen kids. What call have I ries and mulberries, pears and pomegranates, got to do any harm to a pretty gal like figs and plums and loquats, oranges and you!" But flattery was thrown away on lemons, peaches, apricots and nectarines, and Phoebe. She entreated her mistress not to gigantic rock and water melons. Walter leave her to the tender mercies of that thought of the scanty pennyworths of sour wicked-looking man, and made such a fuss apples that he used to get in Norfolk, and that at Jast her master was obliged to say, for a week or two devastated the orchard and "Well, look here, Phoebe. If you don't go the vineyard like a 'possum or a flying-fox. in the dray, you must either stay in Sydney, As soon as it was known that Mrs. Daventry or walk, or ride one of the horses. Take had arrived, the Captain's friends and their your choice-which shall it be?" Phoebe wives rode over to Daventry Hall, and then mounted the dray then, and though it was there was a round of dinners at the friends' night when she reached her journey's end, houses, and then the Captain gave dinners she was on quite good terms with Long in return, and both Mrs. Daventry and Steve when he helped her off the dray. She Phoebe were delighted with the gaiety. But had been talking to him for hours, half conwhen things settled into everyday course, and, descendingly, half propitiatingly, thinking all as often happened, Captain Daventry was the time what a capital adventure it would be away from home for hours together, they to relate in her first letter home. In that letter both began to fall back into their old dread Phoebe made out that Long Steve had cornof Australia. Mrs. Daventry had been proud mitted half a dozen murders, whereas the at first of having so many servants inside honest fellow had never committed one. A and outside the house, but it was not pleagreat many terrible scamps were sent out to sant to remember that all except Phoebe Australia in the old convict times, but, mixed were convicts. Captain Daventry wasa, strict up with them, there were men who were far but not a severe master, and so he got on better fellows than many of the people left pretty well with his assigned servants, but in at home. all their faces-except Long Steve's and his Late in theafternoon the Captain and his wife's-there was a shallow, time-serving party reached his farm. Oh, what a firstlook, however cringingly civil they might be, rate broad!" Walter, fresh from Norfolk, exthat was not reassuring. claimed, when the riders had mounted the Walter did not trouble himself about such top of the shore-hills, and were looking down things. He made friends after a fashion with on the lagoon which the farm fringed-a the men, and rode about with his father to lagoon with thickly-wooded banks, cleared look after the horses, cattle, and sheep; the here and there, a little stream running into maize-paddock and the potato-fields ; the it at one end, and at the other a sandy bar clearers, the fencers, and the sawyers. His over which the sea was breaking, father soon let him go about by himself, and Mrs. Daventry was delighted at first with then he was a proud and happy boy. He could her new home. A pretty flower-garden scarcely believe that only a year ago he was sloped down to the lagoon, and the verandah stumbling through the irregular and defective of the snug one-story house of brick and verbs in that gloomy old Norfolk schoolroom. weatherboard was smothered in passionWalter could leap logs now far better than flower. The Captain had furnished the house he could conjugate Fio or Inquam then. as comfortably as he could for his wife, and Of course, his father or his mother gave him altogether it seemed a much smarter, livelier lessons every now and then, but that was not place than the dark old house in the dull, like regular school, you know. Long Steve grass-grown side-street of the little Norfolk had taught him to crack a stock-whip, and town where she had been economizing whilst Long Steve's wife had plaited him a cabbagehir husband was first doing military duty, tree hat (in those days the country all round and afterwards building this snug nest in New the lagoon was studded with cabbage-tree South Wales. There was no need, apparently, palms), and Walter used to gallop through to economize now. Beef and mutton were the Bush like a Wild Huntsman on his own the commonest of things at Daventry Hall. three-parts blood chestnut Dragon-fly. SomeCream, butter, eggs, honey, pigs, poultry, times he went out on ioot with his little gun, fish and game were all to be got, to almost and after a bit he managed to shoot wallabies any extent,upon the premises. BesidesEnglish and kangaroo-rats, and quail and snipe, and vegetables, there were pumpkins 'and sweet bronze-wings, and parrots and cockatoos to



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112 KEEPING THE "CORNUCOPIA." to be afraid of. We know all about her The word stuck in my throat, and I co-. look," said he, "though it's a windfall I menced to explain that he might jump down didn't just expect." upon us, which I had known him try for less With that he signed to Malloch to sit cause. Just then he ran snuffing to the entry down, settling himself forward with an eye port after another growl from the bows. on the ship, and quite taking the thing for Whitaker gave the boat-hook to Malloch, granted as I turned the boat. So far there and sprang up, one hand on the man-rope, was no help for it, as the first attempt I the other with the revolver cocked. He might make to raise an alarm was certain fired at the dog, hitting him somewhere, but to be my last; accordingly I headed round, only enough to raise his temper thoroughly. and sculled for the Cornucopia. The ruffian, however, got on a level with It got dusk very fast, as is the case after the gunwale, dodging from the springs that sundown in California; the bay coming out King made, and taking sure aim, when distinct again all round. The ebb had begun suddenly he lowered himself a little again, to run hard, and the ship was just swinging asking me if there were people in the barque when we reached her under the lee of one ahead. I told him No, which I was but too counter, Whitaker hooked on, soon haulcertain of. She had now swung stern on-end ing round the other way under the stern, to us, where all that could be seen was a and blocking us from any notice by the couple of boats in the shade of her bilge, timber-barque ahead. The barque being one of them large, but not so much as an laden, swung slower than the ship, so as oar visible. at the moment to slue her whole length What the mischief's yonder, then ?" our way; but she was no advantage to me, whispered he, hanging over us at sight of for the crew had been running since she it; "a man-o'-war cutter by all that's anchored. The brig had by that time blasted! There's somebody in it, too, that dropped off into the sea-way, with her the brute's been scenting at; hold on, you upper sails drawing; and my only chance fool you!" yelled he to Malloch, who had lay in King, up above. He knew I was started, and missed his catch with the boatthere, and said nothing to the boat; only hook. there seemed to be something forward off The skiff had surged off too far for the the bowsprit that troubled him, as he kept young blackguard to hook on again; he tried running there, with a growl and a snarl the oar abaft, then missed the end of a rope that would have roused the harbour if he Whitaker threw to him. King all the while once opened out. was roaring and jumping overhead. Before "Quiet that dog at once, see!" said 1 could lend a hand at Malloch's orders, a Whitaker quickly; and I then spoke to man lifted his head sleepily out of the King, which kept him within bounds, cutter's bow, and hailed us. Now look ye, my young cull," the villain "Answer him right, boy," hissed Whitaker went on: you've just got to go up with us, between his teeth, or else-" fasten in your dog, and show the key of I said nothing, whereupon Malloch sprang the after-cabin padlock, then you can shut on me, trying to keep me down while he yourself in too till we're off; it'll be a pair got his knife out; though his legs being of oars this time, I'll swear!" he said, shaky in the boat, he had enough to do. chuckling at me. "What's more," said he, I dug into them, and worked at his hair as "I'll give ye my word on it, which I'll well, knowing it was all safe if I would bear defy 'em to say I've broke yet, good or bad." up a minute or two, for I had just seen the Here young Malloch nudged him aside, whole six oars of the cutter toss up and flash whispering something I could not hear ; for in the water, with the light of a dark-lantern my part, I felt life was sweet, so that I must turned to us. I knew nothing more for a have given in to anything; but he did not little, the senses having been nearly choked give me the offer again. out of me; but when 1 came to myself, both "Take his shooting-ironfrom him, Jack," the villains were prisoners, with a quartersaid he; meaning a small revolver I had master of the American corvette in charge, lately begun to wear inside my clothes, and and an armed boat's crew, most of whom which I had no idea he had noticed. He proved to be English man-o'-warsmen, all held out his free hand for it, as he hauled quite hearty as regarded me. Besides, there the boat round for the gangway man-ropes were a couple of townsmen who had been on the dark side. privately employed for the Vigilance Com"I've changed my mind," said he in a mittee, by the advice, it turned out, of Col hoarse voice; call the dog to the gangway Rigg. It seemed they had had their eye there." quietly on the brig that was to sail, and



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BUSH NEIGHBOURS. 69 make pies of. Sometimes, too, he took his One day when the Captain and Walter gun out with him in the boat, and shot wild rode home they found Mrs. Daventry and duck, and now and then a black swan, on Phcebe almost dead with alarm. A party of the lagoon. In the lagoon and the little blacks had taken possession of the front river, moreover, he caught eels and schnapverandah, on which they were jabbering pers, and guard fish, and so-called bream, and and gesticulating-rubbing their sides and mullet and trout, and delicious oysters. The poking their fingers down their throats. Captain was very proud of the way in which Poor Mrs. Daventry and her servant thought his little boy took to the colony, but Mrs. that these were signs that the blacks wanted Daventry was very anxious because he was to eat them, and therefore were ready to faint out so much alone, from fear. The Captain soon bundled the Page 72. black fellows off the verandah, but he made Captain for his kindness. Unfortunately, it a point of policy to be kind to them, and they had tasted his potatoes, and thought so he ordered the cook to supply them with them so nice that they twice saved him the tea and damper and mutton-chops. They trouble of digging up his crop, and once ate and drank until even they could eat and even scooped out and baked his seed-potadrink no more, and then remarking, with toes. The Captain did not want to make great self-satisfaction, that they had "budgeree enemies of the darkies, but he was obliged big belly," they drowsily tramped into the after that to give up supplying them with bush, and lay down in the sun to sleep off chops and damper, except when they had their surfeit, fairly earned them by working for them. The blackfellows were not grateful to the Far worse thieves than the blackfellows,



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THE LAST NEWS OF THE FAIRIES. 13I Swhere he had been born and reared, and the eye. "The folks hereabouts used to which he had scarcely ever quitted; and had think so-at least they did before we had ended with an account of the various curiMechanics' Institutions and those sort of osities of the neighbourhood,-he mentioned things to tell us it wasn't possible. But some a large cave, capable of holding fourteen of the old people believed in them for a long people, which was on the moor hard by, time. When I was a boy, it was said that if and was called "the Fairies' House." you crept quickly in to the Fairies' House "What!" said I eagerly, "are there any you might see them there-provided you were fairies in this part of Yorkshire?" early enough in the morning." John looked at me with a queer twinkle of "And did you go ? Pray, John, did you ever see a fairy?" I put the question halfhe was a man that you wouldn't like to conlaughing, lest he might suspect I was in tradict for nothing, was William Butterfield." earnest. And who was William Butterfield?" Well, ma'am," replied John with grave "The bathman at the Wells here, for many politeness, I can't say that I ever did. But many years, and a most respectable man too. I have known those that saw them, or at least He never got drunk-as most people did in firmly believed so." those days-and he never told a lie that I What! in the present generation?" ever heard of" "Very nearly. That is, when I was a lad I But he might have made a mistake, or knew one old man who declared positively he fancied things ? had seen fairies. He was so strong upon it "No, he wasn't given to fancies, nor likely that nobody ever contradicted him. Besides, to make ,mistakes. An .uncommon sharp









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KEEPING THE CORNUCOPIA." 15 ig a word of him in private. No sooner almost lifting him along. Among these was were their two heads together than Colonel my former employer, Mr. Malloch, still lookDugins, the Alcalde, after having fairly suring rather pale from his late accident. There rendered, could not resist the opportunity, and was no fear of this sort of thing now, of fired. The idea was, that he had no special course, but I began to be alarmed afresh enmity to Colonel Rigg. The wide-awake lest my fears should prove correct about the hat on the Colonel's head was sent spinning, young man ; for the people were not to and Mr. Malloch, though noway hurt, looked be trifled with any longer. I did not see like to faint. The Colonel's rifle was at his exactly where Mr. Malloch got to; everyshoulder in a twinkling, and at the crack of thing else was now thrown into the shade by it one would have thought the old alcalde the reappearance of the Colonel's carriage. jumped right over a knot of his people in the It was now empty save for the driver, who middle of the Plaza. He fell stone-dead, and stood up with a huzza as it dashed round was carried into the Custom-house. Some the corner of California Street. One of the one picked up the Colonel's hat and handed double doors was then thrown open, and some it up, pointing to the bullet-hole. He put it of the members came forward to address the on again without taking further notice, after public. A few words were said to the effect which all he had to do was to see matters that the men were safe and ready, the only settled quietly in town. question being what to do with them. There You would have supposed every one in the was one roar of "Hang them up-now and city, harbour, fort, and Contra Costa, was on here I" After that, the sounds were like the the Vigilance ticket," as the saying went. The sea in a gale off Cape Horn. The other jail, to be sure, had to be battered down, at door flew wide, showing three men pi ioned, which the firemen could be heard busy, and the ropes round their necks, and the ends the engines were playing water to lay the leading from the tackle to the hands of the dust; but all that hindered was the timber committee, who were ranged in as many walls, locks and bolts, and that was soon groups behind. Where I stood, it was too over. There were only the chief prisoners, far off to distinguish faces So far as conwith, of course, the Vigilance men captured cerned the figure of at least one of the men, over night; the rest were thought nothing of, I knew nothing; Whitaker's square build and probably escaped. They were lifted into could not be mistaken, nor his actions the carriage beside the Colonel, and driven either, for he was trying to work the boots' round to the committee-rooms, where the off his feet, evidently to kick them down leading men of the movement were gatheramong the mob. He had nearly managed ing for the occasion. I could not make sure it with one, when Colonel Rigg held up a as yet of the number of the unfortunate men; 'hand where he stood out at the side, and there was no seeing them as they went along, dropped a handkerchief; that moment the Every one seemed to be their enemy, neither committee turned their backs and ran off guard nor handcuffs being needed; now would inwards with the ropes, like a full ship's crew come a yell with the name of Bob Mackenzie, with the three topsail-halliards after reefing. and again it was Sam Whitaker. All that could be seen then was the three The Vigilance Committee chambers conbodies quivering and turning aloft; but my sisted of the upper floors of two large framevery heart grew sick at the sight. I knew by houses in the principal part of the city, the legs of the tallest that the attempt on the near the Plaza or square, but fronting BatCornucopia had been dearly paid for-a long tery Street, in the block between California way dearer than I could have wished, even and Pine Streets. The lower portions were though "Jack Wilkinson" had run me still used as mercantile stores, and in the two closer. gable-ends above were a pair of double In the afternoon, when they were cut down, doors, with projecting cranes and pulleys to a coroner's inquest was held on the bodies. hoist goods from the drays. Here we could The verdict found by the jury was, that now see the ropes being reeved for immediate Samuel Whitaker, Robert Mackenzie, and execution; a terrified jailer stood by to idenJohn Wilkinson, had "come to their death tify the prisoners, while the committee were by the act of a body duly styling themselves ranged behind, some taking off their coats, the Vigilance Committee of San Francisco, and appearing in their shirt-sleeves. The and this on Sunday, the 24th of August, crowd was packed below into every opening; 1851." It was afterwards said that some of all the windows and roofs were occupied. the members had felt a good deal on the Still, if a member of the committee wanted to occasion. This must have been the case. get through to his place above, way was I should say; at the same time others were made for him, the people more than once seen to stand in the next doorway, while



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120 YARNS. themselves to submit to it; that it will be conflicting evidence, come before the first. of no use to appeal to the captain or firstlieutenant for solution. One day at the lieutenant, as they will not interfere ; that it is usual hour, seven bells, two men were not likely to make them ill for more than a few brought for fighting on the lower deck thl days; and so on. Then, if possible, a box of previous evening, just after the hammocks surgical instruments is borrowed, and dishad been piped down. "Well," said the playedwith razors, towels, sponges, and a basin first-lieutenant to one of them, a sleek of water. Then the youngsters are admitted mutton-faced man, "what have you to say one at a time, and the smallest possible about this?" scratch made on the end of the nose with a Please, sir," he replied, "Bill were apenknife, just enough to draw blood, which sittin' under my billet when I cum down with : is made the most of on a towel for the benefit my 'ammick, and I says to him, says I, 'Bill,' i of the next customer. But I believe this says I, 'will you be so kind as to be so good innocent and playful initiation is now seldom as to be so obliging as to move a little a one practised; let us hope the midshipmen of the side while I 'angs my 'ammick up?' Them period are not the less manly or gentlemansir, is the werry words I spoke ; and with that' like for its disuse. sir, he ups with his fist and 'its me right in Part of my midshipman's life was spent in the heye." a fifty-gun frigate, one of the crack ships of "And you," said the first-lieutenant to the her day; the captain was a sailor, every inch other man, what have you to say?" of him; as the saying runs, every hair of his "If you please, sir, it worn't a-nothink o' head was a rope-yarn, and every drop of the sort; he come up to me where I were a. blood the best Stockholm tar. But he was a sittin', and he says to me, 'Hout, you beggar, taut hand; if the other ships of the squadron hout, or I'll knock your eye out !'" beat us reefing topsails or shifting spars, he So curiously does the same thing strike would pretty well make the men jump out of different people from different points of view. their skins, and the officers too. I've seen You landsmen have little idea of the mates aloft in that ship exercising in their change steam has made in the navy. When cocked hats and epaulettes. there were only a few steamers attached to Our -first-lieutenant had no sinecure; of the fleet, we could generally tell the officers, course he was expected to know all about the men, or the boats of a smoke-jack, everything, and was held responsible for the wherever we might see them; we used to discipline of the ship. Why, only to look declare they were smutty and unclean, and after the midshipmen was enough to make smelt of melted tallow. It had not then him prematurely old! On board a man-ofbeen found out that a steamer could be and war there is a court held on the main deck ought to be kept as clean as a sailing-ship. every morning at half-past eleven, where the We were lying in Besika Bay, the French first-lieutenant is judge and jury; very serious and English fleets together, when we first offences are reserved to be dealt with by the saw a screw line-of-battle ship; and I think captain. Now we had a particularly good every officer and man in both fleets crowded band, and an affected bandmaster who used on deck to see the Napol/on steam in to the to talk in a languid way about the gentleanchorage. The first English screw-liner to men of the band ;" and it came to pass that join the fleet was the Sanspareil, a miserable one day the sergeant of the band got drunk, tub; and then came Sir Edmund Lyons in and came to blows with one of "the gentlehis flag-ship the Agamemnon : she was a men of the band:" of course he was placed magnificent two-decker, and right well did in confinement by the master-at-arms, and she maintain the glory of her name, formerly brought up before the first-lieutenant the that of Nelson's ship. Now, alas! we are next morning. Maudlin and seedy, he urged building ships with no masts at all, and this remarkable defence: Please, sir, he've heavy iron plates fastened to a timber a-seized me by the 'air of the 'ed, and he've backing; but still our hearts of oak are the a-dragged me three times round the lower only backing that will support our country's deck; now I astes you, sir, is that treatment honour. for a gen'leman?" And with this sentiment I wind up my Sometimes even more difficult cases, with yarn.



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THE FIRST ALMOND-TREE. 27 dise Lost' to the girls, and give them a are going on about him, and gives himself up sketch of the Life, with a Note or two. to this one work. It is this unwearied, earnest Mr. M. (the matmaker) has the book, sir." application which, after all, wins the day. Milton was fetched in a trice; and we Do not imagine for a moment that blind tried the blind man in half-a-dozen places; people have any wonderful or special aptigiving him a line taken at random, wherever tude for remembering things, or any unusual we pleased, and he at once giving in reply the genius for steady work-except what practice lines that followed, as clearly and accurately and a strong desire to succeed bring with as if he read every word from a book. them. The surest sign of genius is, in fact, By working slowly, steadily, and carefully the power of giving your mind steadily to a on in his odds and ends of leisure time, and single object; and, in this sense, the old progoing over the ground again and again, while verb comes true: 'An ounce of genius is at work, he had not only learned the "Paradise worth a pound of clever.' So, at last, the Lost" by heart, but a very large portion of blind boy succeeds in learning by heart many Scripture, the whole of the Prayer Book and many a long page which puzzles his Psalms, and a vast number of hymns,-to say friend with eyes; not because his powers of nothing of Goldsmith's Deserted Village," memory are keener or stronger than his and other modern poetry! Very few perfriend's, but mainly because he gives time sons, even with sight, could ever accomand labour to the work, and puts his heart plish such a holiday task, simply because few into it. Step by step, and little by little, he would set to work for years with such incesfinds out the strength that is in him ; very sant, unwearied application, often by being thrown upon his own resources, Oh," says Frank, "blind people must and left almost alone to make the most of have extraordinary memories, -that's the what he has. reason 'vhy they can do such things." Take a few hints from the blind boy, "Yes," said I; "they have got extrawhen he sets about learning by heart. Do ordinary memories, simply because they put not attempt too much at a time. Go slowly. them to the right and the best use; and in Memory,' says a wise man, is like a purse: spite of all difficulties fight their way steadily if over-full that it cannot shut, all will drop on. And see what a blind boy's difficulties out.' As for facts and dates of history, try to are. Nearly every line he learns must be sift the chaff from the wheat, be content 'to from the voice of a friend; not a book can let the little fishes slip through the meshes be looked at, not a note referred to; he has of the net, provided you save the big ones.' to rely solely and entirely on his own wits. Don't turn so good a servant as memory But watch the blind man as his friend reads into a slave; above all, never dream for a to him. See how intently he listens; he moment that you have 'No Memory.' Give is now all ear, not a word, not a syllable it only fair play, fair exercise, and a willing escapes him. He cuts off every channel of heart, and some day you may rival Butler in communication with the other things that gettingup a thousand lines of 'Paradise Lost.'" THE FIRST ALMOND-TREE. H EARKEN to the ancient fable that tells Perplexed and dreamy, she was pacing the the origin of the fair almond-tree, sea-shore one summer evening, watching the which breaks into bloom long ere a leaf is wavelets as they rippled at her feet, and visible upon its naked twigs. sparkled in diamond flashes in the light of Many hundred years ago there reigned the setting sun. upon the shores of Thrace a young queen. "Dione," said the young queen to her She was fair as day; her soft brown hair favourite handmaiden, we shall have a rippled far down her white neck, which storm to-morrow, mark my word. See that looked as though it had been born of snow and dark streak of red 'neath Phoebus' car, and kissed of roses. Yet the lovely Phyllis knew note the deceptive stillness of the water. Ah! little joy in her life, for it was lonely and would that storm, sunshine, or cold ever broke destitute of love. Called early to fill her in upon the stillness of my life !" she sighed. father's throne, born to rule over rude war"The night falls apace, let us return like men, in whose pursuits she felt no inwithin," said Dione, who knew not how to terest, what wonder that restlessness reigned deal with her mistress when in these strange within her breast ? moods.



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"TACKLING OLD EPHRAIM." -': pa-ge 3-



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58 PA UL AND JEAN. chateau is handsomer within than I can tell about the siege of Troy. It sounds very odd you; such carpets and curtains and mirrors; in French rhyme; but everybody says it is and I am sure if you saw the place you extremely well done. This old gentleman would think nothing sad or uncomfortable sometimes gives great dinner-parties to a could come near it. But all the upholstery number of other old gentlemen, and then in the world will .not keep out sorrow, and he has a great show of silver plate; and it so you will think when I tell you what takes the cook all day cooking, and the happened here only fourteen months ago. Intendant all day scolding, before things This chateau belongs to an old bachelor, are in order. The Intendant is something one of the most learned men in France. He like an English butl&r, and manages everyhas just finished a translation of Homer, all thing in a great house. So one day in August, 1868, M. le Comte in Paris; but though the father and mother de X. had sent out fourteen invitations to were very fond of them, there was some one fourteen learned old gentlemen, who were they loved still more-their one little son coming, some from Paris, which is an hour Paul, born so long after his sisters that he off by rail, and some from neighbouring was still only a boy of eight years old. He chateaux, and early in the morning of this lived at the chateau with his parents, and day the Intendant had a great deal to see went to school in the village. to, and his wife also, she being the houseSo in the morning his father gave him a keeper. Now he and his wife were rather slice of bread and jam, and sent him out to oldish. They had two grown-up daughters play till lunch time. Paul set off, munchwho were married long since. One kept ing his tartine, and went past the dairy farm the lodge of the park, and the other lived buildings, which are very handsome, and built



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JACK AND JANE. x6r Jane could both hear their hearts thumping. they got from the farm, would squander their "Gie me your hand,, Jenny," gasped Jack; wages in drinking ever so much more of the "we must bolt by." Accordingly, they began hard swipes at the public-house. to run, but just as they got alongside of the On the day I speak of, Mrs. Lycett had kiln the dog-rose bushes rustled, and round got her husband and her sons' allowance of the kiln-mouth rushed three dusky forms, rough vinegar corked in a stone bottle, with Jack and Jane for a second were motionless a scrap of an old newspaper rolled round the with horror; but the next second rushed bung, to serve as a corkscrew, and their hot terror-stricken down the hill! After them in pork and greens and potatoes covered up a mad gallop came the three dusky forms of with three willow-pattern plates in a great three moor-sheep so close to them that they yellow basin ;and called to Jane to carry down almost knocked both Jack and Jane down. the dinner to the Twenty Acres. Though Jack grew very brave then, and laughed at it wasn't a washing-day, poor little Jane had Jane for being such a coward, been almost run off her feet; and as she If I had had my pick of pictures for this toiled down the lane outside the cottagelittle paper, I should have chosen the garden, hugging the yellow basin to her breast Brothers' Kiln for the subject, but the clever with her left arm, and lugging along the artist who has kindly consented to illustrate heavy bottle that gave her, in sea-phrase, a my scribbling (the readers of G. W. Y-and list to starboard," she was very pleased to see the writers too-ought, I think, to be very Jack floundering through the unmortared grateful to the clever artists who make such stone wall that bounded tTie lane on one side. a rich picture-gallery of its pages)-mry clever The lazy, mischievous young scamp, being artist has chosen to give you a pretty picture tired himself, had made a clattering gap in the of the children taking dinner to their father stone-fence rather than take the trouble of and big brothers in the fields. So I must climbing over it. Nevertheless, and though, make my paper a little longer by telling you as was generally the case, when he was not a story about what happened to Jack and at work," and had not rambled too far, he Jane when so employed, was more than punctual in coming home with Master Lycett and his two sons, Samuel a keen appetite to the cottage dinner-he and Ezekiel, were hoeing turnips one day in instantly ran up to his sister, and insisted on the Twenty Acres. Farm-labourers' wages in carrying the stone bottle. Jane gladly gave the West of England are nothing to brag it up to him; and when they got half-way about now, and they were worse then; but down the lane, she was still more glad that since Lycett and his wife, and Samuel she had her champion with her, for half in the and Ezekiel, and little Jane, too, were all ditch, into which he had wheeled his grindhard workers, and clubbed their earnings stone-barrow, sprawled Jane's biggest lowamicably, the family lived more comfortably land bogie," black, bristly-chinned "Tinker than most of their neighbours. When her Tim," leaning on his elbows, and smoking a husband and sons were at work near home, black pipe. He got up when he saw the and she was not washing, Mrs. Lycett always children, and tried to snatch the yellow basin tried to send them, as a treat, some hot from Jane; but Jack swung the stone bottle boiled pork and greens and potatoes for against his shins, and brougat it down with a dinner. As at other times they did not pavior's thud upon his toes; and bade Jane always get even co.d pork, but dined off run. And Jane did run, smashing two of bread and cheese and cold potatoes, Lycett the willow-pattern plates in her flight; and and his sons appreciated these treats hugging the stone bottle, Jack ran after her, gratefully, and were very glad when they lustily shouting Father." Of course, the were set to work in the Twenty Acres, or any big, black bullying tinker was a big coward. other field as near to their cottage. The Long before the children could get to their farmer for whom they worked saved money father, Tinker Tim had dragged his barrow by giving them cider instead of higher wages. out of the ditch, and was hurrying off with it They drank the cider, because, as West-counat the double. trymen, they were accustomed to drink cider, Jane ran like a hare, and had told her but I don't think it did them much good. father of Jack's pluck some minutes before They were sensible enough not to waste he toiled up across the turnips, still hugging money in buying more cider at the "Leathe stone bottle. He hugged it so tight, ther Bottle" or the "Brass Knocker," and and was so full of his adventure, that would have been very glad to get money good-tempered Samuel thought he might as instead of the cider allowed them; although well go on hoeing till the story was finished, most of their mates were of quite a different but thirsty Ezekiel yawned rather sulkily. opinion, and when they had drunk the cider RICHART) RowE. II



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THE CROWN IMPERIAL LIL Y 75 she would prove to them this evening that petulant tones. "I will show myself to the they had not ill bestowed their honours, Lord in my utmost loveliness. That is my that she knew how to support them with bemanner of worship." coming dignity. It was right and fitting the Jesus heard the words, and He advanced other flowers should bend before the Master, yet nearer. His look grew terrible in its awebut it would not be rikht that she should inspiring reproof and admonishment. He bow her head. She was above the others in spoke no word, uttered no sound, but rerank; she must not be beheld prostrating hermained standing before the flower in silent self together with them. No, to-day her reproof, His eye unremittingly fixed upon her pure white cups must boldly meet the wilful crown. Her resolution faded more and Master's eye; and surely, she considered, more; her pride began to waver; she felt it would not that give Him far more pleasure was a fruitless combat, endeavouring to resist than if she merely showed Him her bent outthe power and command enforced by those ward form, which was not near so fair as her heavenly eyes looking upon her for the first pure inmost depths? Thus, while our Lord time without pleasure, but full of unmixed prayed, was the evil spirit of pride and pain. vanity reasoning within the Lily's breast. Slowly, slowly her white bells began to When He had ended His petition, He rose tremble under the Divine glance; still more and began to pace beneath the olive trees, slowly she unbent their enforced rigidness, His eyes resting kindly upon the flowers, who over each flower-cup spread a dark red blush bent lowly before Him as He passed, and of shame, tears of repentance started into her sent upwards their choicest, richest perfumes. eyes, steadily and gradually each flower-cup Walking further He came to the spot where dropped its head earthwards, and soon the the Lily grew in her imperial loveliness, and hitherto proud Lily stood with drooped, flameas He drew nearer she stiffened her stem coloured bells, and sorrowful mien before the yet more rigidly, bore her bells more haughtily, Lord. and when Jesus stood before her, she made He had observed the whole change-the no movement of reverent recognition and fleeing forth of the evil spirit, the repentance, devotion, the act of remorse. He removed His fearful Now our Lord knew what was passing in glance from the flower, and a milder expresthe flower's heart. He felt sad and turned sion returned to His gentle visage. away a while, hoping that the Lily might yet Rest in peace, Lily. Sin no more," He conquer the demon within her, and bow said, and passed on. before her Maker, to whom alone she owed When He had left the garden the other her beauty. Yet no, when He resumed his flowers raised themselves from their pendant gaze her crowned head was still raised upposture, and all of them assailed the Lily with wards, and a supreme indifference to His reproaches. presence spoke out of her whole bearing. "How couldst thou dare to be so proud?" Then the Lord came closer, and stood still they said. Knowest thou not 'tis a fearful before the plant. He fixed His clear grey sin? Oh thou whom we had crowned our eyes in pained wonder upon her. She felt empress to-day, how couldst thou shame us the look, it shot like lightning through her thus before the Lord of Life, when just frame, but the demon of pride was active because of thy high estate thou oughtest to within her, and she strove to hide her have been the first to humble thy head?" emotion. Many of the flowers wept bitter tears, and A reproving look came over the gentle could speak no further for sobs. face. Still no change in the upright bearing The Lily answered not a word; she who of the Lily. A pained shade passed over the erewhile had dared the Lord. She was cowed clear eyes. The Lily felt her resolution and humiliated, her spirit broken. Silently wavering, though she struggled with might she bore the reproofs of her companions; and main to remain in her proud posture, silently the taunts and jeers some less Bend thy head, Lily," whispered the delicate-minded shrubs would utter. She felt other flowers, pained and grieved at this she had too well deserved all this; ay, and conduct. Bend! Acknowledge thy Lord. far, far more. She continued to hang her Cause Him no grief; He has enough to bear. head, the deep blush was still unfaded on her Bend I" cheeks. But these expostulations only made the As she replied by not a word, the others at Lily more self-willed, made her desire more length ceased their reproaches, and left her than ever to display her superiority over her alone to her sad and bitter thoughts. The companions. short Eastern night o'erspread the land with "I will not bend," she said half-aloud, in a veil of darkness, the moon's yellow rays



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142 THE SWALLOW-IWORT. "Kind children," thought the swallow, as wended her way to her nest. The little one she pecked up the crumbs and flew with missed all the merry chatter and kind words them to her nest among the vine-leaves, he had been used to that day. "Sweet birdie," said the children. Mam"What if I apply to the owl!" suddenly ma, is it not tame? Do you think it knows thought the swallow. She always looks so us and loves us that we give it crumbs ?" wise and learned, she will surely know. Only After a While the swallow bethought her I am afraid she is too wise, and will ont conto consult the bees anent the blindness of descend to me: still I will try." her young one. "They are wise and learned," Mistress Owl," asked the anxious mother, she said, "and travel a great deal, so they "I have come to you for advice; pray give must acquire much knowledge. Stay quiet, it me. I know it must be an easy matter to my child, I shall return soon," and she winged you with your vast learning." And she told her way to the garden where stood a large her tale. wicker hive. "Can you find your way here again at "Gentle bees," she said sweetly, tapping eve ?" sleepily answered the owl. I can with her beak at the hive, I crave to speak help you, but I want to rest now. Goodwith one of you." night," and she had dropped her head on What is it?" demanded a drone, issuing her breast again and closed her tiny eyes. forth; "why do you disturb us? We are Here was hope at least, and the swallow busy, and have no time to talk to such as returned more cheerfully to her nest, quitting you." it again at dusk in mortal dread lest that horrid The swallow rapidly told her misery, cat should espy her in the dark when she was "Oh, indeed," said the bee; "and you less able to elude his grasp. However, she come to us for help. In sooth, that is cool reached the owl's roost in safety, and found of you. What! do you fancy we are likely her friend just awakening. to care for the welfare of your child when "Good evening! she said. "You come you and yours have devoured so many of our for my advice. I assure you I feel sincerely brethren and friends? Adieu, and consult flattered. But you do right to apply to me; some one of your own kind. The eagle is I know much, and will help you. I am always your king; go to him," and saying that, the glad to help, but I am undervalued-underbee vanished, valued. Good people always are; do you Go to the eagle, he is your king," repeated not think so, Mistress Swallow ?" the swallow sadly. Nay, I cannot do that; Perhaps so," said the swallow. She was I cannot leave my child so long alone. Then, impatient at the owl's slowness, and wished too, I fear him, he is so large and strong; she would come to the point. But she knew and very fierce, they tell me. He might kill from experience that it was not wise to hurry me if I went, and then what would become her. of my child?" The swallow began to weep, "Yes, always undervalued, my dear friend. but her weeping only sounded to the children To speak of our business, however, for no like a repeated chirp; they fancied she was doubt you are very sleepy and want to go hungry, and fetched her crumbs, home. You swallows do sleep at such ridi"I will go and ask the ants," thought the culous hours. The best hunting-time, my swallow; "they travel much also, and perdear friend, believe me, the best hunting haps they are not quite so stuck-up as those time; it is a pity you should lose it by idle bees. I wonder if the little sparrow whom slumber." I found in my nest had a mother, and if she "Not for us," ventured the swallow. grieved at his long absence. I wish I had "Ah, well, perhaps not. You are inferior not murdered him." animals. But, as I said,.to come to the It was curious how much that fancy had point. Your little one is blind; you wish a occupied her lately, and would not quit her remedy? Well, listen to me. You know the head. She was so unhappy herself now, forold garden-wall that divides the orchard from saken of her mate, alone with a blind child, the flower-garden?" (that her heart was full of sympathy for others. "I do." Formerly she had been too glad to feel for "Go there at break of day to-morrow, and others' grief, you will find growing in a large clump a plant Her mission to the ants was no more sucmortals call the larger celandine. You will cessful than that to the bees. They also know it by its flowers; They have four taunted her with the injuries her fellows had petals of a yellow colour, and large pods done them. "Ask of your friends," they that hold their seeds. The leaves are large, said, and returned to their hillock, thin, divided into three, notched at the edges, Sad and dejected, the swallow once more of a bluish green. Can you remember all -i



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26 THE BO Y WHO HAD NO MEMORY. as we came up the river. I can see that verses of the Psalms for the day; and, when great pool now, quite plainly, and watch the the time comes for singing, joining heartily fish feeding; and I recollect that queer story in the verses out of 'Hymns Ancient and the keeper told us about the two big trout Modern,' which are some hundreds in number. fighting,-charging each other like a couple Ask that little girl, there, busy weaving a of rams--to settle which should be king of sash-line, how long she took to learn the the run." whole of the one hundred and fifty Psalms. "And how is it," said I, "that you can She will tell you about eighteen months;recollect all these things so clearly and all done, too, not in the school-room, or exactly if you have no memory ?" while at work,-but after school-hours, while Oh," replies Frank, but trout-fishing is strolling about with a friend, who teaches a very different thing from Roman history, them to her a verse at a time, line by line, Of course, a fellow can recollect all about and makes her repeat it, verse by verse, until trout, and the chalk-stream, flies, and beetles, she has mastered the whole Psalm, and so and the river, because he likes them so much." on through the one hundred and fifty. And, "Just so: he likes them all, and puts his once learped, she never forgets them. If you heart into the work of storing them up in his doubt my word, try her, by giving her a mind. The facts all fit into their right places, verse out of any one Psalm you know, and she and he keeps them there safe and sound for will at once go on with that which follows, many a long day. And the very same machine to the end of the Psalm.-There, I told you he uses to 'learn the history of the trout, so. Once she had no memory. Now, you the names of the flies, beetles, and birds,see what she has. There are fifty other girls only wants careful use, and plenty of oil and in this long work-room who can do what a little heart in the business, to serve equally she does so easily and so correctly. well for Roman history. Some day, Frank, Gossipping old Bishop Burnet 1 tells us you and I will have a talk about this long of a blind lady, a Miss Walkier, who had masstory of names and dates again." tered five different languages, and knew by ** heart all the Psalms, and the whole of the A few weeks after this we got back from New Testament; and Mr. Wilson, in his the country to our own home at the Blind Biography, of a blind sailor, who had learned School in St. George's Fields, where about the 'Navy List' straight through from beone hundred and sixty poor blind children ginning to end. are taught to read and write and cipher, and "You smile, Frank, at this, I see,-but work at a trade; all of which things they come now over to the other side of the learn to do as nimbly and correctly as boys school, where the blind boys and men are at with the sharpest eyes. work, and you shall see and hear for your"Now, Frank," said I, "come along with self a man who can beat the sailor, if not me, and let us hunt up a few fellows who Miss Walkier. once had no memory,-like a boy I once met Here we are in the mat shop, full of boys in the holidays,-but somehow or other have and men, all busily at work on cocoa-nut managed to learn by heart scores and hundreds matting: coarse mats for doorways, or of words and lines which would puzzle you coloured rugs of the daintiest kind. There, as much as the Roman history, at first, at the loom, is D. Butler.""These blind children come to, us at all "Well, Butler, how are you? Busy as ages, between ten and eighteen, and generally ever ? knowing nothing more than the names of a few Yes, sir; and quite well, thank you." letters; often unable to say even the Lord's How does Milton get on ?" Prayer correctly, and without even a notion "Pretty well, sir; but the 'Paradise Reof what arithmetic means. As to writing and gained is a deal harder than Paradise reading they look upon the whole thing Lost.'" as an impossibility. And yet more than 'Paradise Regained I' have you been ninety out of a hundred learn to read fairly learning that?" with their fingers, and to emboss a letter on "Just finished two books, sir, in the thick paper which they can make out for holidays; and the 'Life of Milton,' which you themselves, or a friend in the country can lent me, as well,-and most of the Notes." read in the usual way; and all of them, some And can you really say the whole of this early and some late, wake up to the fact that by heart ? they have got strong, clear, sharp memories. "Yes, sir, I think so. Will you try me? "Go into the chapel on Sunday morning: I shall be glad if you will, because I am you will hear a hundred voices repeating going to repeat a book or two of the 'Paranot only all the responses, but the alternate i Travels, vol. i p. 218.



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78 GIACOMO AND PALLIDINA; OR, they would ask. "Send him to some of farmers, and especially the farmers' wives, the asylums for children ; do not let him into bestowing liberal alms. He used to take beg." me with him, but the long walks did me To which she replied that she would do so harm, and I began to be lame, which enby-and-by, when I was older, chanted my father. When I was between five and six there "They will see that thou art not fit to came a very hard winter, work," he would say; "and I shall not be "You are going to be ill, Lucia," said my blamed for keeping thee back from it." father; "do stay at home." Having always been accustomed to hear "I What can you be thinking of, Bastiano? my mother use gentle language and beg in How can I remain at home with arms folded humble strain, it shocked me to listen to the and making nothing?" curses my father hurled out, and made me "You may sew." cry. "I cannot bear sitting still, sewing. It "Silence, little fool!" he said; "you see kills me! You know it does." that I am doing what I do for your sake, and* "Then it is no use my talking," replied you must let me do it my own way." my father, dolefully; "I must just let thee I hated, too, going home in the evening. take thy own course." Teresa used to come in to light our fire and The Tramontana1 was cutting, and it make our soup. My father, who was very snowed. It was a perfect journey to get stingy, would give her a plateful of soup from our house to the church. One evening for her trouble. Sometimes we had so much my mother came in earlier than usual, went bread we did not know what to do with it; to bed, had a sharp illness, which did not last in which case we sold it to other beggars. long, and died. Meanwhile I was very dull; I never played, My childish sorrow was terrible. I sat and grew thinner and thinner. beside her without stirring till Teresa carried One day Teresa advised my father to enter me away by force. All day long I cried; into partnership with some mendicants who then when evening came I contrived to made a very good thing of it. At first he escape, ran to our abode, got in without refused, afterwards thought it over, and we being seen by any one, slipped myself under went to station ourselves with the rest on the sheets to my mother's side, and there fell the Piazza del Duomo. Since I had lost my asleep. mother, all my notions were utterly changed: After anxiously looking for me, my father in. her lifetime everybody seemed good; since saw a slight movement beneath the covering her death the whole world seemed to have of the corpse. Terrified in the extreme, he grown wicked. Formerly I had seen many raised it, and there he found me. No one had smart ladies speak kindly to my mother, and the cruelty to awake me; I stayed where I slip silver into her hand. I had noticed was till break of day. priests and monks interested about her When I first awoke I had forgotten that my health. I had heard them speak to her mother was dead, and threw my arms around about the good God; and, besides, we had her to kiss her as usual, but she was so cold always been in and about the church, where that I screamed out. My father called in bad people did not go. While with my Teresa, who carried me off and kept her eye father I was generally lounging about publicupon me all day. houses, hearing so many oaths and curses That evening when I returned I found the that I was beginning to use them myself, bed empty. My mother was under the earth and coming into contact with gamblers and -her sweet gentle face hidden from me for people who had no charity about them. I ever. was ill-treatedand laughed at. People I wanted to run away, but my father held would cry outme back. I was afraid of him, having always "Little idler! are you not ashamed of been so much alone with my mother. I felt begging? Your mother must blush for you." that for me the world was empty, and fully "Alas," I sobbed, "I have no mother believed, in my childish way, that henceforth She is dead." all would seem dead to me, my mother having "The young impostor! he says that to died. excite our compassion,-his mother is most My father, who had now no one to assist likely in the public-house !" him, came to the conclusion that begging Such speeches as these used to pain me so would bring him in a better income than that I cried-oh, how I cried !-enough to gardening. He took to leaving the town and have blinded myself. I repeat it-the whole going about in the country to frighten the world appeared to me to have grown wicked 1 The north wind. since I had no mother.



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ABO UT PHILIP. 149 his elbows on the sill, and his eyes looking not take so much notice of Philip, and Philip far away over the tree-tops. Instead of going heard him say that he feared the boy to bed this night happily and full of fun, as would be quite spoilt by being brought up he usually did, the poor boy was heavy and with so many girls." This rather hurt Philip's sad, for he felt, for the first time in his life, feelings, for he had always thought himself a lonely. Perhaps, when I tell you the cause very manly boy; and though he did speak of this feeling of loneliness, you will think gently to iis sisters, and kindly mend their that he was very foolish, and that he ought dolls and their workboxes, he knew himself not to have given way to it. You v\ill be that he would much rather have a game of quite right in so thinking ; but then we all are cricket with other boys than be a dolls' doctor foolish and give way sometimes, and so you or girls' carpenter. His uncle, too, had once must not be too hard upon our friend or twice called him lazy, and had said that Philip. before he was Philip's age he had been half Philip was one brother amongst many sisround the world, and that he never had more ters-they therefore thought him the noblest than three hours' sleep at a time. It struck and bravest brother that had ever been; and Philip as rather hard that he should be rePhilip really was a brave and noble boy, for proached because he had not run away from though he may not have had all the good school (as his uncle had done), but had kept virtues that his sisters gave to him, he cersteadily at his lessons instead ; while as for tainly had some which his sisters knew sleeping so much, why, he never.wanted to nothing about. For the last three months go to bed when he was told, and only went the family had been anxiously expecting the because he did not like to worry his mother coming home of a sailor uncle. The children to let him stay up later. When he was in had not seen him since they were very small, bed, to be sure, he might wake up every three the youngest having been even a baby ; and so hours; but, if he did, he did not see what perhaps you can imagine how much they good it would do: so Philip, and I think were all thinking about the tales that they justly, fancied his uncle was not quite fair expected Uncle Kit would tell them. They with him. were looking forward to them with too great This evening, as it had been very hot all a pleasure, for it would have been impossible day, and the cooler air now was so refreshing, unless he had had as many voyages as the children had been allowed to stay up Sindbad the Sailor, or seen and done as many later, and they were gathered round their marvellous things as Sindbad the Sailor saw mamma and uncle, telling their good and bad and did, for him at all to have satisfied their deeds of the day before they went to bed. dreams of his adventures. Thus, when he Ruth confessed to have been very cross did come home, the children drew away from over her music particularly, when she had him, and spoke in a disappointed tone, for, to play the scale of G with six flats. Fanny instead of the talkative, brigand-looking remembered having cried, though she could uncle they had expected, they saw a tall, not exactly recollect why; and then Uncle thin man, with a square serious face, and eyes Kit turned to Philip, And what, sir, have so deep in his head, that they were not quite you done to-day?" sure, at first, if lie had eyes at all; and even "I don't remember to have done anything when Little Bessie did find them, by their in particular," answered Philip, his uncle's twinkling, it struck her that they were a great abrupt question putting all his deeds, both deal too small for them ever to have seen good and bad, out of his head. much. They were disappointed, too, at his I would much rather hear," said Uncle dress not being at all strange, for he had not Kit, "that you had been in mischief than even gilt buttons, but might, as Philip said, that you had done nothing in particular." "by the look of his hands and coat, have Yesterday I broke mamma's best glass done nothing but walk down Regent Street -dish, and spilt all the custard," returnded all his life." However, after a time, the Philip. children got used to their disappointment, "Glorious achievement !" said Uncle Kit and then gradually got used to their uncle. drily, while mamma could not help smiling, He began to tell them tales, too, about people and the little girls laughed loudly. Philip and places he had seen; not such wonderful looked fierce; and then his sisters, who really tales as they had longed for, but still very loved him very much, were sorry that he amusing ones. But he seemed to like best should be so vexed, and tried to be grave to have one little girl on his knee, and the again, whilst Ruth, his pet sister, pushed up others standing round him, and then to hear to him and squeezed her little hand through about their work and their music, and about his shut fingers. what they did all the day-time. He did There was a silence for a few minutes;



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o1 THE FRENCH DOLL. black silk bibbed apron, but her hair was I'm not sure," Ursula's voice had a tone stiffly strained back, and gave her an artificial of doubt in it. "I don't think the little appearance. She had a sweet little face, creature is natural yet, she looks as if she round and babyish, with large dark liquid could be full of fun ; I'm not sure that 1 eyes, and well-cut expressive lips. Just now should like fat Amy's hugs either, she's so they were pressed closely together with a stupid." troubled, puzzled look ; the child seemed to "Stupid As if a baby like that ought not be fumbling in her apron pockets. Amy to be grateful for any notice." Glossop, a good-tempered dunce, had thrown Hush !" Ursula looked over her shoulder both arms round her, but Mimi kept her and saw how near Mimi was. Miss Pearson head turned another way. says the child understands some English. I Rose Watson looked round at me. wish I knew whether one ought to like her." Oh, you've come, have you, Miss Tyrrel, I too felt puzzled, but I confess I was to see your doll?" disappointed in Mimi. I did not stoop She spoke in a whisper, but she might just down and kiss her, though I longed to do it; as well have spoken out loud. she would probably repulse me too. A bright flush spread over Mimi's face, "So strange,-one would have thought and she pushed Amy away. that here all alone among strangers she "I say, Miss Mimi, we shall have to teach would have been grateful for any affection; you manners," said rough good-natured a little creature like that cannot discriminate; Amy. so long as she is loved it cannot signify who Just then the tea-bell rang, and as they all the person is." passed out I found myself close to little I felt sorry for poor untidy, good-natured Mimi; involuntarily I slid my hand down and Amy. took hers in it. Mimi is a cold-hearted little puppet after She gave a quick observant glance from all," I decided, as I let go her hand, and under her long lashes, and almost, like Rose saw her pass into the school-room with the Watson, I shrank from her scrutiny, it was rest. so searching. However, I suppose she was satisfied ; the little plump hand was not drawn PART II. away. E all brAeakfasted together, and I founi I sat by Mimi at tea-time. She evidently v my eyes straying after Mimi. She sat noticed everything, but she scarcely spoke, next Mrs. Smith, looking a picture of daintiand she never once smiled,-still she sat ness this morning. It was difficult to say erect, and there was no look of shyness on what it was that made the difference between her face. her and her English schoolfellows, but there Amy sat on the other side of her, and was a striking difference between them. when tea was over she bent down, and Mimi had such a finished little manner; she looked into the sweet little face beside her. looked so exquisitely neat, and yet so grace"You're such a nice little doll, ain't you, ful, it seemed to me that she was like a little Mimi ? and she tried to kiss her. fairy yacht among a fleet of fishing-boats. Mimi looked so distressed that I feared She talked and laughed with Mrs. Smith, and she would burst out crying and offend Amy. looked about her easily and naturally. But Amy was not sensitive; she wanted to I was sitting next Rose. kiss Mimi, and she kissed her, hugging her Well, Miss Tyrrel," she said presently, as if the child really were the doll she called I hope you have looked long enough at her. your French doll." "Leave me quiet," said the little one in I blushed; it certainly was very absurd to French, and her face was red with vexation, be so taken up by this one child. There was a half-suppressed buzz of dis" Stay here till I come back, Mimi," Mrs. pleasure. Little stuck-up goose !" ColdSmith said, and I was left alone with her. hearted little puss!" "Doll indeed !" came Good morning, Mees," said Mimi and in very audible whispers, and the girls broke she looked up at me with her large dark up in twos and threes, holding counsel eyes. If I had not remembered her treattogether on their way to the school-room. ment of Amy, I must have kissed her, she I took Mimi's hand again, looked so engaging, her manner was such a Ursula and Rose went on before me, and charming mixture of frankness and exquisite I could hear all they said. good-breeding; but I resolved not to expose Rose spoke first, myself to a repulse. Well, what do you say now ? I tell you "Good morning, Mimi." I nodded, and she hasn't any feeling in her." shook hands, and then I fancied that a dis-



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94 MAA Y'S DREAM. May's mother, as you may suppose, didn't Well, dreams are sometimes very odd-.I know very well what to make of such a dream have had strange things come to me too," as this. She only saidsaid her mamma; "but dreams are mostly Ah, but when you get to the country, May, nonsense, so you mustn't think of it any you won't dream like that any more. Dreams more." come because you are so weak, you know." But May couldn't help thinking about it, But don't you think the dream means though she tried all she could. By and by something, mamma?" her mamma, who had gone to look after -----___________________ ' '* *________________things down-stairs, came and sat down beside In a week May and her mother and a serher again, and she began to tell May how in vant started for Devonshire. It was a longa week's time, if she only kept well, they were ish journey ; but May had a nice corner in to go into the country-to the place they had the carriage, made up with cushions for her; lived at long ago, though May would not and she was so delighted with what she saw mind of it. It was all green felds and thick out of the window, as the train swept along, woods there, and May would see so many that she did not weary very much. It was things to interest her, and have so much runnearly evening before they got to the station, ning about, that she would not be troubled where there was a coach waiting for them. with dreams to make her think and brood May slept very soundly that night, and when afterwards, she awoke in the morning the sun was shining



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96 THE TWO NESTS. THE TWO NESTS. THE old vicarage with its low, red gables with a foot-bridge, which leads to the village and clustered chimneys nestles into half a mile off. the hillside in a perfect nosegay of lilacs, Dropped down thus in the midst of quiet laburnums, and laurel. It is girdled in with fields and the sweeps of woodland, all the tall elms, out of the midst of which rises the shyest birds and beasts about have their free ancient flint-built primitive little church, entrance and exit into the garden, and very while just below the hill runs a small river pleasant company they make. Corncrakes T V cry in the fields below, nightjars are heard upon which one day this June some sharp in the hedgerows, white owls flit noiselessly young eyes detected the beginning of a nest. past the windows, and all the tits" in It was most artistically swung to four of the English ornithology seem to have their dwellsmaller twigs, skilfully twisted in with cords ing-places there, of grass, and the pouch of green moss There is a large yew on the lawn whose sprinkled with lichen grew till it was nearly branches hang low over the little terrace, six inches deep. The golden-crested wrens,



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ABOUT JAMAICA. 171 Jessie always took their bamboo cage into quite thin; the snake was leisurely proceedher own room at dusk for greater security; ing to swallow it, and we could see by the and one night, just after we had all separated bulges exactly where the other dove was in to go to bed, I was very much frightened at its horrid body. The old butler first cut off my poor little sister suddenly bursting into the bamboos which formed a sort of dome to my room, as pale as a ghost and perfectly the cage, and then he and Harry prepared speechless with terror; she looked so horrified to kill the half-gorged snake, but before they that my alarm was quite as great as hers, struck the first blow Jessie and I went into though I did not know what was the matter, my room, as we could not bear to see it. She really could not speak, though she tried In a few moments Harry triumphantly anto do so, but seized my arm and dragged me nounced that it was all over, but he seemed towards her room, which, as I have told you, rather disappointed at the snake not showing was next to mine, but with no door between, any fight. It was not venomous,-none of the At first I thought Jessie must have gone sudlarge snakes in Jamaica are so, being only denly mad, for everything there looked just dangerous to the poultry-yard, and paras usual, nor could I see any cause for all ticularly fond of newly-hatched ducks and this agitation. She did not, however, let my chickens, or even a baby-turkey. There is a arni go, but pulled me towards a recess where very small snake, only two feet long, called the doves' cage stood on a low table. There, the "whip snake" from its resemblance to indeed, I saw a horrible sight; a huge yellow the lash of a driving whip, which is said to snake, with loathsome black spots all over it, give a poisonous bite, and is apt to make its had forced its way in through the slender, way into cellars, as it is fond of a cold, damp elastic bamboo bars of the cage, and lay place. I never heard, however, of any one coiled up at the bottom, with its flat head being bitten even by this reptile. raised, its forked tongue sticking out, and its I killed a very large snake once all by small, cruel eyes fixed on the only surviving myself, and, though it was quite by accident, dove. It had already swallowed one, and I felt as proud as if I had performed a great the end of the survivor was very near. Poor feat of strength or valour. I was dressed for little "Selim was on the lowest perch swayriding and had my whip in my hand, but being ing backwards and forwards, gazing at the very thirsty I went into the bath-room to see snake; at last he sank slowly down, just as if if the water in the great earthenware Spanish he had fainted, and in an instant had almost jars was any cooler than that in my bedroom. disappeared among the coils of the horrid The walls of this bath-room were made of snake's body. I never saw anything so rapid jalousies, which could be left open all night as the way the reptile crushed the dear little so as to allow the cool air from the mountains helpless dove the moment it dropped within to get in and make the water in the big cedar its reach. Jessie gave such a shriek that I tubs fresh and nice for our morning bath. feared the snake would be roused and perhaps Whilst I was drinking some deliciously cold escape, but he was too intent on his supper water very slowly and with great enjoyment, a to mind us, so I took courage, and proposed large snake suddenly thrust its head through to go for our old Portuguese butler, who I the open jalousies and began greedily drinkthought would know what to do. Jessie still ing out of the very jar from which I had clung to me, sobbing, and we found the old just taken a tumblerful of water. It was so man's room, roused him up, and whilst he thirsty it did not perceive me at first, but in was dressing we remembered our schoolboy a moment it raised its head and hissed at brother, who would be certain to enjoy a me. I thought this so impertinent that, scrimmage at any hour of the day or night, without thinking I should hurt it in the least, and, in answer to our knocks at his door, he I gave it a smart tap on the head with my soon appeared, as quickly dressed as if he had little riding-whip. The snake shrank back, gone to bed with half his clothes on and I heard a heavy fall on the grass outside. When we returned with this reinforcement Of course I immediately looked out of the to Jessie's room, the dove was dead, but the window to see where it was going, but to my snake had not yet quite swallowed it; and surprise it lay quite still, so I called Harry to here I must tell you how curiously it had back me up in case of danger, and we went prepared the poor little plump bird to go to examine it nearer. It was actually quite down its narrow throat. Those dreadful dead. Harry was as much astonished as I was squeezes among its coils had broken all the at my little blow having had such an effect, dove's bones, and the snake had carefully and he immediately proceeded to measure licked its feathers t'e reverse way, so that my victim, triumphantly proclaiming it to be instead of being a fat, snowy ball, it was of a over six feet long. great length, and so drawn out that it was We used often to find the skins of these



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ABOUT JAMAICA. 173 looking object, with its awkward unwieldy agreeable habit of exploding suddenly, the body, quite bare of feathers, with patches of tree is very popular on account of its deep down on it ; and then its wide face and great shade, and on one of its lowest boughs Jessie goggle eyes blinking and staring at you. and I watched a beautiful pair of ruby Whilst we were in our first moment of humming-birds build their tiny nest. They horror and disgust, another victim fluttered made it of tufts of cotton and an occasional and fell down the wide chimney, but before horsehair to keep all together, lining it with it could reach the hot hearth Harry had down from their own shining breasts. Prerushed forward and seized it, so it was quite sently, during the morning absence of the uninjured, and Jessie and I immediately hen, we discerned two eggs, exactly like little took possession of the ugly little creature, white sugar-plums, and for some weeks we making a great pet of it and rearing it most never wearied of seeing the cock flitting successfully. As soon as it came to years, backwards and forwards with a drop of or rather weeks, of discretion we gave it its honey in his long slender beak, for his mate's liberty, but "Moses" always retained a refreshment. He did not alight whilst he grateful recollection of our care; and if we fed her, but would flit like a winged jewel called him at night when we saw other owls towards the nest, and just hover over her for flitting about, he was sure to come to us and a second; we could see the dear patient allow himself to be stroked and petted as of little hen raise her bill, which he touched; old. I used to like to bury my face in the then with a little cry he would dart off again soft feathers at the top of his head, and into the brilliant sunshine. I cannot find "Moses" would perch quietly on my finger words to tell you how beautiful the sight whilst I did this, only his claws became very was; one felt as if it was fairy-land, for such long and sharp, and as he held on very exquisite and tiny creatures did not seem tight by them to my hand whilst I was to belong to this great big rough world of petting him, I soon got tired of having ours. Presently, after nearly three weeks wounds all over my fingers. of watching, we saw the hen also very busy We had also a cage full of Cardinals," carrying honey, and then by gently moving most beautiful birds with bright scarlet a sheltering leaf we peeped in to see two feathers. In fact, they were scarlet all over, little birds, each no bigger than a bee. their legs and even their eyes included. Can you fancy a bee with a beak ? for that They were very healthy and apparently very was exactly what they were like. We asked happy in a sort of hut at one end of the the opinion of several people as to whether verandah, with plenty of room to fly about it would be cruel to take the nest as soon as in, and, above all, a constant supply of water the young ones grew a little bigger, and at for their incessant baths; whenever they last we very carefully cut the twig it rested wanted something to do they took a bath on, and transferred the branch to a cage, These birds do not belong to Jamaica, but which we hung outside our window, under are brought from South America, and so an awning. The parent birds saw it directly, were our beautiful Tropioles." Never have I and flew in and out of the open door, feedheard such a clear sweet note as these lasting their young ones just as regularly, till named beauties possessed ; it had all the gladtheir feathers came and they looked quite full ness of the skylark's, as well as the sweetness grown. The papa and mamma now deserted of the blackbird's. They were our only them, and Jessie and I shut the cage door musical pets, and their song awakened us at and tried to induce them to feed themselves daylight. They seemed very happy, and with honey out of the same flowers from were quite tame, eating fruit out 6f our hands, which we had seen their parents bring them Their plumage was magnificent, rich glossy their incessant meals; but no, they were black, and the most brilliant orange-coloured either too lazy or too stupid. We then enmarkings. Such bright fearless birds they deavoured to feed them ourselves with honey were, about as large as a thrush, but of a or with sugar and water, but we saw in a much more graceful shape. very few days that it would only end in their The last pet birds of which I am going to death. They drooped and lost the burnished tell you were not at all successful. Outside look of their plumage, so we very reluctantly our window grew a tree called the "sandbox;" opened the cage door, and after a few preits foliage is something like a horse-chestnut, liminary flutters our lovely little captives and it bears a pod of a round shape, made darted away info the free air. We watched up of the most symmetrical divisions like the them hovering over a bough of honeyquarters of an orange; when this pod is ripe bearing blossoms, and feeding themselves quite it goes off like a small pistol, and scatters cleverly, and then they were off like a glancing the seeds all about. In spite of this dissunbeam, and we never saw them again I



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118 YARNS. and dragged me into safety: the next wave lieutenants, staff commanders, and staff ca-' again struck the paddle-box, turned the boat tains. I don't think they've got to be staicompletely over, and threw her inboard amidadmirals yet. I don't know whether they jet ships; we three were knocked down, but, more pay, and I haven't heard that they strange to say, not a bit hurt. better men than they used to be. Some There are no masters in the navy now; people say the line is to be abolished it was a good old name, and had been borne altogether. I'm glad our master hadn't beef f by many a hearty seaman of the old school, abolished altogether, when I fell against th) who was to his captain as a tower of strength. paddle-wheel. Now they have expanded into navigating Well: we steamed out through the fleet against the black driving storm, and kept in the course of a few days, but we never the sea all that night, and when we returned anchored quite so close to the beach again. to the anchorage the next morning it was a sad sight to see the shore strewn with .II. wrecks. A few days later we heard that the T makes all the difference in the world army had suffered severely from the gale, what sort of ship a youngster goes to sea and that there had been wrecks elsewhere, in for the first time. Somewhere about the but it was not till the newspapers came from year 1850, Sir William Parker's flag was England that we realized the foundering of flying on board the Queen, as commander-inthe Black Prime, and the awful tragedies of chief in the Mediterranean. All the youngBalaclava Roads. The Black Cat was none sters of that ship turned out well; they the worse : we fishedup both our lost anchors couldn't help it. I don't suppose there evel



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0o TACKLING OLD EPHRAIM. floor, and told the great fellow that he ought be brought on deck again, he held a levee. to be ashamed of himself. He let go his Everybody on board came to be presented hold, and looked for a moment as if he felt at his little court; and when he had dropped inclined to knock her down, but directly afteroff to sleep upon his mother's lap, great wards he did look ashamed of himself! rough fellows, both passengers dnd crew, "It was his fault, he aggravated me," the would stoop down as they passed to uncover big brother growled; "but I won't meddle his face that they might have a look at him. with him if it bothers you." And off he went They lifted his little shawl with a comically to his berth, like a whipped dog with his tail tender touch to be given by such rough finbetween his legs. gers, but the little amateur nursemaids who When baby fell ill the doctor had so many were longing to have 'Dolphy lying on their inquiries to answer in every part of the ship, laps, watched these bold proceedings with that he had serious thoughts of pasting a buljealous severity, greatly wondering that letin of the state of baby's health daily upon Chessy, though she lifted up her fingers and the mainmast. If there's safety in a mere mulsaid "Hush !" looked pleased rather than titude of counsellors, Chessy need not have otherwise at having her baby peeped at by felt alarmed about her little pet. For a possuch rough fellows. session so precious to her and to us all, mere When I last saw Chessy and her baby they doctor's advice-the doctor a bachelor, too were pulling away from the Gold Finder en -of course was not considered sufficient, route for Liardet's Beach, in charge of Adoland amateur prescriptions of all kinds poured phus senior. In spite. of the poor opinion in upon Chessy from all quarters for her we had held of him, Adolphus senior had little fellow's measles, hooping-cough, teethbeen waiting for his wife and child for a ing, or whatever it was. One grave old week or two in Melbourne, and had boarded sailor, whose opinion was greatly respected the Gold Finder before her crew-those who by his mates because he was a family man, had signed articles for the return voyage as advised Chessy, in perfect good faith, to put well as the shilling a mohth men "-had pitch-plasters on the back and breast of had time to run away. Adolphus senior Master 'Dolphy, and to give him a good seemed so delighted at recovering possession spoonful of brimstone and treacle every time of his two treasures, that we included him, he blubbered. "That was the way," the too, in the ringing cheer which everybody sailor said, "in which his old woman had on board gave to Chessy Chalk and her baby got all his young uns over their mulligrubs." as they were rowed ashore. When 'Dolphy had recovered sufficiently to EDWARD HOWE. ------TACKLING OLD EPHRAIM. AN INCIDENT ON SURVEY IN CALIFORNIA. BY THE AUTHOR OF "THE GREEN HAND." IN the year 1852, when things were at their scrub, chapparal, wild-corn or mustard-brake. busiest in the American Gold States, Each of us had a six-shooter in his belt, and I formed one of the chief Government surit may easily be conceived that when quail, veying-party engaged in laying out ground crested partridge, or white cranes were started, from San Francisco bay to the mountains or perhaps a black-tailed doe hiding to save of the coast range. During that time there her fawn, or a couple of huge donkey-hares, were various opportunities of seeing Calior a puzzled young antelope, the sport at fornian life "in a way unknown to most who times tended to drop our duty to Governhave described the country; and we enment out of view. Whatever our success joyed a great variety of field-sport and woodin the field,-which could not be much craft all along. Even round the bay, and with such tools, not to speak of the two throughout the level land of the Contra sharp surveyors at our head,-a pretty good Costa, or over the settled bottoms about San time could generally be had about camp at Jose, game of every sort fairly swarmed leisure hours trapping, tracking, or fishing. during the spring season while we were ocThe creeks from the bay abounded in trout, cupied thereabouts. And a better test could mullet, and the finest salmon in the world, not well have been had of it than our surveywhile moreover it might so happen that you chain, going ahead over everything, through hooked an alligator-terrapin or a snapping-



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YARNS. I19 was a ship in a higher state of discipline than depends, to a great extent, upon the order the Queen was during that commission, and discipline of his first ship, and this My first ship was what was contemptuously rests mainly upon the captain. There's called "a jackass frigate," six-and-twenty nothing so bad for a youngster as often guns. None of our youngsters turned out changing his ship; if you start in a good well. The captain was one of the kindestship, stick to her. What station you go to hearted men that ever breathed, and a clever matters comparatively little ; the Mediterscientific man too, but he did not know how ranean is the favourite station, and the fleet tocommand even a jackass frigate. He gave is generally in good order, but if you think us youngsters the free run of his cabins, and you have any private interest, don't exert it made believe to teach us navigation himself, to be sent to a pleasant station. If you don't but we didn't mind him much. I remember go to the West Indies, somebody else must; one evening we all made such a row that he somebody quite as tenderly loved at home, threw the candlesticks at us, and then we and probably not more robust than yourself. got under the table in the dark and pinched If you enter your country's service, and draw his legs. Shade of Benbow a midshipman your country's pay, your sense of honour and pinching a post-captain's legs! The ship was generosity tells you you are equally bound to on the Australian station when the gold fever peril your health or life, whether the danger broke out; the senior midshipman deserted, be yellow fever or an enemy's guns. Duty is and went to the diggings. It was a curious in itself noble. You remind me that there is instance of carrying coals to Newcastle, that a higher duty, which includes our duty to our he forgot to leave the mess cash-box behind country. Yes. him. Of course a youngster's first two or three The success of a youngster's whole career days in the Bay of Biscay are very poor fun. I remember sitting between two guns on the either to sing a song or drink a glass of side of the main deck, with a bucket before tolly-water." Now tolly-water is water in me, and even wishing I were again alone which a tallow candle has been hastily exwith Dr. Vaughan, in the fourth-form room tinguished. If it is true that the boy is the at Harrow, or anywhere on dry land. But father of the man, how much more of the at twelve years of age sea-sickness soon midship-man I have known a bench of passes off, and the crisp air of blue water worshipful magistrates, with a nickname and gives life with each breath; and when I was a penalty of champagne for a newly-fledged all right again, it was great fun for the older brother beak. midshipmen to catch me aloft, and lash me Have you pictured to yourself what it must in the rigging until I paid some forfeit. This be to have your nose slit? The three ugliest admirable custom, which is called paying things in the British navy are said to be your footing," is very old, and prevails on a big midshipman, a young quartermaster, dry land in some places, as well as at sea; and a small piece ot pork. Imagine two big but sailors never call it a douceur, or a honomidshipmen holding down a curly-haired rarium, or goodwill, or commission, or fee, or darling, while a third neatly divides the carfixtures at a valuation. There are other tilage of the nose with a purser's razor, and nauticul customs, more or less prevalent allows the two flaps to fall back on each among midshipmen, whose laudable object damask cheek; imagine all this, and you will appears to be to impress the new comer with have no idea of what really takes place. a sense of his inferiority; one of these is, Two or three of the senior midshipmen, not that every naval cadet must on first joining one of whom has probably undergone the have his nose slit. I remember at Harrow, operation himself, inform the youngsters that in Dr. Vaughan's house, every new boy had this is an invariable custom; that they had





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A MEMORY OF THE THAMES TUNNEL. 33 that I might as well lie down and let the under an empty stall lay an old woman, a snow cover me up; but just then, on a little girl, and a smaller boy. They were board, on which a lamp shone direct, and pinched and ragged, but somehow they did not which the snow had not yet furred, I saw look like beggars. If they had been beggars, To the Thames Tunnel, gO." no doubt they would have been enjoying There, at any rate, the snow could not a far more comfortable night's lodging. reach me. I hurried on to the Rotherhithe Well," I said to myself, I fancied thit shaft, and invested all my property in the I was the only person in London that would purchase of a night's shelter. Bitter weahave paid a penny to sleep in the Thames ther," said the old man who took my penny, Tunnel, but these poor things have done the blowing on his mittened fingers, as I passed same. The old womanan 't be fond of gin, through the turnstile. I wish I was going or she would have spent the threepence on home, like you." it, and left the'children to shift for themselves Down, down, down the wearisome steps I as they could." I had felt quite Alone in the wound. Three men who were coming up world the minute before, but the sight of on the other side were very merry, knocking these three sleepers linked me on to my kind one another's hats off, jumping on one again. They slept so peacefully, too, that I another's backs, and making the shaft echo grew ashamed of my gloomy forebodings. with the songs they howled. But when I There was I, who, at any rate, must be able got to the bottom there was perfect silence, exto do something or other for a living, grizzcept the singing of the gas. The boarded-up ling, whilst that weak old woman and those right-hand arcade stretched along in mystwo little ones were sleeping as soundly as if terious gloom. The left-hand arcade soon they had been lying on a swan's-down bed, ended in mysterious gloom, in spite of the gas beneath an eider-down quilt. jets that lighted its horseshoe-arched vista. I curled myself up beside my co-mates in It was a queer bedroom, but I was most subfluvial exile, and once more tried to get to thankful to have reached it. Down there, at sleep. I chanced to lie down upon the little first, the air felt quite, soft, after the cutting boy's foot, which he had drawn up under his atmosphere from which I had descended. tattered clothes. He kicked it out, and feelThe comparative warmth made me feel ing the cold, began to toss and mutter; but sleepy, and I was besides dog-tired; but so when I had covered it up with the flap of my long as I thought that there was any chance coat, he gave a sigh of satisfaction, and once of anybody passing me, I did not like to lie more slept soundly. Tired as I was, it was down. Backwards and forwards between some time, after all, before I could get to the Surrey and the Middlesex sides I paced, sleep. Now that I had got used to the ternuntil I thought myfeet would drop off at the perature of the Tunnel, and, moreover, had ankles. When I saw any one coming, I stopped walking, I began to feel very cold hurried on as if I were as anxious to get out again; and then, although, of course, it was of the Tunnel as they were. Very few people only fancy, I could not help fancying that I did pass me-not more than three, I think : heard the water poppling over-head, and a thievish-looking young fellow, who scurried speculating as to the possibility of a heavy along like a scared rat; a drunken man, who anchor plumping through our bedroom ceildid not take the slightest notice of me, but ing, and letting in the Thames upon us. stopped to shake his fist at every gas-burner, Brick fo your sheets, clay for your blankets, and exclaim with sobs, smiling blandly all and a river for your counterpane-however the while, Well, really now, I shouldn't ha' tired you might be, you would think that a thought it;" and a very stout old woman in queer bed the first time you tried it. a pilot jacket, and tugging along something At last, however, Ifell assound asleep as my heavy in a fish basket, who seemed to think curly-headed, barefooted, little unconscious that I was a thief, and threatened to knock comrade. I did not feel very grateful to him me down if I offered to molest her. when he awoke me about seven by a kick in I suppose it was about two in the morning the cheek. He kicked me back from a deliwhen I arrived at the conclusion that at last I cious dream into a consciousness that I had had the Tunnel to myself, and prepared to passed the night in the Tunnel, and that I turn in. had not a penny in the world. I started up "The next recess but two I come to I'll and stared at him he started up and stared take," I said to myself. When I came to it, at me. I was greatly astonished to find that I had "Granny, here's a man," he shouted, shaknot the Tunnel to myself-that I must have ing the old woman by the gown* She started passed and repassed ever so many times a up, the little girl started up, and all three of group there sleeping. Huddled together them stared at me. 3



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THE FRENCH DOLL. I1 appointed look came into the dark bright In the afternoon I stayed in the study. I "eyes. meant to have read some German there, but Mrs. Smith came back. seeing the girls clustered round Mimi on You can go to the school-room now, my the lawn, I went to the window and watched dear," the principal said; have you been them. making friends with Miss Tyrrel ?" They were asking her questions in French, Yes, and no," said Mimi, in French, and and she answered them readily. she darted off like a butterfly. Can you play croquet?" said Rose. She is a most charming child," said Mrs. Mimi shook her head and smiled. "But Smith. I can learn," she said gaily; I can learn "I can't make her out," I answered. everything." Page zo. Rose translated this speech for the benefit After her! after her!" Amy shouted. of the little ones. Her temper was fairly roused by the child's Oh, she can learn everything, can she ? dislike, and, strong in all her impulses, she The conceit of the little puss !" ran off at a headlong pace. You shan't bully her," said Amy ; "she's But slender, quick-witted Ursula Swayne only a baby, and she's too pretty to be bulstood in her path. lied. Come along, little one." She snatched Leave the child alone; she shan't be Mimi up in her arms, and was carrying her off. hunted, Amy. You don't understand h-r, Mimi struggled; in another minute she you great clumsy thing !" freed herself, and darted across the lawn Amy looked at Rose, and Rose hesitated. towards the gap in the shrubbery. Amy might be stupid, but she was very



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30 THE FIRST ALMOND-TREE. maidens strove to comfort her. She was cerfor my darling's return, lest he yet come and tain, had he remained true, he would have I not know it." come through all obstacles of whatever kind. The gods, who loved her, granted her wish. All hope was now dead, and she had even Her soul passed into the form of a Dryad, ceased her visits to the shore, and became enclosed within the bark of a She was pining her life away; she refused young tree, barren and leafless; unlike the all nourishment, and at last she died heartlaurels and olives that clad the same spot, broken at the neglect of him whom she had and were decked in evergreen garbs. Thereloved so tenderly, fore all noticed the tree, and wondered at its 0 eternal gods !" she had prayed when new and strange aspect. she felt life slipping fiom her hold, "grant The Thracians wept their lovely queen me yet one request. Let me not quit this for three days great mourning prevailed in the world, but let my shade remain upon it, near to land. the promontory whence I have so often looked At daybreak on the fourth a light barque was seen to round the promontory; bright loved. The smoke rose upwards and migled coloured sails hung from its masts, and it with the trees on the promontory. showed the signs of joy. It held Demophoon, Was Phyllis sensible of his return and deep come at last, detained by adverse winds and despair ? It must have been. storms from keeping his solemn promise to For as the fumes from the altar wreathed "his beloved. the leafless branches of the tree that enclosed When the sad news of her death was told her in its bark, it burst forth into one mass him, he was in despair, and his grief knew of tender rosy blossoms, covering the bare no bounds. He searched the whole palace twigs with a blushing wilderness of flowers. for her, he could not believe she was indeed Then Demophoon knew that his dearest departedfrom him. was become a Dryad, her home that tree; But when he became convinced that it knew too that she had forgiven him, and was bitter truth, he bowed his head to inexthat death had wrought no change in her orable fate, and offered sacrifices upon the affections. sea-shore to appease the manes of his beHELEN ZIMMERN. '\



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ABOUT JAMAICA. -69 always, at the very beginning, so I shall first 'piece of sugar-cane. I am sorry to say, howmention that as soon as we were all settled ever, that these parrots could not speak at all in our mountain cottage, Jessie and I begged well; they whistled and chattered incessantly Mamma to allow our rooms to be changed in their own way, but it was very difficult to to the only two which were downstairs. In teach them even a word or two, and their hot countries the sleeping-rooms are always voices were thick and husky. It required a upstairs, partly to be cooler and partly to great many lessons before the cleverest of avoid the risk of venomous insects; but them could learn so much as a bar of one of there was no danger of heat where our little Jessie's songs, and when he began to practise, summer home was built, for the nights were all the other birds had a most insulting way always cold enough to allow us to use a of stopping their own chatter to listen to his blanket; and as for the scorpions, centipedes, tra-la-la," and going off into peals of ants, &c., we thought we could protect ourlaughter, mingled with the negro exclamaselves against them. We had discovered two tions of "Hi, hi," or "My king!" This charming little rooms, side by side, downconduct affronted Master Bully-that was his stairs, opening with French windows on a name, bestowed on account of his tyrannical verandah, the pillars of which were covered and greedy nature-very much, and he always with beautiful creepers: from this verandah ceased the song directly the laughter began, you stepped on a lawn sheltered from the and sat sulkily ruffling up his feathers. They sun by a grove of orange and mango trees, were all of the same kind, these parrots; towards the south-east, and beyond that lay rather small, of a bright emerald-green colour, the garden, which sloped down to a long with a few red and blue wing feathers, and a valley, divided into paddocks of the tall, gay yellow top-knot; their beaks were quite bright-green Guinea-grass (so called because black, and so were their tongues. One of the seed was brought from Guinea, on the their wings was cut to keep them from joincoast of Africa), of which the cows and ing the flocks of wild parrots which constantly horses were so fond. flew over head. Their greatest enemies were The chief reason Jessie and I begged for the owls, who used to swoop upon the poor these rooms was, that the verandah and the sleeping Polly and carry it off at night; we adjoining trees would be so nice for all our lost two in this way before we discovered the pets, and after some hesitation and a great cause, but then we taught them to go to roost many warnin s against snakes, scorpions, and every evening in a large wooden cage under other insects, Mamma at last consented to shelter of the verandah, the door of which allow us to change; so for a few days we were was securely fastened, and our noisy pets happy, and busy moving all our absurd little lived to a good old age. It is the custom in possessions down to their new quarters, which Jamaica to have a cup of coffee brought to had hitherto only been uced by gentlemen your bedside every morning at six o'clock, visitors, and were generally called the and as soon as our black maid "Rosetta" "Bachelor rooms." It took us some time to had awakened us, she used to open the arrange our pictures, books, and ornaments French windows into the verandah, unfasten to our own satisfaction, and dear Mamma the door of the parrots' cage, and place a was often called upon to give her opinion on saucer of bread and milk on the threshold our devices, where we could see it. In a moment all the But the very first thing to be attended to parrots were round it, chattering and gobbling was the comfort of the pets, and they cerit up; Bully had a bad habit of getting into tainly must have approved of the change. the saucer and trampling the food into a The parrots at once established themselves in mess, so Jessie and I were obliged to take it a large tree, and we watched them with great by turns to get up and drive him away and delight clambering about its branches, nibsee fair play. As soon as they had finished bling at the fruit, and chattering incessantly, their breakfast, they set off as fast as they They were nine in number, and had been could waddle to an enormous shallow pan of brought to us at different times in the nest water, which was sunk to the level of the some months before, when their beaks were ground and filled twice a day with fresh quite soft, an, we had to feed them on boiled water. It was such fun to watch them splashrice and sugar. Nothing could be tamer than ing and dashing the water over each other, these birds were; when we sat down in our enjoying their bath thoroughly; then they rocking-chairs in the verandah, they used to betook themselves to the shelter of the trees, scramble and flutter out of their tree and and there dried and pruned their feathers, come waddling towards us in a great hurry spending the remainder of their time in eatwith their toes turned in, clambering up the ing fruit and clambering about. In the arms of the chairs in the hope of getting a middle of the day they generally took a nap,



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MA Y'S DREAM. 93 bright spire till she fell into a dream, and she could not refuse to grant the sick child's in the morning she would try and try to wish, so she sat down beside the arm-chair; recollect it all, just as she was wont to do for though she would much rather have with her lessons; and her mother would kept May quiet, as you can easy fancy a wonder to herself what it could be that the mother desiring to do at such a time, still child was thinking about, and would be she had a notion that perhaps the speaking afraid to ask in case it was anything dismight be a relief to her, as she found her agrepable, and the telling of it make her think-think-thinking so often now, and still more uncomfortable. And May, who didn't know very well what to do with her. had a tender conscience, was not sure So May, by help of her mother's questions whether it was quite right of her to hide and remarks, managed to tell her dream. such things from her mother; but then, Although she could not say how she got when she tried to think it all over, it was there, she suddenly found herself in a green so strange she was afraid she could never field with a little stream of water running tell it half; and her dreams lay on her conthrough it; and there was just one big brown science and did not let her get better so cow in thefield, and the cow pursued her whenquickly as she might have done. But the ever she tried to run, and stood stock-still doctor had a notion of his own, and said when she stood, and looked at her with such to May one day that the only thing for her strange black eyes, the breath all the While now was to get to the country. The only coming out of her wide nostrils, like smoke. doctor who could do her the good she At last May made a great effort to run, and needed lived there and nowhere else. the cow ran too, and suddenly she was She must rise for an hour or two the day nipped up into the arms of a strange man, after to get strong. So next day, when her who carried her till she fell asleep; and mother had lifted her into the arm-chair, so when she opened her eyes again, it seemed nicely lined with pillows that it looked exactly as if there was nothing but sky all around like a big nest in a tree, May was so overher, and she was quite alone. She could come with joy that she cried, and when her neither rise nor cry out; but no sooner mamma had dried her tears and kissed her, had the tears started to her eyes, than a she felt she must tell about her dream. So man with a face very like Doctor Spurstowe's, she rather suddenly saidand a big head, but oh such a little man, Mamma, dear, was I ever across the sea you can't think, with a blue woollen shirt in a ship?" on, came to her and told her he had "What makes you think of that, child?" something to let her see. Then he went said her mamma, rather taken aback at the away and came back in a little time, leadsudden question. ing the brown cow in a chain, with a bright, Because I had such a strange dream, tlree-cornered spot on her forehead, someand I feel sure, now I'm awake, that it must thing like the gold top of the spire; and be very like something that happened once the man made her touch the cow's head, -very long ago, though I was just a baby so soft and sleek, with her hand, and that at the time." moment both man and cow were gone, and "Everybody's dreams are like that somea tall, pale-faced lady stood in their place, times, dear; but you shouldn't think about holding a little child in her arms, just able it. The doctor says you are to get up every to walk, for there were shoes on the tiny day now, you know, and then you won't have feet. And the lady stooped down, and so much time for dreaming and thinking." after speaking very softly in May's ear "Oh, but I'm sure this is real, mamma, and kissing her, she made May kiss the and isn't like any other dream; and it has baby, and May saw now that it was very come to me twice, and both times so much like herself; and suddenly she heard the alike, you wouldn't believe !" swish and swirl of water, and felt that she Well, I hope it was a pleasant dream, was sailing on the sea; and there came a May." great noise of feet, though she could see "Yes, it was pleasant," said May, with a nobody close to her. But looking round slight pause over the word pleasant;" "it at last she caught the brown cox's eyes would have been delightful, if it hadn't been staring at her from the oppcsite side; and for the brown cow." the little man with the big head rose up "The brown cow, May! I don't underas if he had sprung out of nothing, and stand you." took her hand in his, and the cow rose "Well, mamma dear, come quite close to up with the baby laughing on its back, and me and sit down and listen and I'll tell you." all at once it went as if with a great plash May's mamma was good and kind, and over the side, and at this little May awoke.



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THE ITALIAN BEGGARS. 87 she was a cripple, but she always sat at the who did come were not going to say their Capella del Carmine, and she is dead, and I prayers, but merely to amuse themselves, and am all alone in the world-that is," she they took little notice of the poor. added, all alone with my brother." I know what we must do," said Pal" Ay, ay! a droll sort of relationship, lidina, after three or four hungry days and Bastiano's son, eh?" said Signor Carlino, nights spent in the porches of houses or on laughing. the pavement around churches; "I know, Si, Signor, his father has forsaken him; Momo, what we must take to : we must sing. but I am not so forsaken as he is, because I can sing quite well 'La Donna e mobile,' my aunt is in heaven, and she will pray for and 'Giovanottino che passi per la via;' and me, she was so fond of me;" and the child I shall learn more songs. We will go at burst into tears, night and listen at the doors of the theatres." The Cicerone was moved. Well," said And I know Giulia Gentille,' and 'Garihe, what are you going to do?" baldi's Hymn,' and a great many others." I do not know, because Teresa says Yes, yes, but we must get the words." that we are too big, and that she will have Ah, as for that, we can put them in out nothing more to do with us." of our own heads." Impossible !" That very evening we began to sing, and It is too true, Signor Carlino, that we got more money than usual. By way of are forbidden to return to the Piazza del showing off my voice, I screamed myself Duomo, and that you will never see us again, hoarse. It grieves me, for I was so fond of coming to Don't scream so," my sister would say; see you, for you never sent me away when I do as I do, sing softly; people like that asked alms from the rich people to whom better." However, on that point I would you were showing the church. Oh, yes, and take no advice, and soon my voice went and I shall be sorry, too," said she with renewed I could sing no longer. grief, to bid farewell to the Piazza, where I Pallidina was so grieved at this that she have amused myself so well, and to this shed tears. If you had believed what I church, where I have so often prayed to said, we might have sung such pretty duets; God." 4 now what can we do?" I will speak about it to M. le Curd," If I had a fiddle I could accompany you." said Signor Carlino, and gave a penny to But how get one? they are very dear, Pallidina, who returned charmed with her and you don't know how to play." expedition; and, moreover, some passers-by Indeed I do; I've watched men playing gave us two other pennies. I, too, was much on the fiddle a hundred times. I could try, pleased, but Pallidina soon ruffled me by and I'm very sure that if I were only shown a saying, We have got this money on Mother little I should soon do as well as others." Teresa's ground; we must take her half of it." But this prospect was too ambitious to be I told her that she was wrong, and, after realized, and had to be given up. No one many remonstrances on my part, she came to would give me a fiddle. the conclusion that we need only give the Late at nights, when our old companions old woman one penny and keep the other had left the Piazza, we sometimes stole back two for ourselves. Having done so, we rethere-a pleasure mingled with many regrets. turned a dozen times to have another look at Look," my sister would say, that was the Batistero, the Campo Santo, the Duomo, where your father sat, and it was against that and the Leaning Tower; then went away, not door thatPietrina,who was so kind and pretty, knowing where to go and seek charity. The used to stand." municipality, which looks pretty well after I am quite sure, sister," said I, that male vagabonds and beggars, takes little she is not with my father, and that she must notice of women and none at all of children, be dead." No one troubled himself about us. Very likely, my poor Momo, but who We were, however, terribly afraid of the knows ? God is good; perhaps she is very police. To be sent to prison was our nighthappy, and has found her husband." mare: therefore, whenever we saw one of the By this time our clothes were falling to guardians of public safety, we used to put on a pieces. Pallidina would pick up all the gay demeanour, and, lest we should attract his needles and bits of thread she chanced to attention, sing away at the top of our voice, find, and make an attempt to mend them Finally we stationed ourselves on the Proearly in the morning, hiding from me behind menade, but it was only in the evening some large blocks of stone around a new people came there, and it was by no means building. It was there we kept our toilette so profitable a place as the Piazza. Those apparatus-a rag with which we wiped our





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KEEPING THE "CORNUCOPIA:" A PASSAGE OF CALIFORNIAN ADVENTURE. BY THE AUTHOR OF "THE GREEN HAND." II. THE excitement in San Francisco made coming to a trial of strength with the Governhead again. Moreover the feeling against ment beforehand. A number of people bevarious members of the influential class who gan evidently to take the Lynch view, while kept the authorities in countenance increased. many more were disposed to give in to it. The first step on the part of the previous The new word was Vigilance," which, taken reform committee was to call a new meeting, along with the rumour as to Colonel Rigg, at which subscriptions were made; and an appeared fairly to alarm the authorities. None armed party of determined fellows forthwith of them except the Alcalde, old Colonel started in pursuit of Whitaker, to bring him Duggins, seemed to keep their heads in the back to justice at any cost. Meanwhile secret business, but he proved fully able for it. measures undoubtedly went on with a view to In the midst of all this a curious circuman outbreak. A main difficulty in the way had stance occurred, causing some amusement in always been the uncertainty of gaining over town. It concerned my former employer, the body of volunteer night-firemen at the Mr. Malloch. He was on 'Change in the various engine-houses, who formed the Alpublic Plaza, opposite the Parker, where he calde's real support, and were still by no boarded, when a passenger just arrived by means easy to convince; but there was anPanama mail-steamer came up to the hotel. other point, even more important. Amongthe He proved to be a partner in a celebrated recent settlers across the Bay, on the Contra English brewing firm, from which we had Costa, was a man who had more bearing on the had various large consignments during my matter than the whole of them put together. short period of service. No sooner did he This was the well-known Colonel Asher J. observe Mr. Malloch, whom he seems to have Rigg, originally of New York city, where he known by sight, than he went to him, and put at one time held a post in the fire service, some question or other, to which very little He had come out to the Gold State with five answer appeared to have been returned. sons, who went up with him to the Yerba. Owing to the brewer's manner, Mr. Malloch They did well there, but were chiefly dishad drawn back, and presented a revolver; tinguished for their father's knowledge of but next moment it was sent flying overhead. Lynch law, and invariable success at it. The brewer then attacked him with an umThe sons were not understood to take after brella, and the two set to work hand and him in ability ; but the family always kept foot, till they rushed together into the hotel united, and were now farming together across door, amidst immense excitement. It was the bay. It was given out that the Colonel said that Mrs. Malloch had come out on the would himself arrive at the right moment. balconies with some other ladies, and must This, if true, made the result a dead have witnessed part of the scene. She had certainty. The great point now was, to put the reputation of having whipped a colonial off the time for a few days, and avoid editor or two when on the stage, and being 109



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56 TACKLING OLD EPHRAIM. soon got there; everything was dark inside, once more to scramble up, before he was and all quiet except the pattering of the earth well down, and more than once he just naron the leaves where Billy's shovel seemed at rowly missed being gripped. The bear apwork, with the. grating of his knife, appapeared set on keeping cover within reach rently, as he fell closer to. Going up nearer, of him, where there was no mark for a shot; the teamster caught sight of him through the so that we had nothing for it but to fire the dusk, hard at it; there he was, sure enough, evibrushwood to windward, which was cleverly dently never dreaming he had been followed, done by the Malay creeping in. Here it hodging up and down in the hole, and tugwas found we had brought matters to a head, ging and cutting away like a good one. and no mistake; for though our axeman of Tobin then made Andy wait, while he stole course succeeded in getting down on the softly in behind, flattening his hand to come safe side, the bear no sooner took the open, down sharp upon the fellow, and setting his than instead of giving chase to the mounted mouth for a suitable remark in Mr. Higley's surveyors, as calculated upon, he turned and style. At the same time he thought he heard charged us where we stood. It may easily something like a husky whisper from aloft, be believed I never forgot the sight; the with a rustle out of the tree; and our worthy blaze of the scrub showing the old monster teamster being as superstitious an old boy as as he tore along upon us, with the hoar-frost ever was raised on the Mississippi, this "struck bristling from him, as it were, and his him strange" at the moment, as he expressed swinish eye at red-heat. it. Rufus's manner of handling the meat had We had taken care to get the channel of a caused a horrid notion already, as if he began dry arroyo in our favour, but he came on like to nuzzle at it in the raw; so, with a pretty a race-horse, and was over it in a twinkling, smart slap on his shoulder, Tobin commenced with the bullets of five six-chambered Colts a speech of his own, by no means inferior to emptied at him, to no apparent effect save on what our compassman would have given, one fore-leg. Just as he was upon us in the oaths aside. The words stuck in his throat, dusk, we scattered right and left, some dodghowever, for he found himself turned round ing down the dark bed of the water-course. upon with a growl like thunder-his escape My friend Lettsom had still a bullet left, and being solely due to the depth of the hole, and seeing it was useless to run, he stood on the the other's hands being full at the instant, bank as the bear dashed at him, then fired with his jaws as well. It was no less than an close into the brute when rearing on end, enormous old grizzly that he had tackled in claw up, with his jaws about his very shoulthis fashion. As for poor Rufus, he was fast der. Down they went together into the artreed overhead, trying for breath to tell how royo-bed, the bear uppermost, but luckily matters stood. Tobin fired one shot at losing hold for a moment or two in the reedy random as he bolted, tumbling over little bottom. Owing to his crippled fore-leg, too, Andy, who came off after him into camp. the brute did not nip poor Fred so quickly The first alarm among us, in fact, was such as must otherwise have been the case, but that the Malay ran some risk of being shot kept searching, in a style that made the by mistake for the grizzly in pursuit. sedge fly like rags. Not a shot among us The Judge and Mr. Higley got out their was ready, and the quickest-loaded would rifles, in addition to which they had it in their have been too late. Mr. Higley had left his power to keep mounted on the occasion. mule, taken a steady aim, and hit the old They accordingly decided at length to go in a bear somewhere, yet without serious effect. body and see what could be done for getting He went on loading again as he ran up, for the axeman off. The survey-duty for next it must be said of our compassman that he day was certainly much more to the point was not the character to flinch at such points, than any mere risk to Billy, or his night's no matter who might be concerned. comfort; and even then the whole object By this time, however, we did not even see lay in scaring the bear off, or at least drawwhich was which in the shadow of the arroyo. ing it out for a sufficient time, while the The best we could have done was useless, had Missouri man could get down to run. This it not been for the old Judge himself, who was given him to understand, and proceedcame forcing his terrified mare right over the ings were therefore tried on the cautious hollow; then he threw himself off, let her system. But whether the old bear was too go, and next moment was down in the much bent on his night's meal, or had an eye arroyo, rifle in hand for the proper moment. to the tree besides for supplies, it proved He took the grizzly fair in the eye when difficult to make him leave it at all on any just rising with Lettsorn in the hook of its reasonable terms. Back he always would free fore-paw; a sure shot, that dropped the go again, growling savagely; Rufus having brute a dead weight a-top of the poor fellow,



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PEGGY'S AFTERNOON NAP. T was a blazing afternoon in summer smoke beyond, where the dingy town when little Peggy Bevan staggered down huddled at the bottom of the long, brightthe shaggy mountain-side, with a great creel blue, sail-dotted bay. But the pits and the piled high with fresh-cut grass upon her back. town were so far off that they only made She had thought that she would never be Cefn Madoc seem all the drowsier to little able to toil up Cefn Madoc-the sun beat Peggy Bevan. The very railway at the down so, and the creel pulled back so, and bottom of the mountain had nothing bustling the brown grass and the gray stones of the in it. The rails shone like gold in the sunhillside were both so slippery; and now she shine, little blue butterflies were fluttering began to think that she could never reach dreamily over them, and a row of sleepy the valley beneath unless she rolled down sparrows stood on one of the up rails as if into it. There was not wind enough even to they were roosting. Peggy meant to ask for wave the pale-blue harebells. Lizards basked a drink at Evan Evans the pointsman's coton the hot, hoary boulders. The black-faced tage; but when she got there, she found that little mountain-sheep lay panting in hollows no one was at home except Evan, and he that gave them the merest fringe of shade, was lying asleep in his shirt-sleeves, with a The black mountain ponies impatiently half-smoked pipe in his mouth, in the shade whisked off the plaguing flies with their long of a little grove of hollyhocks that rested rusty, ragged, bur-buttoned tails. Not a single their heavy, claret-coloured blossoms on the bird was singing anywhere around. Now and thatch of the cottage as if they wanted to then a rabbit slipped out of the patches of go to sleep too. So on poor thirsty little fern and furze, or flung up its heels, as if it Peggy had to trudge with her creel of grass were taking a header, as it plunged into them behind her, waddling like a crab covered with again; but these were exceptionally restless shells and sea-weed. The proper crossing rabbits. The vast majority of their more was a bridge over the points about a hundred sensible comrades were napping in the coolest yards from the pointsman's cottage, but corners of their burrows, postponing frolic Peggy was so tired with her long walk (and until the dew had begun to fall. All the she had still to climb up a good bit of the country seemed asleep in the sunshine-the mountain on the other side of the railway brown hills, the tiny green "parks," the before she got home) that she determined to goldening corn-patches, the clumps of dusky take the shortest cut. There was a gap in trees, the tumble-down straggling limestone the railway fence just at the bottom of Evan's walls, the dogrose-wreathed lime-kilns, the garden, and through that she pushed her sloping stony bed of the dried-up river, the wearying load. This was why she was mossy mottled bridge that spanned it like a carrying it: Her grandmother's cow, Spot, V turned upside down, the mouldering village was ill; and as Peggy had no brothers or churches nodding over their coffin-shaped sisters, no father or mother-only a grandflower-beds, the crumbling ivy-clad remnants mother, who was not quite as kind to the of the three old ruined castles, the box-like little girl as she might have been-Spot was little meeting-houses, the thatched whitePeggy's bosom friend. She herded Spot on washed little cottages and farmhouses with the hill-side, and chopped up her furze and no gates to their farmyards. Everything potatoes for her, and put her arms round looked asleep, except far-off where the coalSpot's neck and cuddled her, and talked to pits raised their tall chimneys and gibbeted her in the dark little cow-house that joined wheels, and blotched the country-side with on to the cottage. As soon as she was boils of black rubbish; and, under the thicker allowed to milk Spot, Peggy thought that she 37



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KEEPING THE "CORNUCOPIA." 103 to act as tally-clerk on the wharf, or on board evidently kept up by habit at other times. vessels elsewhere in harbour, when the firm These tricks were such as coming to a dead had any interest in the cargo. Every sort stop at the door of some inland gaming-booth of life then astir in San Francisco was to be or cock-pit, trying to turn off to some fandango seen there. Still I did not confine myself tavern, or making a sudden bolt round the to one branch, being ready to give a hoist back of one house in particular, where there or a shove if necessary, and frequently helpwas a very jealous-looking old Spaniard, appaing old Mr. Macansh at ready-made shifts rently ready to jump up at sight of the mare, of carpentry or engineering, where he was as if I wanted to steal his fruit. The in his glory. He showed a considerable worst of it was that, owing to her being so degree of favour for me; when we were often out at nights and kept so long dark at work among the goods together, he would when in-doors, there was something odd commence to talk about the Scotch highabout her sight. She would keep shying lands, which he had left early in life. I had in the sun; the dusk evidently made her been partly brought up there, though in a feel more at home, and she went best in quite different district; and at times I could the dark. I soon found how the case stood, not help being amused in my own mind by being told by a Chileno horsebreaker whom his expecting me to know as much about I used to meet on the road to the Mission Balquhidder as he did. After various anecDolores, and who knew Juanita and her dotes regarding it, and scraps of old Gaelic, master perfectly well. He examined her part of which struck me as being more like eyes, and said she was day-blind already, Indian or Spanish, he would find that he had and, if not put on free-grazing, would soon kept me too late for dinner at my boardingbe past cure ; the sort of food she had house, and make me share his own, which he got was bad for her, he said, and nothing always brought with him ; and it could not could have been so bad as rough rice, which have been much plainer if he had been still was the staple of it. This information I was herding cattle in the old spot. A more of course obliged to make known at once to worthy, honest, hard-working character it Mr. Oswald. At first he was quite angry; but would have been hard to find, I should say. on trying an experiment or two, as the Chileno He was mostly to be found among the goods, had recommended, he seemed not a little cut with his apron on, and an old straw hat; and up about the mare, of which he was really being an elderly little man, with a face very fond. He then ordered me to take her out like a Scotch terrier's, his appearance at first oftener, and see that she got grass enough. did not correspond with one's ideas of a Business matters in town were meantime British Consul. At odd times he would sit becoming more unsettled. The mines had down in a kindly manner to give me various taken a less productive turn, and the import good advices on my own behalf; such as market had got overstocked. It had once or not to think for a moment of running for twice been said there was an idea of young the mines, not to drink at restaurant-bars, Mr. Malloch going over to Monterey, to take nor get into rowdy company, but, above all, charge of a new connexion in the lumber not to gamble. Mr. Macansh made a point trade; and old Mr. Macansh was now so deof paying the charge for my board and other termined about this, that the change was acexpenses every week with his own hand, as cordingly carried out. Mr. Oswald, in short, he had recommended me to the people, and went off early one morning by the up-bay the house was on his way home at night. steamer from our wharf. His mother had come This left a small surplus weekly, out of which down from the hotel with him to the warehe would hand me a dollar or so when rehouse, and she took care to make sure he quired, but by no means in the readiest way: was well supplied in every way, as regards his advice decidedly being to let my money luggage. It appeared he was to stay some run up in his keeping, till I might think what considerable time, and, besides, he took the to do with it. He used to ask what family favourite mare with him. For my part, I there was of us, inquiring more than once regretted parting from Juanita, but could not about my mother, and always reminding me say I was sorry otherwise. that a dollar would go several times as far in He had not been many days gone, when an the Highlands of Scotland as in California. unexpected incident took place in connexion I still continued taking charge of young with him. Luckily it was at dinner-time, Mr. Malloch's little Spanish mare occasionwhen the streets were comparatively empty, ally, as before, much to my own enjoyment. I having stopped behind among the goods She had got pretty well broken in, generally with Mr. Macansh, as I still sometimes speaking; some of her tricks, on the other did. A well-dressed Spanish ranchero from hand, I could not rid her of, for they were the country came riding along in a hurry



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TACKLING OLD EPHRAIM. 55 quite stampeded us off the line, axemen nexion, at the same time had a touch of the included. Besides the strict orders against true nigger turn for "'possum," always treemeddling with them seriously, there were ing and baiting for odd venison at every always enough of idle Spanish vacqueroes chance. There was rather a suspicion scouring about on the watch to pick up a amongst us that the pair occasionally pretext for complaints and lawsuits, which squared their differences behind backs, to the Government of the new State could not the concocting of what Andy called a blindthen help attending to; though, so far as frijole; which in fact often proved too concerned our annoyance, the Spaniards good to be inquired into. Somehow that took but little pains, seeming rather to evening the mess was not so successful; at relish the sight. This was all very well all events there were sundry discontented for Judge Tracey, the Surveyor, who kept remarks, with a pretty plain allusion or two a riding-horse, and got along comfortably to the prime fresh beef lying "ciched" at enough when using it. As for our compassthe moment within reach, under the big oak man, Mr. Higley, he could make shift with on the level. However, the night was dark, one of the mules; but one morning the and the spot some distance off; moreover, case was pushed just too far to be borne, the mouth of that ugly-named redwood A shaggy-headed bull gave chase to Lettsom caion had to be passed on the way, and and me, and so far from being daunted, would after a stiff day's survey all hands seemed certainly have finished one or the other before to think the treat not worth the pains. there was time to use our Colts, but for the The surveyors had no better fare than ourlucky neighhourhood of a clump of bush on selves; so it was just going to be made the the open, with a large tree in the midst. We best of, with the prospect of a good pipe at thus dodged him, firing several shots after all the fire before turning in, when suddenly we with very little effect, till the two axemen missed our Missouri axeman, Rufus, from came up to our help, and settled the busithe mess. It turned out he had left before ness. Both surveyors, of course, had obthe talk commenced, and, as Billy never served what passed, and, though no Spaniards failed at his grub, this meant something in could have been within view at the time, Mr. his case. The truth was easy to guess, when Higley rode up with decided instructions to we brought to mind his wistful looks behind bury the carcase carefully there and then, him that day. He had taken his tools along turfing it up, and on no account meddling with him, after giving his knife a sly rub of with it further. This he waited to see done. the grindstone, and clearly intended securing The work was then proceeded with as before some tit-bits for a late roast to his own cheek; for the rest of the day, during which some indeed, Billy was not the character to think miles were completed; and, as usual, by of extra slices for his friends. sundown we got round to camp, which was He could not have been many minutes still in the old place, gone, when, on listening after him behind the Nothing more had been said of the bull tent, we could hear plain enough that the till supper was serving up for the bell-tent, coyotes had been beforehand in the design, where the surveyors had their quarters, our evidently likely to save Billy some trouble at own meal being all ready at the fire, outside shovelling up. Then, in the midst of their the main-tent. Nor in fact did any one seem noise, off they scattered with a louder yell to have thought of it again, till the time came than before; close upon which we could for smelling that perpetual salt-pork, as we make out a loud note or two from our axecould do through the best fry which our man's voice, apparently giving them a Miscook could turn out. To tell the truth, not souri war-whoop to quicken their flight. It only were camp-stores seldom varied after now occurred to our joky old teamster that being so long off from the settlements, but the cook and he, both being fresh, might even Uncle Sam's chief staple had begun to give Master Bill a start in turn, as he well get rather rusty for our taste, and that in deserved; namely, by setting off quietly spite of every attempt to help it out on the across his tracks, on a nearer cut over the part of our two camp-keeping hands, old open. The right bearings they at once got Tobin the teamster and little Andy the from us. Accordingly away they set at a good cook, who made up the party. Andy was rate, the Malay first signifying for our benea Malay, and though clever at his own fit that the supper might perhaps not lose by work, a perfect imp for skill at trapping, waiting a little, though the surveyors had got snaring, and decoying; while our worthy theirs served. teamster, who came out of New Orleans, By old Tobin's subsequent account, they and was of course far above associating steered fair for the clump of bush, with the pleasantly with aught in the coloured conbig tree for a mark against the stars. They



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ENGLISH GIRL IN FRENCH SCHOOL. 39 THE ENGLISH GIRL IN THE FRENCH SCHOOL. BY THE AUTHOR OF "THE FRENCH DOLL." "WXHEN Ursula Swayne was fifteen, she ingly been fixed on her copybook, but she was sent to a French school. Ursula had taken more than one sweeping furtive was too much in the habit of dreaming or glance at the new arrival. "mooning" to be able to realize everyday For pity's sake look then at the Anglaise!" life, and so it happened that she surprised all she said to her right-hand neighbour. "I her friends by the willingness she showed to -told thee, Sophie, when Mademoiselle Prage go so far from home and so entirely among brought her in to breakfast, I thought she strangers. was just the sort of shy, awkward creature I have never got comfortable with schoolEnglish girls must be; but look at her face, fellows yet," the shy girl said to herself. "In then, quick, and see how she is peacockFrench stories the girls seem so delightful, so ing." full of heart and sentiment, and besides it Sophie looked up timidly; she had a dark will be such a thorough change, and I am so freckled skin, a skin that nature had meant tired of everything being alike, and of course to be sallow, but which was as sunburnt as they are not near so clever as I am, so I shall that of a haymaker; light greenish eyes, and get heaps of prizes." hair of a lifeless dull brown. Nobody could She had been a morning now at Madame help thinking Sophie de Visme a very plain Henry's school, and she had met no check to girl, and yet there was something in her her anticipations. shrinking manner, in her low gentle voice, Madame was a tall grey-haired lady, who more attractive than in dark-eyed, slender, had once been fair and was now the colour mocking Valerie. of brickdust. She smiled very graciously "She is timid," Sophie whispered; "and at Ursula, but there was a kind of hidden she looks ill." lightning in her transparent grey eyes sug"Ah, bah! Timidl I don't believe in it. gestive of storms. Madame had only come in Thou wilt see presently. I say she is infor an hour or so, had walked to the top of solent." the room with stately steps, while every one Valdrie had spoken rather loud, but so stood curtseying, and had then taken the fast that Ursula sitting opposite could not "analyse" of the elder girls-an analysis make out what she said; still her self-conwith such a hard name that Ursula felt sciousness guessed that she was the subject excited to know what it could be about; of discussion. difficulty always acted like a spur to this "Ah! but no !" Sophie spoke so eagerly English girl. She looked down the long that she forgot all caution. She raised her row of brown holland frocks and smooth head from her copybook and looked at exquisitely-arranged heads of her comValdrie; "insolent is not the word. I see panions. Madame Henry's was a large many things in her face, but not insolence." school, and every one dressed alike. "Taisez-vous, Mademoiselle Ursula Scarcely any one looked at her. started. Madame Henry's voice came like They don't stare as English girls do," thunder from the upper desks, and glancing said Ursula; "but perhaps that is because towards her the English girl saw that her we're in class. Well, it's a comfort I have eyes were flaming with anger. Madenothing set me yet. I shall be able to get a moiselle Sophie de Visme, is it not then ingood look at them. Oh, I shall soon beat conceivable that you of all my pupils should these near me at any rate Girls who spend draw down on yourself this reproach; you to so much time fiddling over their hair can't whom the instruction you receive is so imhave any brains; besides, isn't it always said portant-the means doubtless of your future French people are vain and frivolous? and support? Whatwill your benevolent guardian frivolous people are never clever or learned." say when he hears of your misconduct ? Ursula had been stooping forward shyly Ursula shrank at first from looking at the over the desk at which she was placed; but culprit; her own spirit rose vehemently against at this thought she drew herself up with a this public attack; she felt as if she could have smile of self-complacency. shaken Madame Henry before her scholars: Sitting opposite to her, apparently intent but presently an irresistible fascination made on writing a cacographie" in the time her long to look across the table, and a supallowed for it, was a tall, slender, blackpressed sob took her eyes there. Sophie was haired girl; her long dark eyes had seemcrying; great drops were falling fast on her L.



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THE ITALIAN BEGGARS. 79 Teresa would, indeed, have mended up wicked place since I went about with Palliour clothes if we had paid her. dina; and whether running across the Piazza Bastiano," she would sometimes say, "do hand in hand, or playing at hide-and-seek give me a few pence, and I'll put your things around the Batistero and the Leaning Tower, and the little lad's into order." we contrived to get plenty of amusement. But my father only replied, "For our One day when all were assembled as usual, business the dirtier and the more ragged we waiting for strangers and sight-seers, Tonino, are the better." a young cripple of our party, came up, dragI was now seven years old, and for at ging himself on his crutches, and saidleast twelve months I had gone about bare"We shall have a bad day, Mother footed. But when we entered into partnerTeresa!" ship with the Piazza band of beggars, a new "Why so, Tonino?" life began for me. The poor creatures "Why, because it rains; and rain, you see, thought I was pretty : always puts rich people out of sorts." If he were less ragged, and well washed, Why don't they buy fine weather, then ?" he would bring us in more money. His I asked. eyes are enough to ruin his soul, and that of Ah, if there was any one clever enough others. Foreigners will think him so beautito sell fine weather, his fortune would soon be ful, they will let him go close to them, and made," replied T6nino. he'll turn a fine penny for us." I say, Momo," broke in Mother Teresa, Accordingly, Teresa was charged to put don't you and Pallidina go far off; for if any me to rights, which she did at the joint young ladies should come, you must go up expense of the whole band, and I was set and beg of them smiling, and opening your to beg with a little girl of about my own eyes as wide as you can." age, who was so delicate, so pale, and so Has not that fellow got us lots of pennypretty, that she had been surnamed Pallipieces with those eyes of his?" exclaimed dina. She had an aunt a cripple, wlom they Tonino. Mind you, Pallidina, that you seated every morning at a church door, and don't go and get any fatter; you would be this woman hired out Pallidina to Mother good for nothing to us then." Teresa for a penny a day. "No fear of that," replied the little girl; This little girl and I were neither ragged "my aunt does not let me eat much; she nor dirty; we were always together, gave takes great care of me." ourselves out to be brother and sister, and "And quite right of her, too. Does she spoke the truth at all events when we said, ever beat thee ?" through our tears, that we were both mother"I should think not; she is very good to less. me, only she likes me to look thin and sickly, It did me good to be with this child, who because we gain more that way." was kind and gentle as an angel. "Now, then, for your little low voice: how Do not swear, Giacomo," she would say; does it go ?" said Mother Teresa. "you make the good God angry; and, besides, The child at once began to whine out in the ladies won't give you anything." the most lamentable way her appeal for Pallidina was the first who had spoken to charity. The whole party burst out laughing. me about God since I had been an orphan. I say, listen, do, to old Giacomo coughI taught her the prayer my mother had ing himself to death under the porch yonder; taught me, and morning and evening we used he must have thought that you were begging to go into the Duomo, and, kneeling on the in earnest," observed Tonino. floor in the Virgin's Chapel, repeat that "I have always told the old fool that by prayer. And very often the persons kneeldint of pretending to be consumptive he ing near would give us an alms without our would really break a blood-vessel one of having asked them. these days," said Teresa. How pretty they are, those poor little And as for me, it suddenly broke in upon ones-what loves of ,children!" they would me that we were all of us liars. This was cry. the first time I had ever had a thought of the It is because we are good and pray to kind. God that they think us pretty," Pallidina Look at Pietrina over there," called out affirmed with sincerest conviction, and I Tonino; "is not she pretty, wrapped up in thought she was right, and used inwardly to those red rags, with her baby in her arms? say-" My mother, too, was very pretty, What a one she is to tell crams, always talkbecause she prayed in the churches and at ing of her dying mother, and she never knew home." her mother at all-and calling her son her The world no longer seemed such a little brother."



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io8 KEEPING THE CORNUCOPIA." boat by a wharf. Up near Clark's Point hails with him likewise; after which the was the berth where old Sippy Jones kept dingy went round the island, and that was his dingy moored among others, always, of the last I saw of it. course, beyond low-water mark, the oars Business had not long commenced next being taken out, but the poodle fastened in morning, when a sensation arose along the it, particularly if he meant to go out early wharf in regard to Sippy. A customer of trapping or fishing. The creature was there his wife's, who had recently left his watch on that night, every now and then yelping for pledge at their store, saw it ticketed for sale no reason; whereupon King would lift his in a Jew's window; on which more of such head, prick his ears, and settle again in disarticles were found, there and elsewhere. gust. How long I had slept I could not say, The first idea was that Sippy had run off; when a growl from the dog awoke me. He till in the course of the day a similar disjumped up, stood listening, and fairly roused covery was made as to his own favourite me by his manner, though all was still as gold snuff-box, in which his free-papers used before, and he gave tongue no further. I to be kept. Suspicion was excited among thought I had dreamt that Sippy's poodle the coloured people, which soon led to the broke out into a perfect yatter of barking; truth. That afternoon the body of the unbut the town could not have been quieter fortunate old black was found, sunk to the than it was. By the hang of the stars, it was boat's mooring-tackle. Little doubt remained little past midnight, if at all; the steward, as to who was the likeliest man in the State who was a heavy sleeper, had not once to have done the deed; in fact there were stirred; so I took a few turns on deck, numbers of people as certain of its being meaning to go inside again, when a circumSam Whitaker as if they had seen him. The stance occurred which on any other night I evidence seemed rather to the contrary, so would scarce have noticed at all. Sippy was far as respected the Jews and others involved, evidently bent on getting the full advantage who either swore they did not know Whitaker of the morning tide for his sport; he had the by sight, or declared the things were bought dingy well out already, heading more up from a perfect stranger, no way answering his than usual, toward the inner end of Yerba description; and this weighed greatly with Buena island, so as to pass at some distance, the city authorities. On the part of the At first I inclined to hang back, and kept latter, inquiry appeared to show that Whitaker the dog quiet; but on second thoughts it could not have been concerned, as he was occurred to me to hail him, which I did. among the passengers by the first steamer I could see him turn his head, hanging on for the Sacramento that very morning, some his oars a little, with the poodle sitting astern said the morning previous, at all events no under the boat's hood, beside the various question remained but he had gone off. At tackle. The current drifted him fast ahead, the same time a good deal of talk passed as and he made some answer or other, taking to poor Sippy being but a nigger after all, to his oars again. A man-o'-war guard-boat not to say a fool for keeping valuables in his was coming down outside, and exchanged boat, still more for having slept aboard of it. Continued on next page.



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THE ITALIAN BEGGARS. 91 I drew a bit of bread from my pocket. still kept asking, Where is he ? Do you see First of all, my good man, eat this, and it him ?' No,' said I, but children are quick will give you strength." walkers. He must have run-we shall find "May God bless and comfort you; may him fuither on.' Let us go back, Bastiano, He give you your heart's desire !" and look for your child !' she insisted; but At that broken, subdued voice, those loving I declared that she must be crazy to talk and grateful words, I felt a thrill pass of returning to Pisa when she had heard that through me, but the shade of the trees you had gone on in advance. 'If you are around hid the face of the unfortunate man deceiving me, Bastiano, God will punish you,' from me. she said." With the child's help I got him up and on, Dear Pietrina! Where is she?" asked I, he leaning his white head on my shoulder, interrupting my father. Just as I was about to lift him on to the "She is dead. She died two years ago at mule, a ray of moonlight shone on his feaPisa, during her last journey thither to look tures, and I sank to the earth, for thee." Here my father's voice sank, and Oh, father father !" I cried, "it is you 1 he could not go on. it is you !" Our tears mingled. How sad !" I exclaimed; "such a good My poor child, my forsaken one !" sobbed woman !" my father, is it possible that your heart can She was an angel!" murmured my father. have forgiven me ?" The boy pressed my hand, and silently wept * * for his lost mother. All violent emotions are succeeded by calm. My father resumed: "A few days after My father rode the mule, and we were making our arrival at Siena, Pietrina insisted upon our way together to the mill. The boy kept my going back to Pisa to look for thee. I pressing my hand, and at last said to me in a only went as far as Turpoli, then returned tone of reproach, Have you nothing to say and assured her that I had made all into me? Do not you know that I am the quiries at Pisa, but that thou wert not there! Ettore of La Pietrina-do not you know that Ah, I am indeed a guilty man ....... I am your brother?" I had procured work at Siena, and no My brother !" I exclaimed, in bewilderlonger begged. One day Pietrina informed ment. me that she was going herself to seek for Yes, Ettore is indeed thy brother! How thee. She was away a week and returned many things I have to tell thee, Momo I" with mournful tidings. Signor Carlino had broke in my father. It is more than twelve told her of the death of Clotilde, and how years since Pietrina became my wife. I you were sent away from the company of married her unknown to any one about beggars of the Piazza del Duomo, adding eighteen months after your poor mother's that he had spoken to the priests, who were death! Oh, I am very guilty !" he went on; anxious to assist you, but, after making in" I frightened that young girl into marrying quiries for several days, was not able to me, by persuading her that if she refused I find you, everybody having lost trace of you. would pursue her with maledictions and I was already full of remorse," continued throw spells over her. It was a country Cure my father, "when a terrible affliction fell who married us. 1 calculated that Pietrina upon me. I became blind! Pietrina was would get more money by pretending to be too weak to work for our subsistence and forsaken than if she were known to be my that of our child. I had once more to bewife. That is why she never came to live come a beggar. It is God's chastisement,' with us. I used to go to her late and early, she affirmed; 'had you not forsaken your but, being very fond of her, I became anxious son, the Lord would not have quenched the to change my locality and way of life, in light of your eyes!' A prey now to reorder to be constantly with her. She was morseful regrets, unable to believe that God always blaming me for being a beggar, and would ever forgive my crime, I made little only consented to follow me on condition Ettore lead me into a church, where I used that I should find work. Accordingly, I went to spend whole days on my knees, imploring off to Siena; but as I did not want to be God's pardon, and beseeching Him to restore followed, I told thee I was bound for thee to me. When Pietrina saw me so Lucca. One night I came back for Pietrina. wretched, she endeavoured to comfort me. Where is Momo?' was her first question. I 'Now that you believe and pray, my poor told a most wicked falsehood, for which the Bastiano, you are saved, and one day or Lord has duly punished me. He has gone other your son will be brought back to on before us, and is waiting on the road,' was you.' Determined to leave nothing undone, my reply. When we had fairly set out, she Pietrina set out once more on a journey of



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166 ABOUT JAMAICA. that it is not worth while. I hope you underand soiled, her dark curls dabbled in blood, stand the difference quite clearly nowabetween the kind, smiling eyes closed, and her face the cotton-tree and the cotton-plant. as white as the handkerchief with which the We must go back to the slowly-assembling doctor was preparing to make a bandage. party by the roadside. Nurse was still in the I am told that I gave such a shriek .of tree, for, warned by Jessie's fate, she thought terror and dismay that my voice roused her it better to stay quite still till plenty of help from the long swoon in which they had arrived, which it did in a wonderfully short found her; and nothing which happened time; for long before we thought Joe could yesterday is half so plain before me as her even have reached the Moneague he had bewildered face, as she unclosed her eyes, returned, accompanied by every officer and and looked at me. To the surprise of every soldier in the place, and a couple of carts one, she almost immediately raised herself with mattresses and pillows inside, and, best on her elbow-and oh how well I rememof all, some large stone bottles, of water, for ber the deep, horrible cleft in her head we were all dreadfully thirsty. How kind which I then saw!-and, putting up the everybody was! I can remember a big other hand to clear away the blood which soldier attempting to tidy me a little, and was streaming over her face, said feebly, saying, Why, little lady, you'll frighten My hair is getting into my eyes, I wish your poor Mamma to death if she sees you you would keep it away," and then sank like this;" and he actually contrived to make back again. 1 think my story is getting so me more presentable by arranging my hair, much too dismal that I must hasten to tell tying my sash properly, rough, kindhearted you she is alive and well at this moment, nurse that he was. But all these were trifles and the only lasting consequence of her compared to the great anxiety every one felt terrible fall was that all the hair which about poor Aunt Nelly's fate. After a hurried grew where the cut on her head had been search among the upper terraces of the steep turned quite grey. It does not matter now, mountain-side and along the track of broken for all the rest matches it, but for many boughs caused by the rapid descent of the years this long thick lock of silver was carriage and horses, it was resolved that a very conspicuous among her brown curls. party of soldiers, Papa, and the surgeon Now that I have eased your minds a little, should go quite dqwn to the bottom of the I will go back to that dreadful evening. We precipice and search for her. I do not rewere all packed in the carts and conveyed member how long they were away, I only to the barracks, where everything was done know I was very unhappy; for all my first to make us as comfortable as circumstances excitement had died away before the real would admit of, but I do not remember much trouble and sorrow around me. I was so after the fright I had at my first glimpse of frightened to see Mamma's pale face and my dear pretty aunt with her head cut open. closed eyes. Nurse, who had been extriI have been told since that she had passed cated from her lodging among the topmost her arm inside the long strap at the side of branches of the tree, was giving her somethe carriage, just as she knew we were going thing out of a teaspoon, and whenever I to have an accident, thinking to save herself came near she said, half-crossly, "Now go from tumbling out; but when they found her away, Miss; pray go and play with Miss at the bottom of the precipice she was lying Jessie:" but Jessie and I had no heart to near the dead horses, and the surgeon said play; we were getting very hungry and he fancied the blow on her head must have sleepy, and thoroughly terrified at the posibeen given by a kick from one of them. The tion of affairs, carriage was broken into little pieces, so small The most vivid of all my recollections of that they could be carried up the hill again in that sad afternoon is hearing a soldier say a man's hand. The poor horses were frightthat he saw the exploring party returning, fully battered and cut I heard, but fortuand he added, "The young lady is alive nately they were quite dead, and so was a too, I am certain." I rushed off to Mamlittle pet spaniel which I have forgotten to ma with the news, but I suppose, as usual, mention, and which had been lying under I managed to tell it in the worst way, for the box-seat during the journey. Our own my joy was damped by nurse saying in escape was so marvellous, and we were so great anger, There, Miss, you've made thankful to God for preserving our lives, your poor Mamma faint again; now go that I never heard a regret wasted on-either away, do/" So I returned, just in time to horses or carriage, though I mourned in see Aunt Nelly, who had been brought up secret for a long time over the sad fate of in a shawl carried by soldiers, lying on the poor beautiful \Vhitefoot and Firefly. white dusty road, her pretty dress all torn Aunt Nelly lay for a long time dangerously



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So GIACOMO AND PALLIDINA; OR, We are all a poor soft set," sighed Mother Mother Teresa, and made over to her our Teresa: pointing to my father, Bastiano is money, which she divided most equitably the only one of us who knows how to gain between us. money without any trouble. He is so dis" It's only Pietrina and old Giacomo who gusting that he has but to get up and prehave not chosen to enter into partnership tend to follow people, and they'll throw him with us, and I don't think they have acted any amount; with his plaister over his eye, wisely," observed she. and that hideous mouth he twists, he's sure of "There's no telling," returned Tonind; "I his game-except, indeed, that two English have heard say that neither of them want for lords one day had the courage to go by and anything." give him nothing." "Nor do we want for anything either," "Ah, did not I laugh?" said Tonino. said my father; "except," he added, "that "Hush, hush, here is a carriage;" and at when I take off my plaister at night I feel once old Teresa, Tonino, and two or three uncomfortable, I'm so used to it, and every more, rushed up to the occupants and obnow and then I am inclined to go on all tained a few coppers, fours." "Now for our turn, Momo," whispered "What a thing, to be sure, habit is!" obPallidina. served Teresa; "if I were not to beg, I No, mine," growled my father; and, dragshould think myself the idlest of creatures. I ging himself with great rapidity on his hands should find time hang very heavy." and knees, he lifted his distorted face towards "And to think," said my father, "that the strangers, and held out his dirty cap withthere should be fools who would have us go out a word, and three of the strangers lookinto the poor-house I hope we shall never ing away dropped something into it. be reduced to that." Next came Pallidina. As for me, who had never before paid much I have no mother, and I have had nothing attention to the general conversation, I was to eat for two days, my good gentlemen, much struck with it on this occasion, and in 'datemi un soldo se vi iace.' the evening, when seated with Pallidina in the "The others have had it all," was the Duomo waiting for Benediction, I felt quite reply. sad. She inquired what ailed me. Pallidina hid her face and sobbed. "Here, "I am afraid we are great sinners," I repoor child," said a passer-by, slipping a plied, "because we tell nothing but lies." silver coin into her hand. Pallidina duly I don't know what you may do," returned blessed her benefactor; then, drawing back, she, gravely, but for my part I tell none." Now, Momo," said she, "you go up to the Yes, you do; when you are asked if I am Signorina." your brother, you say that I am." Accordingly, I ran and leaped and con" That is not a lie-for, besides that I love trived to reach the church porch as soon as you like one, the old priest told me once that the young lady. I only looked at her, we were all brothers in Christ." smiled, and held out my hand without a word. But is that true?" "Oh, what an exquisite child!" she ex"It must be true, Giacomo, when the claimed. "Do look, mamma; how handCurato said so." some these Italians are. Have you any "Well, I am glad to be really your brother, pence?" I can tell you." I was indeed, and could I have none left." hardly sleep for joy. Have you some small silver?" It requires a good deal of talent to make The mother turned back, and I was dea successful beggar. No one understood the lighted to be as rich as Pallidina; between us art better than Pallidina. She seemed to we actually had a whole franc. Old Giacomo, read people's faces. "That poor lady will under the porch, coughed himself black in give me something," she would say; "that the face, but he got nothing. ugly lady will not-she has a dog; people Pietrina, standing at the entrance of the who have dogs do not like the poor. There's church, bent her head over her sleeping child that fat gentleman, you may try him-he is as the strangers went in, and so hid her face not charitable, but he'll give to get rid or from them. you. That young lady has new gloves on. Poor creature, she is ashamed to beg," it's no use asking her-it would spoil he! said the lady; "I really must get the cicerone gloves to open her purse. Look at that young to change me a five-franc piece, and I'll give man speaking to a lady, he'll like her to see her a trifle as we go out." him give alms-make haste, you will get While the party were admiring the interior something." I followed her injunctions, and of the church, we were all gathered round always succeeded.



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THE ITALIAN BEGGARS. 85 heaven to utter my last prayer, and murmurusual, the first to arrive on the Piazza, and ing Our Father," it recurred to me that we went together into the cathedral to say God wds Pallidina's Father too, and running our prayers. to the Piazza del Duomo I said my prayers Now come and take me to your aunt, there, then lay down on the flags, and for for I want to speak to her," said I; and lookthe last time a placid slumber closed my ing much surprised, but not uttering a remark, childish eyes, for on waking on the morrow she obeyed, and in a quarter of an hour we I felt myself an independent and responsible reached the Capella del Carmine, on the being-a child no longer, other side the Arno. Pallidina, always an early riser, was, as Do you see that little old woman ? That Page 90. is myAunt Clotilde." Then, goingup to her, "I come," continued I, "to ask permis"Aunt, here is my brother Momo, who has sion to work for you, and pray you to be so something to say to you." kind as to let me sleep on straw in the "What is it, my boy?" kindly inquired the passage at your door." old woman. The aunt reflected. "You can do me a great kindness. My "There is the little loft where we put all father has forsaken me." sorts of things," suggested Pallidina; "he So I heard from the little girl." can sleep quite well there." "Yesterday my bed and all I had were I agree with you then for a month, on carried off. I am in the streets." trial," said Clotilde ; I shall see how you Oh, what joy!", cried Pallidina; "we can behave, and if I am satisfied you can stay have him with us." on."



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MA Y'S DREAM. 95 in upon her. She only remembered she was of the vessel, at which May was so very much in the country when she looked for the spire afraid that she cried whenever she was taken and couldn't find it; and when, instead of the upon deck : but one of the sailors, a very ticking of the clock, she heard the cows lowthick little man, spoke to her so kindly that she ing near by, and the hens cackling under her was quieted at last, and laughed when nurse very window; for she had been taken to a held her up to see the poor cattle, which must farm-house, which once belonged to her have felt so strange on the sea. And when father, and where she was born nearly seven May's mamma sat down beside her in the years before. She had lived the first two afternoon and told her all this May saidyears of her life there. When her mamma I was sure the dream was real, mamma. in the next room heard May stirring, she Are all dreams real, like that one? and it was soon beside her, and gave her some new must be real, you know, though I confused milk to drink, quite warm from the cow. the brown cow with the bull. I had forgot Then May rose and got her clothes put on. all about the fright in the field, of course." She asked her mother when the doctor would "Well, May, very often our most unpleacome, and her mother said that here they must sant dreams would be easily explained if we go to see the doctor instead of his coming to only knew a little more; at. any rate, now I see them; for this doctor wasn't like town think of it, I am convinced your dream is doctors, and made it a rule to see his patients just a confused recollection of what took out of doors, if they were at all able to go. place five years ago, and it is very distinct, He was very strange in his ways, and did a too, when you come to think of it." great deal of his work in secret when people "And I would never had got to remember were not thinking of him at all. about the fright, if you and nurse and me May was accordingly put into a perambuhadn't come down here." lator, and the servant wheeled her through No, it isn't very likely, child; but theri one field and then another. When at last you see when we are oppressed with sad and they had crossed a road and passed through a painful thoughts, whether they come to us at gate into a field lying on the slope of a little first in dreams or not, we should always gentle valley, May grasped her mamma's believe that if we only saw a little more, or hand tight, and said excitedlygot to know some very little thing we don't "That is where I first saw the brown cowknow, we should find that it was foolish to yes, there," pointing down towards the water, trouble ourselves so much about them. Your And then her mother all at once rememnature was craving for the fresh air, and the bered how when May was a little thing, just streams, and the green fields, and your imagibegun to walk, the nurse had a pet cow that nation in sleep took you back to this place, she used often to take May out to see, and it the only country place you were in for any was so fond of nurse that it would follow length of time, notwithstanding that everyher about in the field. And one day, when thing seemed so confused; and now that you Jessie was patting her favourite "Brownie," have come to the very field where 'Brownie' the bull from the neighbouring farm had used to roam about, there is no fear, I think, broken loose, and had got into this field, and of unpleasant dreams of that kind coming to made a rush at nurse, who snatched May up you any more." in her arms and ran, pursued by the bull, "No, mamma, I think not; but it was a which would no doubt have seriously hurt strange dream: and wasn't it very strange too them, had it not been that a labourer, for us to come downhere just to find it all out?" seeing the danger, got over the fence and "Yes, May, and that is the way we always took May in his arms, and with his goad find things out; it looks as if it were all by drove back the bull, while Jessie, as she conchance, but God knows better, who gradually fessed afterwards, stood trembling and cryleads us so as to convince us that all is for ing, now that she saw the bull driven back. our good, however strange and trying it may The man had taken the child in his arms, as seem to us." he felt this would be safest, because nurse But we've forgot the doctor !" said May, in her fright might fall and hurt her. Not with the gravest of looks. very long after this, May's father and mother Oh, no, the doctor saw you, though you left the farm and went down to Scotland to didn't see him, child, and he says you will see some of their friends before settling in soon be strong and big." London. They stayed there nearly two He must be a very sharp doctor," said months, and instead of returning by the May; "but I must watch him better next railway they took a fancy to sail in the time: I was so taken up about the dream! steamer as the weather was delightful. Yes, I suppose, that must have been it !" There were some cattle in the fore part RANDAL BEVAN.



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98 THE RIDE ON THE CLIFF. THE RIDE ON THE CLIFF. LITTLE Janet was tired of the sands. "Well, by and by," said Mamma. When she first arrived at Sandby-by" Oh, don't say by and by-that sounds the-Sea, she had thought that she could dig such a long time off--say presently," Janet and pile up pleasure for ever with her little persisted. She buzzed about like a bluewooden spade; but even the delight of bottle until she had made her mamma and building sand-castles palls in time. Janet sister put their work into their pockets. was very weary of it this hot morning. She You tiresome little thing We were so was tired, too, of making the sea-weed pods cool and cosy here," said Sister Bessie, as she go pop ;. and she couldn't find any shells; prepared to rise. But Sister Bessie's jacket and the sea was too far out for her to be had stuck to the pitch of the perspiring boat, able to soak her socks and fill her shoes and she had to pull herself off just as if she with gritty, wet sand, by running into ithad been a plas er-greatly to Janet's delight. that is a delight which never palls. All the "You wouldn't have got yourself in that bathing-machines stood high and dry except nice mess, only you would come down to the one, which had afforded Janet some excitesands when I didn't want to, Bessie," rement as it performed its journey over the marked Janet, with the air of superior wisdom moist desert to the distant main; but since which little girls, when they have the chance, it gave no signs of coming back, she had are so fond of assuming towards elder sisters grown tired of watching that too. She was who lecture them. tired of trotting to the drawn-up bathing" You look just like a sheep, Bessie, with machines, and inspecting with silently phithat black mark on your back." losophical curiosity the young ladies who "Little girls should be seen and not lounged, reading, against the wheels, the heard," retorted Bessie. machine-men and machine-women-who "I'm six next birthday," was Janet's indigwould have been dressed just alike if the nant rejoinder. "You're not so very old. men had worn bonnets-and the poor old You used to wear pinafores just like me only broken-kneed horses munching in their nosea little while ago. Little girls must mind bags. She was even tired of talking to her what their papas and their mammas say, but old friend the coastguard-man, who was they haven't got to mind what sisters say that lolling against the canvas-covered gig, and wear pinafores." "looking at nothing through a spy-glass," But just then they reached the Esplanade, as Janet said. She thought him very silly and Sister Bessie, for the time, was saved for doing so. Presently she heard a "Hi from further tattle. hi hi 1" and a party of donkey-riders galThe fly-horses on the stand twitched their loped past. That gave a momentary fillip ears and noses, and tried to whisk their tails, to her spirits-especially because the big as the flies lighted on their quivering skins; girl" screamed and clutched her donkey the saddled donkeys and the donkeys in the "-ound the neck, when he put down his head chairs and chaises stood stock-still-in stolid and flung up his heels. But the big girl was enjoyment of the donkey's heaven, nothing to not thrown off, and it was only when they do, and nobody to wallop him; but some of did throw somebody off that Janet could the harnessed goats seemed inclined to try take much interest in donkeys now. She whether they could not get rid of the load had had so many donkey rides that the lumbering at their heels by throwing a somred-taped white housings had become almost erset, and every now and then butted at as uninteresting to her as the frayed horseeach other with a dull clash of horns. As hair bottoms of the lodging-house chairs, soon as Janet was seen, the goat-boys bore But as Janet languidly watched the donkey down on her. party a bright thought suddenly struck her. No, I shan't have yours," Janet said to Back she ran to the rusty old mackerel-boat a curly-headed little fellow, whose goat under whose shade her mamma and her trotted after him like a dog. "Your goat is sister were crocheting. so fat-he looks as if he was going to sleep. "Mamma !" cried Janet, "you promised 1 shall have this boy's-he knows how to me a goat-chaise, and I've never had one make them do funny things. I don't like yet. Do give me a ride to-day-not on boys that are afraid to do funny things." those stupid sands, but ever so far over the "This Boy's goat did not look nearly so cliffs." well cared for as That Boy's, but, by pulling



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THE CROWN IMPERIAL LILY. A GERMAN LEGEND. O NE of the most stately ornaments of our Now our Lord liked this shady spot at the gardens in summer is the Imperial foot of Mount Olivet. Often and often, Lily, whose tall slender stem supports its when He was wearied with the day's teachcrown of red drooping flowers, shaded by a ing, with exhorting the people to sin no more, central tuft of graceful emerald leaves. If but believe; when His tender heart bled for you peep within the lovely bell you will our human woe, He would wend His sacred perceive at its base six drops of water, crystal feet to the grove of shadowy olive trees, clear. Remove them gently, similar ones and crossing the little bridge that spanned will instantly appear; take them away again, the brook of Kedron, rest a while in the they will come back as before. Whence do garden of Gethsemane. they spring? What are they? They cannot Jesus loved flowers. He saw in them be dew, the flower's mouth is bent earthwards, God's smile on the earth," and as He trod no heaven-dropt moisture could enter its bellthe winding paths of the enclosure, His eye shaped cup. looked with benign pleasure on the many Listen, and I will tell you their story, bright blossoms growing around, that bent Eighteen centuries ago, when our Lord their heads beneath His gaze in holy, revehad taken unto His gracious self human form rent awe. So many a time had He passed and walked this earth, our Lily's aspect was below the grey olive boughs, and not unnot the same she presents to us to-day. Her frequently had He beheld with unfeigned flowers were then of a pure silvery white, and delight the pure crown of silvery bells which they stood upright, presenting their fair the Lily's stem held up to heaven. bosoms to the blue eye of heaven, and to The other flowers noticed this preference, the gaze and joy of men. The slender but they were not envious, nay, they were drooping leaves above its coroneted head but too glad that one of their number were then indeed a protection for the tender could afford, if but the briefest pleasure, to flowers from the too boisterous play of the Him. elements, and not a mere futile ornament as "Lily," said the grave old Olive tree, who they are now. Of the six tearlike drops there rarely condescended to conversation with any was no sign. Still more than now was the but his fellow trees, and had never before Lily a fair ornament in field or dell, and all addressed a plant so far beneath him in age things named her beautiful. Thus lovely, and condition : Lily, you are favoured above pure, and innocent, she bloomed in spotless us all; the Master loves you; let me wish you glory in the garden of Gethsemane. joy of your beauty." And for once the stern, 73



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URSULA SWAYNE'S TROUBLE. 15 Monsieur Jeanneton started at the rude, the bright dark eyes and rich complexion abrupt question; it seemed to him that this reminded Ursula irresistibly of Monsieur child was recalling him to his duty. A flush Jeanneton. came into his face. Till now she had not thought whether her No, Mademoiselle," he said; I wish French master was handsome or not. She you all to make a translation of this fable knew that she liked to look at his white foreinstead." head and curling brown hair, and that his It was La Fontaine's "The Grasshopper eyes were bright and seemed to see into her and the Ant," and most of the children heart, but it was absurd to think of likeness found it an impossible task; but Ursula, between a grown-up man and a baby child. troubled as her mind was with anger, was "Come along, little Aimee," said Mary determined to succeed-and she did. Halket, "come and see the mco-cows." But though she had finished, she would Mary's wishes were always obeyed. She not hand up her copy-book with the others, led the child by the hand towards a large She kept her head bent, as if she were still gate on one side of the playground, and the writing, other girls followed,-Ursula among the last. Let him find it out," she said to herself; She did not dislike Mary, but she was un" he will be ashamed of blaming me for an willing to submit to her sway. accident when he sees how well I have She followed in one of her waking dreams, done the fable." wondering at the secret of Mary's influence. Monsieur Jeanneton waited patiently, and Mary was not clever. She was often really then looked at his watch. unkind in a light merry way she had of dis" You may go, young ladies: I must stay cussing the failings and infirmities of her and speak to Mrs. Smith." companions without regard to their feelings. The girl who sat next to Ursula had been "It is her pretty face and the way she looking over her shoulder. She was one of smiles when she speaks, that's why they are the elder pupils, and a favourite with the all so fond of her," sighed Ursula. I can master. never have the first, and I should feel a hypo. "Monsieur, Ursula has done it better crite if I smiled at every one alike." than any of us" She had not noticed, as she moved meA glow of triumph rose on the child's face, chanically along, that they had passed across but as she glanced up at Monsieur Jeanneton the first field, and had reached the gate of all her anger came back. another which was usually left open. .It was He looked so very grave, almost sorrowful, shut fast now, and a heavy chain was fastened "Ah, Mees Ursule, if you would study on to the staple and then wound round and little things as well as large things, how round the gatepost. There was a halt and a happy you would be !" And he handed back short discussion, but the little Aimde pointed the copy-book. eagerly forward, and Mary and another of He bowed round the table, and in a few the elder girls succeeded in opening the gate. minutes the girls were all in the playground. Ursula could not tell how it all happened. "Little things," thought Ursula; "what She was following the rest when a deep sullen does Monsieur Jeanneton mean?" roar roused her from her reverie, and, before There was a buzzing cluster of girls in one she could well look round her, her companions corner of the playground, and as she passed were running back as fast as they could toby them Ursula stood still, spelled by the wards the gate they had unfastened. most intense admiration she had ever felt. They had some distance to run. The field She had often seen fairies in her waking they were now in was very large, and before and sleeping dreams, for Ursula had a bad they turned they had reached the farther end habit of dreaming in the daylight, and I of it-reached almost to afiother gate, behind believe it was the being roused abruptly from which appeared some pretty cows and calves. these blue moons," as her brothers and But Ursula did not see the cows and calves. sisters called them, that often drew out her She saw only two things. She saw Mary, left insolent words. I don't say made her cross, behind the others, try to drag the tiny, fanciNo one can make us speak crossly unless our fully-dressed child along with her; but the better will gives way, but the sight she now child would not stir, it stood paralysed by gazed at banished every sore and angry feelthe other sight, that made Ursula's heart, too, ing. Ursula dearly loved beautiful things, and stand still an instant and then beat so fast she had never seen anything so beautiful as that it nearly choked her. the tiny, fancifully-dressed little girl in the A huge white creature much larger than centre of the group, any cow was standing at the farther gate, and As she looked more closely, something in 'again came the deep sullen roar,-which had



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URSULA SWAYNE'S TROUBLE. 153 one corner of it. There was a sort of cave field on the other side of the hedge. She here, and the twisted roots of an ash-tree had forgiven him by this time, but she felt growing above made a groined roofing, and too sorrowful to give him a welcoming smile. this place Ursula called her den. She had Willie could not guess her thoughts, he only planted it with ferns, and usually it was a saw a swelled face and red eyes. favourite play-place for her and Willie. Now Sulking here, eh, Lul? Well, I never saw she sat crying at the mouth of her den, lost such a muff. I wanted you to come and fag in her sad thoughts, for us at cricket; but I hate sulks." "Lully!" She started. Willie was in the "I'm not sulking,' said Ursula indignantly. "I say, Fred, she says she's not sulky; She went in-doors, but her afternoon isn't that a joke? Come on; Lul will find seemed doomed to trouble. her temper if she's left alone; she's dropped She was reading a book when the rest sat it in the field perhaps." down to tea, and answered haughtily when Fred laughed heartily at this, and they went reproved ior her delay,-so haughtily, that back to their cricket, her mother looked serious and her father "How cruel!-how shamefully unjust!" angry. Her eyes sparkled and her checks flamed up She felt miserable, and was glad when bed. with anger. How dare they say I'm sulky ? time came.



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MASTER EPHRAIM BINES, JUNIOR. 65 to let un have his own way as he do. Bines Ephraim. always drew himself up, as if to is none so easy with his gals." intimate that he was singing under protest; All this greatly scandalised old Ephraim, that in. his case, at any rate, the hymn was who was a leading man at the little Sloefield mere poetry. chapel. He lectured, he thrashed young Of course, young Ephraim had long helped Ephraim more vigorously than ever; but all himself to forbidden fruit in his father's garwithout avail. den, but for long he graciously refrained from What was to be done with a boy like this ? doing any wanton mischief in it. After a The only one who seemed to have any in-, certain flogging, however, he got two moles fluence over him was his second sister, quiet, and turned them loose in the garden. They sickly Kezia. It was not always that she burrowed into the soil almost as if they were could exert it, but still sometimes she could diving in water, and in a week's time the trim get him to sit by her, and behave something beds and paths were pimpled everywhere with like a Christian little boy, instead of an imp little mounds of earth. Poor old Ephraim possessed. And it was Kezia who at last was alm, t beside himself, but at last he cured Ephraim of his monkey-tricks-so far managed to trap the moles, and hung them as he was evercured. on one of his lilac-trees. He raked the Old Ephraim had a nice bit of ground molehills smooth, readjusted the plants attached to his cottage, out of which he which they had disturbed, and once more had made at odd times a very cosy oldpottered about in his garden, before he fashioned garden. At the bottom there were went out to work, and when he came cucumber-frames and beehives, and a makehome from work, with great complacency. shift little greenhouse, with passion-flower His graceless little son, however, had angrowing over its brick end, and a vine, that other cross in store for him. bore very creditable little clusters of grapes, Old Ephraim had a dozen dahlias of which peeping, greenand purple, through the panes. he was very proud-the blooms were so A few fruit-trees were nailed against the walls regular and bright and velvety. He wanted like spread-eagles; others, standard and esto keep them in blossom during the winter, palier, and laburnum-trees, and white and so he potted the tubers in autumn and put purple lilac-bushes, marked off great oblongs them into his little greenhouse. Next afterin the beds devoted to strawberries, raspnoon Jemima saw Ephraim poking what she berries, gooseberries, and currants; rhubarb thought were potatoes into the fire, and and celery and artichokes and asparagus; Keren-happuch looking on in high glee. peas, beans, potatoes, cabbages, and cauli" Where did you get those potatoes, you bad flowers; radishes and carrots and parsnips; boy ?" asked Jemima. cress, lettuces, leeks, onions, and shalots; "They ain't potatoes, Crossy," answered parsley and fennel; spinach and mushrooms; Ephraim. I wanted to see how baked Sand all kinds of fragrant herbs in sunny dahlia-roots would taste. Won't father be quarters. The flower-beds outside were very in a rage? They're his prime uns." And narrow, but they were crammed, according as he spoke, the shameless young varlet to the season, with stocks, wallflowers, sweetbrandished the trowel with which he had william, Canterbury bells, pinks, picotees, scooped up the tubers. carnations, polyanthuses, columbine, monk'sAt the risk of having her shins kicked, hood, flags, jonquils, daffodils, periwinkle, Jemima could not help boxing Ephraim's crocuses, snowdrops, double daisies, roses ears and bundling him out of doors. As she of all hues, lilies of the valley, white lilies, did so, up came old Ephraim, who had got tawny tiger-lilies, peonies, dahlias, marigolds, away from work earlier than usual, bringing lavender, ribes and honeysuckle and nasturwith him a saucer for one of his dahlia-pots tiums and convolvuluses, that festooned the that was in want of it. Jemima soon told trees with blossom-spangled clusters, and her tale, little Ephraim standing by in dogged claretand sulphurand rose-pink-bloomed silence, with his head down, and his hand up hollyhocks that nearly overtopped the trees, to his chin, just as his father had his. The The paths, as well as the flower-beds, were thrashing old Ephraim gave young Ephraim very narrow, but not a weed was to be seen was so terrific that Kezia screamed and, in them. His garden was the only thing timid though she was, she rushed in between on earth that seemed to give old Ephraim her father and her brother. Her father shook unmixed satisfaction. When he had to join her off, and went on with the flogging. Then in singing at the chapelhe marched little Ephraim to the shed, and "No foot of land do 1 posse locked him in without food for the night. "No cottage in this wilderness, Old Ephraim little thought that any of his A poor wayfaring man," daughters-least of all timid Kezia-would 5



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THE SWALLOW-WORT. 141 The year advanced, summer was come, told her husband, on his return, that of their and in the swallow's dwelling there chirped presence he would speedily be relieved. She and twittered a whole brood of unfledged could not discover what ailed the youngest. young. Tenderly had their mother reared His wings were strong, but he seemed fearful them, never stirring from off the eggs until of using them, and never understood her the little ones had issued thence, nor leaving directions as to the course of flight. He them after they had broken forth from the would whirl round and round helplessly, and enclosing shell, lest their featherless bodies at last with a piteous moan flutter back to the shouldfeelcold. Hermate roamed away daily, nest and lie panting within its soft warm walls. bringing home to his nest at even spiders, Another weekl and the other children were flies, bees, and other insects, to be distributed able to quit home and begin life on their own among his wife and children. If he did on account. Their mother was nothing loth, these occasions reserve the titbits to himself, the burden of their education had been Well, was it not very natural since he had heavy, besides entirely separating her from had the trouble of seeking for them while their beloved father. Yet now this little one she had sat lazily at home was still in the nest, and what could it be So spoke the mother to a friend who had that ailed him and prevented his learning to once ventured to throw out a hint that the fly? In all else he was not stupid, he could mate was not kind, extolling at the same time speak and sing as well as the rest. At length in extravagant language her own attentive the truth dawned upon the swallow: he was husband. blind. "Oh, he brought me such nice worms, my When she became convinced of this medear, when I had to stay at home with my lancholy fact, she perched herself upon the children. To be sure I was not content like cottage roof that the little one might not you to remain in, in stupid dulness, but hear her grief, and began to pour forth a sad wanted to go out into the woods also, therestrain of wailing. fore I suppose he thought I needed some "Look at that pretty little bird," said a consolation." child in the garden below. "How sweetly "I wish you would not interfere with my he is singing! Do you think he is glad bedomestic arrangements," testily answered our cause the sun shines, Mamma ?" swallow. The close confinement had been No doubt," answered his mother, and no small deprivation to her, though she did they passed on. not choose to own it. I will not hear any Poor swallow, what should she do now for complaints against my husband; he is as her young one? She loved him so dearly, good as yours any day." and would have given her own eyesight for The other swallow flew off, wondering at his, yet that could not be. Oh, whom should the infatuation of the poor she-bird creation; she consult in this strait? Her mate,to whom to care for such an animal,-to praise him she had confided this new grief, had become -well, well, she was glad he was not hers, very angry when he heard it. that was all. "Those children have been the plague of "My dear wife," said the swallow one our lives," he said, "and if we are still to morning to his mate ere setting out for his be burdened with one who will need every daily excursion, do not you think our young morsel of food sought for him-well, wife, ones will soon be able to fly and take care you must choose between me or him." of themselves? Then you might go out How could the mother leave her helpless with me again, which I should find far more offspring? pleasant than being alone; and to tell you the I'll stay with our child," she said. truth, when I do stay in it bores me to hear "Sweet, will you really go ?" you teach them to speak and fly, and how to Of course," was the heartless reply, and find worms, and so on. It is dull when one from that day he never came back again. has passed it oneself." The swallow who had once before called But the children must be instructed, my visited her again in this distress, but she dear, just as we have been." would not listen to her invectives against True, true ; but have they not had her beloved mate, and comfort or counsel she enough ?" brought none. A few days after this the mother tested Daily the mother flew down into the garden the flying powers of her children, and findto seek for nourishment for herself and the ing that all save one were strong in their little one, and when the children of the house wings and would speedily learn to steer perceived that it was always the same bird their course aright, and not be made giddy that came, they would strew crumbs for it by the varying scenes beneath them, she before the window-sill.



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116 YARNS. the men were hanging hardly dead, in order well known, continued for some weeks under to recognise acquaintances below, and talk Vigilance control, during which period I loft in the easiest way possible. Mr. Malloch it with a mining party, and was afterwards eventually rose to various leading positions, chiefly occupied as a settler, or surveying both commercially and in a public capacity; under Government, and seeing life among the he died, however, before I left California, his redwoods. wife having long preceded him. The city, it is YARNS. BY A YOUNG SEA-CAPTAIN. I. length or the weight of something, and I told I WENT to sea as a naval cadet when I them I had no head for remembering figures: was twelve; if you think you're ever but I added that I always wrote down dimenlikely to be twelve, I advise you to do the sions at the beginning of my log-book; they same. turned to the -page and found it ruled with I can tell you all sorts of yarns about a red and blue and black lines, and full of seafaring life, but I can't put them together figures giving every conceivable weight and into one connected story as a Memoir" or length in the ship: they were mueh impressed Life and Adventures of," because I'm not by it, and gave me a first-class certificate. a literary character. Nowadays a midshipman does not pass for During the Crimean war I was midshipa "mate," he passes for a "sub-lieutenant." man of a large paddle-wheel frigate in the I suppose it's thought to be a more genteel Black Sea : the Russians nicknamed her the name; but I know I was very proud of being "Black Cat with the white paws," because a mate. she was painted black and had two white The Black Cat was. at anchor off the funnels: she could scratch and spit too. I Katcha, to the west of Sebastopol, when that don't recollect what her tonnage was or the terrible gale of wind arose on the i4th of length of the main-yard; if you want to November, 1854. The Katcha is a mere know, you must really write and ask the stream draining a broad valley that runs Secretary of the Admiralty: I never can inland to the mountains behind the town; remember that sort of thing. When I passed towards Sebastopol the shore rises steadily, for a mate, my passing-captains asked me the and becomes at last a high cliff, while on the



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THE LAST NEWS OF THE FAIRIES. 133 Immediately the little people began to "And did anybody else in the Dale ever "squittle" off, just like Riinnows when you see them, John?" asked I, when we came throw a stone in among them. They went to a pause in the story. tumbling and scrambling, head over heels John looked at me, as if to make sure that and heels over head; indeed their limbs I was not quizzing him, and answered causeemed made of india-rubber, and they tiously, Yes, there were several stories bounded over the eight-foot wall like so many abroad of folk who said they had seen them, india-rubber balls; not in silence, however, but they were generally stupid folk, or drunken but with such a great buzzing and humming, folk, quite different from William Butterfield. like a swarm of gigantic bluebottle flies, that The most reliable of them was a man named they quite confused Butterfield's faculties. Henry Roundell, who declared he had seen He stood gaping at them, he declared, "like them once in the early morning, at his sister's a big fool," making no attempt to catch farm, ten miles off." them, until they had all disappeared, one after Did you hear the story from himself, the other, over the high wall, leaving the then?" water empty. No," said John, honestly, "I can't say Then he came to his sober senses, and I did. I never knew the man myself, rushed out to the door, and looked in every but he was well known in these parts, and direction up and down the hill-side. But bore a very good character too. A shrewd there was nothing to be seen, except a great fellow he was, who knew quite well the difstirring among the bracken-which was ference between a pound and a shilling; and growing tall and green-as if a troop of hares a steady church-goer, which often stood in or rabbits, or some such small animals, were his way, because the most of the rich folk scampering through it. And while he stood here were then Independents, and disliked watching, and thinking what a stupid ass he having to do with Church people. So he had been, the big, round, red sun popped up must have had a conscience, you see, his head from the horizon, and shot his first ma'am." arrow of light from east to west along the dale. I agreed, and begged John to tell me, Butterfield ran back inside the wall, and even if it were only by hearsay, the story. searched all about the bath, but it was quiet Henry Roundell, it seemed, was never and silent, and the surface of the water peranything beyond a labouring man himself, fectly motionless, looking exactly as it had but a sister of his was married to a prosperous looked for so many years, and as it did confarmer, and lived at a place called Washburn tinue to look for many years after, for he Dell. There he often hired himself, doing never saw the fairies again. The whole any work that came to hand. It was a large thing had passed so like a dream, that he farm, and parts of it were exceedingly lonely, rubbed his eyes and pinched himself to see and far away from any cottage or human if he were quite awake yet; but whether he habitation. To one of these distant fields he was dreaming or not, no one but himself was once sent to hoe turnips. He used to could ever know. start off long before dawn, taking his food The story seemed so strange, and even with him, and often not seeing a creature.till ridiculous, that he was a good while before he returned to the farm at the close of day. he told it to anybody; besides, he had an One morning he rose, so early that it was idea that if they were fairies, his seeing them almost in the middle of the night, and started might be unlucky, and might bring some off for the field, which he reached long before harm to his wife and child. But as no harm sunrise. He thought somehow it looked queerever came-indeed, being an uncommonly like, in the misty dawn, that the turnips had steady and industrious young man, he rather grown ever so much greener and higher since prospered in the world than otherwise-Buthe left them overnight, and that their leaves terfield took courage and told his wife, and were stirring strangely. When he looked of course she told everybody; and by the again, he saw that what was moving about time he grew to be an old man, and people was not the turnip-leaves at all. Between had gradually ceased to believe that there every row of them was a row of little men, all were such things as fairies, he used to tell dressed in green, and all with tiny hoes in the story very often indeed to all sorts of their hands. They were hoeing away with persons; some believed it and some didn't, might and main; and chattering and singing but nobody ever doubted that William Butto themselves meanwhile, but in an odd, shrill, terfield believed it, and he being a man of cracked voice, like a lot of field-crickets. such undoubted truthfulness, it was a very They had hats on their heads, something in great puzzle to a good many. But one thing the shape of fox-glove bells, Roundell thought, was certain, he never saw the fairies again, but he was not near enough to distinguish



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IN THE FRENCH SCHOOL. 41 "I will tell you." Valdrie spoke quickly, accent. If I tell the professors that I don't and drew Leonie with her as she moved understand the rules as they are given out, I away, "Julie, and F6licit6, and Zenaide, and shall be put in the second class, and that Victoire-all go to-morrow, and if-Ursule," mocking Valerie will tiumph." Forhersensishe made a sort of gulp at the name, "can tiveness had warned her of Valerie's jealousy. do the devoirs of the first class, why she will Valerie was vexed; Ursula's industry and move up there with you and me and Sophie." determination to succeed made it necessary Ursula stood where they had left her, with that she too should put out her strength and a proud smile on her face. "Do the'devoirs?' give up her careless, pleasureloving ways. That means the exercises," she said to herself. She grew almost to hate the pale, dark-eyed The school bell rang, Madame came in girl who grew daily paler and thinner, and again, and, when every one was seated, she always had a headache. But Ursula was began to give a lesson in dictation, very happy. Life held a bright new charm Ursula's cheeks burned. She could write for her-a charm till now unknown. She French correctly, she could speak it fairly, had fallen in love with L6onie Rendu. but she had never heard it spoken by natives. If it were not for Valerie, I know LIonie Her master had lived so long in England, would be very fond of me. I wonder why and had grown so accustomed to square his she always will come to spoil our talk, just accents to suit English ears, that she felt like when I have got Leonie all to myself." a drowning creature as she strove to indiviSophie had made one more effort at dualize the words in Madame Henry's glib friendship, but Ursula remained cold and sentences. She did her best, but the room ungracious. seemed to go round with her, and as to "Sophie is so ugly, and I hate all ugliness. accents and niceties of that kind she had Leonie must have a beautiful soul within not a moment's thought for them. such a charming body." "However, none of the others can have Ursula had now been-a month at school. followed such rapid dictation as that," she Her progress had been marvellous, and had thought. She was sitting between Sophie attracted the attention of the professors who and Ldonie; Valerie sat opposite, between attended the school daily, as well as that ot two sistershard-faced, red-cheeked girls, the superintendent, Madame Henry. Valdrie with eyes like black beads, and glittering grew more and more discontented. She was white teeth. idle and unprincipled, but she had too much Presently Mademoiselle Prage came back self-love to give up her position to a girl with the "dictd" books, younger than herself. Ursula grew crimson-tears gathered in It was a warm afternoon in May, but her eyes; she saw "40 at the bottom of Ursula shivered as she stood beside Leonie her page, and she knew that meant correcin the court. tions. She looked up and met Valerie's Some of the younger girls had formed mocking glance, themselves into a circle, and were singing "How many, Ursule? I have eight." La Boulang're at the top of their voices. "Forty." Poor Ursula hung her head. Ursula put her hand to her forehead. "Ah, you will stay in the second class; Oh, what a noise !" she said. you cannot work with us yet. Is it not so, Leonie slid her arm round her waist and Mademoiselle Prage ?" she said to the kissed her gently on both cheeks. "You governess, who was distributing the copyare so red to-day, and your cheeks burn. books. What is it, my dear friend?" "We shall see," said Mademoiselle. But even Leonie's affection seemed to Poor Ursula Had she come to France worry Ursula. Just then Valerie came up. for this-to be despised by her equals, 'and "Imagine -the little Leroux is just taken set to learn with girls much. younger than off to the sick room with measles. Is it not herself; girls there would be no credit in a horror?" striving against! "The little Leroux!" Leonie untwined Next morning came. To Ursula's surprise her arm from Ursula's waist, and drew away and Val6rie's disgust, the English girl found from her shuddering. "I saw you kiss her herself in the first class; her schoolmistress this morning, Ursule, and I warned you that thought that her mistakes were not caused her father had been a roturier." by ignorance or stupidity, and though Ursula "What has that to do with measles?" said knew in her heart that the work given her Ursula crossly ; her head ached so she could was too hard for her, she worked away,unnot control her words. flinchingly. "I can't stay near you or talk to you:; it "It will be easier when I get used to the is quite possible you will have measles too.



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THE RIDE ON THE CLIFF 1I01 the goat's beard, and poking him in the ribs, Bessie, when they saw what had happened, This Boy made his goat seem very frisky, rushed after her screaming, but they were too because he saw that Janet was fond of a bit far off to do any good. Janet's boy tried to of fun. If she had been a quiet little girl, he stop the goat, but, as it drew near the cliff, would have taken good care not to plague he grew sick with fear, and, though the trailhis poor beast, whilst she was in the chaise. ing reins were quite within his reach, he As soon as they had got out of the town, Inade such a trembling grab when he stooped Janet wanted a gallop. So the boy gave her to snatch them, that they slipped from his the reins, and ran along by the side of the fingers. goat, stirring him up with the long pole," as Over Janet must have gone, if it had not he called it. Janet was very pleased to been for That Boy. think that she had chosen such a funny boy. He was not afraid. "She'll stand quiet, When they got up on the Downs, mamma Miss," he said to the nursemaid who had and Sister Bessie sat down to rest, whilst hired his goat to bring her little charge on Janet took little scampers east, west, north, to the downs, when he saw the other goat and south. It was a beautiful day-there run away; and then he rushed to the rescue. was a pleasant little breeze up there-the Part of the way he had to run right along shallow little chalk-pools were pale blue-the the edge of the cliff-shouting and flourishsky was bright blue-and the sunny sea was ing his stick. A great lump of chalk, with a deep blue. As the goat-chaise rattled, rockpoppy on it, gave way under his foot, and ing, up and down the short-grassed chalk rattled down to the beach. hills-making the sheep scamper off too with He was not able to scare Janet's goat their mouths full of thyme-Janet was pleased back, but he got up just in time to keep that she had got away from the "stupid goat and chaise and Janet from going over. sands." He flung himself on the goat, and slewed "You wanted me to have that other boy, him round with such a wrench that the chaise Bessie," she said, when the panting goat was capsized, and Janet got a black bump nulled up for a minute or two before the little like a budding goat's horn on her temples. heap of flints against which her mamma and But what was a bump, when but for That sister were leaning; "but I'm sure hewouldn't Boy she might have been lying on the have given me half the fun that this boy beach a lifeless bundle of bruises and brodoes." ken bones? "You mustn't drive your poor goat too Janet's opinion of "funny boys was conhard, my boy," said mamma. siderably altered when she had been picked "Oh no, mum-bless ye, he likes it!" up and smoothed down, and saw That Boy and then off Janet went for another rocking looking so brave, and her boy looking so rattle, sulkily sheepish. The goat didn't like it, however; he had "You see, mum," said That Boy to long been tired of what was such fun to mamma, when he was about to depart, Janet, and presently, to escape from any highly pleased, to resume the charge of his more "funny" pokes in the ribs, he went off own chaise, "I never worret my Nan ; there at a wild gallop right down towards the edge she stands like a statty. Goats is just like of the cliff. Janet turned as white as the menfolk. Treat 'em kind and they'll behave chalk, dropped the reins, and clutched the -but plague 'em, an' they'll give it ye back sides of the reeling chaise. Mamma and somehow." CHARLES CAMDEN.





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164 ABOUT JAMAICA. We remained in Spanish Town, the capital to. be only a brook, when my attention was of Jamaica, where my father's office was, until attracted by hearing the warning notes of the the hot weather set in, about March, and then shell. Whilst I was listening intently, Mamma we all got ill one alter the other. Papa was tied the strings of my cottage-bonnet securely looking out for a cottage in the mountains, under my chin. You will see presently why in which to spend the summer, when a friend I mention this. My little bonnet was very who was going to England offered us the use hot and uncomfortable, being exactly like of his country-place in the centre of the those charity-school girls now wear; but in island. The climate was very cool there, the days I write of it was quite fashionable. but to get to it we had to cross a high The hood of the carriage was still up, though range of mountains, and the lowest pass the sun was sinking below the high hills toby which we could reach this part was wards the west, and I thrust my restless head so steep and dangerous that it still kept beyond it to see what was going on. How the name of "Monte del Diavolo," or well I remember it all! Just at that moment "Devil's Mountain," by which the Spaniards a second discordant blast came from the shell; had christened it nearly 300 years ago. the horses pricked up their ears and slightly When the'time came to start on our journey, started, enough to send one of the hind wheels the English coachman was too ill to accomto the very edge of the steep precipice. My pany us. My father therefore drove the father encouraged them with both voice and britschka, Joe, the black groom, was oh the whip, and all would probably have been right, box next him, and inside sat Mamma, Aunt if poor well-meaning but stupid Joe had not Nelly, the nurse, and Jessie and I. We forgotten all his master's cautions. He jumped had a journey of fifty miles before us, but off the coach-box, and was at the spirited the horses were very valuable ones, and had animals' heads in a second. At the sight of just arrived from England : we therefore only a figure dressed entirely in white, with jettravelled in the early morning and the cool black face, hands, and bare feet, the horses evening, as they could not endure the tropibacked a little more, and the off hind wheel cal sun at mid-day. These horses had an slipped over the edge of the precipice. What unfortunate dislike or dread of the negro follows takes much longer to tell than it did grooms, and when we began to ascend the to happen. The horses tried to drag the Monte del Diavolo on the afternoon of the carriage up again, but in vain; every instant second day, my father gave strict orders to added to the weight. I can distinctly recolJoe not to leave the coach-box on any lect my father's blanched face as I saw him account, but to take the reins, and that he fling down the useless reins and whip, and himself would go to their heads, if necessary. spring to the horses' heads to help Joe to You must know that the road was exceedingly drag them back by main force on to the road. steep, and so narrow that even a man on horseWe were all quite still and breathless inside backcould notpassacarriage. Inseveralplaces the britschka. I remember the sensation of a recess had been blasted by gunpowder out the carriage gradually slipping back and of the side of the mountain : a negro mounted dragging the horses nearer the edge; their on a mule preceded the carriage, and if any frantic strugglds-I saw them dig their front one was coming towards us he blew a shell hoofs, as a cat might its claws, into the loudly, and then either we or they drew up bank over which their hind legs had now into one of these recesses till the other had slipped. That was the last I saw, for we passed.' Child as I was at the time, I reheard a sort of scream from the terrified member the grandeur of the scenery, and I animals, mingling with the men's voices jumped about the carriage from side to side, of encouragement to them, and I felt admiring first the steep cliff rising straight Mamma suddenly snatch me into her arms up from the narrow path along which-.we and fold me tight with my head buriedin drove, and next the precipice, which sunk her breast. Then came a swift rushing away almost from beneath the horses' feet; through the air, which soon took away my the tops of the tall cedar, mahogany, and small senses; and I never can forget my cotton trees were on a level with the road, amazement, on awaking from what I thought and numbers of bright-plumaged birds flitted a deep sleep, to feel a soft weight preventabout among their branches. At the bottom ing me from stirring. I niust have made a of this ravine there sparkled what looked slight movement, for Mamma gave me a little like a thin thread of water. I immediately shake and asked me if I was alive. We have begged for some to drink, and Mamma often laughed at that question since, but you was explaining to me that it really was must remember that our wits were rather a large river, and that it was because of scattered after such a fall. I assured her I its 'great distance below usig thUt it appeared was very much alive and anxious to get up,



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104 KEEPING THE "CORNUCOPIA." to the warehouse door, where he jumped Fortunately there was one resource to fall down and gave a rattling knock, evidently back upon in San Francisco at that time,,. in a state of high indignation. The animal namely ship-keeping. Among no less than he had ridden was no other than Juanita three hundred sea-going vessels in harbour herself, who could not easily be mistaken, without crews, at every stage of clearing out or from her colour. She had been sold to him getting ready again, not to speak of steamers, for a swingeing sum, and he had subsequently coasting craft, and ships at anchor outside, it found out she was going stone-blind. He may easily be conceived that suitable hands showed the venta, or bill of sale, not signed to take charge were at a premium. My age in Mr. Oswald's own name, but the seller was no objection in ordinary cases with had soon been traced. The consequence Americans, as I had learnt something on the was that the ranchero demanded his money voyage round Cape Horn, besides the expeback on the spot. Mr. Malloch happened rience I had gained in the firm. I was, beto be in the office at the time, and Mr. sides, well grown, and able to give a character Macansh paid the Spaniard, while poor if required. In this line, in fact, I got along Juanita was led round as quietly as posvery well, from one engagement to another, sible to her former quarters. for the most part for short periods, and withThe same afternoon there was a rumour out much responsibility. Sometimes I had a that young Malloch had been seen in a preferable job ashore, but at other times Sacramento steamer, bound for the diggings could carry on both if needful, as during the with a party; as to the mare, circumstances day I was generally my own master. On so turned out that I could not attend to her the whole I liked the occupation; the pay further, and it was the last I saw of her. A got to be worth considering, in addition to vessel in harbour had been brought round which there was often extra employment to' that very day, with English coal in her hold be had among the cargo. Then the lodging for our firm; she had to lie out from wharf, was free, the board often partly so, and the and a trustworthy hand was required aboard washing handy to do for oneself, which was while clearing cargo: also to keep the ship no trifling advantage. There were always during night. The duty was assigned to neighbours of some sort round about, occame, and I thus not only saved the expense sionally worth getting acquainted with; in of board in town, but had the promise of every case, too, I had a boat at my own coma little extra pay for the night business. mand, so that I could go into town when Several days were quite taken up with the necessary, or try a little fishing in the bay; charge; I saw nothing of what went on at or even take a short trip once a week, during head-quarters, and had not the least idea of the safe hours of the day, round Yerba any difference in the state of things there. Buena island or further, to have a shot at But before my services in the ship were at the seals and ground-squirrels. On the latter an end, an event took place which brought account, not from any real danger in the the firm to the verge of ruin, whilst it wholly circumstances, I bought a first-rate English dissolved my connexion with them. One rifle, which of course I did not carry othernight our warehouses caught fire, half of wise; never having gone into the general them being burnt to cinders (including habit of wearing a revolver, which would poor Juanita's shed), and the remainder scarcely have looked suitable, and if any being greatly damaged. Next day a meetone had inclined to meddle with me ashore, ing of creditors had to be called, and a could only have made matters worse. satisfactory arrangement was not long of I had begun keeping a barque in harbour, being come to. In my own case, however, the Quincey Adams, the fourth or fifth I had it turned out very much the reverse. I did taken charge of, when I almost thought I not wish to trouble old Mr. Macansh, who should be driven out of her by rats. The left immediately at the close, and took to only spot where I could manage for a time his bed for some days, having over-exerted was in the fore-hold, which had been full of himself to save the goods during the fire. sugar, and consequently swarmed with cockAfter waiting for Mr. Malloch, he did not roaches; a rat seldom daring to show face seem to know almost anything about me, or there so long as the cockroaches could fly, if a balance was really due in my case, and or if he did, better sport could not have said he could do nothing whatever in it been wished than to see them after him, with till Mr. Macansh was there; but I could his feet sticky. However, as soon as the call again. As for my continuing in the sugar was clear, the chill of the nights began employment, he said they were going to to settle the cockroaches, and wherever I restrict themselves exclusively to the home berthed myself, there was no sleeping for the trade, and would not want any young hands, rats. It was no use shooting at them; in



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THE ITALIAN BEGGARS. S8 "Look merry," she would bid me, or some sick and some well. And, after all, it is look sad, go and make that old miser abuse no great hardship to beg; it's a hundred times you well, and then the lady following him worse to be rich and wicked. I once heard will be sure to give you a trille." Monsignore the Bishop say a thing I have In the summer we used to sit on the never forgotten-that it is harder for a rich -withered grass of the Piazza, and sing togeman to get to heaven than for a camel to go ther. Since I went about with Pallidina, I through a needle's eye." was no longer unhappy. That, however, was too much for me, and We never missed a service or a musical I exclaimed, that he could not have meant a mass. The beautiful dresses worn by the camel like those belonging to the dairy farms, priest, the flowers on the altar, the chanting, that brought milk on their backs every mornthe organ, the incense, the kneeling crowd, ing into the town. the great tapers that twinkled like stars, all "Yes, but it was one of those very camels," these were a delight to us. Sometimes, too, she affirmed. we went up close to the theatre, to listen to "In that case," I argued, there can be the music, nothing but poor people in Paradise. How "Which do you like best?" Pallidina will they contrive to live there ?" would ask me, "the Opera or the music in "No fear, mio caro, I am quite sure that the Duomo?" those who have bestowed charity upon us To which I answered that I liked the with all their hearts will be there, and those church music best, but that perhaps that was pretty ladies, too, who put their hands, all because the operas sounded so faint heard sparkling with rings, before their faces to from the street. Pallidina, however, preferred hide their tears-oh, how often I have seen the organ and church chants, because they that! .." were meant for the good God, and declared "What, you have secn ladies in silk that, all lighted up of an evening, the church dresses crying ?" was like Paradise; and no wonder, since it "And in velvet dresses and in pink bonwas the road thither. nets, too, and their carriages were waiting for As we had followed strangers and the them at the church door." cicerone about the Duomo times without "Somebody must have been dead athome," number, we knew all the pictures quite well. I replied. "That Virgin is by Andrea del Sarto-look, Certainly not, Momo, for they were not Momo, how beautiful. The pulpit in the Batisin mourning. I tell you that they had pink tero is by Nicolo Pisani. You know there is a bonnets." portrait of Nicolo Pisani in the Campo Santo." They must have been ill, then." "So you have told me," &c. "No, they had their sorrows." We were also well up-but more especially What sorrows can people who want Pallidina-in all the lions of the place: nothing have, Pallidina ?" knew the history of Ugolino and Archbishop "Dear Momo, it seems that in this world, Ruggiero; knew, too, about Republican Pisa, when people think you have got everything, and that it had been a seaport; and when we there is always something or other wanting. walked through the Duomo, my sister would So, you see, the good God is just, since He point out the old lamp that hung in the great sends rich people such sorrows that all their nave, and say : smart dresses and their fine palaces, and their Don't forget, Momo, that that was what servants, and their carriages, cannot comfort first made Galileo think of the pendulum." them." "What was he a clock-maker ?" It must be a wonderful sorrow, indeed, I "No-lie was an astronomer." reflected, that would have made me cry in a Are there pendulums in the stars, then ?" beautiful carriage, and wearing a gold chain "No, no! how silly you are. I don't and gold watch! I thought that it was so know rightly how to explain it, but I will ask just and right of God to afflict the rich, that Signor Carlino, the cicerone, the next time I actually thanked Him for it mentally i I meet him alone and he seems in a good From that time I was less unhappy, and in humour." In this way Pallidinaused to keep church I liked to creep near the ladies who my mind awake, and with her aid I learnt were the most beautifully dressed, and if I more than any one would have imagined, saw them shed tears, I thought to myself, I remember once saying to her, After all, Nina is right; their tioublcs must be greater it's very unjust that some should be rich and than ours," and I used to feel sorry for them. some poor." Another of our pleasures in church was to "There must be all kinds," she replied; touch the different textures worn by them"you see, some are pretty and some ugly, satin, velvet, furs-and sometimes to feel with 6



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JACK AND JANE. xI JACK AND JANE. ARMERS have a saying that a boy is a on the moor. He liked jobs of that kind boy, two boys are worth a boy and a a great deal better than bird-keeping, half, and three boys are no boy at all. That because they gave him a good excuse for means, that if a little fellow is sent crowwandering. And he learnt a good deal in keeping and so on by himself, he may, his wanderings; and when Jack did know perhaps, be of some use, but that if he has things, he could tell you right off what he'd mates he is sure to waste his time. I am "zeed 'em do with his own eyes." afraid, though, that little Jack Lycett was Though Jane was such an industrious litle not of much use to his master at any time. body, and Jack such an idle young scamp, Jack was an idle, mischievous little urchin, she was very fond and proud of Brother What he earned on the farm did not pay his Jack. Jane was a year or two older, yet parents for the extra clothes and boots he she looked upon Jack as a protector. To wore out in the fields, but they thought he get out with idle Jack was the greatest had better be doing something, and he would treat that industrious Jane could have. At learn nothing at school; so it was mere waste whort harvest," and at mazing," all the of money to pay twopence a week for him women and children of the country side there. His sister Jane would have liked to turned out to pick the crimson juicy beads, have the chance of going to school, but it and the smooth, golden eggs in their rough was not often she could get it, she was such green cups; and then Jane could be out a useful little body at home. for days together with her pet brother. Mrs. Lycett had younger children thanJane But what Jane liked best was a long day's and Jack, and she was not very strong; and stroll with him, without work of any kind yet she took in washing from the farm and to do. Jack often took such strolls, but it other places, and her two big sons boarded was not often that Jane got the chance of a with her, so there was plenty for little Jane to real holiday. When she did, and could spend do at the cottage. She was cook, and nurse, it in wandering about with Jack, she enjoyed and housemaid, and water-bearer. She the day even more than he did, though Jack helped her mother to fetch and carry home liked to have his sister with him. the linen; and when her father and brothers In their part of the country a few red didn't take their food with them to the field, deer still roam wild, and Jack knew where she carried them their dinner and their every stag had his bed. Jane was afraid of beavers "-I forget the West-country the stags, especially at the season when they phrase for the intermediate snacks. Jane fight so fiercely, and you can hear their horns would have liked to learn gloving, but, clashing together like a little timber stack even if her other work had left her time, it falling down. Jack rather liked that time, would have made her hands too rough. Jack because it gave him a better chance of getwas not an ill-natured little fellow. He was ting near the deer; but he was very cautious, fond of Jane, and was ready enough to help too, then, though he pretended not to be in her in her fetching and carrying, when he the least afraid when Jane was with him. happened to be at hand. But that was not Once when they were out together on the often. Master Jack was generally away moor, a stag charged them; but Jack pushed "at work"-such funny "work When he his sister up to the top of a great block of first went out bird-keeping, he did stick to it grey rock rising out of the furze, then scrampretty closely, because he was allowed to bled up himself, and bellowed back at the have a rusty old horse-pistol; but he blazed stag, and shied stones at him, and behaved away such a lot of powder in the first week altogether with such apparently undaunted that the farmer took away the pistol, and gave courage, that Jane felt more comfortable than him "clappers" instead. Rattling them was Jack did. He was very pleased when the no fun after an hour or two, and so Jack stag stopped pawing up the turf, snuffed conbecame a very lazy bird-keeper. In fine temptuously at his defier, tossed his head, weather he used to poke about in the hedges and cantered off. After that, Jane believed and ditches, hunting for nests, and rabbits, that Jack could do anything; but, even with and effets, and blindworms; and in wet Jack to protect her, she had no wish to go weather he made a wigwam with a thatched near an angry stag again. Once they came hurdle in the snuggest corner he could find, upon a fawn asleep in a patch of glossy and warmed his toes at the stick fire he had fern. It was so sound asleep that it let Jane lighted. Sometimes Jack got a job of pigpat it, and lay down her sun-bonneted head tending in the woods, or of cow-watching on its soft warm little side, Suddenly, how-



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KEEPING THE "CORNUCOPIA." 113 took notice of all who went aboard, but had John Wilkinson, against which I did not given it up, till their attention was drawn to think fit to say anything. All I had to do my boat in passing, after which they met the with them was to give my evidence in regard cutter, and lay on the look-out accordingly. to the Cornucopia. Whitaker was known at once by his descripNothing particular occurred afterwards in tion, and took it wonderfully cool, considerthe ship, though she was detained some days ing; Malloch at length gave his name as longer for the trial, which the city authorities persisted in holding over, till the heavier victed, and sentenced to be hung; "Wilkincharge could be settled regarding poor black son being then sent back to jail along with 'Sippy. As to this case, they brought it him on the new charge. The Governor forward without delay, when "Wilkinson" thought fit, before bringing the man to exewas put at the bar with Whitaker, but got cution, to have the fresh case tried; thereby off through Whitaker's denying all previous allowing for any new light about his conacquaintance with him. Whitaker was conpanion. I was then ashore, the ship having 8



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PA'UL -AND JEAN 59 just like Swiss chalets. The dairywoman was generally hungry, everybody wondered saw him go by, and called to him to come where he could be. The dairy-woman said and take a cup of new milk. She was very she had given him a cup of new milk at half fond of little Paul; as indeed were all the past eight, and the two mowers told of having people about the place. Then Paul came sent him away eating his bread and jam, and tc a great sheet of grass, not exactly a lawn, one of them said he thought he had seen nor yet a field, where a couple of men were little Paul talking to Etienne the gardener. mowing the August after-crop, -they told Now Etienne was a married man, who lived him to get out of the way of their scythes; in the village and went home to all his and he went on, always eating his bread and meals; and as it was agreed by all present jam, till he came to where a little boy of his that Paul must have gone home with him, own age, or a little older, was pulling up the stable-boy was sent round to fetch him; weeds. One of the gardeners was there too; but the stable-boy came back in ten minutes, but apparently he did not think little Jean and Etienne with him, who said that, so far very necessary, for he made no objection to from having taken Paul home, he had not the two little boys running off together, bebeen with him for any time at all; but had cause Paul said he wanted to play at horses, run off with little Jean the cobbler's son to Now Jean, I should tell you, was a year and play at horses. At this, Paul's mother, looka half older than Paul. He was the son of a ing uneasy, said the boys must have gone drunken cobbler in the village, whose family farther than they intended, down to the very were all in dirt and rags, and very ill brought bottom of the park; and his father, laying up. Usually none but very respectable people down his knife and fork, left the head of the were employed at the chateau, but Paul's table, and taking his hat went round to the mother, who was a kind-hearted woman, had garden front. The park is not very large; taken pity on the wretched vagabond, and it took Paul's father about twenty minutes to had got the gardener to give him some work. walk round it. The ground slopes from the The hours went on that hot August mornchateau into a deep wooded valley; once ing; M. le Comte de X. sat in his study, upon a time the trees were all planted in in a great wide dressing-gown, drinking chodouble semicircles, just as they were at the colate out of a fine china cup; the Intenking's palace at Marly. But M. le Comte dant put out all the silver for the great de X.'s father had had a great fancy for dinner; his wife looked up her maids all English planting and gardening, and so durover the house, and took the covers off the ing the last fifty years many thick tufts of blue satin chairs of the best drawing-room. shrubs and quick-growing trees had been The dairy-woman pottered among her sweetinterspersed among the stately old rows of smelling pans; the two men finished their limes and chestnuts. Paul's father, getting mowing and made little cocks of hay on the more and more uneasy, shouted as he went shorn grass; the gardener tidied up his walk along, "Paul i Jean I Jean Paul! But no and carried all his tools off in his brouette or answer came. He went up to several of the wheelbarrow and put them into a tool-house, thickets and struck at them with his stick, Just as he shut the door, the great breakfast thinking that the children might be purbell rang in the courtyard for the servants' posely hiding. So he made the round till meal. It was eleven o'clock, and fifteen indoor he came up again near the house, when he and outdoor servants came flocking together crossed the lawn near the Long Pond. Now to eat eggs, and bouilli, and salad made of hard by the Long Pond (there were two others cold vegetables chopped up with oil and in the grounds, all of them near the chateau) vinegar, and to drink thin red wine out of was a great tuft of pampas grass, its featherlong black bottles. ing spikes towering up above the leaves, and Where's Paul?" said the Intendant's wife, as he came near it he thought he saw these settling her capeline straight, and hanging a feathery spikes trembling more than they great bunch of keys on a nail in her own need; for the day was very calm and hot. sitting-room. Paul's father, struck with a sudden hope, "I gave him a piece of bread and jam, hurried up and struck his stick vigorously and told him to go and play in the park," said into the tuft, saying somewhat angrily, "Paul, the Intendant. come out this instant; you are frightening It's very odd the child does not come," your mother and behaving very badly. You said the mother. Whereat the father went shall not have any breakfast, sir." As the to the garden front and called as loudly as he stick went poking into the pampas grass, a dared, being afraid of disturbing his master, little voice gave a yell of dismay ; and Paul's Five minutes passed, and no Paul made his father, plunging into the middle, pulled out, appearance, and as, like most little boys, he not Paul, but Jean A sickening fear came



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128 LIME'US AND PADDY. except that they generously gave Towzer the with ? Towzer wouldn't take part with on heads and tails. It wasn't so nice in bad against the other. When they quarrelled 'if weather, but so long as they were not forced they ever did quarrel, I have no doubt that to stay all day in the smoky little cabin they Towzer sat looking at them with sad severity did not mind. They made themselves cosy and then jumped up and wheeled about like a enough, snuggling under the tarpaulin with dancing dervish when they made it up again. Towzer, whilst the soft snow fell thick, or I can't help thinking that theirs must have the hail or the rain rattled sharply on their been rather a jolly life-always at home, yet counterpane. And when Betsy was quite always out. They saw all kinds of placesfrozen in, they could slide and scamper on cornfields, and meadows, and water-mills, the ice, wondering at the dead fish they and farmyards, and hop-gardens; old villageso could see inside the ice, and laughing to see sound asleep round their old churches, and Towzer tumble on his nose or slip along upon old towns not much wider-awake; and woods, his haunches with his forelegs very wide apart, and rocky hills, and furzy chalk-downs dottedl as he tried to scamper after them. And even over with sheep, and marshes with black when they were obliged to stay in the smoky bullocks grazing in them ; and huge jumbles little cabin, they could amuse themselves for of black buildings with ggslight gleaming in a time, especially when Towzer was allowed the early morning out of hundreds of windows, to slink in after them. and tall chimneys lost in the smoke they Black Bill did not want his children to belched out; and miles of country black learn all the plaguesome things that your papa with cinders, blotched with coal-pits and wants you to learn. He thought that he had brick-kilns, and bristling with iron-furnaces done his duty in that way when he had taught vomiting flame, and sluggishly fuming pothis daughter to play at oughts and crosses, tery-cones. Sometimes they were up above "There, Lime'us," he said, as proudly as the country; sometimes it towered high if he had been the mistress of a finishing above them. The long canal-tunnels never school bidding good-bye to a governess she frightened Lime'us and Paddy. They were had trained to teach everything; "There, so us :d to them by the time they got Lime'us, you knows it now, and when he's to understand what they were that they old enough, you can larn Paddy." thought it great fun to glide out of daylight Wouldn't you like to have a kind, thoughtinto the darkness. Going down, down, ful papa like that? Lime'us played at oughts down, or up, up, up, in the slimy, dripping and crosses with chalk on the black side of locks, with the water cascading in or out, the smoky little cabin, and at first Paddy and was also great fun to Lime'us and Paddy; Towzer would be very much interested in and so was the splash with which the towthe marking and the smudging out; but the rope fell into the water when another barge amusement palled after a time. Towzer had to be passed, or the horse had to cross looked the other way, and Paddywould pull his a bridge where the towing path changed tail; and then Lime'us grew tired of her game. sides. What Lime'us and Paddy liked least Altogether, however, I should not wonder was when Betsy stopped to take in or disif there were a good many unhappier little charge cargo. The children then had no children in England than poor little neglected longer the run of Betsy, and these stoppingLimehouse and Paddington. I can't say places were some of the dreariest places much for Mr. Black Bill and his wife, but whicl Betsy visited. They were especially at any rate they did not make little white disagreeable to Lime'us and Paddy. When slaves of their children ; they gave them Betsy was lying alongside them, Lime'us plenty to eat, and clothes to wear; and could only make up stories about churchthough, I am afraid, they often set them a yards, and ghosts quarrelling in them, and bad example, oughts and crosses was the pelting one another with their gravestones. only thing they taught them by precept. But Lime'us and Paddy greatly enjoyed Towzer was as fond of the children as even Betsy's stopping-places in the country. Betsy a dog can be, and they were a good deal -or rather Black' Bill and Carroty Salfonder of each other than a great many little sometimes stopped longer at them than was brothers and sisters are. So, as long as they proper, but of course Lime'us and Paddy continued little children, I don't think they knew nothing about that. could have been so very unhappy. I suppose One calm, dewy summer evening Black they must have had a little quarrel now and Bill and his wife moored Betsy in a quiet then, but, so far as I can make out, it was so reach of the canal-where it ran between a soon over that it could hardly be said to gentleman's grounds and his snug little homehave begun. If they quarrelled, who was farm-and departed with the horse to the there that either could have made friends neighbouring village. If the truth must be





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140 THE S WALL 0 WWORT. lover, for the sake of that upstart sparrow? "What is it, sister?" they askedi ', No, never. "Remain only a little while, do you weep so bitterly?" dear bird, I conjure you," she said more She told them her sad tale, and one amonr tenderly, and all shall yet be well. What them-he was an old bird, and had had much am I not to live in my own house that my experience-bade them fly out of the usur-'' mother b'iilt for me ?-my mother and father per's hearing to yonder large oak, that they: built it, do you hear that, you little good-formight there confer what should be done inI nothing sparrow? But perhaps you never this grievous strait. There they set up a had a father or mother," she added superloud chattering, and at last returned to the: ciliously. I dare say your connexions are thatched roof bearing some straw, lime, or very low people." And then, her grief and road-dirt in their several bills. In turns they' rage once more coming uppermost, she perched upon the gutter, and bending forward raised such a lamentable wail of woe that deposited their burden on the door of the speedily all the swallows of the neighbournest, disregarding the piteous plaints of the hood flocked arounl her. little sparrow that they should let him go,-he would evacuate; indeed, indeed he would! low. He had been the only lazy one of the He might wail and moan; his griefs fell on party, though for very shame he had made deaf ears; nor did the assembly cease their some pretence of work. Your friends seem labour till they had completely fastened up very kind, your home is well situated, and I the opening so that no air could enter, and have no doubt we shall be comfortable." the prisoner must inevitably die. Then, proAt his words joy came once more into the mising to return next day and help to reopen swallow's heart; she had still feared that nice the door and throw out the dead bird, they bird would leave her. And now he had procongratulated the swallow on her approachmised to stay, to-morrow the nest would be ing marriage, and begged permission to be once more hers ; and overflowing happiness present at the nuptials that were to be celeprevented her from hearing or heeding the brated under insect-seeking in the adjacent heart-rending sighs that broke from the dying wood. sparrow who had so innocently appropriated "Well, I think I will stay," said the swalthe vacant nest.



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162 ABOUT JAMAICA. COME TO THE WOODS. BY THE AUTHOR OF CHILD NATURE." C OME to the woods with me, The woods where nothing grieves: Life is innocent and free Beneath the little lea-'es. The birds are very glad, They love to see you come; If a pair of wings you had, en The woods might be your home. Lie softly on the grass, It likes to feel you lie; "Kiss the shadows, as they pass Before the shining sky. The woods are cool and green, The sky is soft and gray; So in pictures have I seen The distance melt away. No picture is so fair, With such a living glow, And the fragrance of the air A picture cannot know. Oh earth is dear to me, Because of trees and skies Child, how sweet it is to see How happy are our eyes AUNT ANNIE'S STORY ABOUT JAMAICA. BY LADY BARKER. I AM going to give you an account of and how it came to belong to us long the first adventure I ever had; and, ago, and that they will try to remember all although it happened so many years ago, I about it. I will only say that it is a most remember the incidents quite distinctly. I beautiful island, with splendid scenery, lovely was only six years old at the time, but it flowers and delicious fruits growing wild, was talked of in the family for long afterparrots flying about the woods, and humwards, as you may suppose, and this preming-birds flitting among the aloe-blossoms. vented me from forgetting it. Then, by and But then, on the other hand, it is not by, as soon as the younger ones grew old nearly so nice a place to live in as our enough to like stories, they would often beg dear old England, in spite of her fogs and their eldest sister to tell them all about the grey skies; for in Jamaica, as well as in great upset." Since those days I have told all the West Indian Islands, the climate is the story many times to other children, and very bad, except in the high mountains: now I am going to repeat it once more. there are earthquakes and hurricanes, snakes, I daresay you would not wish me to mosquitoes, scorpions, and quantities of begin with the geography or history of poisonous berries and blossoms. Children Jamaica, though I hope any little boy or are seldom taken or kept there after two, girl who is interested in these stories will or three years old, and they have not the ask their papa to tell them where it is, free out-door life of English boys and girls;



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ABOUT JAMAICA. .65 if she would only move; which she accordhair all blowing about my face: think of the ingly did very slowly, poor darling, for she contrast of this little beggar-girl's appearance oras a good deal bruised and shaken. I was to a very smart light-coloured parasol emon my feet in a second, and rather delighted broidered in bright silks I can distinctly with the novelty and excitement. Mamma remember my surprise at finding that my' and I had fallen out on the first landing, as it successful piece of disobedience did not were,.of the steep mountain side, not very make me so happy as I expected it would; far from the top. She desired me to tell her on the contrary, my conscience began to what I could see of the others; so I rushed prick me horribly. I seemed to hear a about in great excitement and delight, revoice telling me quite plainly how wicked porting my observations. In a tall cotton-: it was to take advantage of my poor aunt's tree below us I caught a glimpse of the nurse absence to do what she had forbidden; in and Jessie lodged like birds in the upper short, I was so tormented by the clamour of branches. I announced that nurse was lying these internal reproofs, that I hastily closed quite still, holding Jessie's frock, but the poor the parasol and put it carefully on one side, little girl was kicking vigorously and crying resolving to confess my naughtiness as soon to be taken down. Papa I could see on the -as possible. I must tell you here that I road above, with his hat and coat off, and went about with this burden on my mind literally tearing his hair out with his handsfor many days before any one would listen the only time in my life I have ever seen any to my penitent acknowledgment, and then one do this. There were bonnets, shawls, I was fully and freely forgiven, and never books, &c. strewn all about, and I was parwished to touch the parasol again. ticularly delighted to perceive a very smart I have only fitful gleams of memory about embroidered parasol belonging to Aunt Nelly what followed. I fancy I see dear Mamma sitlying near me. I must confess to being very ting on some of the carriage cushions, and naughty indeed about this parasol, and I will leaning against the rocks by the roadside. I see tell you how. Mamma asked me if the carJessie in Papa's arms, choking and coughing, riage or horses were to be seen, but though and I heard afterwards that in her struggles I fancied there was something dark in the she had fallen from the branch which caught bed of the river below us, it was imposher, headforemost into the hollow of the old sible to tell what it might be, and, selfish, cotton-tree, and had been nearly smothered naughty little girl that I was, I felt very by a fine powder, caused by decay, with anxious to get away from her with my which the vast trunk was filled. Here I am prize, the parasol, which I had always been going to make a little digression to explain strictly forbidden to touch. I suggested, something to you. The cotton-tree of which therefore, calling Papa to help Jessie and I have spoken is quite different from the nurse out of the cotton-tree, and so escaped cotton-plant which furnishes us with all our with the parasol tucked under my arm. Poor calico and our pretty cotton frocks. That Papa was very glad to see me unhurt, and to cotton is the snow-white contents of a hear that Mamma was also safe, and on my small pod about as big as an egg. Fist there pointing out the cliff under which she was is a bright yellow flower on the shrub (for still lying, he prepared to go to her assistance it never grows more than eight or nine feet first Joe had been already despatched to high), then a pod succeeds quickly to the a place where a detachment of soldiers was blossom, and when this bursts the little tree quartered in those days, about three miles looks so pretty with these tufts of cotton on it, off, with an entreaty from Papa to the comeach with some seeds inside. It grows freely manding officer to send a cart directly to in Jamaica, but is not cultivated to any great our help, and also the surgeon. The sun extent. All the cottonwe use comes from India was now fast setting, and' I thought with and America, and some even from the South sorrow that my precious parasol would soon Sea Islands. Now the cotton-trees I have be useless, as there would be no sun from been telling you of as growing in the forests which to shelter: but I determined to avail are as big as elms or beeches, and with very myself of the few moments left; so I opened thick trunks. They also bear a pod full of it and strutted up and down the road. What cotton, but it is quite useless, though it is 'a ridiculous little object I must have looked exquisitely soft and fine. In the first place, -my frock, &c. torn. to ribbons, my bonnet it is a lightbrown colour, just like a mouse's crushed quite flat, and now hanging down back, and in the next place it is quite full of my back (the doctor said afterwards its little seeds the size of apple pips. Somethickness had saved my head from a frighttimes the negroes collect this silky down to ful blow, as the straw was quite cut through stuff a pillow, but it takes such an immense in one place), and my thick shock head of time to separate it from these little seeds



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66 BUSH NEIGHBOURS. presume to solace theyoungrebel. But when too ill then to be scolded. The night before the old man and her sisters went to bed, had been frosty-the first autumn frost-and Kezia made some excuse for staying up a Kezia had run out without putting anything few minutes. She had saved her s6p from on, and then had come back to a blanketless supper, and got a couple of blankets off her bed. For days her life was despaired of-for own bed. She took down the key of the weeks, for months, for a year and a half, she shed from the dresser-hook on which it hung, was confined to her bed. I do not say that and started for the shed with her supplies, during that long time little Ephraim never did Sore, scared little Ephraim, sobbing in the any mischief, but he was an altered boy, and dark and cold, was greatly cheered by the would sit for hours in his sister's bedroom, bedclothes and the bread and milk. Kezia watching .her like a dog. I do not say that stayed with him as long as she could-then he never did any mischief when Kezia got tucked him in, and locked him up once about again; but it was only a very little more. more than the amount that is natural even in Old Ephraim was very wrathful when he good boys-good boys outside book-covers. went to the shed in the morning, and found His sister's love for him and his love for his the young criminal comfortably rolled up and sister did him more good than all his father's snoring in the blankets. But Kezia was lickings. BUSH NEIGHBOURS. CAPTAIN DAVENTRY was a military which two masters, in cap and gown, nodded "settler in Australia, in the old convict over their far-apart desks, and pretended to times. When Mrs. Daventry, and her son teach Walter and another small boy, and Walter, and her maid Phoebe, went out from tried to fancy that they were preparing a England to join the captain on his grant, lanky hobbydehoy for the University. Masboth mistress and maid thought they were ters, and hobbydehoy, and small boy, all never to know what comfort was again-that half-envied Walter, in a drowsy kind of way, they were going, so to speak, to the world's when one morning he burst into that gloomy back-yard, in which all kinds of dirty rubbish old schoolroom to say good-bye. An hour were shot. Walter would have preferred afterwards he was rattling out of the dreamy India or Canada; people teased him so little town along the Ipswich road, en route when they learnt that he was going to for London. The coachman was making his "Botany Bay"-asking him when he was leaders and the off-wheeler canter, the guard sentenced to transportation -how many was tootle-tooing on his horn; the townsyears he had got-and a good many more people stood at their doors and the inn-gates, such silly questions, which they thought a sleepily watching the coach that had come great deal wittier than Walter did. Still, any from great Norwich and was going to still change was acceptable that would take him greater London, and sleepily waving their away from the dull little Norfolk town that hands to proud Walter, who had begged for never seemed thoroughly awake, and its an outside place instead of being shut up in dark, long, low-pitched grammar-school, in the stuffy inside with Mamma and Phoebe,



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"DAPPLE'S OPINIONS." See page 144. See page 144-



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24 RUNNING AWAY TO SEA. But dirty weather soon set in, and the in his mouth; and though he expected to be pumping-which had been throughout the whirled off like a withered leaf, yet he had just voyage a cause of grumbling-became more time for one thought, that stabbed him like a fagging than ever ; as Jack, whose hands knife, about his mother and his sisters from were skinned by the ropes and his back stiff whom he had run away. with the bending, had good reason to know. But the Onyx did right herself when they The men no longer chantedgot the canvas off her, and was still afloat next morning, when the sky was bright They say, old man, yonr horse will dieagain, and the zebra-striped Cape pigeons They say so--and they h/lntk so--" were flitting blithely over the subsiding sea. as the beam was jerked up and down. Masses of seaweed, too, were floating on the Mutinous growls were the chorus now. The waves. The captain, however, obstinately way the skipper behaved in bad weather refused to follow the mate's advice to bear puzzled the men. He would scarcely take up for Table Bay, and ordered out the boats. a stitch of canvas off the ship when she was You're lobbing your owners, if you desert lying over so that her yards nearly dipped her, Captain Mitchell," said Mr. Munnens. into the water. "I'll stake my life we can take her into It's my belief," Jack heard one of his Cape Town." friends say to another, "that the old man's "Obey orders, if you break owners, sir," either mad, or else he's bribed to sink the growled the skipper. ship, and gets so drunk he forgets he'll go Obey orders, and break underwriters, Capdown in her. If Mr. Munnens would put the tain Mitchell-that's it, isn't it ?" answered skipper in irons, I'd stand by him." the mate. I won't leave her while she'll The rowdies, however, although they did float-who'll stay with me?" grumble at the pumping, were on the Most of the men went over the side with skipper's side. He raved at them, too, the captain, but Mr. Croggan, and the carsometimes, but he maintained no discipline, penter, and Jack, and three or four of the He made very little fuss even when the mate men, stopped with Mr. Munnens; and after told him that the cargo had been broached, a very anxious day, Table Mountain stood and a barrelful of spirit-bottles stolen. up clearly dark .against the sky, and the The skipper was carrying on as usual one Onyx floundered past Robben Island, and day, although black, ragged clouds, like let go her anchor in Table Bay. dusty cobwebs, were fast mounting from all The underwriters made a handsome presides of the horizon. The distant sea was sent to the mates and the men who had bristled by the hurricane that was rushing stuck to the Onyx, when they got to hear towards the ship. of what had happened, since she had been As Mr. Croggan shouted, "Stand by the insured shamefully above her value. Perroyal halyards !" the royals flew in rags from haps the underwriters might have had the bolt-ropes, and the royal masts snapped something unpleasant to say to Captain like twigs. The skipper, drunk as usual, Mitchell; but he and the men who went came reeling from his cabin, but Mr. with him never turned up again. Munnens rushed before him. A very different skipper from Captain "All hands on deck!" the mate bellowed, Mitchell took Jack home out of charity; but and his watch came tumbling up half-drunk, though he had been kindly treated, Jack Down came the hail in lumps like jagged respectfully declined the captain's offer to pebbles. Down, too, through the nighttake him as an apprentice when they got black sky shot a great lump of lightning, and back to England. A brown, shabby little sank like a seething mass of molten metal urchin was Jack when he reached home. into the black sea. Blue and pink and He was considerably ashamed of himself "yellow zigzags constantly scarred the sky, and as well as his shabiuiess, when his mother peal after peal came the awful, overlapping and sisters rushed out to meet him; but thunder. Tacks and sheets doubled like they seemed so proud of his brownness that whip-lashes; the fiercely flapping canvas Jack grew proud of it too, and bragged of made a thunder of its own ; the thick mainhis adventures, especially when he found that yard was snapped in the slings as you might he was not to go back to Elm House. break a lath across your knee. The Onyx He is rather apt to give himself airs when lay over so that it seemed impossible she nautical matters are discussed, on account could ever come up again. Woen Jack went of his extensive maritime experience ; but he up the weather-rigging-tauter than harphas never gone back to sea-as a sailor. strings-behind two of his old friends, to give a hand in shortening sail, his heart was RICHARD ROWS



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6 MARY AND KA TIE. was something to see!" When a Scarlet "What nonsense you do talk, Katie! I Admiral fluttered over the nettles in the ditch, really believe you're growing silly. If you Mary was pleased, and tried to catch it; but were a sheep, the butcher would kill you, she could not make out why little Katie called and perhaps you'd be put into those greasy out "Please dort! and to see Katie watchmutton pies. Wouldn't that be nice ? Little ing the flies, and the little burnished beetles girls should be seen and not heard. You crawling on the dock and plantain leaves, and should think before you speak. You're too "nasty weeds with nothting on them," and a fond of talking, Katie." "stupid old dusty donkey," that was standing It wasn't fair of Mary to say so, for she stock-still-except when it whisked its tail or talked twenty times as much as Katie; and if twitched its ears to get rid of the flies,-with Katie did not exactly think, she dreamt a its head down and a clog on, leaning against good deal before she spoke. One reason why the gate of the cornfield : watching things she spoke so little was because she did not like these "as if there was anything worth know how to talk about the things she was looking at" in them-to see this angered always thinking about in her way. sturdy little Mary, good-natured though she Mary's lecture made Katie's lips twitch was. and great tears come into her great eyes. "Oh, do come along, Katie," sh' said," Don't talk about putting me into mutton what fun is there sitting down here, do'ng pies as if you didn't care-I thought you'd nothing?" be sorrier to get rid of me than that, Mary," Katie could not tell her sister; she could sobbed poor little Katie, and she threw her only say she "liked it." arms round her sister and hugged her hard. "No, of course you can't tell me," anMary was vexed that she should have made swered Mary, triumphantly. "You're only Katie cry, and so she gave her a hug; but making pretence, because you think it's fine. Mary was so utterly puzzled to guess how it I heard Aunt Annie tell Mamma that if she was that she had made her sister cry that she didn't take care, she'd let you grow up into a was as much annoyed at Katie as she was at sentimental silly. She did-that's just what herself. "Now, do give over, Katie. It she said-I heard her. It made Mamma cry. isn't nice to be always crying, and for nothing Mamma said perhaps you'd never-but I too-it seems so silly." wasn't to tell you that. Big girls hear things So on they went, between the tall white they mustn't tell little girls. But Aunt Annie windmill, that was taking a holiday, on a said, 'Stuff and nonsense !'-so come along, mound on one side of the road, and the low, you little goose '" brown, old watermill, that was still at work, Katie wanted to sit down again in a place but in a very sleepy sort of fashion, on the where the hedgerow trees met overhead, other side of the road. On the top of the Some sheep that had got out of a meadow windmill steps sat a miller's man half asleep. through a gap in the fence were lying panting In the willow-fringed pond behind the wateron the chequered roadside turf. Another mill floated a pair of white swans, lazily sheep was standing in the gap motionless, as drifting or paddling to and fr'o. if it had gone to sleep whilst trying to make "Don't you like the country better than up its mind as to whether or not it should the streets?" asked Katie. play truant too. A clear little roadside runnel Oh, it's all very well for a change, but I made cool music as it ran over its smooth should soon get precious tired of the country stones and between its trembling grass-tufts. -everything's so quiet." Don't they look pretty ? cried little Katie, That's why it seems nice to me-there's meaning the sheep. no need to hurry. At home, sometimes, it They've no business out here," answered makes me feel as if I'd walked ever so many practical Mary; and she began to drive miles, and had ever so many more to walk, them back into the meadow, but soon dewhen I sit at the window and see the people sisted, saying, It's no use-they'd get out rushing along the streets." again as soon as we were gone. If I were a "There, you're talking nonsense again, farmer, I wouldn't have holes in my hedges." Katie. You can't feel tired sitting still, beThe sleepy sheep, however, had run back out cause other people are running about. But of the gap, and the others had run up the if you feel tired now, we'll go in here and sit lane, jostling one another in huddled bewilderdown." ment, as startled sheep generally do. They had come to the churchyard just Oh, Mary, you've spoilt it," said Katie, outside the village, and easily climbe. over reproachfully. "They did look so comfortthe low mossy wall. Mary seated herself on able-I was just thinking I should like to be one of the graves, but Katie sat down in the a sheep like that." grass beside it.



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84 GIACOMO AND PALLIDINA; OR, GIACOMO AND PALLIDINA; OR, THE ITALIAN BEGGARS. BY COUNTESS MARIE MONTEMERLI. II. "Hold your tongue, Giacomo," said Tonino; "this has happened to many beSO long a time passed without any tidings sides you-to me for one." of my father, that the rest of the Pallidina, who was standing by my side, beggars began to murmur. looked at me with an air of indignation: "Have you heard from Bastiano?" they "How can you cry like that? One might would ask. think you had lost everything on earth. No." Have you not got me 1 You see now that the "Are you quite sure it was to Lucca he holy angels did hear us, however, for since was going?" your father has left you, you will not have to "Yes, he told me so." go to Lucca, and we shall remain together." "He deceived thee, my child!" I did what I could to seem cheerful, but "That's impossible." with poor success. "-Did he leave his money and his clothes You are getting quite good for nothing," behind him ?" our companions would say; you don't bring He took some away with him, but he us in half that you used to do. The fact is, must have left some behind." you have grown too big and you are too "You may bid good-bye to your father, dull, you don't interest strangers, you only Giacomo, and consider yourself an orphan, look like a great gawky vagabond." for younwill never see him again." As maybe supposed, such remarks did not Such speecheq as these threw me into a raise my spirits. state of consternation that forbade my One evening on returning to go to bed I making any reply, but Pallidina whispered in found the door shut. My father must my ear: have come back !" thought I, and my heart "Don't cry, Momo, if he has been cruel beat so I could hardly breathe. I knocked enough to forsake you, you will still have gently-no answer. Then I knocked might the same Father as I, the one to whom and main, but still no answer. Terrified, I we pray night and morning, the Father in ran off to Teresa, who gave me a very unheaven." gracious reception. There was another disappearance, too, at I can't get in," I said. this time, which gave rise to a great deal of "And what brings you here? Do you talk among us. For several days Pietrina suppose I'm going to take a good-forhad not occupied her usual place at the door nothing like you in? oi the Duomo. It was supposed that she "Has my father returned, Teresa? Our or her child must be ill, and at length door is shut." Pallidina and I, who were really fond of You must be a fool, my boy, to suppose her, went to see what was wrong. Her that! Bastiano has not paid his rent; his neighbours told us that one evening, when landlord heard that he was gone, so he she had returned earlier than usual, they saw carried off the furniture and shut up the a man prowling about the yard, that the next room; and quite right he was, too." morning her attic was found empty, and that "Then I shall have no place to sleep in !" no one knew where she was. A great wonder that i there are plenty We carried back this fresh piece of news besides you who sleep in the streets." to Mother Teresa, who at once exclaimed Teresa's hardness prevented my shedding that to a dead certainty Pietrina had gone a tear. off to join my father. This was an inex"I am hungry," I said; I have had no pressible shock to me. supper." "And I-what is to become of me?" I "There is bread for thee-and now go off exclaimed. in God's name, and don't harass me." "You! you must take your chance! All that night I wandered through the That does not trouble them much. They streets of Pisa half frantic-I lay on the have cast thee off." parapet of the bridge, and felt so desolate "My father may, but Pietrina would never and miserable that once I was tempted to do such a thing," I replied, sobbing, drown myself, when, raising my eyes to



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I2 THE FRENCH DOLL. willing and very strong, a most useful adhesurely Mrs. Smith, and the governesses, and rent, and yet Rose did not want to offend I have not been rude." Ursula. Mimi flushed up to the forehead. If Amy leaves Mimi alone, you must do Pardon, Mademoiselle, but it is you I the same, Ursula. We can't have you sentithink of in this moment." mentalising with Mimi, and making her think My ears tingled; I began to think Rose's herself a victim, when she's only a spoiled, estimate had been near the truth: Mimi must, stuck-up doll." indeed, be stuck-up if she ventured to call Ursula cast a wistful look at the gap, but me rude. she was no match in strength for Amy, and What was I rude about, pray ?" I said she followed Rose. stiffly. At seventeen girls are a hard-hearted race, Mimi smiled. and now, though I was longing to comfort Ah, Mademoiselle is angry, but I must Mimi, I said to myself that it was too hot to tell the truth if she asks it. Well, then, stay indoors. Mademoiselle, I said to you, 'Good morning, "I can read Sintram' just as well in the Mees;' if I say this in France, a French summer-house." young lady of your age takes me in her arms But the summer-house was empty. I went and embraces me, and says to me so many on reading Sintram," but I was listening tender words; and you, Mademoiselle, you instead of trying to understand it. Presently make to me a little cold shake hands." I heard a sob; one of those deep-drawn I got red now. quivering sounds that thrills through you, Why, Mimi, I wanted to kiss you, and I and takes pain along with it. saw you push Amy away; I thought you Just outside, between the summer-house would push me away too." and a huge pollard-oak under which it stood, Mimi laughed merrily; the tears were not was Mimi. Her arms clasped the rough bark, dry on her cheeks, but she looked as blithe and her face was pressed against it. as a butterfly. She came close to me, and Maman! Maman !" that was all her looked searchingly into my face. little cry, and then the deep-drawn quivering Mademoiselle should have been more sob. wise. It is possible I never could like that Mimi." I touched her hand. She looked Amy should kiss me; she is greedy and round quickly, and showed me her great ugly, and she has such-oh, so untidy hands, dark eyes brimming with tears, and her poor with cuts, and scratches, and long nails little face puckered up with sorrow; only Ah!" Mimi shrugged her little shoulders just a glance-she buried her face again and with disgust. "But," she put her head on kept in her sobs. one side reflectively, if she had kissed What is it, Mimi?" I spoke in French. me for love, bon / I would still have let "Amy only means to be kind to you. Don't her do it, but it is quite different for amuseyou like to be kissed?" ment." Mimi did not answer, but she sobbed "But, Mimi," I argued, "how can you again, know whether people kiss you for love or The little English girls like to be kissed, not? and poor Amy thought she was being kind But-yes-yes-yes, Mademoiselle, it is to you. She kissed you as if you were her not possible to mistake. Mademoiselle herlittle sister." self is not very tall, and how would she like Mimi let go the tree; she turned round that a big fat woman should take her up and and faced me with great reproachful eyes. carry her like a doll, and kiss her hard at No, Mees, she kiss me like a doll-like pleasure? I cannot-I will not," she said a plaything." impetuously ; I will tell to Mrs. Smith that I was puzzled, so I waited, for Mimi's face I go home to-morrow." was full of indignation. You dear little thing." I stooped down I do not want to be a little English girl. and kissed the hot flushed cheek, and Mimi Papa said I was to become a little English nestled herself into my arms at once, and let girl at Mrs. Smith's, and I will not. I will me hug her like a baby. You don't undergo back. English girls are so unpolite-so stand English girls, darling," I said; they harsh; English people do not love each are full of love and affection, but they are other. No," she stamped her little foot, "I rough in showing it. Let them love you in will go back." their own way, Mimi, and you will soon be I began to understand, happy." But, Mimi, why do you say we are im" No-no." Mimi gave another quivering polite? The school-girls are perhaps, but sob, and nestled still closer in my arms.



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86 GIACOMO AND PALLIDINA; OR, Oh, I am so glad!" cried Pallidina; that Cicerone, and then we will return to see my way he is sure to stay on all his life." poor aunt." After duly thanking Mother Clotilde, I Where did your aunt keep her money?" said to Pallidina : inquired I with some anxiety. "Go and beg at the dairy-farms. I won't In her straw bed." have you any longer with Teresa, she is a Depend upon it the woman who laid her heartless creature." out will have taken it." "And what are you going to do?" Very likely, Momo, but I was too un"I have got to speak to several people," happy to think about that." replied I, with much importance. "I have When we returned we could not see Clobusiness on hand." tilde; she was in her coffin, and they were Do kiss me, then," returned she, "for I just going to carry her away. Pallidina's never was so happy in all my life as I am screams were heartrending, and I was in to-day." despair. The landlord came, looked all Our joy was of short duration. The very about, but could not find a penny; consenext morning I was awoke by Pallidina's cries. quently, he seized the poor furniture and CloHer aunt had died suddenly in the night. tilde's clothes to pay his rent, then closed It is impossible to describe my despair, for the door upon us,-and there we were in the my sister and I were now utterly forsaken. street. The evening before I had had hopes of Rich people may wonder at such heartfinding some work; I had trusted to being lessness, but the poor get accustomed to it, recommended by old Clotilde, who was very and are not so much pained by it as might respectable and well known to the priests: be supposed. After all, those who let their now I had no one to whom to refer for a rooms to beggars lose more than they gain, character, for I knew that if Teresa were and unless they acted thus they, too, would questioned she would say, "Little Giacomo, be ruined, and they are so accustomed to Bastiano's son, is a good-for-nothing fellow, hear wails and entreaties that they cease to His father is a vagabond, a stregone, and heed them. Ah, one must be poor oneself eloped with a young girl." to learn how hard some can be to the The neighbours ran off at once to the wretched, and how difficult it is now-a-days Curato to get Clotilde buried at the expense to excite pity. of the parish. All day long we remained I saw that henceforth we should have a crying in the room of the deceased; when struggle to live at all, for when we informed evening came, Pallidina was so unhappy and Teresa that Clotilde was dead,and that neither so afraid of staying with the old woman who Pallidina nor I had a roof over our heads, had come to lay her aunt out, that she and she put it to the band whether they were to I spent the night out of doors in praying undertake our support or not. There was a and crying, till, worn out, we both fell asleep discussion, and it was decided that we were side by side, with the sky for a covering and both too big to interest the charitable, and a stone for a pillow, that it was better to get rid of us ; conseAs I opened my eyes, Pallidina threw her quently, we were forbidden to return to the arms round my neck. Piazza. Knowing that Teresa never recon"Brother," she said, "I have no one but sidered a matter, I made no attempt to move you on earth ; promise never to forsake me." her, and merely said to Pallidina, My dear, I swear it !" was my reply. there is nothing for it but to go away." What are we to do ?" No one knows us elsewhere, and we shall "I had hoped to get some work, sister; die of hunger," said she, mournfully; then, now it will be very difficult. The best plan, after ashort silence,she smiled upinto myface: I think, will be to go and beg as before, with How foolish I am to be uneasy the good the rest." God is in other places besides the Piazza." "But now that your father is gone and my Yes, my sister, He is everywhere." aunt is dead, they have no longer any engage" However," she said, I won't go away ment with us." without speaking to Signor Carlino, the Cice"Well, then, we must beg on our own rone. I'll just see whether he is in the account. We have our friends who always church." Having found him, the poor little give to us." thing accosted him very humbly: You can't "And where shall we lodge? Not at my see it, sir, because I have no black to put aunt's, I should be too much frightened." on, but I am in mourning, my aunt is dead." Where we tan, then, Pallidina." What's all this, fig/io/a mia ?" was the To-day," she said, after a little thought, reply; I never knew thav you had an aunt." I shall go and speak to Signor Carlino, the No, sir, she never came here because



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___S___ ._ .^ ......-"MASTER EPHRAIM BINES, JUNIOR." Page 63. i-ac 3



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"ir THE LAST NEWS OF THE FAIRIES. fellow was William Butterfield. Besides, often He had gone to bed at his usual hour and often as he told the story, he never rose as usual, perfectly sober and "' altered it one bit." headed; climbing the steep ascent of "And he told it to you yourself?" moor with active feet, and noticing nothi Ay; I remember the day quite well. We in particular, except that it was a very were sitting on the bench outside the publicmidsummer morning, cool, grey, and si house door-he never went inside; he said for the sun was not up, and the only souiP all the beer in the world was not worth a glass along the hill-side was the cry of one solita' of the Wells waters. I was a boy, but a bigcuckoo in the distance; it being so early tha gish boy-old enough to like the company of no other birds were awake. my elders and betters, and I used to go about Butterfield thought he had made soie a good deal with this William Butterfield, mistake as to the hour; however, it mattered who had such a lot of queer stories to tell, little, so he went cheerfully on his way, and especially about his Wells, of which he was coming to the circular wall, drew his big' 1 very proud." key out of his pocket, trying to open the (Here I ought to explain that "the Wells" door. But there was something uncanny" are the principal feature of the village where about it; it refused to be unlocked-or rather John lives, which they are fast changing from the key turned round and round in the keya village into a flourishing town.) hole quite easily, but the door stuck fast. And it was at the Wells," John continued, As often as he tried to push it open, it was "that he saw, or fancied he saw, the fairies." pushed back again from inside; and he fan" Do tell me all about it," I asked eagerly; cied he heard within the enclosure a rushing and John told me. I wish I could give anyand a scrambling, as if of a troop of rabbits thing like the graphic words in which he did or rats, accompanied by a noise not unlike so; but as I cannot, I had better give it in children's laughter, only it was such very my own. shrill thin laughter, as if the children had The Wells were originally a moorland been tiny babies, except that new-born babies spring on the hill-side, supposed to have never laughed; which William Butterfield, some medicinal properties, but at any rate who had one of his own at home, was well producing an unlimited supply of very pure aware of. and delicious water. Over them is now At last, with one steady push, he forced erected a handsome building, and outside the door open, and then-what do you think there are benches where people may sit he saw? about and admire the view up and down the I repeat I do not expect you to believe the dale, one of the finest in Yorkshire. But in story, but he believed it, and kept firm in John's boyhood the Wells were left open to his belief as long as he lived. the sky-the spring being merely led into a All over the well, skimming on its surface reservoir, which was enclosed by a circular like water-spiders, or dipping into it as if they wall, eight feet high, and used as a sort of bath. were taking a bath, was a swarm of little This bath was entered by a small door, of people, the biggest of them not above eighwhich William Butterfield kept the key. It teen inches high ; yet they seemed perfect was his business to lock it up the last thing at human beings. They bathed with all their night, and go back to open it the first thing clothes on; and Butterfield noticed that they in the morning. He did this day after day, were dressed from head to foot in green-as and year after year, without seeing anything green as the colour of grasshoppers. There until one midsummer morning, was such a quantity of them, and they were I inquired particularly, and found out from so agile, and lively, and frolicsome, that he John without telling him the reason whyfelt he might as soon have tried to catch them the fact that it was upon midsummer mornas if they had been a swarm of may-flies or a ing, and just before dawn. Which was a shoal of minnows. He only stood and stared curious coincidence, as I am certain neither in mute amazement, though not exactly my friend John nor William Butterfield had afraid; indeed he was not the sort of young the slightest idea that St. John's Eve-or the man to be afraid. Only bad men are night before Midsummer-day-and the magic cowards, and Butterfield was a very good hour "between the night and the day," is, fellow in his way. according to all popular superstition, the So he stood and stared, he could hardly favourite time when the fairies are abroad, tell how long, for his tongue seemed frozen and disposed to make themselves visible, to the roof of his mouth. At last, with a William Butterfield got up that morning, very great effort, he called out, Hallo he declared, no more expecting to see anythere !" in his blunt Yorkshire way, it being thing "queer" than on any other morning, the only thing he could find to say.



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LIME'US AND PADDY. 9 told, Lime'us and Paddy liked being left back at little Paddy. Of course, all three alone for a little. They were used to it, had their usual week-day gambols on the under such circumstances; Towzer was there Monday, but they did not enjoy them half so to take care of them and the barge; and much as they had enjoyed their lazy strolls Carroty Sal, though she did leave her chilthe day before. All three were getting seridren-to boose with her husband at a publicously anxious. On Monday afternoon, when house-was mother enough to leave them Towzer was away on the nearest but still plenty to eat. There was a luscious scent of distant bridge, howling Come back, come new-made hay in the air, and Lime'us and back," the Squire's daughters chanced to Paddy and Towzer greatly enjoyed it. They stroll down to the waterside. They looked went to bed together in the little cabin, not with kindly but yet half-contemptuous comat all distressed by the non-appearance of passion at the lonely little barge children. the other members of the Betsy's ship-corThey were inhabitants of a far-off, lower pany. But when the clock of the village world to the Squire's daughters. The Squire's church had tolled two over the hushed coundaughters were inhabitants of a far-off, postry, Towzer, who had only been taking a sibly higher world to Lime'us and Paddy; "dog sleep," stretched himself, and finding and they returned the young ladies' stare with that his master and mistress had not returned, interest. jumped off the children's coverlet, and trotted Poor children, have not you any one to up, like a conscientious dog as he was, to look after you ?" asked the eldest girl. take his watch on deck. All day long on "There's Towzer," answered Lime'us sturSunday the father and mother stayed away; dily; and round-eyed Paddy snuggled up to but Lime'us and Paddy and Towzer did not her with a look that plainly said, If you're trouble themselves. They snuffed the scent a-goin' to hurt me, there's Towzer and of the new hay, they basked in the glorious Lime'us won't let you." Sunday sunshine, they took lazy strolls in "Are you hungry, my poor children?" the gentleman's waterside meadows; lying "No, we ain't," answered Lime'us. down every now and then on the yellow "But isn't there anything you want ?" bristles of the shorn grass, and in the cooler "We want feyther and mammy to come green, white and yellow flower-spangled, unback." shorn grass. They could not have told you Just then Towzer gave a yelp of delight, why they were less frisky on Sundays than and galloped off the bridge towards the vilon other days, but somehow they were, even lage. Presently Black Bill and Carroty Sal when Betsy was in motion. That Sunday as and the horse crossed the bridge, and came she lay at rest in the still green water, along the towing-path, with Towzer circling bristling with rushes, and plated with blosround them, and jumping up at their noses som-bossed broad water-lily leaves, they to express his pleasure at their return. The greatly enjoyed the peal of the village bells, big dog and the very disreputable-looking ringing out before morning and evening couple frightened the young ladies. They prayer; and so didTowzer. He understood retreated from the towing-path; but they as much about the meaning of church-bells turned round to watch the meeting between as Lime'us and Paddy. Poor little s6uls, feyther and mammy and their youngsters. they had never heard a prayer. There was so much pleasure on both sides, All three left on board Betsy enjoyed themthat the young ladies were astonished. Their selves all Sunday, and went to bed quite papa and mamma were much nicer-looking peacefully; but when they woke on Monday and nicer-behaved people than Black Bill and morning, and found the complement of.their Carroty Sal, but yet they could not rememcrew still missing, all three began to feel ber ever feeling, or seeming to feel, so pleased anxious. That was a new experience. Towat the sight of their parents after an absence, zer ran up and down the towing-path, yelpas Lime'us and Paddy did at the sight of ing; and little Paddy stared at Lime'us for theirs. The Squire's daughters went home an explanation, but Lime'us could only stare wondering. CHARLES CAMDEN. 9



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72 B USH NEIGHBO URS. whilst their houses were turned into little come. A little after nine the convict houseforts. In spite of all precautions, the bushservants went away to their huts, and Long rangers committed the most impudent robSteve carefully bolted the doors after them. beries, and though some of the gentlemenMrs. Daventry and Phcebe were persuaded settlers assisted the police in hunting the to go to bed. The garrison of three sat in robbers, no captures were made. silence-the Captain expecting every moment One afternoon, when Walter was in a to hear the police ride up; Long Steve and lonely part of his father's grant, a huge, Walter, on the other hand, dreading the arshaggy-bearded, roughly-clad fellow sprang rival of the bushrangers. About ten a party from behind a clump of trees, and seized of men were heard galloping up. "There him by the collar. The stranger's right they are!" cried the Captain, and before arm had no hand, but brandished a sharp Long Steve could stop him, he had opened hook, and Walter thought that his last hour the front door and run down to the gardenwas come. He was awfully frightened, but gate. "Why, What a time you've been, he tried not to seem so. Let me say my Saunders," the Captain shouted to the supprayers first," said Walter. posed police-sergeant. Hookrhanded Bill gave a grin which was "Have we?" growled back a gruff voice. even more hideous than his habitual frown, "Well, we'll try to make up for lost time, as he answered, "Time enough, youngster, you-!" I ain't a-goin' to kill you afore night. I Discovering his mistake, the Captain fired want you to take a message to your -his pistol at the speaker, and rushed back to father. He's a deal too cocky for my taste, the house. A hailstorm of lead soon rattled is the Captain, flogging his men, and lagging on the weatherboards, and Mrs. Daventry and his neighbours, and now he's been boasting Phoebe got up and rushed about like maniacs. that he'll take me dead or alive. Will he? The women's screams were not calculated We'll soon see who's master. I'll show him to improve the Captain and Long Steve's how much I care for his blowing. You aim, and though they had the advantage take him Hook-handed Bill's compliments, of cover, and Walter to load for them, and tell him that I give him fair warning and of the moon which came up prethat I mean to pay him a visit to-night, sently, seven to two are heavy odds. (The and to half flog the life out of him and overseer and assigned servants said next his sneak of a, bullock-driver, and then to morning that they had been sound asleep string 'em both up-an' you, too, you --one, indeed, had heard a little firing, but young spy!-an' to carry off the womenfolk thought that it was the Captain out duckhe's brought from -Old England to look shooting !) I am afraid that the besiegers down on their betters. There you be off, would have been the victors, had not a party youngster !" of the Captain's friends suddenly made their At first the Captain was inclined to treat appearance. They had been dining together the bushranger's threat as mere bravado, about ten miles off, and a drunken convict "However," he added, "if the rascal does had let out in their hearing the intended choose to come, he could not have consulted attack on Daventry Hall. They had inmy convenience better. The police are stantly rushed to horse, and galloped the ten coming over to-night, Walter, my boy. We miles at racing speed. The bushrangers meant to have given the bushrangers a hunt turned tail when the new-comers poured a to-morrow morning, but if they like to save volley into them. Five of the scoundrels, us the trouble, so much the better. Don't altogether, had been hit, but only one was say anything to your mamma, but go and call taken. When this prisoner was escorted to the Long Steve." nearest police-barracks next day, the reason The bullock-driver was firmly convinced of the constables' non-appearance at Daventry that Hook-handed Bill would keep his word, Hall the night before was discovered. and advised his master to begin his preparaThe escort were very much astonished to tions at once, in case the bushrangers should find no sentinel at the barrack-gates. They hear from some of their scouts of the intended were still more astonished to find the sergeant police-visit, and resolve to rush the house and his men lashed down on the mess-room before the arrival of the constables. Acfloor-all gagged, pinioned, and fettered. cordingly guns, pistols, ammunition, a sword, Hook-handed Bill had been fully aware of a cutlass, and a bayonet were got in readithe Captain's arrangements with the police, ness by the Captain -not that he really and had taken them by surprise in their lonely believed that there would be any use for them barracks before he despatched his insolent that night. The kitchen clock struck sevenmessage by Walter. eight-nine, and still the constables did not EDWARD HOWE.



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RUNNING A WAY TO SEA. 23 on and skimmed round the Onyx, like a flock ways miserable; no boy can be, however of dark-winged sea-birds; but he was obliged badly he is treated. Jack soon got his seato go ashore in one of them to buy a new legs, and grew proud of being able to go anchor and cable; and when the anchor had aloft without feeling at all funky. When Mr. been fished, the skipper relieved his feelings Croggan, as was often the case, had the sole by giving Jack a drubbing, for which he did command during the captain's watch, and not take the trouble to invent a reason, the drunken captain was snoring in his "Run up and shake out the main-royal, berth, Jack was safe. Mr. Croggan was as you lazy young whelp !" the skipper bellowed kind to him as he could be, and the good to Jack in the fair weather that followed the fellows, who happened to be all in the foul, as the Onyx stooddown Channel. Jack, captain's watch, wouldn't let the other men whose sea-sickness had passed, was delighted treat Jack as a football. Besides, the at the chance of getting something sailor-like savagest people cannot keep on being to do, but he had the vaguest idea of where savage for ever. They will let you alone and what the main-royal was; and because sometimes, because they cannot get any he hesitated, the skipper was going to lick fun out of plaguing you-especially if they see him again. The pilot, however, interposed, that you are beginning not to mind-and and gave Jack a dim notion of what he was that was how Jack began to feel after a bit. expected to do. He did not run up the rigAnd then he saw Madeira-a silver mist ging very nimbly-especially when he had no rising out of a golden sea; and porpoises rattlins to help him; he turned giddy every were harpooned, and dolphins grained, and now and then, and clutched the shrouds as if bonito hooked, and flapping sharks hauled he could not "run" or "shin" up another on board with a lump of pork down their foot: he fumbled sadly with the unfamiliar horrid horseshoe mouths, and flying-fish fell sail-fancying every moment that he was on deck; and Jack managed to get a taste going to be shaken off the yard like a rotten of them all; and as he ate, he thought pear; but still, as the pilot said, when Jack what a much more heroic personage he was came down) beginning at last to recover his (though he was kicked about like a dog) old opinion of his special aptitude for a than the fellows who used to lick him at sailor's life), his performance was "very fair Elm House, but who had not the pluck to for a beginning." Jack had expected louder run away from Saturday's "resurrection-pie." laud than that; he had thought that even Jack did not much relish crossing the the skipper would clap him on the back. Line, however. He was the only one on The skipper did clap him on the back-in a board the Onyx who had not crossed it very unpleasant manner-the next time he before, and the savage fellows made up for ran foul of Jack when the pilot was not by. their lack of other fun by taking it out of" The pilot was a very trifling check on the Jack extensively, and even the jolly fellows skipper's bad temper, but still Jack looked thought that he was fair game then. Jack ruefully on the boat that carried the pilot was lathered with unmentionable soap, the ashore, huge shaving-brush was dabbed into his When Eddystone's star had faded from mouth, the skin was rasped off his cheeks the sky, Jack began to think that he had and chin with a jagged bit of rusty iron been brought on board the Onyx simply to hoop, and then-up flew his heels, and he be tormented. With the rowdy portion of the was floundering in a tub of filthy water. crew, Jack was sharp enough to see, the And when he had scrambled out, in spite skipper wanted to curry favour. The first of the many hands that tried to keep his mate, too, he seemed to want to win overhead under, and was gasping for breath as and to be puzzled because Mr. Munnens did if he must shake to pieces, bucketful after not respond more cordially to his advances, bucketful of water was shot into his face to Mr. Croggan and the carpenter he snubbed, drive the breath out of him again. and the jolly fellows in the forecastle, who But Jack recovered his breath, and the lumwere far and away the best seamen in it, he bering, leaky old Onyx waddled on with him was so fond of bully-ragging," that even Mr. into the South Atlantic. He saw the Southern Munnens, well as he liked to hear any one Cross and the Magellan Clouds, and whales blown up, when he had not the chance of sending up silvery jets, and routing about in blowing anybody up himself, used to put in the waves like monstrously magnified pigs his oar on the other side, simply out of the in a monstrously magnified strawyard. He sympathy which every good seaman feels with pitched biscuit to the huge grey and white another good seaman when his seamanship is albatrosses when they leisurely folded their unjustly impugned, wide double-jointed wings in a calm, and You must not suppose that Jack was alswam up to the side like tame ducks.



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YARNS. 117 other side of the river it is rocky, with low faster to meet the increased strain. The cliffs here and there. We were anchored barque lay for a few seconds heaving up and pretty close inshore to protect the boats of down, when a huge sea lifted her under the the combined fleets when they went for Sampson's bowsprit, which broke loose from water, and from our mast-heads we could see the gammoning and bobstays, and for an far up the valley. Posted on commanding instant stood erect in the air; then, with a knolls were the Cossack videttes, while crash that could be heard even through the among the distant trees we sometimes saw fierceness of the blast, it fell back upon the troops moving to or from the farmhouses foremast: instantly the foremast fell back they occupied. Few ships condensed water between the two funnels upon the mainmast; at that time, and it was considered a wonderthe mainmast fell flat upon the mizenmast, ful discovery; the whole fleet got their water and the mizenmast fell over the stern: the by sending their boats to the Katcha. French barque, surging clear of the Sampson, The gale began in the forenoon, rising swept on before the blast, and met her doom steadily and rapidly, and soon one little on the rocks. But the Sampson held on merchant vessel after another broke adrift, safely to her anchors: though her decks were The French transports during the war were crowded with men, but one of her crew was mostly small, and several were with the fleet, injured, and some of the Frenchmen saved We watched one of them drag her anchor; their lives by scrambling on board of her. a second was let go and more cable veered; But now with a violent jerk both our own still she dragged dangerously close to another cables parted: the ship's head fell off inbrig; the furious howling wind swept sheets shore: three or four heavy seas rolled in over of spray over both ships, while captains and the forecastle, and dashed down the enginecrews danced and gesticulated as only room hatches. "Go ahead full speed!" Frenchmen could. Then came the smash, shouted the Captain: but the great cranks and in a moment both ships were drifting to remained motionless. Again was the order leeward with shattered spars and tattered given, and repeated below, but without sails. Nothing could be done to help them; result. And now the ship was indeed among in twenty minutes they struck at the foot the breakers, drifting every moment nearer of the low cliffs; in half an hour they were to the shoal water at the river's mouth: some complete wrecks. even took off coat and boots to be ready for Many of these small vessels met the same a swim, when at length slowly and uncerfate, and many lives were lost, but all the tainly the great wheels began to revolve, and men-of-war held on: the old sailing line-ofthe Black Cat to answer her helm. The battle ships had four anchors down, and their heavy seas we shipped penetrated to the hemp cables out. We're wiser than to use engine-room, which was soon knee-deep in hemp cables in these iron days, but at that water, but the engineers and stokers stood time every ship had one supplied to her, progallantly to their posts, even throwing the coal bably for the sake of auld lang syne." The on to the fires with their hands: still the steamflag-ship was the old Britannia, carrying gauge showed no rise: the water continued Admiral Dundas's flag, and she was curvetgaining on them, and at length threatened to ting to every sea with her four cables ahead extinguish the fires. At this moment, with as rigid as iron bars. That's not the same as great presence of mind, one of the engineers the new Britannia, where they dry-nurse the knelt down, and by main force lifted an iron young salts in Dartmouth Ocean. flooring-plate, so allowing the water to escape Meanwhile the steamers of the fleet had into the bilge: he saved the ship, and was got up steam, and were moving their engines rewarded by a step of promotion. slowly ahead to ease the strain on the cables. And now the great power of the Black We were anchored so close in-shore that as Cat's magnificent engines began to tell, as the gale increased and the sea rose we even against the force of that mighty hurriwere almost among the breakers, and now cane and those huge rollers her bows came and then a wave broke over the bows and slowly up to the wind, and she steamed out swept right aft along the quarter-deck. in the teeth of the furious gale. Abreast of us was anchored the Samnpson, a I was standing on the paddle-box with paddle-wheel frigate: presently we saw a the captain and master, when suddenly a sea French barque break from her anchors, and lifted from its bed the paddle-box boat I was drift down, broadside-on, athwart her hawse. leaning against, landing her a couple of feet Every moment we expected to see her part outwards, so as the wheel revolved the floats her cables : all hands came on deck; from struck the flaps of my monkey-jacket. I his station on the bridge Captain Lewis T. must have fallen into the wheel had not the Jones gave the order for the engines to move master caught me by the scruff of the neck





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THE ITALIAN BEGGARS. 77 "Are you never afraid that God may upon them. If you could know what a mind punish you, Bastiano?" sighed my mother. I have to burst out laughing when they call "For what? why should He? words do me Strcgone!" no harm: and there is no fear of the peasants My mother was silent-silent and pensive. revenging themselves ; I defy them, they never Before she put me to bed she always made me could know me again. I have my plaister say my prayers, and lit a good fire: "Warm over my eye, and I twist my mouth-you thyself, Giaconino mio; thou hast been so know how. My dear soul, if I did not cold all the day long." It was but a short frighten them, they would never give me a prayer that she taught me, and I still say it farthing." on waking and before falling asleep :-" My "That is true," acquiesced my mother. God, make me virtuous, gentle, patient; give "They are afraid of my casting a spell me health; give us our daily bread from the hand of such as take pity on us: whoever mother was brought to beg; my father, howthey be, rich or poor, good or bad, bless ever, used to say to herthem, I beseech Thee. I ask it in the name My poor Lucia, thou art so feeble; if and for the sake of our Lord Jesus Christ, there was hard work to do, thou never couldst Thy Divine Son. Blessed Virgin Mary, all stand it. It is best to go on as we do." Saints, all Angels, pray for us. Amen." We had no relations at Pisa, but a few Once in bed I soon fell asleep, my eyes neighbours came to see us. My mother had fixed to the last upon my mother, who sat a friend, a beggar like herself, named Teresa. there mending our clothes, while father sorted The priests knew her well, and often beseeds for the gardeners, stowed an alms upon her. I never knew how it came about that my "What will you make of the little lad?" i 4



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KEEPING THE "CORNUCOPIA." 107 with the principal newspapers; others were one finer than another, bound for somewhere scientific gentlemen from New York, sent out about the back of Kearney Street; Sippy to look after matters of science in the new himself limping along at the head, in a suit State; consequently, as the ship got ready to of black, with a white neckcloth, a silver sail, a variety of luggage began to come chain, and at the end of it, according to aboard, and from time to time amongst this report, his choice of various watches left in were two or three rather unadvisable-looking keeping. The understanding was that they packages. The captain, however, had always went to a kind of meeting among the coloured taken care to state in the most public manner people, where he did something in the way that nothing valuable could be received till of preaching. At all events, he was never the last. This was a matter in which I felt to be seen afloat on a Sunday, and the last equally concerned with any one else; as time I met him he took occasion to put in neither the crew nor the passengers were by a very fatherly reminder on that point. An any means got together, and delay was indignation-meeting of the Vigilance Conalways occurring to put off the time, while mittee of San Francisco was to be held out Captain Simmerall continued my engagement of town next day at the Mission Dolores, by the week, with the advantage always in when various startling facts were to be brought my favour if he sailed within it. His conforward. The appointment was for a Sunduct was so liberal throughout, that I could day, and this being told me by an acquaintance not well refuse ; moreover, it so happened in Sippy's hearing, it caused him to drop his that just at this time a movement had taken remark before we parted. place in San Francisco which put me conNext day the ship's steward did not wish paratively at ease as to any risk, taking the to go ashore till the afternoon; consequently due care we did. I was able to go to the indignation-meeting. The old black waterman, 'Possum Sippy, as There was very little new information given, he was called, used still to come across me except that a notorious villain named Sam occasionally when I was in the boat, after Whitaker had returned from the mines, and taking the Cornucopia in charge; and if bent been seen openly about town. He had previon any of his trapping excursions about ously escaped more than once from the rotten Yerba Buena island, or up-bay, he generally old jail, yetno step was being taken on the part passed our anchorage, whereupon he always of the Government to bring him to account. gave the ship a look to see whether I No new charge was brought against him, was visible. In that case he would lie on however; and for all that was known, he might his oars for a minute or so, and hail me, have made his pile at the diggings, and either saying something cheery or giving turned over a new leaf, as was often the good advice, though seldom in a way to be case. People were, therefore, in no mood ill taken. The accident of our each having to commence a disturbance on such grounds, a dog proved enough in itself to settle any when the state of things was so decidedly further advances on his part; King seem, improved ; and the rest of the business con ing to get more furious every time he sisted chiefly of stump speeches from a few saw 'Doiphus, as Sippy called his hunting discontented loafers, for the most part abuspoodle, which really looked fitter to be ing men of position in town because they hunted itself. I did not know till aftersupported the authorities. But this sort of wards that the worthy old black was conthing would not go down with the majority, sidered to be in such a good way, commerand accordingly I left the place much recially speaking. The skin-trade paid well, lieved. and he was thought to be no way particular I got on board in good time, and after the as to supplying the coloured boarding-houses steward had joined me, and we had made the and Chinese restaurants with game; besides usual arrangements, I went to sleep, more which a waterman's fares were high. Along comfortable in my mind than ordinary. Late with this, however, Sippy had the benefit of in the night I woke up, feeling the heat inthe slop-store kept by his family behind the side, and inclined to be restless. I at last wharf where he put up, where, as it turned rose, went out to a heap of sails at the door, out, they did a little in the lending and where the dog had made himself snug, and, pledging line. So far as could be seen, he drawing a corner of them about me, began never had much that was valuable in the to drop over again. It was so quiet that boat, except a curious old gold snuff-box every ripple told against the various craft at with his free-papers in the lid, and these he anchor; and away over on the Contra Costa was fonder of showing than advisable. But you could hear the wild coyotes on the hunt; on Sundays the whole family might be seen whilst any occasional noise in town coild be coming out in thorough nigger style, everymade out, down to the very bumping of a



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" WHAT THE WHOLE FAMILY SAID." See page 137.



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KEEPING THE "CORNUCOPIA? 105 fact they would actually carry off the lighted about a ship; I gave him the name of "King," candle before my eyes, or come down and and turned him loose on deck the same dip the oil out of the lamp with their tails; evening, as I required to go ashore. Having till between danger of fire and risk to myself, stayed a little later than usual on the strength I was on the point of throwing up the enof this, and coming alongside in the dusk, I gagement. The barque lay opposite Clark's could not get aboard for him myself; after Point, from which she used often to be about an hour's trial, it was all I could do to passed by one of the watermen plying there, scramble up the rigging and come down a curious character, well known at the time, naturally upon him, which he took in a and destined to cause a sensation in town quieter way. Subsequently King was all before long. This was an old wooden-legged I could wish; the rats were more than we black with a boat to match, half dingy and could manage, but they soon gave up running half canoe, whose wife and family kept a over us, and as to old Sippy offering to bring sort of nigger slop-store behind the wharf, his poodle aboard, the very sight of it in the combined, I believe, with a peltry and curioboat made King wild; whilst in regard to sity trade among coloured people in general. keeping ship, I could have left her safe with He came originally from New .Orleans, and him all night if I chose. commonly went by the name of 'Possum Not far off us was a large New York ship, Sippy, owing to an odd turn he had, at every the Cornucopia, fitting up for passengers chance, for what he chose to call fishing and home, and such return-freights as were got at hunting; his real name being, according to the time. She had a crew to get together himself, Mississippi Jones, though by the first besides-no very easy matter; meanwhile word he meant Scipio with a handle to it. He there was a regular ship-keeper, in addition had turned an eye in my direction, much more to whom the steward generally slept aboard, than I cared for; and somehow got an idea and occasionally the captain himself. Capof the barque's infested state. Indeed I had tain Simmerall was a thorough Southerner, a pretty shrewd notion already as to the kind very open-mannered and pleasant. He got of game he was in the habit of looking after, into the way of noticing me as he passed the He offered to come on board that very night barque, and more especially the dog seemed with suitable tackle and a special bait of his to draw his attention. I once or twice had own; he was also to bring his dog, a woolly an opportunity of obliging him by the use of white poodle, of the sort peculiar to negroes, my boat, after which he proposed to buy which always kept him company on such King at a handsome price if I would part occasions; promising to make a clean sweep with him, which I did not wish to do. My of the rats in the barque. I knew old Sippy notion was, after leaving the Quincey Adams, to be quite respectable ; the truth was, that to find a companion and try a settler's life a worthier man of his colour could not well over on the Contra Costa, towards the redbe found, or one with less impudence about woods, where money could be made by game him; though being well-to-do, and particufor the market. It was not long, however, larly fond of showing his free-papers, he was before Captain Simmerall surprised me by a little self-consequential at best. But in my the offer of an engagement to keep his ship position, I did not wish to get mixed up with for a week or two, after which she would him; accordingly, I put him off for the time, most probably sail. The man previously in and soon fell in with what I thought a lucky charge had finished his time, and gone to chance in the circumstances, some other employment in town; at the When in town shortly after, I heard from same time it did not always suit the captain an American acquaintance that a friend of to sleep aboard for company to his steward, his, a drayman, had bought a kangaroo-dog and he thought her rather too large for a from the crew of. an Australian ship on their single hand to take charge of in his absence. way to the mines, and wanted to get rid of She was just then hauling out to an anit at any price. He had forgotten to get its chorage half a mile off, opposite the island name, and was under the impression it was of Yerba Buena, in the line of the roadstead; going mad; in fact, he had it chained in his where little more would be required to get stable, where he seemed to have kept by her ready. Still the riggers or others would turns jobbing at it with a pitchfork, and be there all day, and as there was no cargo, flourishing at it with his whip. I went at all that was needed was to help the steward, once, saw the dog, and bought him; and a be regularly aboard before sundown, tend the splendid animal he was, about the biggest cable, look sharp as to fire, and know how to dog I ever saw, though as yet scarce fulluse the proper signals if required. grown. I at once took him on board, where The terms otherwise were the best I had he was quite at home, evidently knowing all yet been offered; I therefore did not hesitate



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168 ABOUT YAMAICA. it was too late for any hesitation about the tongue was dumb when I saw poor pale fate of the boots, and the lace frills of the little Jessie, who had been discovered, and little trousers and the skirt of her pelisse with some difficulty dug up. I remember were hopelessly splashed and muddy. We feeling bitterly convinced that she had not both felt quite reckless now, and I proposed grown in the least; she appeared to be weepto shovel in the loose earth, giving as a ing tears of mud, for my gardening had reason that plants required earth as well as splashed her face a good deal with earth, water to make them grow. In a wonderand her fast-falling tears melted it all. She fully short time I had really planted my was crying for the punishment which she poor little sister up to her shoulders, and knew would overtake me, much more than jumped upon the earth to press it in, just for her own misery and discomfort, and I as I had seen the gardener do. Jessie was certainly would have cried for myself if I wonderfully brave about it, and I encouraged could have foreseen that for three long days her by assurances of my belief in her being and nights I was to be locked up in a spare a little taller already. However, it promised dressing-room. Nurse came twice a day with to be rather a long process, and I felt too a large piece of bread and a jug of water, but restless to wait and watch; so, entreating her countenance was too awfu, for me to dare Jessie not to be afraid, but to be patient to speak to her. I was quite as miserable as and quiet, I gave her a kiss and went away. I deserved to be, and the only ray of comNo sooner had I lost sight of my victim fort I had was when Jessie managed to escape than all my courage vanished, and my trouand rush to my door, flinging herself down in blesome conscience began upbraiding me. I a perfect agony of grief outside it. We never was in such a dreadful mess myself that I had time for more than a word or two before did not dare to go near the front of the she was recaptured and carried off, but I house, but spent a dismal afternoon hiding heard with additional sorrow that she was behind the shrubs, afraid to go back to not supposed to be a bit taller, though she where Jessie was planted. At last nurse had been planted for three hours when she swooped down upon me, terrible in her was discovered and released. wrath, speechless with horror. Even my AUNT ANNIE'S STORY ABOUT JAMAICA. BY LADY BARKER. PART II. I HAVE no more pieces of naughtiness to puzzle to me how she could possibly rememrelate, for at the time this story begins ber the words of all her songs. Jessie and ten years had passed, and I had returned to I had one very decided taste in common, and Jamaica a tall young lady of sixteen. Jessie that was our great love of pets of all kinds, was, as you may remember, nearly two years especially of birds. Whilst we lived in younger; she had certainly grown taller, but England we never could sufficiently indulge was still only a little creature, with large dark this hobby, for the school-room maid rebelled eyes, which had a most beseeching look in against taking care of more than one cage of them, as if she was asking everybody to take canaries, so we were obliged to be satisfied care ot her. I have never seen any one with that; but when we returned to our with such beautiful hair: it was light brown, beautiful summer home in the mountains of and in such quantity, that when she was Jamaica, we collected a little zoological sitting on an ordinary chair to have it brushed, garden around us in a few months, and it is it touched the ground. She was always singabout these pets I am now going to tell you. ing, just like a bird; and it used to be a great I am sure you will like me to begin, as



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138 TWO STORIES played and lived; on the flat above them "It reads old memories out loud to me," dwelt another branch of the family. And said Godfather: and it seemed to little Marie here too were children, but they had slipped moreover as if many pictures showed themtheir leading strings, they were so big; one selves in the fire. But in the large carved son was seventeen, and another twenty; but bookcase close by stood the real books: one of them was very old indeed, said little and the one which Godfather read oftenest Marie: he was twenty-five, and engaged to he called the book of books; it was the be married. All of them were well off; had Bible. There was pictured the history of good parents, good clothes, good attainthe world, and all mankind; of the Creation, ments; and they knew their own minds, the Flood, the Kings, and the King of "Clear the way! down with the old hoardKings. ings!" said they: "a free look-out into the "All that has happened, and all that will wide world: that is the finest thing we know happen, is written in this book !" said Godof! Godfather is right; life is the most father. "So infinitely much in one single beautiful fairy tale of all!" book! Ay, and all that man has to pray Father and mother, both elderly people, for, is entered there, in the prayer 'Our (older than the children, naturally) said with Father.'" smiles on their lips, in their eyes, and in "It is the drop of mercy !" said Godtheir hearts, How young they are, the young father; "it is the pearl of comfort from God. folk things won't go on in the world just as It is laid as a gift on the child's cradle, is they fancy; still, they will go on 1 Life is a laid on the child's heart. Little child, keep wonderful, beautiful fairy tale!" it carefully! never lose it, however big thou Higher up-a little nearer the sky, as we mayest grow; and thou wilt not be forsaken say when people occupy the attics-lived on life's changeful way-it will beam bright Godfather. Old was he, and yet so young in within thee-and thou wilt never be lost." mind; always in good spirits. Many a long Godfather's eyes were brightened by it, till story could he tell. Far and wide had he they shone with joy; once in his years of been in the world, and from all the lands of youth they had wept, and "this, too, was the world were pretty tokens standing in his good," he said. "That was the time of trial: room. There were pictures from floor to then all looked dark: now I have sunshine ceiling, and some of the window-panes were within and around me. The older one grows of rea or yellow glass; if one looked through the clearer one sees, in adversity and prosthem, the whole world lay in sunshine, howperity, that Our Lord is in it all, that life is ever gray it might be outside. There were the most beautiful fairy tale : that this only green plants growing in a great glass case, He can give us, and that this goes on into and in a globe attached to it there were gold eternity !" fish swimming-they looked at one as if ther "It is beautiful to live!" said the little knew many things they would not talk about. Marie; so, too, said the small and big boys; There was a sweet smell of flowers here father and mother, the whole family, and always, even in the winter; and in winterchief of all Godfather: and he had expetime a great fire blazed on the hearth; it was rience; he was the oldest of them all; knew so amusing to sit looking into it, and to hear all stories: and he said, "Life is the most how it cracked and crackled, beautiful fairy tale." ~F~3~I



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LIME'US AND PADDY. 127 funny words by which they expressed their Paddy was as fond of Lime'us; he was even friendliness: your mamma, for instance, if inclined to think sometimes that his sister she was very pleased with papa, would scarcely was very nearly as clever as the dog. Poor show it by dabbing a wet mop into his mouth, little Lime'us had never been taught to read, and your papa, I suppose, if he wanted to no one had ever read to her, or told her show how much he admired mamma, would stories; and yet she could make up stories not call her "a rummy old gal," and drain that plump little Paddy, at any rate, a dirty bucket over her head);-but I am thought most wonderful. "There was very sorry to say that Mr. Black Bill and a snail, and the snail said, I want my breakMrs. Carroty Sal sometimes took more beer fast.' So the snail went along the towingthan was good for them, and gave one path t) find it, and he met a bee, and the another black eyes. Except on Saturday bee said, 'I'll give you a buttercup;' but the nights, when Betsy was stopping at a snail wouldn't have it: so the bee got angly, town, these fights did not often happen, and pushed him into the canal, and a fish and when they were over, husband and ate him up." It was brilliant inventions of wife did not bear any malice against each this kind that little Paddy listened to with other. Lime'us and Paddy did not like to see ears and eyes and mouth all wide open: these fights, but they got used to them, poor And Lime'us was so clever at make-believe, little things. "Come away, Paddy," Lime'us too. The children played at barge in the used to say; "feyther's goin' to pitch into barge, and public-house, and feyther pitching mammy;" and then sister and brother into mammy. Poor little souls, they meant would scramble to the bow of the barge, no harm, and were very happy over it all. and wait patiently there, playing with They slept together in the little smoky cabin, Towzer, and flinging straws, and little bits and went to sleep cuddling each other. They of coal, and so on, into the water, until got up in the morning for another day of the row in the smoky little cabin was over. love and play. Whenever the weather was When father and mother were sober (which at all fine they were almost as happy as the was generally the case), they were very kind day was long. Sometimes Black Bill would to the children in their way, and when give them a ride on the horse's back, or if "feyther and mammy" were drunk, they the barge stopped near a shallow place, the didn't hurt the children, because the children mother would tell them to take off their took care to crawl out of their reach; so clothes and have a splash; but for the most that Lime'us and Paddy loved Black Bill part they were left to amuse themselves as and Carroty Sal, but still considered Towzer they pleased. They and Towzer used tb a superior being. When he was in a rage have nice scampers on the towing-path, and they hadn't to run away from him. If the in the meadows beyond, too; chasing butterbarge had always had the same horse, perflies and bees and birds, and rabbits when haps that might have rivalled Towzer in they got the chance; and coming back laden their favour; but Betsy frequently changed with butttecups and daisies, wild hyacinths, horses in her long journeys. Sometimes primroses, and cowslips, big branches of white she had two horses trotting or straining may, and great bundles of white nettles, red along the towing-path; sometimes she had sorrel, and trembling quaker-grass. If Towno horse, but was poled along by Black zer had ever managed to catch a rabbit, Black Bill; sometimes she set a little bit of a Bill would not have scolded his children for sail on a little bit of a mast, and crept letting him. Black Bill had an old gun along about as fast as a snail, whilst Black hung up in the smoky little cabin, and if a Bill snored on his back on the tarpaulin, gamekeeper had smelt the savoury fumes and Carroty Sal peeled potatoes as she that sometimes came out of Carroty Sal's leaned, without her bonnet, against the black pot when the lid was taken off for tiller, playfully pitching the parings at her, dinner, I think he would have been anxious slumbering husband's nose. Towzer, Black to learn whether barge-owners made a point Bill, and Carroty Sal were Lime'us and of victualling their craft with partridges and Paddy's inner circle of acquaintances; the hares. If the children could not catch rabbargees, lock-keepers, and other canal bits, they sometin.es caught minnows and people with whom their parents intergudgeons, and now and then a perch that changed remarks, amicable and otherwise, had not arrived at years of discretion, with formed the, outer; but all persons beyond crooked pins tied on bits of string ; and when that they ignored, or looked at much as Carroty Sal was in a very good temper, she you might look at magic-lantern figures. would let them grill their fish, just as they I think I have said before that even better came out of the water, on her stove, and than Towzer Lime'us loved Paddy, and that they had a glorious feast ail to themselves-



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88 GIACOMO AND PALLIDINA; OR, faces after washing them at the fountain, and Stay, Pallidina," said I, with tears in my a large fish-bone with which we used to eyes. comb our hair. Yes, I know I must, Momo, for fear of My sister used to wash my shirt and her despising what God's providence sends," said own poor under-garment, and while so occushe, sobbing; and, besides, you know that pied had nothing on her fragile little form but it is a sin to refuse work when it is offered." her wretched ragged gown. It was summer"Don't cry, my children," said the miller's time; in the evenings I bathed in the Arno. wife. She brought us bread and a great jug Our food was bread, fruit, and a little Salame; of milk, gave me five pence, spoke kind in short, with God's help we did not die of words, and accompanied me to the highway hunger. Morning and evening we said our that I might not lose myself. A man was prayers, and recommended ourselves to the sitting at a house door. Wait a moment, Divine keeping. As we never dared return my boy," said the good woman: I am going to the Piazza in the daytime, we heard noto ask the schoolmaster to be so good as to thing more of Signor Carlino. write down our name and address on a slip One day I said to Pallidina, Will you of paper for you; you might forget the way." come to Lucca? Perhaps we shall find my Mute through very gratitude, inwardly blessfather there." ing God, the madonna, and the saints, I left How can we go so far?" she replied, my sister and her new mistress. "With begging and singing one can get to "Come back soon, Momo," cried Pallidina, Rome itself." at the turn of the road. I took one last look, Then let us set off, Momo;" and without then the trees hid her from me. I kissed my having a single soul to whom to say goodhand to her shadow; then, trembling all over, bye, without leaving behind us in the populous sat on the ground and burst into tears. town one heart that cared for us or missed us, Ashamed of my weakness, I am a man," we bent our steps towards the Lucca gate I cried. "I must work, work as Pallidina and found ourselves in the country, is going to do;" and with a strong effort I The country was almost new to us; we ate rose and ran without stopping from the hills the blackberries on the hedges, and enjoyed into the valley. ourselves thoroughly ; when we got to a farm, When I got to Lucca, I looked out for my Pallidina sang and I begged, father wherever beggars assembled, but no There is far more charity in country places one could give me any tidings of such a man. than in towns. The farmers would ask us Then summoning all my courage, I went to many questions, whence we came, where the police office and gave his name and dewe were going, and the good people could scription; but no one knew him; no one had hardly believe in our utterly forsaken conseen him. One of the policemen who helped dition. One day, among the hills between me in my search took an interest in my case, Pisa and Lucca, in a wooded spot, surrounded and placed me with a brother of his who by olives, vineyards, and chestnut-trees, we hired out hackney coaches-in the capacity of came upon a pretty brook, a small mill, and stable-boy. But first I asked and obtained the miller's cottage. leave to go and see my sister, and had the How I should like to live here !" cried comfort of finding that she suited the miller's Pallidina; and the words were hardly spoken wife, and was herself better off than the poor when out came the miller's wife with a baby child had ever been before. "Momo," she said, in her arms. Coming up to us she put the "if only you were with me, there would not questions to which we were now so used, and be a single thing for me to want." She was then, calling to her husband, said, Look, dressed in a blue cotton frock with a linen Lorenzo; this little girl is strong enough to apron, and had a handkerchief tied about clean the house, help me with the child, and her head. Never had I seen her look so take the cow to the field." neat or pretty. The mountain air had given Do take my brother too," implored Palher a colour, and her eyes shone like stars. lidina. The miller's wife kept me two days to No," said the good woman, he must go make me a little tidier in my dress; and once to Lucca to look after his father; but there is more I had to leave my sister. She came no reason you should have the journey. He alone with me as far as the high road. On will come and see you on his return. Just leaving I embraced her with my whole heart, now we have no need of but just such a young and she, standing under a tree garlanded girl as you; by the time he comes back we with vines, lingered there, sobbing and wishshall see whether you suit us and whether we ing me a good journey. suit you; if not, you can return to Pisa with I carried away her image in my heart, and your brother." all my thoughts remained with her. Whatever



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8 THE FRENCH DOLL. the sunshine only made the dark, lonely water seen that day-Mary was frightened, and she look more gloomy. A few rushes grew just was very frightened when she got out of bed at the edge, and a single white waterlily was and found that her sister did not know her, in blossom there, but most of the waterthough she was sure that Katie was awake. which looked very much like dusty ink-had She called up the farmer's wife, and when nothing growing in or moving on it. Katie she came to Katie with a light, she was so shuddered when she saw it. But presently she frightened that she called up one of the farmpicked up a pebble, and whispered to Mary, boys, and bade him put the bridle on the "Will you count ? Mary burst out laughing. pony, and go at full gallop to fetch the doctor, "Oh, you little silly And you that want to who lived six miles away. And when the pretend that you know about grown-up things. doctor came again in the morning, Katie was But I'll count, that will be some fun." so much worse that her mamma and papa Katie dropped in her stone, and half turning were sent for, and the next day Katie died. away her head, clung to Mary, who, with one After that the people about there believed arm round a \tree, hung over to count the more than ever in the Witch's Pool. But all bubbles. Here they come,-one-twothat the seven bubbles had to do with Katie's three--fourfive-six-seven-no-there's death on her seventh birthday, I think, was no more. Well, that is funny. If it had been this. She had been fevered and then sudto tell how old you were, instead of how old denly chilled before she got to the pool, and you will be when you die, it would have been was going to be ill anyhow; under these cirr just right. Your birthday's the day after tocumstances she saw the seven bubbles, and morrow, and you will be seven then, you as she was a morbidly impressionable little know. But that wasn't it, so, of course, it's girl, who had long brooded over the thought all nonsense. Fancy your dying the day after that she would die young, they made her to-morrow, and ever so much younger than illness worse. me, for I shall be nine next birthday-it's Mary told her mamma and .papa what perfectly ridiculous." Katie had said about the churchyard, and she That night when Mary and Katie were was buried there. Her little grave is just lying in their beds in their pretty little farmwhere she sat; and when Mary is at the farmhouse bedroom, where the roses tapped at house she sometimes goes to sit beside it, their old-fashioned .latticed window in the though Mary is still so practical that she morning to wake them, Katie began to talk, cannot quite "see the use of it." But I think just as Mary was going to sleep. it is of some use to her, at any rate. She "Do hold your tongue, Katie," said Mary; thinks of the little girl with whom she sat "I'm so tired, and it is such nonsense." there on that bright morning, and whom she But when Katie went on talking louder will never see again on earth; and thoughts than ever-a strange jumble about the of that kind are just the ones to do Mary Witch's Pool and every other place she had good. CHARLES CAMDEN. THE FRENCH DOLL. BY THE AUTHOR OF HESTER KIRTON." PART I. she said, "and it seems to me you are forin "M/ RS. SMITH'S is a very nice school, of children." I bowed. "Well then, you There are usually about twenty girls can be very kind if you will;-we expect a there, big and little, and sometimes quite new pupil to-day, a little French girl, and I grown-up young women are there for a time, am afraid the poor child will be so strange as parlour-boarders. The parlour-boarders do at first." not go into the class-rooms; they get private I was just seventeen, very intent on perlessons from the masters in their own study, fecting my education, and I thought it a I was in this study one day hard at work great infliction to be saddled with a troubleat a German exercise, when Mrs. Smith came some child. in. She looked worried. "Very well," I said; "I'll do what I can. "You have lived in France, Miss Tyrrel," But don't you think, Mrs. Smith, children ak;.



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54 TACKLING OLD 'EPRAIM. uttered a sound, with the exception of a no account of them, and asked nothing slight snuffle on his part, as if the smell of better than to tackle a real Ephraim, if such the match were not to his liking. At the it actually was, which he much doubted. same time he put up a claw like a tree-root, The surveyors on coming up, however, conat the end of a monstrous long foot, giving sidered I was in the right, and had done his muzzle a fretful kind of rub, whilst our quite properly; nor was it long before an eyes met. A most particularly wicked little incident occurred to turn the laugh altoone his was, as red as a live-coal; and not gether against Rufus himself. to speak of the great size of his head, there We had finished our measurements on the was something so peculiar about his colour, hill-ground without further trouble of the neither black, brown, grey, nor yet grizzly, sort, and had put in the last angle-post in but more of a steel-blue with a mildew over that direction; after which we were making it, that I kept perfectly quiet, not so much our way back to camp for the night. Rufus, as moving a hand to my loaded revolver, who was our under-axeman, missed some still less calling out to my companions bearticle or other belonging to him, and rehind. The lighted match, by the way, burnt turned to look for it near the post. He me to the quick without being felt at the overtook us again in a speechless state, time. between hurry and fright, without his hat, The bear was undoubtedly a grizzly, and and his red hair bristling like fire. By his a fullgrown one, but from what I heard account, when made out, he had seen a afterwards he must have been quite young. bear-cub of the most extraordinary size and Possibly he observed that the case was colour standing at the foot of the new-made similar in that respect on my side; at all mound, apparently gazing at the surveyevents he dropped on his tracks again, keeppost in astonishment. Before he got within ing uphill as before. By that time the men reach, it went close up, examined the could bo heard on their way up in the same Government hieroglyphics most carefully, direction, crashing through the bush and then gave a yell and proceeded to claw at laughing and talking like schoolboys. I the post as if resolved to have it up. On knew that if my friend Lettsom caught sight this Rufus was of course running in, he said, of the beast, he was sure to fire, and being to make short work with the creature; but one of the best shots among us, not likely hearing sounds desperately like more of the to miss; so to prevent accidents I sung out family on the way down, he concluded to at last. "'Ware snake-a rattler!" I hailed, come off for help. Billy's story was rather in a tone as like a whisper as circumstances salt in some respects, especially as he declared would allow; and that stopped all of them there must have been half-a-dozen of them at once. "Which way?" called Lettsom; coming down in Indian file; but if he could "don't lose sight of him-give us a chance!" be believed, the cub was neither of the black I did not soon forget the bear's style of nor the brown breed; and at that time of the thking this noise. He reared on end again, afternoon no one was inclined to go back and looking back at me, giving a low growl, and see. That there was some truth in the Misseeming to consider whether any affront was souri man's statement, appealed next mornmeant. In fact for a moment or two it was ing; for clawed down the angle-post was, doubtful if he would not come down like with marks in it which no ordinary bear thunder; but finding all quiet, he concluded could have made. A new post was put in, accordingly, and went off straight for the leaving further difficulties to be managed by redwoods, the first settler on the claim. Our subWheni the party joined me, all was safe; sequent duty lay back again on the level but my story was not by any means toward San Mateo, where we thought no well received. No sooner did they take more about such points. But we were not it in than they opened full cry against my to get off just so easily. behaviour in the matter; and the foremost Our special trouble on the low ground to disapprove was Fred Lettsom. Fred was, as formerly, with the wild Spanish had notions as to sport that might have done cattle. These long-horned, little, dingywell enough at home in Yorkshire, but would coloured savages were here worse than certainly have been inconvenient to carry ever, herding over the rich virgin pasture, through California; though his worst luck and ready to charge at all and sundry, if was not to come in that shape, poor fellow, not mounted, the survey appearing beyond Among the party was a lump of a red-haired all to rile them up. The flags on the Missouri lad, who rejoiced in the odd name measuring-pins set them fairly mad, and of Billy Rufus. He declared they saw so whoever chanced to wear a red shirt was, many b'ars of all sorts out west that he made particularly marked out, till at times they



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170 ABOUTJAMAICA. and the quiet which reigned during that time cate constitutions or else they were very was most remarkable, greedy, for they all died one after another We had also a cage full of love-birds, a sort from fits caused by over-eating themselves of parroquet which comes from Carthagena and swallowing their food in a hurry. One in South America; but though these pretty love-bird of a stronger digestion than the little things were very affectionate to each rest survived some months, but he also had a other and to us, I must confess they were daily fit in the middle of his dinner. I was rather stupid pets. They sat close together so accustomed at last to this performance, in pairs all day long, occasionally uttering a that it was quite a surprise to me one day to little chirrup and caressinr each other with observe him lying by the side of his little their tiny bills; but they either had very delisaucer longer than usual, and to find on a closer examination that he had shared the forming a frame for her figure, her dark hair fate of his brothers and sisters, twisted into a thick coronet round her head, Jessie's especial favourites among our birds with generally a wild flower stuck into it, her were her own white doves, and certainly they guitar with its-broad riband lying on her knee, were lovely creatures, so soft and snowy; and these white doves on her shoulder, listenperfectly tame, and never so happy as when ing apparently with great attention to her sweet nestling close to their beloved little mistress, voice crooning some quaint old ballad for the I have often thought since what a pretty picdelight of the younger children who were ture might have been made of Jessie, in her seated on the grass at her feet. These doves white dress, seated on the marble step of the met, however, with a most tragical fate, and I verandah, its arch festooned with creepers must tell you all about it.



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"1'CHESSY CHALK AND HER BABY." Set page 47.



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144 DAPPLE'S OPINIONS. DAPPLE'S OPINIONS. SMAY say without vanity that I am a very from my dignity. When a horse is stepping h ndsome horse. I am a grey, streaked out with his head up, he doesn't like to have and sl otted like a mackerel sky. Jim can it pulled right and left for no earthly reas on make my coat shine like a looking-glass except to make a lady believe that she's when he chooses to take the trouble; but taking care of the horse, instead of tlhe Jim is a lazy, sulky old fellow, and it is not horse taking care of her. If I were to often that he does me justice. When he is mind mistress's jerks, we should often be currycombing me he sisses at me as spitein the ditch, and running foul of every cart fully as a goose, and he stops every two we passed, and every turnpike gate we went minutes to grumble out, Blow greys, says through. And if I were to mind her whips, I-they take twice as much groomin' as and begin to canter or gallop when I'm other 'osses." But if other horses only get trotting along a good showy ten miles an half as much grooming as Jim generally gives hour, a nice screaming I should hear beme, I pity them. It does not matter so much hind the splash-board But I know that in my case, because I'm so good-looking, but she means no harm, and I'm proud of her all horses have not my natural advantages, and the children, and remember that master I do think that Jim is the only person behas trusted them to my honour, and so I longing to the place who isn't proud of me, bring them back all safe and sound. Still, and even Jim is proud of me sometimes, when a horse has done it all, it isn't quite Instead of giving a wrench or two at my pleasant for him to hear his mistress bragging mane and tail as if he wanted to pull them about her clever driving when she gets home. out by the roots, he'll brush and comb them Master understands it, though; so I don't till they look as silky as my mistress's hair, mind so much. As for Jim, he's a sneak, and he'll make my hoofs shine like master's and makes mistress believe that she's a boots, and rub me down and polish me up, wonderful whip to be able to drive a vicias I was saying, until you could almost see ous horse like me. "He is wicious, ma'am," your face in my coat. Jim says, "but he's too artful to show it It is twice as easy for Jim to get me to with you and the master." Of course, that "kim over" when he treats me with proper is because I sent Mr. Jim over my head respect. He has no need then to give me once, when he put the spurs into me; and rude slaps behind, and I don't feel inclined I'll do it again if he gives me the chance, then to turn round my head and pretend to but I'm afraid he never will. mistake his drab breeches for a bundle of However, if Jim is grumpy, I've three hay. At other times, especially when he is friends in the stable who properly appreciate stooping conveniently, I am often sorely me. They would be always with me if they tempted to do so. could, and one of them, Snap, the terrier, Sometimes master rides me, and sometimes almost always is. Master used to have a he drives me in the gig, and sometimes my plum-pudding" dog, but I never cared mistress drives me in the four-wheeler. It's much for him. He was a heavy dog, with when my.mistress is going to drive me, I've no fun in him. All he could do was to run noticed, that Jim takes most pains with me. behind the chaise, and yet, just because he Master often has to find fault because Jim was spotted all over, he was as proud as a has brought me round so rough and dusty, peacock. He seemed to think that I ought but mistress never has. I'm quite a swell to thank him for being allowed to look at horse then. I've silver-plated patent-leather him-the sleepy, sulky cur! I haven't the harness, and my mistress has white ends to least doubt that he thought his spots far her reins to keep her gloves clean, and she's handsomer than mine! What conceited very pretty, and so are the children, and animals there are in the world! they're all dressed very smart, so that it is But Snap is a very different kind'of dog. quite a swell turn-out altogether. He's full of fun-jumps up at my nose, and I should really enjoy being driven by my barks at my legs, when we're out togethermistress, for the chaise runs very light, and but still he is never wanting in real respect. she and the little ones don't make it much He knows that I belong to a superior class, heavier, if she wasn't quite so fond of sawing and behaves himself accordingly. You might my mouth, and flicking me with the whip. think that he was taking liberties with me She doesn't hurt me-she wouldn't, I know, sometimes, if you saw his funny ways. He for the world-but such behaviour detracts will jump up and worry my tail-but, bless



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KEEPING THE "CORNUCOPIA." III sheets. At this the sailor made no further I was situated, explained that he was redelay, but jumped in, and stepped forward quired ashore for an hour or so, and had to the bow. waited till he saw the skiff come out. While shoving off, I had to request the But he said it was all right, and not to put passenger to shift amidships, which he did. the brig's people about for all the difference, The skiff was then in good trim, and I sculled as one of the riggers had undertaken to turn readily in the slack water across the harbour, my dog loose if they left before I came. On after which I knew we should have the this I pushed ahead, trying more than one benefit of the young ebb. This began to of the other shore-boats. They did not care make a ripple outside; whereupon the about the job, however, or asked premium sailor, who had sat looking ahead, making fares paid down, which it was clear were not an occasional jokey remark to either of us, forthcoming; so that I had nothing for it, turned and said he might as well help a but to pass my own ship for the brig's bit. He then asked me to hand him along berth. As we did so, the riggers hailed me, the other oar, and if the gent amidships, as but I could not make out what they said; he called him, was not above pulling a little, and directly afterwards I heard King give perhaps he would take mine. No sooner tongue on deck as usual when let free, showdid I mention how the case stood, than it ing that the men had left on the up-stream was clear he could do nothing with the one side for harbour, but doubtless making the oar, and this somehow annoyed him unship quite safe. commonly. He appeared to get quite sober The noise the brig made was guidance suddenly, gave me a keen glance, and enough, as they were getting up anchor by stopped his talk, after looking about the that time, if not on the very point of tiding bottom of the boat to make sure. I had a off. I could not have said why, but a kind loose piece of tarpaulin in it, besides the of shiver ran through me at the idea of boat-hook and a stretcher, on which I used missing her; and next moment the man in sometimes to put it up by way of a lugsail, the boat's bow gave a meaning sort of cough, but not the least air was then stirring. On at which I saw the other turn his head tothe whole I felt by no means sorry at findwards him for the first time. The sailor then ing the matter entirely in my hands. told me to hold on and take it easy; they My attention had been drawn to the were going to be too late, he said. The younger of the two, who sat right before me young man hereupon bade him cut that in the glare off the bay before sundown; short, naming him in the clumsiest style. his back being to the other. What little What frightened me most was his calling him he had said was too husky or else too sulky Sam." I felt as sure that it was the nototo strike me; and though he kept turning rious Whitaker, as if they had told me straight his face towards the brig with her signal out. up, there was no mistaking despite of his "The short of it is, then," said he to me, digger's beard and hat, the look of his legs "never mind the Queen o' the South-the as he sat, in particular when cramped up. Cornycopay '11 suit quite as well." It was young Malloch to a certainty; in Young Malloch at this dropped all prefact he left no doubt on this point, bygiving tence, seeing I had recognised him. He a half-start at first full view of me opposite did not just face me, but his mate's black him, after which he shifted round as much as look was nothing to the cold-blooded exprespossible, with his hand up about his face. sion in that yellow half-breed eye of his. Startled as I felt for a moment it was evident "Oh cut that, can't ye?" he said again; he was unaware that I knew him. I was take the boat in hand yourself; drop both as anxious to be quit of the job as he could him and his infernal sculling and get through be; and finding the ebb begin to tell in with the thing. We'll have time to catch my favour, I now made the best of it. The the brig after," said he. various boats on their return for town had Whitaker fairly grinned as he looked round to head-up, which made it easy to cross from the boat to the dead calm on the water, them, or to drop down on the brig if none and back again; they would have gone adrift suited; and meanwhile I could see the Corto no purpose whatever without me. nucopia still busy with the riggers, allowing Harkee, boy," he told me with an offfull time either way. Scarce had we come hand leer, "you're in luck as well as ourin full view from her, when the foremost selves, though the gent here don't see it wherry was hailed off the ship's deck, and yet. I wouldn't have answered for ye otherthe steward with his companion, our steerwise," he said, "but as the case stands, just age-passenger, stepped into it. They met you scull round for the ship, do what you're us well out, and the steward finding how bid aboard of her, and you've got no more



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THE SWALLOW-WORY 139 THE SWALLOW-WORT. SPRING was returning to bless the earth. had told him of, he would come and live with The trees, flowers, and woods sung of her? Would not that be pleasant? But if his blessed advent, nature awoke to new life she should not find it? if the inhabitants of and vigour and was glad and gay. The the cottage had pulled it down? or, worse joyous news spread from throat to throat, and still, if she had forgotten the way? all successively took up the chorus. Its So our poor little swallow felt very nervous, sound flew across the sea, far, far away to and got more so the nearer she came to the sand deserts of Africa; it played round England, till at last her friend received such the head of the Sphinx, and its wondrous curt answers to all his questions and tender searching eyes appeared to read the glorious inquiries that he began to fear lest she were message and to relax somewhat from its stony angry with him or had changed her mind, imperturbability, and also grew dejected and sad. Still the tidings sped on, on, till they May I come with you ?" he asked reached the swallows who were passing the timidly, as they were all parting company. winter far from Europe's shores in Afric's If you like," she replied, and he followed sunny climes. They heard them gladly, and her rapid flight. At leng h she saw the grey carolled one simultaneous song of glee. roofs of her natal village and the copse where We will go home, go home," they warshe had so often sought for food; and there, bled. For the swallow, though it flies away yes, there was her own nest safe and sound as each 'autumn, holds Europe to be its home, she had left it when the vine-leaves among and loves its green wooded unlands better which it was hid were turning red and yellow. far than the sand-wastes of Egypc. Now they festooned around it with pale So they all made them ready to depart luscious green. from their winter quarters, and at a given Eagerly the swallow pounced down upon signal from the leader spread their large her home, and was about to enter it in great wings, lifted their forked tails, and flew away haste, when to her horror she found her paswith lightning speed. Over the desert, over sage obstructed. The nest was occupied. the heads of the palms where the giraffes A moment later, and a tiny sparrow sprung were lazily feeding, over the lairs of the lion out and demanded what was her business in and hyaena, over the gleaming sycamorehis house. fringed Nile, over Cairo's narrow streets and "Your house," gasped the enraged swalgilded minarets ; away, away. When they had low, your house indeed Pray, did you passed the vast heaving ocean, they rested build it ?" a while from their flight; and now began a No," answered the sparrow with cool ingreat chattering and leave-taking, for it was difference, but I've lived in it undisturbed here their various paths diverged: some went all the winter, and that is pretty much the to east, some to north, south; or west; new same thing. So you had better leave and leaders had to be chosen, old friends parted build yourself a new nest; and if you made from, and a happy reunion at the banks of this, I can only say I recommend you to the Nile to be wished, construct it on the same pattern, for this is Among these busy chatterers were a swarm very comfortable;" and so saying, the bird who had again to cross the sea as they were drew away his head from the little aperture, bound for England, where they had left their and disappeared. homes under many a thatched eave. and "As you will be busy building the next gabled roof, by many a barn or granary. Of few days," said the swallow's friend, who had this number was a swallow who was more -overheard the whole conversation, "why, anxious than all the rest to return, for she my dear, I fear I shall only be in your way. wished to seek the nest where she was born I won't offer to help you, for I hate work, and and that her mother had bequeathed to her my temper is not sweet when I am forced to as a dying legacy. For had not that very it. I will go for a short voyage, and if in its amiable young bird, who had been so attencourse I do not find a comfortable home, tive to her all the journey and shortened the perhaps I will return to share yours. Adieu, dulness of the voyage by his amusing anecmy love ; I am sorry such a little unpleasantdotes, promised that if she could find that ness should occur the first thing on your nest again which her mother had built under return." the thatched eaves of the vine-clad cottage, No, stay, stay," cried the unhappy swalshaded by the slim mountain-ash that she low. Was she to lose all, her home and





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THE FIRST ALMOND-TREE. 29 laws of hospitality. Returning thence a that the stranger would remain and wed the mighty storm arose, my comrades were all lovely queen. drowned, and I alone survive. Such, 0 So it came to pass indeed. And then queen, is all I have to tell." there dawned for Demophoon weeks of allPhyllis had listened attentively, her soft absorbing happiness. He thought of nought large eyes bent compassionately upon tLe but Phyllis; absent from her side he knew speaker. no pleasure, and she was equally glad in "The gods must love you, Demophoon," him. said she, even though Poseidon be not thy Dione," she said many and many a time, friend, for they have brought thee safely when her handmaiden was decking her proud unto our coasts. Wherefore behold in this beauty for the innumerable games and feasts a sign that thou hadst best remain among the marriage had called forth; "Dione, how us, nor think to regain thy native landwrong I was that night before the storm The Say, shall it not be so?" she continued, weight of an unknown event did oppress me, turning to the warriors. See, is he not stalbut what a joyous one it has proved I" wart and fair, and should he not remain and Alas! Phyllis had spoken too soon. become a Thracian hero ? When Demophoon had passed through the The men shouted Ay," because they saw first intoxicating effects of happiness, the their queen regarded the youth with favour; sense of duty awoke in him once more. He but many were secretly displeased and jeaknew he must return to seek out his father, lous at this marked p.eference shown for that he might reassure him of his safety. DUmophoon. In vain Phyllis sighed and entreated; in Yet he only shook his head sadly at the vain she called him cruel, harsh, unkind, to flattering speech. think of venturing once more on the dan"0 qu'een," he cried, tempt me no furgerous sea, leaving her sorrowing behind. ther to stay with you. To be the meanest Demophoon was firm this time. watcher in your house, and daily to see your "My beloved Phyllis, it must be,"he said; god-like countenance, would be joy indeed "this parting'is no less hard for me than for for mortal man. But duty recalls me to you. I shall return within a month's space. Athens: I am my father's only son, and heir I swear it, Phyllis, by the Styx and the to the throne of Attica. It were not well or eternal gods, whose aid and protection I right if I never went back; but if I may take implore." advantage of your proffered friendship, aid Weeping bitterly, Phyllis saw him depart, me in my return, and I shall for ever rememand watched his bark as it slipped from bet you and this land with gratitude." her view, feeling that her heart, her life, and "If you must go," said Phyllis, and her her joy went with it. Nothing diverted, brow clouded, my men shall fit the stoutest nothing consoled her. Vainly did Dione bark for you, and fifty of my best oars shall strike the lute ; in vain did her warriors perrow you to your native shores." form manly games. The only comfort she Next day, and the next, the storm still found was in Demophoon's oft-repeated proraged with unabated fury. and there was no mise that he would return at the expiration question as to the p ssibility of Demophoon's of a month. quitting Thrace. Meantime he had been conThe tender Phyllis counted the hours till stantly with the queen, who had done all he could be back. At last, at last, after weary in her power to make her guest's enforced waiting, the happy day was at I Ind. stay a pleasant one. Incessantly Phyllis ran to the shore, that A dangerously pleasant one it proved to she might be the first to spy the boat and the visitor, who when the sun shone out welcome her beloved on landing. She never brightly again, and the sea was once more for an instant doubted that he would come. calm, and they asked when it pleased him When night began to fall, and yet he had not to command the bark, felt that the image arrived, she would not credit that the day had of the lovely Phyllis had sunk deep, deep indeed ended without bringing him. Her into his heart, and that he could not bring eyes never closed that night; constantly she himself to leave her. thought to catch the sound ofoars, to distinHe made an idle excuse to rest yet another guish his voice, and ere day had well dawned day. The young queen perceived this, and the anxious queen was once more unquietly her heart leaped within her. Perchance she pacing the sea-shore. could retain him near her, after all. And Again this day did not bring him, nor the when the next day came, and yet the next, next, nor the next. and still Demophoon could not tear himself Phyllis grew distracted and lost all hope of away, it began to be tacitly understood by all his return. It was useless that her hand-



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CHESSY CHALK AND HER BABY. 49 and that a subscription should be got up when he didn't. Baby took a fancy to the for them before they landed in the strange poor fellow also, but manifested it so decountry to which they were bound. Little, monstratively that Master 'Dolphy, in spite if anything, came of the subscription. The of the sick man's remonstrances, was often iron was not hit whilst it was hot. And in sent away in charge of one of the volunteer a week or so scarcely any one gave the lonely nursemaids. When the sick man could no family a thought except Chessy. The mother longer get on deck, Chessy and her baby was a poor, shiftless creature. She was comstill visited him. The male passengers' "sick pletely stunned by her misfortune, and, if it bay" was quite in the forepart of the ship, had not been for Chessy, she would have and to get to it Chessy had to traverse the moped all day in bed, and her children part of the 'tween decks roamed over by would have come poorly off. But the first bison-hordes of wild bachelors; but Chessy visit Chessy and her baby paid in the mornwas not afraid of them, and she had no ing was to Mrs. Weston's berth, and,'Dolphy reason to be afraid. They would cease being consigned, pro tem., to the care of the swearing, and joking, and quarrelling when little Westons in turn, Chessy busied herself she went by, only stopping her to shake in putting, and rousing up Mrs. Weston to hands with the wonderful baby; and whilst help to put, the place and its inmates in she was in the sick bay, they would go on order. She messed with the Westons also, deck that she might not be disturbed and her management made their mess the whilst she was doing what she could both envy of the 'tween decks. Chessy had some to alleviate the poor fellow's sufferings private stores, but she did not confine them and to prepare him for his fast approachto her own mess. Every child on board was ing end. She was in the sick bay when her pensioner, and when people fell ill, the the sick man died, spasmodically clutching tasty little dishes which Chessy concocted for her hand in the belief that it was his them were far more highly appreciated than mother's. His big brother was too drunk the "medical comforts" dispensed by the to be with him then, but the news of the doctor. She would go and sit with women death suddenly sobered him. He swore tossing in their dark, close bunks, when that he would never get drunk again, and their husbands and children had left them that he would never forget Ch-'ssy's kindness. for the sake of the fresh air and bright The former part of his vow he forgot the sunshine to be enjoyed on deck. Somevery night after his brother's corpse had been times, as a special treat, she allowed her tilted into the sea. So long as it lay under patients to have a minute's peep at baby, its flag-pall upon the cover of the long-boat, brought down for the purpose by the everybody on board was strangely quiet; volunteer nurse who then had him in and for a minute or two after the long sailcharge. Chessy had her pick of nursecloth bundle with a rusty iron ring at the maids, and so she had of all kinds of bottom had suddenly shot, with a splash of servants. If the Westons had messed by silvery spray, into the blue, bright, heaving themselves, they would have had to wait on wave, there was a still deeper hush on board. themselves, in spite of the loud promises of And then every moment people began to help which they received off Plymouth. But speak louder, and laughed again, and did when Chessy became their cateress, there was everything that they had done before. But always some one anxious to get her mess's though the big brother did get drunk again water for her, draw its rations, and carry its that night, I do not think that, even when dishes to and from the galley. drunk, he forgot Chessy's kindness. One Chessy did not confine her Sister-of-Mercy night there was a fearful row in the single cares to her own sex. There was a poor men's quarters, and the big brother was the young fellow on board who was going out to worst of them all. The women and the Australia in a vain hope of escape from conquieter men were shaking in their shoes, for sumption. He had a brother with him, a it looked as if the big brother meant to huge healthy ruffian, who, nevertheless, was murder the man he had got down. People s.,metimes very kind to the sick man, but, were crying out "Shame," but Chessy did as a rule, left him pretty much to himself, something better than that. She handed Chessy was like a sister to this poor fellow, baby over to the charge of the nearest availAs long as he could get about, she helped able nurse, and made her way through tile him up and down the steep ladder that led throng of excited menfolk up to the two to the 'tween decks, and sat with him on fighters. Then she laid her little hand upon deck, making him as comfortable as she the two huge ones with which the big could, reading to him and talking to him brother was striving, in very cowardly when he liked it, and holding her tongue fashion, to throttle his antagonist on the 4



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YARNS. BY A YOUNG SEA-CAPTAIN. No. TII. A storm at sea has probably been oftener C RUISING with the Mediterranean Fleet, described than a calm, but in the days of before the Russian War, was very like sailing-ships a calm was sometimes quite as yachting: the Admiral's wife often accomvexatious; utterly unmanageable, the ponpanied him to sea in his flag-ship, where she derous old line-of-battle ships got into the had her drawing-room, her suite of private trough of the sea, and shipping water in at apartments, and better accommodation than the main-deck ports seemed as if they would many houses in Mayfair. The Admiral had roll bottom up : the sails that were set in the generally officers from other ships to dine with vain attempt to steady the ship, flapped and him, so whatever news there was circulated at bafged themselves to pieces against the his table. In calm weather, leave was somerigging, and every block and every rope times given for the officers of different ships chattered: the guns had to be secured as for to visit each other. Life had no particular a gale of wind. Sometimes two ships would object: European politics were stagnant: drift so dangerously close to each other that we were all in the placid enjoyment of full the boats of the Fleet had to be sent to tow pay: the Mediterranean command was rethem apart: and any little catspaw of wind garded as an easy and honourable berth for to give the ships steerage way was most some elderly gentleman who had well served welcome. his party, and was therefore supposed to In 1852 the Fleet consisted of five line-ofhave well served his country. There was a battle ships, and used to cruise with two or tacit understanding that the Admiralty would three frigates, and perhaps the same number not interfere with the Commander-in-chief it of paddle-wheel steamers: but the latter were he would not bother them for ships and men often under sail with their wheels disconand stores. nected, so we numbered about ten ships for And so these great wooden castles floated any evolutions or naval tactics. There was lazily about on the blue waters of the Medigenerally a certain amount of drill daily, terranean, anchoring for a week or two at regulated by signal from the flag-ship. A Athens, Smyrna, Gibraltar, or any place of day with a light steady breeze would be interest. If foul or light winds prolonged devoted to firing at a target: the ships spread our cruise, and the hay for the Admiral's -all over the horizon that each may have a cow began to run short, then it became clear area for practising. The targets are necessary that England should be informed made of a cask with a flag-staff driven into what had become of her Mediterranean the bung-hole: every ship sails round and Fleet: the signal is made to a steamer to round her own, blazing away broadside after get up steam to take dispatches to the broadside, shot, shell, shrapnel, grape, and nearest port; and a general signal announces canister, tearing up the foaming sea around. that an opportunity offers of sending letters When the ship is firing at long range and to England: the Admiral's steward, and rolling about, the cask has a very fair chance. probably a steward from every ship, goes on I have known it bob up and down unhurt in board, and as she steams away we envy the seething water all day, mockingly nodding them their trip. The next morning we watch its little red flag, but when brought on board for the smoke of the returning steamer, and in the evening it was pretty sure to show welcome the stewards, who are laden with traces of its late peril. Firing at a mark milk, butter, fresh meat and vegetables, and with pistols or rifles may be practised at any a newspaper or two. time : the target is usually a bottle (empty) I21





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THE ITALIAN BEGGARS. 83 not always pleasant. In summer-time the her inquiry, as soon as we met. At first I heat of the Piazza was insupportable. The thought I would keep my fears to myself,. glare of the sun on the marble palaces almost but she pressed me so that I ended by conblinded us. True we used always to seek fiding to her my misery at the prospect of out a shady place for our siesta, but still having soon to go away. many of us had sore eyes; and then so "Oh, that will never be," said she; then, few people came in summer-it was our taking me by the hand, "Come along, we dead season. will go and perform a novena to our guardian For some time back Pietrina used to talk angels, in order that they may never separate a good deal with my father of an evening, us;" and, hurrying into the church, we at and I often noticed her cry. Mother Teresa once began our novena. Never before had and Tonino would laugh and say, "The I prayed with such fervour. widower is teasing Pietrina. It is four years Our novena was over, and my father had now since La Lucia died: no wonder he not returned. We begged a penny of Teresa begins to forget her." to get a taper to light before the altar of the "But Pietrina is married," I ventured to Blessed Virgin. Teresa was not generous, put in. and this request put her out of temper, but "And where is her husband?" sneered they. she did not dare to refuse us. "You are very knowing if you find him." Do you know, Pallidina, that my father "Perhaps he is dead." staying away so long makes me think he is Oh, to be sure, it looks like it! Perhaps," settling down at Lucca, and will soon be maliciously added Mother Teresa, "he has back to fetch me?" never been alive!" "I have prayed too much to the good Years passed rapidly away. Pietrina's God, to Our Lord and his Blessed Mother, little one was about three, and I eleven, and to all saints and angels, for that to One morning I had indeed a surprise, for happen," said Pallidina, with a confident my father not only did not put on his air. "And do you suppose Our Lady did plaister, but washed himself, combed his not see the taper we burnt before her this hair, brought out of a chest a white shirt, a morning, and that she will not entreat her jacket, and brown velveteen trousers, dressed Son for us ? For my part, I feel quite at ease." himself very neatly, went out, and returned The child's faith revived mine. So long as with his beard shaved off. Then he gathered I was with her, I too believed that nothing all his money together, filled a bag with his could separate us ; but when Mother clothes, and said, I shall be away for a few Teresa, after making my soup (of which days, Giacomo. I am going to Lucca to she ate half herself), went away and left me seek for work; if I succeed in finding any, alone in my wretched room, I would burst you will come there to me." I did not into tears. I used constantly to fancy that answer him; he kissed me, a thing he never I heard my father turning the key in the did, and went off. The idea of having to door, and to wake with a start, thinking leave Pallidina made me cry frantically, that I heard him say, Get up, Momo, "What is it, Momo ? what ails thee ?" was and let us be off to Lucca." Continued on next page.



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154 URSULA SWA YNEE'S TROUBLE. "Good-night, Ursula;" her father held Swaynes did not; they were very loving her hand a minute when she went to kiss people, and but for Ursula's provoking him-" but if you don't keep your tongue in tongue the peace of the household would better order, you must go to boarding-school. probably have been unruffled. Besides, next I can't allow disrespect." day was Sunday, and Mr. and Mrs. Swayne Little Fanny slept in the same bed with made Sunday a very happy day with their Ursula, but Fanny went up-stairs first, and children. It was a holyday in the true sense was sound asleep before her sister reached of the word; a day of joy and gladness, not her bedroom. of sad restraint. The children gathered noseHer father's words had frightened Ursula, gays from their little gardens for their mother; but they had not softened her pride, then came church, and after dinner amusing She was too full of restless troubled story-books or a walk with papa; or else, thoughts to go to sleep, perhaps, they played in the garden, or sat It doesn't matter what I do," she said to quietly there while their mother read aloud. herself, nestling her dark brown curls into Then came tea, and papa never was so the pillow; I'm sure to be scolded. I amusing as at Sunday tea-time; and then the wonder if I shall always be scolded and great treat of the day, when all who were old found fault with even when I'm a woman like enough went to evening church. mamma; but then, grown-up people don't Monday, too, went smoothly with Ursula, say insolent things, and they are always right; but on Tuesday Mrs. Swayne met Mrs. so I suppose the rightness comes of its own Smith, and asked how her little girl got on accord." There was some comfort in this with Monsieur Jeanneton. reflection, but it did not last. Her thoughts On Wednesday, just as Ursula was starting soon went on again. I used to think it off for her French lesson, her mother called was only at home I got scolded, because the her into the dining-room. boys make me cross. I know I'm cross, Lully, I want you to be very respectful and then the words slip out without my to your French master." knowing. Oh, I wish I wasn't cross!" and Respectful! Mamma, who says I'm not then came a deep sigh. But it was not a respectful?" pleasant reflection to stop at, so the little Mrs. Swayne only looked gravely at her agile brain travelled on. But I never get little daughter. scolded at home lessons, unless I ask Miss Ursula's head drooped; her heart was Grey too many questions. Mamma always telling her already that it was worse to be looks pleased if she comes in the room when rude to her mother than to Monsieur JeanI'm saying my lessons. I'm so glad when neton, and it was rude to answer in that way; she comes. Then why does Monsieur Jeanbut she was not going to own her fault. She neton dislike me ? At first he seemed to me waited a minute, and then, as her mother to be a genius-a hero of cleverness; and continued silent, she hurried off to Mrs. I care for cleverness more than anything. Smith's. If Willie and Fred cared more for cleverness, There were two faults in her exercise, and we should not quarrel, and they wouldn't call three in her dictation. Ursula's cheeks me Minerva' and a walking dictionary.: burned, and as she looked up she saw Mary It's shameful of them; just because I like smile at one of the other girls. She stretched lessons. Boys are so idle; they don't stick to out her hand impatiently for the dictionary things as girls do. Perhaps Monsieur Jeanto correct her misspelt words, and upset the neton's like them? Doesn't he like cleverinkstand. ness? and is that why he praises Mary, and "Ah, Mees Ursule," said the Professor, in excuses her faults? Perhaps if I were always his suave polite voice, it is pity you are mumchance when he speaks to me, and never maladroite. Why do you not help ?" for asked questions, he would praise me too. Ursula stood with wide eyes and mouth Oh, if he would only praise-" gazing at the black stream on the table. Here she fell asleep, but broken sobs told Thank you, Mees Mary," he said, as the her mother when she came to give a last look self-possessed, neat-handed Mary Halket at her little girls that Ursula's trouble had wiped up the ink and set the books in their not left her. She kissed her, and then, places; a young lady should always be kneeling down beside the bed, prayed for careful and graceful. Awkwardness is not help and guidance for herself and Ursula. pardonable in a woman." But Ursula's was an elastic nature, and Ursula shrugged her shoulders. She was when she came down-stairs next morning, she deeply mortified, and the effort to hide it looked so bright that no one could have made her manner still more harsh. remembered yesterday's trouble. Plainly the "Am I to read now?"



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"Iz V"-