• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Preface
 Main
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Cock Robin
Title: Aunt Louisa's welcome visitor
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00026194/00001
 Material Information
Title: Aunt Louisa's welcome visitor comprising, The birthday party, Children's lullabies, The courtship, marriage, death and burial of Cock Robin, The king, queen, and knave of hearts
Uniform Title: Cock Robin
Alternate Title: Welcome visitor
Birthday party
Children's lullabies
King, queen, and knave of hearts
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : col. ill. ; 27 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Valentine, L ( Laura ), d. 1899
Kronheim, J. M ( Joseph Martin ), 1810-1896 ( Printer of plates )
Frederick Warne and Co ( Publisher )
Scribner, Welford & Co. ( Publisher )
Publisher: Frederick Warne and Co.
Scribner, Welford, Co.
Place of Publication: London
New York
Publication Date: 1871
Copyright Date: 1871
 Subjects
Subject: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1871   ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes -- 1871   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1871
Genre: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes   ( rbgenr )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
General Note: Date from inscription.
General Note: Alternate leaves are blank.
Statement of Responsibility: with twenty-four pages of illustrations printed in colours by Kronheim.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00026194
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAB8944
notis - ALG2939
oclc - 58045752
alephbibnum - 002222693

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Frontispiece
        Page 4
    Title Page
        Page 5
    Preface
        Page 6
    Main
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
    Back Cover
        Page 54
        Page 55
    Spine
        Page 56
Full Text









































































The Balduin libr.ro

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AUNT LOUISA'S


WELCOME


VI


S


ITOR.


COMPRISING
THE BIRTHDAY PARTY. I CHILDREN'S LULLABIES.
THE COURTSHIP, 'MARRIAGE, DEATH, AND BURIAL OF
COCK ROBIN.
THE KING, QUEEN, AND KNAVE OF HEARTS.

WITH
TWENTY-FOUR PAGES OF ILLUSTRATIONS,


finut in gaiwm -


FRED


LONDON:
ERICK WAR N E AND CO.,
BEDFORD STREET, COVENT GARDEN.
NEW YORK: SCRIBNER, WELFORD, AND CO.


irgjoanjmm













PREFACE.



ONCE more the Publishers offer a new Picture Book to their little friends.
"A Birthday Party in reality is always pleasant; it is hoped that
the account of one may be so too. Every child who has a baby brother or
sister will be glad for its sake to have the dear old "Lullabies" that were
sung beside Mamma's own cradle long ago. The story of Cock Robin is
always afavourite, and comes to them now with pictures quite new and pretty,
while, lest his death should make the little ones too sad, the book ends with
the funny story of how the King and Queen of Hearts were teazed by the
naughty Knave. With so much variety to offer, the Publishers hope that
AUNT LOUISA will trove a WELCOME VISITOR."


-London, Bedford Street, Covent Garden.




I1
















THE BIRTHDAY PARTY.






IT is May Cecil's birthday, and good
kind Mamma
Has a gift for her darling, and so has
Papa;


And


to-add to her pleasure another
delight,


She will


"Oh,


have a grand


ball for her


playmates to-night.
Mamma, what a dear
cried glad little May;


doll 1"


"It is her birthday too,
quite new to-day;


And,


for she's


Papa, what sweet flowers,
how fragrant and bright I


For my bouquet, of course,


for the


party to-night."
Then she kissed them, and thanked
them, and fluttered away


To sh


Low Nurse her flc
with Dolly to play.


)wers, and






N0


V


the.


guests


are arriving;


May mimics Mamma,


As she grasps her grand
the gift of Papa,


bouquet,


While four-year-old Fanny,
her cousin, John Hay,


Wish


their friend "Many
returns of the day."


happy


And


behind them come all the
young children from Leigh,


Ada proud of her fan;
you see;


Harry shy, as


And


so many


more


guests


May's


party attended,
The child was quite glad when the
greetings were ended,
Tea and coffee brought in, and the
games well begun,
And all shyness forgotten in laugh-
ter and fun.


and





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TDfY-AN D-BYE


from


the ball-


room they hear a glad sound,


dance


music


begins;


off the


And


little ones bound,
Mamma, and Aunt
patient and kind,


Helen,


For each shy boy
partner find.


Cousin


Very


and


girl a good


Arthur himself though


quite twenty years old-
busy in helping them all, they
behold;


While


Aunt Sophy da
small Baby Annie,


nces


with


And


Harold rejoices to gallop with


Fanny.
The glad music rings out, and they
dance with fresh glee,
And merrier children there scarcely
can be.


The


so


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ILY GREY gallops well;
Katie, in blue,
Is most gracefully dancing
young Cousin Hugh;
Johnny Howard, who thinks
self quite a young man,
Is pretending to flirt with the
with a fan;


little

with


him-

child


And George Noble is telling the two
little Fords
Of the grand game of cricket
they're playing at Lord's.


Good


humour


and


kindness


seen everywhere,
And bright smiles wreath the lips
of each happy child there.
Through the course of your lives,
children dear, you will find,


That


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happiness waits on the good
and the kind.


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NO


the supper is


ready,


the


tables are spread


With rich cakes, creams, and jellies,
and wines, white and red,
With ripe fruit and blanc-manges,
with custards and ice;


With


sweetmeats


and crackers,


and everything nice.


With


gay smiles and bright glances
the guests gather round,


And fun, frolic, and mirth at
table abound.


each


They


drink health


to May


Cecil;


next crackers they pull;


Plates very soon emptied were soon
again full;
Strange mixtures were eaten, both
in earnest and fun:


Cracker


mottoes


amused


them


when supper was done.


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BUT, alas, all our pleasure must
finish at last


Soon 1


the hours of May's birt
will sleep with the past,


hday


For the carriages come,
byes must be said;


and


good-


It is time for the dancers to go home
to bed.
The cloaking and shawling's begun
in the hall:


Little Amy is helped
brother Paul;


by


her kind


And the dear little people all kissed
and thanked May


For the pleasure they'd


had on her


happy birthday.
And Mary Bell whispered, "Indeed,
May, my dear,
I wish that your birthday would
come tWvice a year !"

























CHILDREN'S LULLABIES.








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Hush-a-bye, a Baa Lamb,

Hush-a-bye, a milk Cow;

You shall have a little stick

To beat the naughty Bow-wow.



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Dance to your


Daddy,


my


little


Baby,


Dance to your


Daddy,


my


little


Lamb.


You shall have a fishy in


a little


dishy-


shall


have a fishy when the


boat comes in.


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Oh, slumber my darling I thy sire
is a Knight;

Thy Mother a lady, so lovely and
bright;

And the hills and the dales, and
the tow'rs which we see,

They all shall belong, my dear
Baby, to thee.


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Rock-a-bye,


Baby,


thy


cradle


green,


Father's


a Nobleman, Mother's a


Queen,

Bessie's a Lady, and wears a gold
ring;


And


Johnnie's


a Drummer,


drums for the King.


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Dance, little Baby, dance up high I

Never mind, Baby, Mother is by;

Crow and caper, caper and crow;

There, little Baby, there you go I





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Hush-a-bye, Baby, on the tree-
top,
When the wind blows the cradle
will rock;

When the bough bends, the cradle
will fall,-

Down will come Baby, bough,
cradle and all.















THE COURTSHIP, MARRIAGE,
DEATH AND BURIAL
OF
COCK ROBIN.





THE


COURTSHIP, MARRIAGE, DEATH AND BURIAL
OF
COCK ROBIN.
ORIGINAL ILLUSTRATIONS BY HENRY STANDARD.


IT was on a merry time,
When Jenny Wren was young,
So neatly as she danced,
And so sweetly as she sung,-
Robin Redbreast lost his heart:
He was a gallant bird;
He doffed his hat to Jenny,
And thus to her he said:

"My dearest Jenny Wren,
If you will but be mine,
You shall dine on cberry-pie,
And drink nice currant-wine.
I '11 dress you like a Goldfinch,
Or like a Peacock gay;
So, if you'll have me, Jenny,
Let us appoint the day."

Jenny blushed behind her fan,
And thus declared her mind:
"Then let it be to-morrow, Bob:
I take your offer kind.
Cherry-pie is very good,
So is currant-wine,
But I '11 wear my russet gown,
And never dress too fine."






























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Robin rose up early,
At the break of day;
He flew to Jenny Wren's house,
To sing a roundelay.
He met the Cock and Hen,
And bade the Cock declare
This was his wedding-day
With Jenny Wren the fair.

The Cock then blew his horn,
To let the neighbours know
This was Robin's wedding-day,
And they might see the show.
And first came Parson Rook,
With his spectacles and band;
And one of Mother Hubbard's books
He held within his hand.

Then followed him the Lark,
For he could sweetly sing;
And he was to be the clerk
At Cock Robin's wedding.
The Goldfinch came on next,
To give away the bride;
The Linnet, being bridesmaid,
Walked by Jenny's side;

The Bullfinch walked by Robin,
And thus to him did say,
" Pray, mark, friend Robin Redbreast,
That Goldfinch dressed so gay;
What though her gay apparel
Becomes her very well ?
Yet Jenny's modest dress and look
Must bear away the bell."









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Then came the bride and bridegroom;
Quite plainly was she dressed,
And blushed so much, her cheeks were
As red as Robin's breast.
But Robin cheered her up;
My pretty Jen," said he,
"We're going to be married,
And happy we shall be."

" Oh, then," says Parson Rook,
"Who gives this maid away?"
"I do," says the Goldfinch,
"And her fortune I will pay."
"And will you have her, Robin,
To be your wedded wife ?"
"Yes, I will'" says Robin,
"And love her all my life !"

"And you will have him, Jenny,
Your husband now to be ?"
"Yes, I will," says Jenny,
"And love him heartily!"
Then on her finger fair
Cock Robin put the ring;
" You're married now," says Parson Rook:
While aloud the Lark did sing.

The birds were asked to dine-
Not Jenny's friends alone,
But every pretty songster
That had Cock Robin known.
They had a cherry-pie,
Besides some currant-wine,
And every guest brought something,
That sumptuous they might dine.












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Now they all sat or stood,
To eat and to drink;
And every one said what
He happened to think.
Then each took a bumper,
And drank to the pair,
Cock Robin the bridegroom,
And Jenny the fair.

The dinner things removed,
They all began to sing;
And soon they made the place
Near a mile round to ring.
The concert it was fine,
And every bird tried
Who best should sing for Robin
And Jenny Wren the bride.

When in came the Cuckoo,
And made a great rout;
He caught hold of Jenny,
And pulled her about.
Cock Robin was angry,
And so was the Sparrow,
Who fetched in a hurry
His bow and his arrow.

His aim then he took,
But he took it not right.
His skill was not good,
Or he shot in a fright-
For the Cuckoo he missed,
But Cock Robin he killed!
And all the birds mourned
That his blood was so spilled.

























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Who killed Cock Robin?
I, said the Sparrow,
With my bow and arrow,
I killed Cock Robin.

Who saw him die ?
I, said the Fly,
With my little eye,
I saw him die.

Who caught his blood?
I, said the Fish,
With my little dish,
I caught his blood.

Who '11 make his shroud ?
I, said the Beetle,
With my thread and needle,
I '11 make his shroud.

Who'll be chief mourner?
I, said the Dove,
For I mourn for my love,
I '11 be chief mourner.

Who '11 carry the link?
I, said the' Linnet,
I '11 fetch it in a minute,
I '11 carry the link.

Who '11 be the Parson ?
I, said the Rook,
With my little book,
I '11 be the Parson.































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Who '11 be the Clerk ?
I, said the Lark,
If it's not in the dark,
I '11 be the Clerk.

Who '11 dig his grave?
I, said the Owl,
With my spade and show
I '11 dig his grave.

Who '1 carry him to the grave ?
I, said the Kite,
If it's not in the night,
I '11 carry him to the grave.

Who '11 sing a psalm ?
I, said the Thrush,
As she sat in a bush,
I '11 sing a psalm.

Who '11 toll the bell?
I, said the Bull,
Because I can pull;
So, Cock Robin, farewell!

All the birds of the air
Fell a-sighing and sobbing,
When they heard the bell toll
For poor Cock Robin.

















THE KING, QUEEN,
AND
KNAVE OF HEARTS.






















The Queen of Hearts

She made some tarts,

All on a summer's day;





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Knave


of Hearts


He stole those tarts,


And took


them quite away.


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The Queen of Hearts

To eat those tarts

Her royal husband led:






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Knave


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(Who had the tarts,)


Out of the


window


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The


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The King of Hearts

He missed those tarts,

And beat the Knave full







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The Knave of Hearts

Brought back those tarts,

And vowed he'd steal no more.




- -- ---- ---- M W N "










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