• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Half Title
 Title Page
 Dedication
 Preface
 Table of Contents
 Part I
 Part II
 Advertising
 Back Cover






Title: Holly & ivy
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00026183/00001
 Material Information
Title: Holly & ivy the story of a winter Birds' Nest
Alternate Title: Holly and ivy
Physical Description: 191, 1 p., 7 leaves of plates : ill (some col.) ; 16 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Davies, Sarah
Herbert, George ( Publisher )
William Hunt & Co ( Publisher )
M'Laren & Erskine ( Printer )
Publisher: George Herbert
William Hunt & Co.
Place of Publication: Dublin
London
Manufacturer: M'Laren & Erskine
Publication Date: 1871
 Subjects
Subject: Christian life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Orphanages -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Orphans -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Charity -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Poverty -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Volunteers -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Social life and customs -- Juvenile literature -- Dublin (Ireland)   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1871
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Ireland -- Dublin
England -- London
Scotland -- Glasgow
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Miss Davies.
General Note: Added engraved title page printed in colors.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00026183
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002225219
notis - ALG5491
oclc - 57726903

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Half Title
        Page i
        Page ii
    Title Page
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Dedication
        Page v
    Preface
        Page vi
    Table of Contents
        Page vii
        Page viii
        Page Page viii-a
    Part I
        Page 9
        Introductory
            Page 9
            Page 10
            Page 11
            Page 12
            Page 13
        How we began
            Page 14
            Page 15
            Page 16
            Page 17
            Page 18
            Page 19
            Page 20
        Dark clouds
            Page 21
            Page 22
            Page 23
        God's care
            Page 24
            Page 25
            Page 26
            Page 27
        Going forward
            Page 28
            Page 29
            Page 30
            Page 31
            Page 32
            Page 33
            Page 34
            Page 35
            Page 36
        The birds in the nest
            Page 37
            Page 38
            Page 38a
            Page 39
            Page 40
            Page 41
            Page 42
            Page 43
            Page 44
            Page 45
            Page 46
            Page 47
            Page 48
            Page 49
            Page 50
            Page 51
            Page 52
            Page 53
            Page 54
            Page 55
            Page 56
            Page 57
            Page 58
            Page 59
        Daily work
            Page 60
            Page 60a
            Page 61
            Page 62
            Page 63
            Page 64
            Page 65
            Page 66
            Page 67
            Page 68
            Page 69
            Page 70
            Page 71
        How we keep Christmas
            Page 72
            Page 73
            Page 74
            Page 75
            Page 76
            Page 77
            Page 78
            Page 79
            Page 80
            Page 81
        The children's association
            Page 82
            Page 83
            Page 84
            Page 85
            Page 86
            Page 87
            Page 88
            Page 89
            Page 90
            Page 91
            Page 92
            Page 93
        God's providings
            Page 94
            Page 95
            Page 96
            Page 97
            Page 98
            Page 99
            Page 100
            Page 101
            Page 102
            Page 103
            Page 104
            Page 105
            Page 106
            Page 107
            Page 108
            Page 109
            Page 110
            Page 111
            Page 112
            Page 113
            Page 114
            Page 115
            Page 116
            Page 117
        How the building was paid for
            Page 118
            Page 119
            Page 120
            Page 121
            Page 122
            Page 122a
    Part II
        Page 123
        The first death
            Page 123
            Page 124
            Page 125
            Page 126
        Not alone
            Page 127
            Page 128
            Page 129
            Page 130
            Page 131
            Page 132
            Page 132a
            Page 133
            Page 134
            Page 135
            Page 136
            Page 137
            Page 138
            Page 139
            Page 140
        Safe at home
            Page 141
            Page 142
            Page 143
            Page 144
        Called and chosen
            Page 145
            Page 146
            Page 147
            Page 148
            Page 149
            Page 150
            Page 151
            Page 152
            Page 153
            Page 154
            Page 155
            Page 156
            Page 157
        Wanderers welcomed
            Page 158
            Page 159
            Page 160
            Page 160a
            Page 161
            Page 162
            Page 163
            Page 164
            Page 165
        "A pilgrim going home"
            Page 166
            Page 167
            Page 168
            Page 169
            Page 170
            Page 171
            Page 172
            Page 173
            Page 174
        A contrast
            Page 175
            Page 176
            Page 177
        Sure and certain hope
            Page 178
            Page 179
            Page 180
            Page 181
            Page 182
            Page 183
            Page 184
            Page 185
            Page 186
            Page 187
            Page 188
            Page 189
        Conclusion
            Page 190
            Page 191
    Advertising
        Page 192
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text

















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HOLLY


AND


IVY


STORY


OF


",,IRDS


BY


MISS DAVIES,


EDITOR


OF ERIN'S HOPE," AND


AUTHOR OF "THEM ALSO,"


" WANDERERS BROUGHT HOME," &c.


DUBLIN:


GEORGE HERBERT,


LONDON: WILL]


I17 GRAFTON STREET.


IAM HUNT & CO., 23 HOLES STREET,
CAVENDISH SQUARE. ,


1871.


THE


WINTER


EST.


i
k


, .
'l-*,' t


, .


-{

























J M'Laren & Erskine, I

I|( Printers, fj

SGlasgow.






OF


TO

THE MEMBERS

OF


Q^tlbrPen^ g^-on


WHO WIT]

HELPED

WHO


H LOVING HEARTS AND SELF-DENYING LA]

TO BUILD THE NEST" AND FEED TI

HAVE FOUND SHELTER FROM THE W

STORMS, BY THEIR GRATEFUL FRIEND,


BOURS HIVE

HE BIRDS

INTER


THE SECRETARY.


~L/-----

d=I
J


94k


a f 1 ic lxj









PREFACE


TO THE THIRD EDITION.


the Second Edition of this little book was nearly


sold off, it was


thought well to publish its contents in a


series


numbers.


of little books,


This


plan


which


could


be issued


has been most successful;


in large
but still


many letters are coming asking for the original book;


therefore
Edition,


we have determined to send forth


bringing


down


the story


Third


to the present time,


and embodying the contents of the
the little books.


later numbers


We commend


this new edition to


the loving


care of


our Heavenly Father.


May He bless


it abundantly, and


by it touch many


hearts,


causing them


to feel for the


miseries
help in


of destitute
some way to


little children, and leading


them to


provide for the little children in the


BIRDS' NEST.


SARAH


DAVIES,


35 UPPER FITZWILLIAM STREET, DUBLIN,
Honorary Secretary to Children's Association.


December, 1871.


WHEN


and


of













CONTENTS.

-o--

PART I.

CHAPTER 1. PAGE
INTRODUCTORY, 9
CHAPTER II.
HOW WE BEGAN, 14
CHAPTER III.
DARK CLOUDS, 21
CHAPTER IV.
GOD'S CARE 2
CHAPTER V.
GOING FORWARD 28
CHAPTER VI.
THE BIRDS IN THE NEST, 37
CHAPTER VII
DAILY WORK, 60
CHAPTER VIII
HOW WE KEEP CHRISTMAS, 72
CHAPTER IX.
THE CHILDREN'S ASSOCIATION, 82







CONTENTS.


CHAPTER X.


GOD'S PROVIDING,


HOW THE BUILDING


CHAPTER XI.
WAS PAID FOR,


-Il I0----


PART


I I.


CHAPTER I


THE FIRST DEATH,


. 123


CHAPTER II.


NOT ALONE)


. 127


CHAPTER III.


SAFE AT HOME, .


. 141


CHAPTER IV.


CALLED AND CHOSEN,


SI45


CHAPTER V.


WANDERERS WELCOMED,


S158


CHAPTER VI.
SA PILGRIM GOING HOME"


. 166


CHAPTER VII.


A CONTRAST,


* 175


CHAPTER VIII.


SURE AND CERTAIN HOPE,


178


CHAPTER IX.


-CONCLUSION,


. 190


*00
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PAGE


94


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HOLLY AND IVY.

PART I.

-- 00

CHAPTER I.
INTRODUCTORY.
OLLY AND IVY! the very words make us
feel cold, and yet warm. How they remind one
of the snow-covered fields, and the keen, biting
winds of winter! How they remind one, too, of times
of joy, and happy homes, and brightness in the midst of
desolation!
This little book will tell of the dreary winter time of
the lives of destitute little children-of their sorrows and
troubles. It also tells of brightness and joy, and a happy
home; and so I have chosen those magic words for its
title. I hope it will find its way into many Christian
homes, and be read by many of those dear children who













HOLLY AND IVY.

PART I.

-- 00

CHAPTER I.
INTRODUCTORY.
OLLY AND IVY! the very words make us
feel cold, and yet warm. How they remind one
of the snow-covered fields, and the keen, biting
winds of winter! How they remind one, too, of times
of joy, and happy homes, and brightness in the midst of
desolation!
This little book will tell of the dreary winter time of
the lives of destitute little children-of their sorrows and
troubles. It also tells of brightness and joy, and a happy
home; and so I have chosen those magic words for its
title. I hope it will find its way into many Christian
homes, and be read by many of those dear children who






10 INTRODUCTORY.

have early learned to love the Lord Jesus Christ, and are
earnestly longing to have something to do for. Him.
When He was here on earth He took the little children
in His own arms and blessed them. He cares for them
still, and looks down on them with compassionate love,
but He looks to His people to comfort them.
It was because there were so many poor little children
to be comforted that The Birds' Nest was opened; and it
was because so many dear children in happy homes wanted
to help, that we formed what we call the CHILDREN'S
ASSOCIATION, to the members of which this little book is
dedicated.
An account of the Association and its work will be
found farther on. The children have done much, but not
yet half what is needed, for the daily expenditure of such
an institution as THE BIRD'S NEST. In-this great work
there is room enough for all, and we would earnestly call
upon all those into whose hands this book may fall, to
come forward and help. We know there are many calls
upon the purse of charity, but amongst the many claiming
the sympathies of those whom God has made stewards of
His bounty, homes for the destitute must ever take a high
place. And why? Because our Father in heaven com-
forts His dying people with the sweet promise, Leave
thy fatherless children, and I will preserve them alive;







INTRODUCTORY. 1

and let thy widows trust in Mi."--Because the only-
begotten Son, in His wondrous life on earth, left us an
example that we should love little children.-Because
when in His risen body He talked with His disciples, and
would have from Peter a proof of constant love, He said,
"Feed my lambs." Now He is gone, and we are left to
follow out the path He traced; and as alone, or in com-
panies, His servants tread that path, He looks down with
kindly eye and sympathizing heart. Oh let us never for-
get that we are working for Him who took a little child
and set him by Him,-that we have a smile from Him
who said, Suffer little children to come unto ME."
Oh, then-
Aim to be like Jesus; walk with God,
Look up to learn your heavenly Father's will-
Look round the earth on which your Saviour trod-
And when you find a child of sorrow, ill,
Forlorn,and helpless, toiling up the hill,
Be thou a loving angel, and thy face,
In tending it, shall shine as angels' do;
As shine those sons of light in that high place,
Hid for a little while from mortal view,
Where, if you follow Christ, you'll be an angel too."

The Birds' Nest shelters one hundred and ninety of
these "forlorn and helpless" ones. They have been
taken out from the wide world, and brought together, not







INTRODUCTORY.


without many fears that funds might not come in for their
support. But the cases were so pressing that one after
another the Committee could not refuse; and they felt
that He who caused twelve baskets of fragments to
remain after the multitude had fed on five barley loaves,
would also cause a blessing to rest on the "basket and
store" of The Birds' Nest, if only the children were
received in His name.
So the poor little friendless ones have found a home on
earth, where they are being trained for a HOME in
glory-
A home so happy and so bright,-
A home of rest above-
Where, clothed in raiment pure and white,
In that sweet home of love,
No more a ragged orphan wild,
But dressed in white array,
Our God shall own the homeless child,
And wipe its tears away."


V


12







INTRODUCTORY. 13





"cIs there a thing beneath the skies
O'er which the gentle Saviour yearns,
Which finds such favour in His eyes,
Whose tearful cry He never spurns?
It is that little thing so wild,
A poor, neglected, lonely child.

Oh teach that little one to sing
The numbers tuneful, soft and clear,
Hosanna to the Shepherd bring,
Such as that Shepherd loves to hear-
Such as He heard when meek He rode
To Salem, His ordain'd abode.

Such as His gracious ear again
Shall welcome from young hearts set free,
Whom THOU hast rescued from the chain
Of sin and woe; hast taught to flee
To Him who left yon heavenly land
To take a wanderer by the hand."












CHAPTER II.
HOW WE BEGAN.
MT was in the month of July, 1859, four ladies
were sitting together in a small room in one of
the back streets of Dublin. They were met
to arrange the weekly business of a Home for Destitute
Girls, and to see those who wished for admission.
There were many came that day seeking a shelter,
girls who had no place to call "home," who had slept,
some of them, for many a night, in the damp air,
crouched in some doorway, or perhaps an open shed;
and as many as' they could those ladies received in the
name of Jesus.
But amongst the applicants came a woman bringing
a little girl three years of age. She had been deserted.
by her mother a year before, and this woman, poor as she
was, had taken her to her heart and home; but now
worse poverty had come upon her, she could keep the
little one no longer. It was not the first tirt such little
ones had come there. Once two little ones came hand-






HOW WE BEGAN. 15

in-hand, their poor little bodies scarcely covered with
wretched rags, their hair tangled, their faces unwashed;
and as they stood together they looked round with a
wondering, half-frightened air; and their faces, which
ought to have been bright with smiles and fun, were
marked by a serious, careworn look, very sad to see in such
little things. Their mother was dead, and their father
was gone, and they had no home and no food but the
breakfast they got in the Ragged School. But these two,
and many others, had been sent away because the Home
was for great girls; there was no room for little ones.
But now the sad case of the little child touched the heart
of one of the ladies very deeply; and Jesus, who longs to
have the little ones come to Him, put into her heart a
thought:-" We must have a Home for the poor little
ones," she said. There are many children to whom
God has given plenteously, and they will gather the
money to feed them, and so the rich and the poor amongst
the lambs of the fold will be united together, and God
will be glorified." The woman was told to call again,
and something should be done.
That day the ladies sat long together, and they asked
God's blesgng on the work of their hands. Before they
separated, the youngest among them, the one into whose
heart the thought came, had determined that she would






HOW WE BEGAN.


be responsible for the new Home:" It shall be in the
country," she said; "and we will call it 'TFE BIRDS'
NEST.'"
The first thing this good lady did was to write an
article in the little magazine called Erin's Hope," telling
of the new idea, and asking children to help; and then a
Committee of four ladies was formed.
It was some little time before a suitable house could be
found, but at last one was discovered up a little country
road near Kingstown. It belonged to a kind gentleman,
who, when he knew what it was wanted for, charged a
very low rent. It was just the thing for a nest of birdies,
snug and small, and having roses climbingup the small porch.
The house wanted some repairs, and the introduction
of gas pipes, before it would be ready to be inhabited; but
however, by the end of September all was finished, and
the ladies assembled in the new Nest. The first thing
they did was to kneel down to thank God that He had so
far helped them, and to pray that a great blessing might
rest upon that Home, and that it might be a nursery for
heaven. Then they chose a nice motherly woman for a
matron, and the little child was brought in and adopted as
the first nestling; then came another girl, a little older,
and a boy and girl, (brother and sister ) thus we had four
to beg~i with; and very happy they were in their Home.






HOW WE BEGAN. 17

We could not afford to buy bedsteads, but every child
had a little sack, filled with straw, laid on the floor, with
a pair of sheets and blankets; and as we admitted more
children into the Nest, the number of these little beds
increased, till at last they were so thickly laid, side by side,
that it was with difficulty we could step about the rooms;
there were forty children.
Week after week the Committee of The Birds' Nest
met; and week after week they met with two great diffi-
culties: one was that money did not come in as fast as it
was wanted; but for this there was a remedy,-prayer and
work. The other difficulty was, how to refuse the mul-
titude of poor children who pressed for admission; it was
so very hard to turn them away, and think that they must
continue to wander the streets, faint and weary; and the
ladies prayed very much for guidance. They felt as if
God was saying to them, Take these children and nurse
them for Me, I will give you money." And so they de-
termined that as soon as possible they would build a Home
which would hold one hundred and fifty, and they would
write down in a book the cases of the children who were
left without, that as soon as there was room they might all
be taken in,
The'little children who had found a home.in The Birds'
Nest were very busy, and very happy. They rosrearly
B






HOW WE BEGAN.


in the morning, and dressed and washed themselves.
Then there were beds to make, and rooms to sweep;
after which they assembled in a long room at, the back of
the house for prayer. After comfortable warm breakfasts
of cocoa and bread,.hats and bonnets were brought out,
and the little party set off, two-and-two, followed by their
kind matron, to the Mission School; and in many a home,
as they passed, kind voices said, "Here come the children,"
and kind faces looked out upon them and blessed them;
and the clatter of forty pairs of wooden clogs was a
constant reminder to collectors to be up and doing.
But the clatter of the clogs was heard by enemies
too. There were some who were angry because the
children were taken by Protestants, and taught the Bible.
They would break up The Nest if they could;, and
many a scheme was laid for the purpose.
The children knew they had enemies, and that they
were always in danger; but they knew God as their
Father, they knew they were safe only under His
protection, and so they learned to trust in Hip. Up in
the dormitories at night they met for prayer; and a few
trees in the garden formed a tabernacle where these dear
children often met with God. Frequently in the play-
time the voiMe of mirth would be stopped, and you
might hear sweet children's voices joining in a hymn.







HOW WE BEGAN.


19


And then the niusic would cease, and the voice
after anotierimight be heard iri earnest prayer.
About this time the children's friend who hac
mined to 'have The Nest wrote a very nice hy
them, suited to their peculiar circumstances.
She meant it to be sung to the tune of c Uncle
a negro melody. She always liked lively tunes
children, because the very little ones could
them:-
LJ. VZLJ


of one


i deter-
mn for


Ned,"
for the
learn


"I saw in a valley a happy little flock,
They lie in a pleasant fold,
The Shepherd who owns them is kind and good,
He loves them with love untold.
Come all ye who hear, who hear,
Come, and never fear:
There's room for all,
S And the Shepherd doth call,
Oh, come, and be happy here.
Those sheep were lost and wandering once,
And the wolf went about to destroy;
But the Shepherd sought them through wood, waste, and hill,
And brought them here with joy.
Come all, &c.
He made them a fold under green, green trees,
Which healing leaves do bear,
Close by te stream of the water of life,
And He leads His saved ones-there.
Come all, &c.








HOW WE EGAN,

The Shepherd saved those lost wandering sheep,
For He fought with their cruel foe;
And in His blood, then shed for them,
He washed them as white as snow.
Come all, &c.

And He will take them one happy, happy day,
To a fairer, lovelier home,
Across the mountains, far, far away,
Where the wolf no more can roam.
Come all, &c.

Come young and old to this happy Gospel fold,
To this tender Shepherd's care,
For none can go to that lovely distant home,
Till His saving grace they share.
Come all ye who hear,, who hear,
Come, and never fear:
There's room for all,
And the Shepherd doth call,
Oh, come, and be happy here."
,' -













CHAPTER III,
DARK CLOUDS.

OT quite one year from the opening of The Birds'
Nest a great sorrow fell upon us, in the death
of the beloved and loving one who had gathered
the children, and called their home The Birds' Nest.
Brightly and beautifully had her light shone on earth,
and all too soon for us who were left behind was she
called away; but we tried to say, "Thy will be done."
The children of The Birds' Nest were not the only
rescued ones who mourned her loss. When her death
was announced, the Ragged School was a place of
weeping. She was a daughter of the late Archbishop
Whately, and though lately married, died at her father's
house. Some time before her death she had expressed a
wish that her funeral might have none of the usual pomp
about it, but that her dear poor people might be her
mourners. When she was gone her father remembered
her wish. A plain hearse left the palace door, with just
two mourning carriages; but on the, way to the family







.22 DARK "UDS.

burying-place, Nir miles out of town, the procession
increased. There were the Scripture Readers and teachers.
of the Irish Church Mission Society, a sorrowing troop of
boys and girls from the schools, and' a group of mothers,
with their babies in their arms, who had formed her Sunday
School class. These and many others joined the train,
and filled the church. Then all assembled round the
grave and listened to a solemn address by the Missionary,
and as well as they could for tears, they all sang,-
"Shall we ever all meet again?-
Yes, we may all meet again,
If not on earth, in heaven we may all meet again.
Shall we ever all wear a crown ?-
Yes, we may all wear a crown,
If not on earth, in heaven we may all wear a crown.
Tears shall be all wiped away,
If not on earth, in heaven tears shall be all wiped away."
It was a solemn scene; and many a heart too sorrowful to
join in the singing was raised in prayer, that the spirit of
love, so richly given to the departed one, might fall on
others, that the destitute ones might not be forgotten; and
so it came to pass that many hearts were stirred up, and
it was determined that the new building to be erected for
The Birds' Nest should be a monument to the memory of
Mrs. George'Wale.







DARK CLOUDS. 23



Cc COME let us join our friends above
SWho have obtained the prize,
And on the eagle wings of love
To joys celestial rise.

Let all the saints terrestrial sing
With those to glory gone;
For all the servants of our King,
In earth and heaven, are one.

One family we dwell in Him,
One Church above, beneath,
Though now divided by the stream,
The narrow stream of death.

One army of the living God,
At His command we bow;
Part of His host have crossed the flood,
And part are crossing now.
Our spirits, too, shall quickly join,
Like theirs with glory crowned,
And shout to see our Captain's sign,
To hear His trumpet sound.

Lord Jesus, be our constant guide,
And when the word is given,
Bid death's cold flood its waves divide,
And land us safe in heaven."
*













CHAPTER


IV*


GOD'S CARE.

"He'maketh the storm a calm."


E have spoken of the enemies of these dear chil-


'dren; we had


often


thought that some attack


might be made upon them, but for seven months


they were allowed to come and go


began to think


unmolested, and


it would always be so, and perhaps


were forgetting who it is that sends
ness, and so trial came.


we
we


On Sunday night, May the 6th, about half-past eight,
when the little children were just going to bed, a rattling
sound was heard on the roof, then another, then another,


and then a window was broken


by the blow


of a large


stone.


The stones seemed


and so
back.


God could


to be coming


the matron gathered


from


the front,


the children together in the


They were very much frightened, but they knew


defend them, and they knelt in prayer.


The


the peace and quiet-






GOD'S CARE. :25

pelting of stones continued two whole hours, and in the
morning was renewed; but not a child was hurt.
On Tuesday evening, as the children were sitting at
their supper in the back room, a large stone came in
at the window, just grazed the ear of one child, and
passed close to the mistress's head as she was stooping
down. It was very remarkable that the little ones who
usually sat along that window had been put to bed an
hour before their usual time. Had they been there
one, at least, must have beexq killed. See how God
watches over His children, and guides them even in
small things! On Wednesday four extra police were
sent to guard the house,-two in front, and two at the
back. The pelting ceased, and 'it was never discovered
who threw the stones; but when ladders were got to
clear the- roof, thirty-two stones were found, some five
and a-half pounds weight! It was very wonderful that
no little child was hurt. No, not wonderful! Does
not Jesus say, "The very hairs of your head are
all numbered ?"
A few days after this storm I was at The Birds' Nest,
and talking to the children about it, I said, "But how
is it no one was hurt?" They all looked very serious,
and one little girl said, "Sure, ma'am, it was the Lord
took care of us!"







26 GOD'S CARE. *

Ah! the little children of The Birds' Nest have learned
how strong God is, and they rely upon the promise
written in the 9ist Psalm, He shall cover thee with His
feathers, and under His wings shalt thou trust."







GOD'S CARE. 27


FEAR NOT.
"YEA, fear not--fear not, little ones;
There is in heaven an eye
That looks with yearning fondness down
On every path you try.

'Tis He who guides the sparrow's wing,
And guards her little brood;
Who hears the ravens when they cry,
And fills them all with food.

'Tis He who clothes the fields with flowers,
And pours the light- abroad;
'Tis He who numbers all your hours,
Your Father and your God.

Ye are the chosen of His love
His most peculiar care;
And will He guide the fluttering dove,
And not regard your prayer?

Nay, fear not--fear not, little ones;
There is in heaven an eye
That looks with yearning fondness down
On all the paths you try.

He'11 keep you when the storm is wild,
And when the flood is near;
Oh, trust Him, trust Him, little child,
And you have nought to fear."















CHAPTER


V.


GOING FORWARD.

" The Lord shall increase you more and more, you, and your children."


mentioned


in an earlier chapter, we


had deter-


mined


to build a


new Nest


for


but we found it very difficult to


our Birdies-
get a suitable


piece of ground, so we took a larger house, and in a very
short tirpe our numbers rose to sixty-four.


The new comers easily fell


those who had beei
was little difficulty;


n trained to I


into the orderly
good habits, and


ways


of


so there


and as time went on we were induced


to increase the number to eighty-one.
spot of the house were the little beds
assembly at meals was a goodly sight
the centre of the room was a long tal


elder boys


In every available
laid down, and the


to behold.


Down


ble, occupied by the


and girls, and round by the walls were high


forms for tables, and low forms for seats, for the little ones,
and yet there was the greatest order amongst them; and






GOING FORWARD. 29

as they, with clasped hands, stood to sing their grace, and
then quietly ate their food, you would have supposed that
they had been carefully taught, even from their baby-
hood.
Still we had many difficulties in this crowded house; no
baths, no convenience at all for washing either the children
or their clothes, a few tubs in the yard being all we could
manage; and we were very anxious that a new building
should be commenced as soon as possible.
In April, 1861, a piece of ground was procured. It was
a green field nearly opposite the house the children occupied.
Just then the Rev. Alexander Dallas,* who has been so
blessed by God in the conversion of Roman Catholics,
was coming over from England, and we asked him to lay
the foundation-stone; he gladly consented.
The day appointed was the IIth of April. It was a
most lovely day, and the friends who went down to Kings-
town from Dublin almost filled a train. When we arrived
we walked upi first to the old Nest, where the children
were all assembled, dressed in their new summer livery.
When Mr. Dallas came into the playground they all
gathered round him and sang a welcome. He spoke a few
*This beloved and useful servant of God entered into his rest Dec. I2,
I869. His loss is deeply felt throughout the whole of our country. Of him
it may truly be said, He loved our nation."







30 GOING FORWARD.

words to them; after which all formed into a procession,


and walked down the road to the ground selected
new building.


for the


children


took their


places around


the stone, and


then all the other people stood around.


The rector of the


parish offered up a prayer for God's blessing, and then the


stone was put down.
and then the children


Some nice speeches were made,
gathered into a group and sang


many


beautiful


hymns, their


voices


blending so sweetly


together.
joined in


We all
heart and


felt full of joy and thankfulness, and


feeling


in the children's chorus, "All


glory to Jesus."
After this the building committee worked in earnest.


I could not tell


you how often the poor little


Birdies


looked out at their new Nest," as stone after stone was
laid, and the walls rose, and the window-places were left,


and then the roof was put on. AJ
came, and doors 'were put in, and
and then the iron railings were F
gates in their places. How they v
all be like inside!


nd then the carpenters


windows were


made;


)ut up in front, and the
wondered what it would


At last


April came, and Mr.


Dallas was coming over;


and though all


the inside things were not ready, still the


school-rooms were finished,


and we determined


to have


an opening day on the Ioth of


April, exactly a year from


The


I






GOING FORWARD.


31


the time when we all stood in the green field, and the
first stone was put down.
I must explain the plan of the building, or I fear
you will not Exactly understand all I shall'have to tell
you. .It is an oblong building, with a' door at each end;
one has "Boys" written over it, the other "Girls."
This is to suit the day-schools. You remember that,
at first, the Birds' Nest children went to the Mission
School; now the Mission School was to come to the
Birds' Nest.
The large space between each entrance is divided into
two rooms; the one on the boys' end is the infants'
school-room; the other is the feeding-room. In this
latter are six deal tables, some of them very low, with
small low forms for the little children; others are higher,
for those who have longer legs.
Over these two rooms are two others, separated by
folding doors. One is the boys' school-room, the other
the girls'. Over these again are two large sleeping-
rooms.
At the end you will see there are several smaller
rooms. On the girls' end there is first the kitchen, then
two rooms for the matron, two for the teachers, and one,
reaching from back to front, which is intended for any
children who may not be quite well.







32

At the other


GOING FORWARD.


end are apartments


for the master, and


above, sleeping-rooms for the boys.
On the day of opening the folding-doors were opened,
and the two large school-rooms formed one very large


room, which


was beautifully decorated with green leaves


and paper flowers.


These,


hanging upon


with the


the wail,


new school


gave


pictures


it quite


and


a bright,


maps
lively


appearance; and when the bright spring sun shone in at
the windows, our hearts quite danced with joy. On one


of the sides',
platform, on
might stand.


half-way down the room,


which


was a sort of


the gentlemen who were to


speak


two o'clock


the


children


were all assembled


the yard


of the


old house,


each neatly


dressed.


girls


had new straw bonnets, which had


to them
appeared
welcome.
headed b)
hand. S(


by


two kind friends.


they set up a great shout,
Afterwards all formed i


SMr.


Whe


just been given
n Mr. Dallas


and then


nto


sang


a procession,


Dallas with the very smallest child by the


o they walked


through the house and across the


road, and up the stairs of the new Nest, the wonder and
curiosity of the children increasing more and more.
The large room was so full of people, who had come to


the opening, that it was not very easy for the


children to


At


in


The





GOING FORWARD. 33

get in in an orderly manner; but people got out of the
way, and before long the regiment of children in blue and
white was nicely settled upon a temporary gallery which
had been provided for them..
As we looked round upon that large meeting, our hearts
were very full of gratitude to God that so many poor
children had been brought together to learn of Jesus, and
thankfulness that so many friends had been raised up to
provide what was needful for those children; so we could
sing with all our hearts,
SCrown Him Lord of all."
Then there was an earnest prayer to God, that He
would continue to pour His blessing on the Institution,
that every child coming in might be made indeed a child
of God, and that the means might be raised, not only to
feed and clothe the children, but also to pay for the nice
new Home.
Then there were other speeches made, and hymns sung
by the children. It was a very happy meeting.
And now that the Nest was opened, we were very
anxious that the workmen should make as much haste as
possible, and get out, so that the children might come
in. The Matron's rooms were finished first, and she came
in to get all into order. There were new bedsteads to be
c






34, GOING FORWARD.
got, new little beds to be filled with straw, and sheets
and blankets to be prepared; and every day the elder girls
came over to help to hem and stitch.
In about a fortnight the moving day came, and many
little hands carried over bundle after bundle; and there
was such excitement, such ruslg over the house to see
all the rooms, such peering into presses, as only children
who have ever moved into a new house can understand.
It was not very easy to reduce all to order, as you may
imagine. The new house required new plans, and new
work; and the workmen kept themselves a very long time
about, doing little finishings. Just as we thought they
were quite ready to go, a terrible misfortune happened-
the well ran dry! and there was no water for that great
house and its inmates. Many schemes were thought of,
for water must be had. The only thing that could be done
was to dig a very deep well. At last water was found,
but we were obliged to have a steam-pump to get it up.
You cannot think what 'a time of trouble we had of it
all the long weeks when there was no water; we never
before felt the comfort of the last part of the promise,
"Bread shall be given, and water shall be sure." During
that time we were glad when we heard the driving rain,
for we knew the cisterns were filling, and for a time the
want would be supplied.






GOING FORWARD. 35

But the pump was soon set up, and all was put in
order.
I only wish all the readers of this book could now visit
The Birds' Nest; I think they would all agree in thinking
it the very happiest home for poor children they ever saw.;
and a noble monument to the memory of her who first
thought of having a Birds' Nest, and of her dear mother,
the late Mrs. Whately, who, while the building was being
erected, left her earthly labours to enter her heavenly
rest. Mother and daughter had been united in works of
self-denying love in their lives: it was fitting that their
names should be associated in so appropriate a memorial.


HYMN SUNG AT THE OPENING OF THE BIRDS' NEST.
THERE is a better world they say,
Oh! so bright!
WVhere sin and death are done away,
Oh! so bright!
There music fills the balmy air,
And angels with bright wings are there,
And harps of gold, and mansions fair,
Oh! so bright!
No clouds e'er pass along its sky,
Happy land!
No teardrops glisten in the eye,
Happy land







36


This world is oft so dark and drear,
Take us there!
We ne'er can be so happy here,
Take us there!
Oh! listen to that music sweet,
It comes so rich from yonder seat,
Where all the saints in glory meet,
Take us there!"


GOING FORWARD.

They drink the gushing-streams of grace,
They gaze upon the Saviour's face,
Whose glory fills the holy place,
Happy land!
And wicked things and beasts of prey
SCome not there!
And ruthless death and fierce decay
Come not there!
There all are holy, all are good;
But hearts unwashed in Jesus' blood,
And guilty sinners unrenewed,
Come not there!
But though we're sinners every one,
Jesus died!
And though our crown of peace is gone,
Jesus died!
We may be cleansed from every stain,
May all be clothed with peace again,
And in that land of pleasure reign,
Jesus died!


0. N F0













CHAPTER VI.

THE BIRDS IN THE NEST.
And He took them up in His arms, put His hands upon them,
and blessed them."

OME people think "THE BIRDS' NEST" a very
odd sort of name for an institution; but most of
our friends like it very much indeed. I think it
charming; and I know a great many of our children
helpers agree with me. In this chapter I want to tell
something about the sort of children who are taken into
the Nest. It is very difficult to classify them, but I will
tell the cases of some of them, and that will give an idea.
The more destitute a child is, the more glad we are to
receive it, and bring it up for Jesus. Let us fancy we
are at the Nest, and looking at the children. Here is a
little boy I always call Billy, but I think his real name is
Johnny. When he came to me to be made ready for
the Nest he was the most miserable creature I ever saw.
He was thought to be seven years old; and the day I







THE BIRDS IN THE NEST,


expected


him I had


would have fitted him.


prepared


clothes


which


But he came-a mise


I thought
rable little


object, about


face;


the size of a child of three-a poor, worn


his front teeth gone;


his dress-how shall I describe


it ? There was a ragged sort of cape over the shoulders,


and then a
inlaid with


piece of old calico sewed round his body, so
dirt that it was almost impossible to touch it.


But we took a pair


of scissors, and cut the stitches.


am sure this must have been around him at least a year.


He cried bitterly when it was taken off;


but when first a


clean little


shirt, and


then a warm, petticoat, and


then a


long-sleeved frock were put upon him, h6 laughed for
joy, and stroked his frock down with his poor little hand.
"Nice, nice!" he said; and soon he was in the Birds'
Nest, and had a snug, warm bed to sleep in, and plenty
of food. We had a great deal of trouble with this little


He had


been so starved that it was difficult to get


him into anything like health;


but he is quite strong now,


and is learning to read and write nicely.
SAbout three years ago a Scripture Reader visited a very


old and very poor woman.
children to support, who
by father and mother.


He found she had four grand-


had been deserted years


before


They were .all


Roman Catholics, and utterly ignorant;


:and besides, they were almost naked, and quite starving.


38


boy.








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THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. 39

The Reader told the grandmother of a ragged school that
was quite near, and asked her to send the children in time
for breakfast the next day. They went, and soon became
greatly in love with the school, and the nice things they
learned there.
But ope day they were missed by the teachers. Another
day, and another day, and they did not come. Then the
Reader went to visit them, and he found. the four children
weeping over the dead body of their grandmother. They
had now no relative to care for them; but their sad case
was made known,. and the two elder boys were taken into
the RAGGED BOYs' HOME, and the two little ones found
a happy home in the Birds' Nest. And so they are all
under the tender care of the Good Shepherd, who watches
over His little lambs, and causes His people to go after
them, and find them, and bring them to His fold.
How many of our dear children I could shew you who
have no friends but those belonging to the Nest! Here
is one-a dear, loving little girl. She was brought by a
poor woman who had taken care of he#as long as she
could. When I first looked at the child I thought she
must be an idiot, and I took her down stairs at our own
house, and asked the cook, a kind motherly woman, to
keep her for a few hours, and try to make her talk. In
the evening she said, The poor child 'has plenty of







40

sense, but
So it was.


THE BIRDS IN THE NEST.


it was want of food


made


her look stupid."


She is now one of our pleasantest and most


useful children.
One time, when forty-five of the children had measles,


one was dangerously ill.
I could write to? I 1


I asked her,


Had she any friends


haven't got none," she said; "only


Mrs. S .


"And where did she


get


you?" I asked.


N-" In the ragged school."


dear girl


got


quite well.


She is now in service,


and saves a tenth of her small earnings
Birds' Nest.


to give


to the


Another dear girl, now a useful servant, came


poor little wanderer, so starved.


to us a


We put her in a tub of


warm water and washed her, and then cut her hair, and
dressed her. She had not been long in the Nest before


her cheeks


grew round, and


her


eyes bright,


and she


could laugh with the merriest.
Just a few weeks ago we took in two bright, black-eyed


boys.


I will tell their story.


One day last winter a poor


labouring man, the


father


of four children, fell from a ladder and was seriously hurt;
he was carried to an hospital, and attended with care and


skill.


The poor wife went to see him, and her grief was


great to see him suffer so; and when she went home, the
little children gathered around her to hear all about it.


This







THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. 41

As she looked at them, and gathered them to her arms,
her grief burst out afresh. c How shall I feed them?"
she thought.
And day by day this question returned, for it must be
answered. And every day some of their little possessions
were sorrowfully taken to the pawn-shop, and a scant
supply of money brought home to buy bread.
At last, one morning, the poor mother looked around
upon an empty room. Little Johnny saw her trouble;
he did not ask for food, but went out into the street.
Cold and hungry, he sat down on a door-step, resting his
head on his hand. As he sat a bright little boy passed;
he noticed the weary look, and he turned round. "What
is the matter?" he asked. The sad tale was soon told.
Come with me," said the little fellow; "I'm going to
a school where we get a good hot breakfast, if we are in
time-come along, you'll be welcome." And Johnny
went to Townsend Street. At three o'clock some of
the boys got a little more food; Johnny stayed with them.
It was with a very different face from that of the
morning that Johnny entered his home. "Mother,
mother!" said he, "I 've found kind people. I 've been
to a boys' school, and gotf ood to eat. And, mother,
there's another school close to it for little ones. Mother,
mayn't I take the children to-morrow ?"







THE BIRDS IN THE NEST.


And the mother consented.


were


And when


all away, she went out to look


the children


for work.


When


they all came back in the evening there was news to tell;
for the little ones had greatly enjoyed the lessons, and the


hymns, and the nice dinner Mrs. R provides
hungry ones every day, from October to April.


And day


by day things


improved in that poor


for the

home.


And when the father came out of hospital, he had to hear


the whole story; and the children sang some hymns
him, and repeated their texts; and the poor man said,


I could go to that


school


too."


for
"I


"So you can,"


said Johnny.


" On


father, and older,


Sunday I saw men as big


sitting in classes,


and


learning


as you,
ig their


verses just like the children."
And the father went with


Johnny, and he


liked what


he learned so much that he never'misses a Sunday now,


-always


in his place.


But he is so crippled


cannot work enough
and his little brother


to support all four,


have


found


a home


he


and Johnny
in the Birds'


Nest.


Amongst


our very little


girls there are some who have


suffered much; one little girl left utterly alone, her mother


having been taken to prison.


The poor child wandered


about, no one caring for her, until a poor woman, whose
children attended a Ragged School, had compassion upon


42


wish


that







THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. 43

her, and took her in until she could get a place for her
in the Birds' Nest.
Another bright, merry child came to the Nest in a sad
state. Her mother was a widow, nearly blind, who tried
to support her children by selling little things in a basket.
A lady who knew her deep distress got admission for
little Louise; but when she brought her, it was found
that the child's head was dreadfully sore. Miss C- ,
who happened to be at the Nest at the time, hesitated
about receiving her, because of the other children; but
our good matron could not bear to turn one away. "I
will cure it," she said; "do take her in:" and her request
was granted.
Here are two little girls, of seven and eight years old,
standing hand-in-hand; they love each other very much,
and they look up as if they were used to being loved.
They never were very miserable. Their mother was a
happy Christian, one who managed her large family well,
and made her husband's small earnings go as far as possi-
ble; but last year she died, and the older ones being boys,
there was none to care for Margery and Louise; and the
father's health and earnings failed, so the little girls were
admitted to The Birds' Nest. They are pleasant, happy
children, and dearly love the good matron.
There, in the play-ground, are two little boys, each







44 THE BIRDS IN THE NEST.

holding the hand of a little one between them; they seem


very happy
Nest some


together
time ;


r.


The two elder have been.in the


the younger has just come.


Their


mother, too, was a Christian.


them long


Their father had


ago, and the mother worked for


deserted


their support


as long as she could.


At last she was attacked


incurable disease, and obliged to put her children


poorhouse and go to hospital.


great,


in the


Her sufferings were very


but the thoughts of her dear little boys, surrounded


by the influences of the most depraved of characters, was


worse.


She could only


lay


the burden on


Jesus.


length some of the lady visitors heard about these children,
and they applied to our Committee; and first the two


little


fellows were got out of the poorhouse, then


the


third, and there are not three happier children in the Nest.
The mother is dead now, but her boys have found a home.


Two
mother.


other


children


lately


admitted


had a Christian


Years ago she came, a poor, dark Roman Catho-


lic, to the Townsend


Street


Sunday


School.


She liked


what she learned, and she came again and again.


one every false hope was
enabled to lay her sins on


One by


given up, and at last she was
Jesus, and trust only in Him.


Her little children were regular attendants


at the Luke


Street Infants'


School.


A few months ago


woman had to go to the Hospital for Incurables, where she


by


an


At


this


poor






THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. 45

died a most happy death. Her teacher got admission for
the two little children into the Nest. Leave thy father-
less children," Jesus says, I will preserve them." It is
He who takes them up and blesses them; but it is by
human hands, yours and mine, little children;-WE take
them, and nurse them for Him.
Here are three children I must tell you about, a girl
and two boys. Their history is a very sad and strange
one. They were of a respectable class in life, and their
father ought to have earned plenty of money for their
support; but he was a drunkard. That fearful curse of
families, drink, had taken his senses away, and his love
for his wife and children was turned to hatred. After
persecuting them in many ways, he at last went so far as
to take the three children, and go away altogether from
his poor wife. Night came, and they did not return, and
the poor mother mourned alone. Months passed away;
she earned a livelihood by needlework, but tears so often
dimmed her eyes, that she could get but little. One day
she received an anonymous letter, saying that the writer
had seen the three children in the County Wicklow.
The poor mother set off to the place named, and after
some difficulty, she got her three dear ones, and brought
them to her poor home. She found from the children
that a priest had taken them, and she was so angry that






46 THE BIRDS IN THE NEST.

she determined never to go to chapel again. In this state
she was visited by the Town Missionaries, and they told
her of One who cared for her in all her poverty and trials
-one who, if she trusted in Him, would never leave nor
forsake her. They gave her a Bible, which she promised
to read. After this she was visited by priests and nuns,
who promised her all sorts of things if she would return
and give up her children. She refused everything; but
work grew more scanty, and she found it hard to feed so.
many. Happily for the children, they got a good break-
fast every morning in the Luke Street Ragged School, and
sometimes a piece of bread before they went home. One
day the priest visited the mother, and found her reading
the Bible; he snatched it from her, and threw it into the
fire. She rescued it. Her trials were very great and varied;
she could not stand against them; and her poor room was
without furniture,-an old box served for a table, and the
bed was a little straw in a corner of the room. It was,
very hard for those who had seen better days. The
Missionaries made known the case, and admission was
obtained for the children into the Nest, and a light situa-
tion found for the mother. Nothing has been heard of the
father for many months. We hope these dear children
will be left with us. They are nice, clean, well-mannered.
little things, and very fond of each other.






THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. 47
Another group of three are the children of a poor
working man, who lately fell off a cart, and was so injured
that he will never be able to work again; he has been set
up in a little business, selling matches, and laces, and such
things. And the children are getting on finely in the
NEST. The father has been a convert for many years,
and,we believe, a real Christian.
Now let us peep into the nursery. How nice it looks!
The fire burns brightly; the cradle stands beside it, with
a new pair of twin-dolls; and the little rocking-chair is
near. Sitting in it is a little girl, looking tenderly at a
dolly which seems a great treasure; its eyes will shut and
open, and it is neatly and carefully dressed. It is little
Kate H-. The doll was given to her, with a beautiful
set of tea-things, on the Christmas-tree day, by some kind
little girls who have adopted her. Katie was such a poor
forlorn child when she came, that it was very hard to
make her smile, and even now the head bends down a
little too much; but there is a very sweet smile on the
face when you can see it.
Another. little child has in the course of nine months
become so changed in appearance one would hardly
recognize her. The first time I saw her was at our out-
door fete. The children were playing about in kind
Mrs. Harrison's lawn, but one little thing was seated all







THE BIRDS IN THE NEST.


alone


on t


sat down


:he grass,
beside he


looking


so thin and


and noticed


miserable.


that she had a bad


cough.
"What's your name ?"


asked.


" Mary," she said, without looking up.


"You are a new child;
" Last week."


when did you come ?"


" You have a bad cough-are you ill ?"


" I think I am;


I 'm very miserable."


"But


you


will


soon


be happy-all


the children are


happy."
"I never was happy in my life."
"Have you a father?"
"No, he's gone, and my stepmother is unkind to
Nobody ever loved me."


" Poor child,


Jesus loves you."


" I don't think He does."


"I love you." She looked up with a questic
"Do you know who I am?" I asked.-"No.
I told her, a beaming smile lighted up her face.


children love you,"


rning gaze.
" When
"All the


she said; "I '11 love you too."


Here I must tell you that the love of "all the children"


comes to me because I


am the representative


of all the


members of the Children's Association, and their gifts and


love come through me.


I try to send out all the love


48


me.


.r,






THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. 49

through the little books; but that does not make my own
share any the less-
"For we must share, if we would keep
That good thing from above;
Ceasing to give, we cease to have;
Such is the law of love."
Of Eddy B- I must tell the whole story. He was
.a dear little fellow, too young for the Nest, but his father
died in the hospital, a believer in Jesus; his only care was
for his children; they had a very bad mother. A Christian
friend promised they should be cared for, and the poor
man died satisfied.
The little girl was taken into the Nest, but Eddy was
too young, only a baby. We put him to be nursed by a
kind old woman. As soon as the mother saw him well
dressed she took him away, sold his clothes, and after a
little while went with him into the poorhouse. Some
years passed away, when one day a Scripture Reader met
the woman begging with the child. She said she had been
three weeks without a place to lie down at night. She
said she was very sorry for her conduct, and if we would
take the boy she would get work. For the sake of the
promise to the dying, father, we took Eddy; and a little
girl in the South of England adopted him. Some months
passed away,-happy months for Eddy,-and then his
D






THE BIRDS IN THE NEST.


mother


took him again, dressed him in miserable clothes,


and went out to beg.


His friend was greatly distressed,


and she prayed very earnestly for her lost nestling.


she wrote for news.


Often


I wanted her to take another child,


but she would not "give up Eddy." She said, "I'll pray
ON;" and in October the mother again brought the child,


saying, if he


might


be in the Nest


would never take him away again.
once more had his rags exchanged for


he is safe and happy.
Amongst our children
of seven years of age.


with his sister, she
And so little Eddy
Nest clothing, and


is a blue-eyed, fair-haired boy,
His father, a most respectable


workman, died


mother with


some


three years ago,


three children, one a little


leaving


baby.


the poor
She had


no means of support, and gradually all her little possessions
were sold to buy food. Her relations would do nothing


for her,


because she attended


the Mission


Church, and


was trying


to bring


up her little ones in the Protestant


faith, she being a convert.


Application was made to get


the boy into the Nest, but he was too young.


We paid


the rent of a room for


needlework, but


the poor woman,


and


gave


her


her baby hindered her working, and she


became the picture of misery.


In March she wrote:-


" I am very thankful for what you do for me, but it is


utterly useless.


It is very hard to be utterly destitute, in


Po


I






THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. 51

the four walls of a back garret, without furniture, friends,
or any earthly comfort but my little ones. My brother
gives me till the 9th to consider whether I will give up
my boy to go to the convent, or give up the friendship of
all belonging to me. I am really bewildered. Please,
madam, do not look on me as an imposter."
The case was so urgent that the little boy, though only
just past six, was taken and put to lodgings for a few
months. The mother got a good situation as nurse, and
is able to pay for her other two children at nurse. At
Christmas her mistress allowed her to have her boy for a
few days' visit. And if you had seen her coming into the
Mission Church, looking like a model nurse, with her boy
by the hand, you would have thanked God for such an
institution as the Birds' Nest.
Late one evening there came a note, written on an old
leaf of a book, begging for a little relief for a sick child
who attended one of the Mission Schools. I sent a
shilling, and the next day went to the home of the poor
child. It was a very small room at the top of a poor
house, a bedstead and a chair the only furniture. An old
woman sat near the fire with a child on her knee very
ill. Another little one stood beside her. When I
entered, the little one looked up 'with a smile of wel-
come, and I knew her and the sick one as little children







THE BIRDS IN THE NEST.


regular
dressed
was the
before.


attendants at
that we had
little one wh(


the school, bu
never guessed
o had brought


" Oh, ma'am," said


it always so neatly
their poverty. It
the note the night


the old woman,


"I never


begged before;


us.


but the children said the Lord would help


I had not a bit of fire or food; and what was worse,


not a bit of candle to watch my poor child through the
night. I could not face a night of darkness." The child


had had


fever, and was just beginning to recover; all she


wanted was nourishment


and comfort,


which


we were


able to provide.
They had been very respectable people;


the father, a


good workman, earning large wages; but he died suddenly,
leaving 20 which he had saved for his wife, mother-in-


law, and


children.


They were induced to


go to Man-


chester and set up a lodging-house, which at first suc-


ceeded
had.


but the cotton famine came, and they lost all they


They returned to Dublin;


the mother went to


service, where she earned 5 a-year, and 2s. 6d. a-week


to feed herself.
no wonder they
children into the


This was all the support of the family-


suffered


so much.


We took the two


Nest, and the old woman went to the


poorhouse, where she soon after died.


The mother is in


very delicate health, but she is able to support herself, and
comes sometimes to see the little ones.


52


1;






THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. 53

We have two very nice boys now in the Nest, who
were some time ago removed to the Boys' Home, but,
having been very delicate, have come back to be nursed.
They are both, we believe, real Christians, setting a
bright example to all around. I find the history of one
of them in my notes. The family consisted of a father
and mother and seven children. They were all Roman
Catholics, and when first visited by the Scripture-readers,
were in such a very destitute condition, that the children
were obliged to cover themselves with the straw that
formed their bed. One of these children was a bright
little boy of nine years old. He was persuaded to attend
the Ragged School; we sent him a little pair of trousers
to enable him to get out. Willy was delighted with all
he heard and learned, and when he went home at night,
tried to teach his mother to repeat a text: she would not
then. But Willy was one of those boys who are not
easily discouraged, and, as his mother said, "he worried"
at her till she learned one; and then he tried his father.
This was harder work, for being a violent man, he threw
things at the child's head; still Willy persevered. And
when he had learned to read, he.would take his Bible, and
read chapter after chapter aloud, that his parents might be
interested in the story. Soon mother and children were
all regular attendants at the Sunday School.







THE BIRDS IN THE


NEST.


Poor Willy was very delicate, and it was plain that there


was not enough of food in their home for them all;


for the


father earned very little, and often spent that little on drink;
and so Willy and a sister found a home in the Birds' Nest.


She is one of the gentlest of our girls.


At Christmas she


got a prize marked for "one'erer ready to help."
is about thirteen years old, and Willy about twelve.


Nearly two years ago a very nice girl, who had come


from Connemara, left the


Nest and went to service.


have now her two little sisters-such an original-looking


of children.


Biddy


a thin,


narrow-faced


thing, of perhaps
and black eyes.


eight years old, with straight black hair
Maggie is, I should think, six-a little


round thing, with short, brown, curly hair and blue eyes.
They love each other very much, and Maggie seems to


think that everybody means to be good to her.


Both these


by friends.


little ones are adopted


One day


asked charity from a friend of ours.


was in India;
had not heard


she had come home with th


from him since.


A little


from time to time, but it seemed of no 1


starving, as the


mother was too weak


to


e children, and
help was given
use; they were
work. So the


three elder children were admitted into the Nest, and then


the mother died, and then the


baby.


54


She


pair


WVe


little


last year a poor woman, with four children,


She said her husband







THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. 55
Twelve months afterwards a very respectable-looking
man came to the Birds' Nest inquiring for three children,
answering to the description of these three. He said his
wife had come to Ireland with them, and he, not hearing
from her, had given up his situation to look for her. He
had traced her to Dublin, and then to the Birds' Nest,
where he found his lost little ones. He was in great
delight to find them so well taken care of, and begged
that we would still take care of the motherless little ones.
He would go to service, and save all he could to help to
pay for them. So Polly, and Conny, and Tommy remain
in the happy home where they first found rest after their
trials and wanderings.
Another little child we have taken under like circum-
stances. The father went to America some time ago.
The mother was to follow as soon as the baby was a little
older. She had a situation as servant, where she was
allowed to keep the baby; but the poor woman fell into
ill-health and died. The lady did what she could for the
child, denying herself many comforts that it might be fed
and clothed. Now she is very ill herself, and so we have
taken her little charge. And if the father ever is heard
of again, he will be very glad to get his little girl safe. If
not, we trust she will meet him in the beautiful land,
where







56 THE BIRDS IN THE NEST.

"Little children are never hungry
And mothers are never sad;
Where there's nothing to make them sorry,
And plenty to make them glad."

There is one wee child in the Nest who attracts every-


body's al
" JENNY


attention.
ROBIN."


What do you think her name is ?-
Is not that a nice name for a birdie?


She is very little, and has eyes as bright as the real robins


that hop about in winter.
her very much; but she


Jenny has a mother who loves
has a little child younger than
0D


Jenny.


She earns 8 a-year, and


pays 4 to the nurse


who takes care of him. With the re,
She was a Roman Catholic; and wh
her poor home she knew nothing of
Now she is a real Christian, and is


st she clothes herself.
ien I first saw her in
Jesus and His love.


so thankful


to have


Jenny in the


Nest.


Two dear little girls came from the country to the


Nest quite lately. TI
Mary is ten years old;


heir names are Mary and Nannie.


Nannie is eight.


Their case was


so pressing that we were obliged to take both when there
was only a bed for one; so they both sleep together in one of


the small beds.


first.


It was in December we heard about them


Their father had gone away two or three years ago,


and no one knew anything


about


him;


but he had been


so unkind to his wife and five children that no one wished







THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. 57

to find him. The mother worked very hard to support
the children, and some kind friends subscribed a little
money to apprentice the eldest boy to a shoemaker. He
worked very well, and was learning his trade nicely, when
he was taken ill of hip-disease. He was in hospital some
time, then sent home incurable. Such a home-only a
stable some one had given this poor woman rent-free! It
was harder than ever for her now, and little Mary had
tried to help her by going on messages for the neighbours;
and an old lady of seventy-seven undertook to teach
Nannie. (There was no Protestant school near.) She
says, 1"I have an apt scholar; she spells and reads, learns
multiplication-table, Scripture, and hymns." This kind
lady also gave Nannie food every day. This was what
we first heard of this poor family. Then came another
letter, saying they had been told they must leave the stable,
and then they would all be homeless. We wrote to say
we would take Mary and Nannie in as soon as possible.
And when the dear friends at Southampton said they
would support them, we got them in at once. They are
so grateful, and are already quite at home in the Birds'
Nest.
A great many of the children in the Birds' Nest have
got no fathers, and a great many have no mothers. I
could not give the history of them all. If I did, it would







THE BIRDS IN THE NEST.


only be like the roll mentioned in


Ezekiel,


" full of lam-


entations, and mourning, and woe." Frc
said, you can imagine something of their


like much


,m wha t I


have


former misery.


better to tell of their present happiness, and


to lead those who have been our helpers


to thank


that He has made them the means of so much


God


blessing,


and encourage others who have not yet entered upon the


service of the I
Him, that that
He will one day
one of the least


heavenly


Master to join in this work for


may be a very large


company to whom


say, Inasmuch as ye have done it unto
of these my brethren, ye have done it


unto ME."


TO THE WANDERER.


LONELY traveller!


little orphan!


Sorrowful and weary,
If thy life seem lone and cheerless,
If the way be dreary,
There is One can hear and see,
Looks, and loves, and pities thee.
'We have got a Home for children
Poor as thee and lonely,
Where they hear of Christ the Saviour,
'Tis for children only.
Come, then, little wanderer, here
Learn' of Christ the Saviour dear.


58








THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. 59

On the cross He died for sinners
Full of sin and cheerless,
And He waits to take you to Him;
Come,, oh come, then, fearless.
Meekly bow before His throne,
All your sins and sorrows own.




TO THE WANDERERS' FRIENDS.
OH! kind friends, help us in pity,
There are very many
Orphans wander through the city
Without e'en a penny.
Give us of your bounteous store,
Give to those distressed and poor.

And our Lord will bless the giver,
For His grace is endless;
Therefore, friends, where'er you be,
Try to help the friendless.
Christ will say, when life is o'er,
(6 Come, for you have helped my poor."
One of the Collectors,















CHAPTER


DAILY


VII.


HAVE told you


a great deal about the


history


of the


Nest, and now I think I ought to


you what it


is like.


Well, to


begin


with the


outside.
oblong sto
wish it wa


It is just what the picture represents, a


Ine
1S.


great


building,-not at all like a real bird's nest; I
I should like to have had it a cozy-looking


place, with all sorts of nooks about it, porched doors, and


domer windows,


roof;


and little chimneys


popped about the


been my taste to have roses,


and ivy, and creeping plants climbing up, and round about


the windows and chimneys.


a nice green field
quick-set hedge.
ful, but would hav


And there should have been


round about, surrounded by a good
All this would have been very delight-
e cost a good deal of money. And do


you know we were obliged to put away all idea of beauty


when we considered the plans for


The Nest.


The great


problem we had to solve was, how to accommodate the


WORK.


tell


and then it would have


























o


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PAGE 60


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. ,l






DAILY WORK. 61
largest number of children for the smallest sum of money.
And after thinking and planning a great deal, we were
obliged to take the plan that was the very simplest possible.
It is ugly, I allow, outside, but it is economical and useful.
The beauty is all inside. Who cares about the casket
when compared with the precious jewels it contains ? who
cares about the purse when compared with the money it
contains ? And so we do not care about the outside of the
house, when we think of the precious jewels that are there
being polished and prepared for the Saviour's casket. We
are content that no money has been wasted; and though
.a great deal has been spent-much more than we at first
thought would have been'enough-yet it is all put to good
practical purposes.
I have elsewhere described the plan of the building;
now let us peep inside, and see what goes on there. It is
just break of day, on a fine spring morning. The green
blinds of the great dormitories are drawn down, but through
the line left at the edge a bright beam of sunlight stretches
in; it rests on a little iron cot-bed covered with a bright
patchwork quilt; it kisses the rosy cheek of a curly-headed
sleeper; he wakes up, and looks round on his sleeping
companions. Forty-five such little iron beds, inhabited by
forty-five such sleepers, are in that' room; but they are
not to sleep much longer: one after another awakes, and






62


before


very long


DAILY


somewhere


WORK.

about a


dozen of the elder


girls come in, and the little ones are soon carried off to the


washing-rooms down stairs, where


they are washed, and


dressed, and brushed, and then
ground to wait for breakfast.


turned out


into the


play-


Some time


before the streak


of sunlight


roused


up the


little boy in the infants' dormitory, the elder boys were up
and dressed, beds were neatly made, and if you want to
know where the boys are, you must listen for the sound of
scrubbing-brush, shoe-brush, or knife-board, for this is the


time for household work for the boys; ;
lighted they are to be permitted to take


and very much de-


their


share.


you know we are quite proud of our boys, they are
pleasant, industrious fellows, and so fond' of work.


Do


such
Just


before breakfast-time these busy workers assemble in their


washing-room, to


when


change


the breakfast-bell


their


clothes


rings at half-past


and wash;


eight
0


and


o'clock,


boys, girls, and infants are all ready to march into
dining-room.
The sun never shone upon a happier set of children.


is a comfort to look at them seated round the tables, each


provided with a good
filled with hot cocoa.


piece of bread, and


a little tin


can


Breakfast is soon despatched, and


then there is a run in the play-ground; and at nine o'clock


the children divide


into three


companies,-boys,


girls,


the,

It






DAILY WORK. 63

and infants,-each company marching into its respective
school. And now begins new work,--mental work,-
cheerful, happy seeking for the knowledge of which many
of the dear-children were deprived so long. In any sec-
tion of these schools you may have sweet hymns sung by
first and second voices in beautiful harmony; you will
get wonderful answering in Scripture texts and doctrine;
and you will be Surprised to find how much lessons are
loved.
While lessons are going on the kitchen presents a
busy scene, for there dinner is preparing, not only for the
190 nestlings, but for their teachers and helpers besides.
The dinners are very simple,-potatoes and milk, or pease
soup, two days; meat in broth, two days; cold meat and
potatoes, one day; fish or bacon, with vegetables, one
day; and on Sundays, tea and bread and butter. At ten
minutes to one six of the elder girls come out of school
to lay the tables; and at one the great troop marches in,
each child knowing its own place, and quietly taking it.
The bell rings for silence, and then all voices join in
singing-
"Be present at our table, Lord;"
and then begins the clatter of knives and forks or spoons,
and the pleasant murmur of happy voices. At any moment
a touch of the bell brings silence; and this is a very







DAILY WORK,


pleasant time to
all there.


talk a little


to the children, as


they are


At two


o'clock all are again in school, till three;


then, on fine days, there is a walk, the three schools going
separately with their own teachers.


Returning


from


the walk,


there are


various


small
\


occupations, till, at six o'clock, another meal of cocoa and
bread; and then the infants are all washed and put to bed,
and the elder children go into evening-school.


is the regular routine


of every day


but Saturday


and Sunday.
I should


like to


give my readers two peeps at the


family life of our children.


A peep on a winter's


afternoon.


dinner, and walk are all over, a fine


When lessons, and
fire is made up in


the girls'


schoolroom ;


forms are arranged


in great semi-


circles around it, inclosing a large basket full of things
to be mended, and a box of needles, thread, scissors, &c.


The little


boys


and the little girls


are in the infants'


schoolroom, enjoying a game of romps with
loved friend, Miss M---; but all the boys and


their be-
girls who


can sew are gathered around the schoolroom fire, and
some of the mere babies, too small to romp, are there too,


and Mrs. O'Neil in the middle;


and scissors and needles,


and hands and tongues, are soon busy enough.


" How


64


and


This






DAILY WORK. 65

is this to be done ?" and, Please, what shape-patch shall
I put here ?" and, "Wouldn't it be best to make these
two pinafores into one ?" &c., &c. But by-and-by all
is in fair progress; and then one starts a hymn, and all
join; and by the time that is done, perhaps the door
opens, and some dear friend enters with a book in her
hand, and a chair is soon found for her, right in the
middle; and the supper-bell rings before the story is half
read, so it shall be finished next day.
Now for a peep on a summer's evening. It is eight
o'clock, but it is yet light, and for the last half-hour there
has been undressing going on. And when the night-gown
was on, and the clothes folded, each little one knelt down
beside its bed to thank God for all His blessings, and to
ask for more for itself and all its friends. And now they
are all in bed-forty-five-in the infants' dormitory;
and we open the door and peep in. Some one at the far
end spies us, and strikes up a hymn of welcome, and in a
moment all are sitting up to join; and the sounds are
heard in the other rooms, and some who have not begun
to undress come in, so we have quite a concert. And
then we say good-bye, and the children go to sleep; and
we pray that each one of those rescued little ones may
have a place amongst the white-robed company above,
who shall sing the new song unto Him that loved them.
E







DAILY WORK.


On Saturday school


elder


is over at twelve o'clock, and the


girls immediately set to work to scrub floors, .which


keeps them busy almost all day.
Several of the girls have responsibilities all to themselves.
One has to take care of the tin cans, another of the knives


and forks; several of them have to help


in keeping


wardrobes; and others act as mothers to a certain number
of the small children.
If our girls were not very industrious they never would
be able to do all the work of the house, as till they have


passed


their examination they must be in


school


in the


morning hours; but they get up very early, especially on
washing days, and work so heartily, that the great house is


at all times a pattern of cleanliness.


One day I was down


at the Nest during the girls' half-hour's play, which they
always have in the middle of school. I was passing the


laundry, when


saw three


girls


hard at work.


" Well done, little women; but why are you not at play ?"


"Oh!" said one, "it is play-hour;


but we like work bet-


ter than


play.''


And so, of their own accord, they were


spending the half-hour in folding


and ironing


clothes.


I turned away
spirit of these


,feeling very thankful
dear girls; and I wond


that such was the
ered less than I had


done before at the cleanliness of the house, and at the suc-


cess of those who go out.


Our desire for the children is,


66


the


said,






DAILY WORK.


67


first of all, that they may be true followers of the


Lord


Jesus Christ, and then, that they may find
eyes of those with whoni they have to do.


favour


in the


Now I should


like to tell you how our nestlings spend


Sunday.


It is a very happy day in


Christian homes, and


I am sure it is a happy day in this great Home.


But I must begin with Saturday evenings.
dinner washing begins, for every child must


Shortly after
have a warm


bath, and


be thoroughly cleansed;


then, as each


one is


undressed to go to bed, its clothes are well brushed, neatly


folded,


and laid into a


basket;


arranged ready for the morning.
at seven o'clock there is a stir in


and the Sunday ones
When morning comes,
the little beds, and the


clean faces pop up, and one after another turn out of bed;


and soon there is a happy bustle of


washing


and dressing,


and then the elder ones make the beds and lay the
fast, and at nine o'clock all sit down to the tables.


break-
After


this, while all keep their places, the matron talks a little to


them about the Sabbath-day, and the


children can serve God.


way in which


Then she reads a chapter,


little
and


prays.
After


this the'children go


into the


play-ground,


walk about, learning hymns, or singing, or reading, for
half-an-hour; then they have to dress for church. Even


the little ones go every Sunday.


None remain


at home,


and


I







DAILY WORK.


unless one happens to be sick.


Two-and-two they go to


church; and they sit very quietly, though many of them


are so little they cannot understand much.


After church


they all get home, and the


cloth


is laid for dinner, and


all sit


down


to it.


Then


there is another half-hour's


quietness in the


After


play-ground, and


this there is a spare


hour, in


then Sunday School.%
which all do as they


like, only there must be no noise; and then all assemble
in the infant schoolroom, and a kind clergyman or friend


meets


them, and there is a children's


service.


They


answer the responses, and sing the chants; and the sermon


so simple


that the very


little ones can understand.


They do so enjoy


this; and some of the elder ones take


notes of


the sermon.


After


this supper is soon ready,


and then the younger ones


go to bed, and the elder ones


sit up a little longer, and read their books.
I am sometimes asked whether we have any naughty
children in the Nest, for all my stories are about good
ones? And one day a lady said to me, in quaint language,
"Thee thinks' them a great deal better than they are."
Well, I don't know about that. I think it is much better


to think about bright things than


I must plead guilty
pleasant to tell, and


dark.


telling bright


And I'm afraid


things, for they are


pleasant to remember;


and there is


an old proverb which says, that "Every


family should


68


is






DAILY WORK. 69

wash its own dirty clothes,"-that means, that troubles
should not be made public. And you know kind parents
always try to forget their children's faults when they are
forgiven. But I suppose, as our birdies have so many
parents, and parents ought to know all about their
children, I ought to shew the dark side of our nestlings
as well as the bright side. Of course we have troubles
and difficulties of all sorts. Our little children come to
us with wild habits and untrained minds. Some of them
have never known loving care, and it takes a great deal of
patience on the part of the Matron and teachers to restrain
wild habits, and instil principles of obedience, and love,
and order.
One cold day in winter I saw a new little girl looking
as if her clothes were very thin. I had lately given warm
petticoats to each, and I looked at hers-she had but one
on. "Did you not get a new warm petticoat ?" I asked.
"Yes, ma'am." And where is it? She did not
speak for a moment. Then she said, "I sold it to
." She did not say for what price; but the other
little girl had three petticoats. It is very common to find
new children changing clothes with each other when out
in the play-ground. They have to be taught everything,
even how to put on their clothes.
Sometimes little boys and girls who have been, up to







DAILY WORK.


nine or ten years of age,


living


an idle, wandering


cannot bear the restraint of home, and they wander away,


over and over again.


Even one boy who has this restless


propensity does great mischief, and


will often lead away


others.


One day


a little


girl


wandered


away


another, and was found


by


Dublin, with her bib full


had nowhe.
her safely


the Master in the streets of


of her little possessions.


re to go, and was greatly fighter
back again, poor little wanderer!


led; he


She
took


We try to


make the children as happy as we can, surrounding them


with gentle influences, and most of them grow up


and even the


troubles are blessings, if they


give


1


nicely;
us fresh


errands to our loving Saviour.
We try to teach our children to live as in the presence
of a loving Father; to do the meanest of their daily work


as for Him;


to obey, not with


"eye-service ;"


to go


Jesus in all trouble, and thank Him for all joys.
even the little ones can thus glorify God in their
lessons and daily work.


70


life,


with


to


For
daily








DAILY WORK. 71



LITTLE LIGHTS.

JESUs bids us shine
With a pure, clear light,
Like a little candle
Burning in the night;
In the world of darkness,
So we must shine,
You in your small corner,
And I in mine.

Jesus bids us shine
First of all for Him;
Well He sees and knows it,
If our light grow dim:
He looks down from heaven
To see us shine,
You in your small corner,
And I in mine.

Jesus bids us shine
Then-for all around,
For many kinds of, darkness
In the world are found:
There's sin, there's want and sorrow,
So we must shine,
You in your small corner,
And I in mine.













CHAPTER VIII.
HOW WE KEEP CHRISTMAS.
"It is more blessed to give than to receive."


I think


I must tell you something


SChristmas time in t
the real Holly and
joy, comes to the poor birdies.
of one Christmas it will do for


:he Birds'


Nest; and


about
how


Ivy, and the real time


If I give you the history


Sa specimen.


Well, there


is a kind gentleman who lives near the Nest, and who
very often Watches the procession of one hundred and fifty
boys and girls going to church on Sundays, and sees their
good behaviour there.


About a fortnight before
thought came into his head
will give those dear children


Christmas


time a very kind


and heart-it was this:


a real


Christmas dinner-


beef and plum


pudding.


He asked a lady to manage it


for him, and he would pay the money.
kind heart and a wise head, and so


make her calculations.


This 1
she sat


There were raisins and


ady had a
down to
currants,


and sugar and suet, and flour and bread,


and beef and


of





pOW WE KEEP CHR STMAS. 73

potatoes, to be bought; and the first question was-how
much of each would.be wanted? and the second was-how
such a great dinner should be cooked? Both these ques-
tions required consultation and calculation; but at last the
plans were all laid, and the children were told what their
kind friend was going to do for them. There was a great
clapping of hands, and a great shout of joy at the news.
And from that time till Christmas-day there was as
much pleasure in the hearts of the poor little children in
the Nest as there is in the hearts of the little children who
live in happy homes, and have kind papas and mammas,
and elder brothers and sisters, who they know are pre-
paring joyful surprises for Christmas-day.
At length the Christmas-eve came, and on that day the
preparations were to be made. Early in the morning
three carts, loaded with ivy, and holly with red berries,
arrived at the gate. And the boys were sent to carry it
all in, which they accomplished in a wonderfully short
time. Then, with the help of the girls, and directed by the
schoolmaster and schoolmistress, the room was dressed up.
Such a happy time it was! The sun shone in at the win-
dows, and the hum of the mingled happy voices was right
pleasant to hear. Many hands made light work," and
by the middle of the day the decorations were finished.
Then came the girls with brooms to sweep out the rub-






HOW tE KEEP CHRISTMAS.


bish, and


that was all that could be done in that room for


that day at
the kitchen.


least, and the work was finished.


There a number of


the elder


Not so in


girls, headed


the kind matron, Miss


Howard,* were most busily


engaged


all


day


long,


making


those


most wonderful


things, plum puddings!
It was eleven o'clock


before


they all got to bed;


no matter, they were all too excited to be sleepy.


very early on Christmas morning the


little ones were


roused, that there might be time for much extra combing,
and washing, and dressing; really I do think the big girls
had made up their minds that every little face should be


polished so as to be a regular looking-glass, reflecting


the


brightness around.
But all this washing and dressing was over by breakfast


time; and then the children went to church, all


except


few elder girls, who had to stay at home to lay the tables.
This was accomplished with even more care than usual.


The cloths were quite clean, and


the knives


and forks


polished up in a marvellous manner.
The meat was roasting in the kitchen, and the puddings
were boiling in the boiler, when the little ones came home


from church;


and they were all seated in their places at


Miss Howard was the kind friend who undertook the office of matron
when we first got into the new Nest.


74


by


but
And


.






HOW WE KEEP CHRISTMAS. 75

the tables when the kind gentleman and his family and
other friends came in. It did not take long to place the
dishes on the tables, and then grace was sung, and several
kind friends set to work to cut up the joints, and soon all
were helped.
While the plates were being washed for the pudding,
the children sang some hymns, and so gave pleasure to
the friend who was giving them so much. It was four
o'clock before this happy dinner was over.
I don't know whether the kind gentleman thought of
the words of Jesus, but I am sure many others did,-
"When thou makest a feast, call the poor They
cannot recompense thee, but thou shalt be recompensed."
Oh, yes! in doing good there is a recompense now, in
the joy and lightness of heart; and there is a recompense
hereafter, for will not Jesus one day say, "Come, ye
blessed of my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for
you; for I was an hungered, and ye gave me meat; I was
a stranger, and ye took me in; naked, and ye clothed me.
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these
my brethren, ye have done it unto me!"
These promises, and the smile of Jesus, are the HOLLY
AND IVY to us,-the bright things of winter time. But
when they are all fulfilled, and we live in His presence,
where there is fulness of joy, there will be no winter time,






76 HOW WE KEEP CHRISTMAS.

for the trees yield their fruit every month, and there is
no night there."
But we have not done with Christmas time yet. There
were some little children living in England, and they
wanted to give pleasure to the poor little nestlings, and
they set to work and made a large number of bags, with
pincushions and thimbles in them, for the elder girls, and
they dressed dolls for the little ones; and when I heard
of this, I said, "We must have a Christmas tree to hang
all these nice things on." Other children heard of this
plan, and they took up the idea, and some sent balls and
tops, and some sent little books and markers; and at length
there were enough things for each child to have something.
I could not tell you what idea the poor little children
had of a Christmas tree; some of them had never seen
such a thing, and so they puzzled over it till they
dreamed about it, and at length made up their minds that
it must be something very wonderful indeed. And so
it was.
We did not set up the tree till one day in January.
The children's friend, Mr. Dallas, was coming over, and
so we waited for him, for it was to be a regular day of re-
joicing. We opened the folding doors, and so made two
great rooms into one; and then we set up the tree in the
middle. It reached up very high, there were some pretty






HOW WE KEEP CHRISTMAS. 77
flags at the top, and each article on the tree had the name
of a child upon it. Tables were set up around the tree,
for the children were to have tea and cake, and they were
to be questioned, and friends were to be present to listen,
and share the fun. The little children of the Nest were
not allowed to see the preparations till all was ready; but
they did not mind this, for they had a secret too, and felt
themselves quite important. I think I must let you into
their secret. Well, you know Jesus said, "It is more
blessed to give than to receive," and Miss Howard thought
the nestlings should, on this grand occasion, taste of the
pleasure of giving. So she got a piece of canvas, and
prepared the pattern of a lamp-stand, to be given by the
children to Mr. Dallas. She determined that each child
should at least put in a stitch, This was not very easy
to manage; but if Miss Howard once set her heart upon
a thing, she would be sure to carry it out. She arranged
the children all in a row around the schoolroom, then she
took a chair and sat at the head of them, with the work
in her hand. She then gave the order for a very slow
march, and as each child came up to her, it put in one
stitch. In this way all had a little share; and the work
was afterwards finished by some of the elder girls. It
was quite a pretty lamp-stand. When it was ready, a
letter was written, signed by all the children who could







78 HOW WE KEEP CHRISTMAS.

write, and the little ones' names were put down for them;
and this was the children's secret.


Well,


at last the time came, and


friends


assembled;


amongst them many of the members of "The Children's
Association;" some who had given the things for the tree,


but not a
places;


all.


Then the children marched in and took their


but the little ones opened their eyes so wide, and


wondered so much at the beautiful


tree, that


they had


be lifted


into their seats;


one of them tumbled over a


form, he did not know what he was doing,


Very soon


Mr. Dallas came, and then


the children sang


a song


had been composed for the occasion, to


the tune of "Some folks like to sigh."
here for those who did not hear it.

Welcome, welcome home,
Father dear, father dear,
Welcome, welcome home,
We're glad to see you here.
Join all with heart and voice,
And glad hosannas raise,
We'll swell the song,
Our Jesus' name we'11 praise.

SOnce we wandered far,
Father dear, father dear,.
Once we wandered far,
But you have brought us here.


I must put it in


welcome, which


to


of







HOW WE KEEP CHRISTMAS. 79

Join all with heart and voice,
And loud hosannas raise,
We '11 swell the song,
Our Jesus' name we '11 praise.

Erin's children sighed,
Long ago, long ago,
Your arms were opened wide
To shelter them from woe.
Join all with heart and voice,
And loud hosannas raise,
We '11 swell the song,
Our Jesus' name we '11 praise.

SErin's children love
To welcome you, to welcome you,
You've taught us how above
We '11 meet the Saviour, too.
Join all with heart and voice,
And loud hosannas raise,
We '11 swell the song,
Our Jesus' name we '11 praise.'

"In the better land,
Father dear, father dear,
A glorious angel band
Will welcome you up there.
Join all with heart and voice,
And loud hosannas raise,
We '11 swell the song,
Our Jesus' name we'll praise."

When this had been sung, and tea and cake finished,


'.w 'c -.






80 HOW WE KEEP CHRISTMAS.

the smallest child, a little boy with rosy cheeks and curly
hair, was lifted up on the table beside Mr. Dallas; and
he handed him first the letter, which Mr. Dallas read
aloud; and then he gave the paper parcel, and Mr. Dallas
opened it, and expressed his delight and his thanks. And
then he took the little boy in his arms, and kissed him,
and blessed him; and he told the children the kiss and the
blessing was for them all; and all the children looked very
much pleased; and then they answered some questions
nicely; and after that the pretty things were. taken from
the tree, and given round to the children; and there was
such joy, and such wonder, and such looking at each
others' things as never was known before. And then we
thought all the fun was over; but no, we were mistaken.
A strange gentleman was present, and he was so interested
in the children, that he came forward, and said he had a
nice Magic Lantern, which he would be very glad to
bring and shew them.
Of course all were delighted; and so the Magic Lan-
tern was brought; and the happy day had a very happy
ending. And I think you will all agree with me in think-
ing that the children of The Birds' Nest had indeed, what
we wish to every one of you, as year by year goes by,-
A HAPPY CHRISTMAS !







HOW WE KEEP CHRISTMAS.


.CHRISTMAS DAY.

'Tis Christmas Day-glad voices
Awake the solemn sound,
And happy voices in our home,
And healthful looks around.
Why do we thus keep Christmas morn?-
It is the day when Christ was born.

With little gifts that tell our love,
With garlands on the wall,
With thankful hearts and helpful hands,
We keep a festival.
Why do we thus keep Christmas morn?-
It is the day when Christ was born.

Full eighteen hundred years ago,
Christ Jesus came on earth:
He came, He rose, He died for us-
We thank God for His birth.
And therefore we keep Christmas morn,
The day our Saviour Christ was born.

Christ healed the sick, and helped the poor,
While He was here on earth.
Do what you can to be like Him,
This morning of His birth.
Help some one to keep Christmas morn,
The day our Saviour Christ was born.












CHAPTER IX.
THE CHILDREN'S ASSOCIATION.
The rich and poor meet together: the Lord is the maker of them all."-
PROV. XXii. 2.
E have told a great deal about the Birds' Nest,
and the children who have there found a home.
Now we want to tell something about the way
in which children in many places have joined together to
support them; but I should like all, especially the little
ones, to remember, that every good thing we are enabled
to do is of God-it is He who worketh in us both to
will and to do." What a wonderful thing it is that He
should let us be sharers in His great work! He could do
it all without us, even as He said, Let there be light,
and there was light." But, in His wonderful mercy, He
takes us, a band of feeble people and little children, into
partnership with himself, and gives us strength to labour,
and then gives us such rewards.
When our dear friend, Mrs. George Wale, died, some
of her work fell into my hands,-the preparation of the





THE CHILDREN'S ASSOCIATION. 83

"ERIN'S HOPE," the juvenile magazine of the Society
for Irish Church Missions. For some years it had been
a great pleasure to her to write true stories about Irish
children for the children of England.
I love little children very much indeed. I think that
when Jesus gathered a group of children around Him,
and put His hands upon them, and blessed them," He
meant that His followers should be blessings to little
children. And when he said to Peter, "Feed my lambs,"
He meant that not only Peter, but all who could say,
with Peter, Lord, thou knowest that I love thee,"
should take the words of Jesus to their hearts, and should
try to lead the lambs of the flock into the right paths.
Thousands of children every month read "Erin's
Hope." I should have felt it too great a responsibility
to write for so many, only I knew that if Jesus said to
me, "Feed my lambs," He would give me stores of food;
He would give me the right thoughts and the right
words; and so I took it as my work for Jesus. Well,
you know, besides the children I was writing for, there
were the poor little children God had given us to work
for; and one day the thought came to me, Surely these
children belong to each other, we must form a CHIL-
DREN'S ASSOCIATION." The children to whom God
has given good gifts will be. glad to share them; and how






THE CHILDREN'S ASSOCIATION.


happythis


will make


them, for


Jesus


said,


" It is


'more


blessed to give than to receive."


So I


asked


Jesus


about it


all, and


then formed a


Children's


Association.


My own name was put down


as Secretary, and


three


little children


who lived


in the


same house were the first members.


We made


three


resolutions,-
We will pray for the Birds' Nest.
We will work for the Birds' Nest.


We will collect for the Birds'


The very first


Nest.


thing we did was to pray.


And


once


every week regularly, and on every special occasion, we


went into a room together in


the dark;


and


talked a little together of our wants; and then


down, and each one prayed.


then we
we knelt


And as we got on a little


we found that
and before we


we had


thanks to


offer as well as prayer;


knelt we counted our mercies as well as


our wants; and so in everything, with praise and thanks-


giving, our wants
Father, who seeth


were made
in secret.


the youngest, is not with us nc
in that fair land where


known to our Heavenly
One of these little girls,
)w; she is gone to dwell


"The streets are shining gold,
And the glory is untold."


We miss


her earnest voice at our prayer meetings, and


84


- j


0






THE CHILDREN'S ASSOCIATION. 85

her glad voice in the hymn of praise; but we know her's
is one of the most joyous voices raised in the heavenly
song. And it may be that she and many another little
one who on earth learned to care for poor children, for
Jesus' sake, talk together of them there.
When we had thus started the Children's Association,
I published a little penny book, entitled, "A few words to
little Children who want to be like Jesus," and wrote
about it in Erin's Hope." I asked any little children
who wished to join to write to me, and then prepared
some cards ready for any children who might wish to
collect.
We took three wretched little children who wanted to
get into the Birds' Nest, and a friend photographed them;
from this a woodcut was made and printed on the cards;
and then I waited a little while to see what would come of
it. I felt like a gardener who had sown seed in a bed in
his garden; or a farmer who has sown a field all over with
wheat; or a little girl who has planted a geranium slip in
a pot in her nursery window. I thought of some words
of Jesus-"Any plant that my heavenly Father hath-not
planted shall be rooted up." And I watched to see
whether my plants were of His planting.
After some days there came a letter by post. It was
directed in a lady's handwriting. There was nothing par-






86 THE CHILDREN'S ASSOCIATION.

ticular about it; but the inside caused me great joy. It
was written in letters copied out of printed books, each
letter about an inch long, and the words, "My dear Secre-
tary," filled the first page. When I had read it all, I found
it contained the request of a little girl, that I would send
her a collecting-card. And I did send her a card, and
wrote her a letter directed to herself; and after that the
postman often brought me letters from little children
wanting cards; and some from fathers and mothers, who
were delighted that their children had found a work for
Jesus so suitable to them. One of their dear, loving
mothers says, "I feel truly interested; it is so nice for
children to feel that God will graciously employ them in
such a work. I trust, in this coming year, if spared, to
know and to feel more of the- power of prayer, to pray
more, and to watch more for answers to prayer; and your
little book has come to help me in this, by giving such
marked answers to your prayers, and those of your dear
children. My child, who will take up the card, is my
only one, and not strong. I mention this to you, because
I feel your hearts are large enough to take other people's
children in; and when you pray for the young collectors
and helpers in your interesting work, you will include my
boy in your petition. May God bless and prosper you
abundantly, even as He has promised, and He is faithful."





THE CHILDREN'S ASSOCIATION. 87

Writing is the best way of talking to friends at a
distance, but for those near it is better to meet face to
face; so we got up some meetings of different kinds.
The first was a tea-party in St. John's School-
house.
Sometimes we had meetings without tea. Sometimes
we had a magic-lantern meeting at the Nest. One
meeting was a very charming one-a real Children's Asso-
ciation meeting, "the-rich and the poor meeting together."
4 We asked every collector to give a shilling, and to come
to the Nest on a certain Thursday evening, at four o'clock.
When we had got all the shillings, we got a great quantity
of currant-cake made, and ordered the children's evening
supply of bread to be made into flat cakes, and to be
brought hot. Then we hired some cups, saucers, teapots,
jugs, and bowls, and we arranged our tea-party. Six
cups and saucers, a bowl, and jug, went to each teapot.
The hot cakes were buttered, and the currant-cake cut
up, on plates down each table; and when the collectors
had arrived, the nestlings were all brought into the tea-
room, and a little girl collector presided at each teapot,
while a little boy waited on her. It was a most enjoyable
party.
Our Children's Association has grown very fast, and
struck down root in many different places; and year by





THE CHILDREN'S ASSOCIATION.


it has


grown, and


strengthened,


and yielded


richer


and richer fruits.


When we made up the account at the end of its first


year, and found


that the children had sent 35, we were


very much


delighted.


And year by year the sum in-


creased more and more, till last year,


1870, it was more


than 900.
engaged in
with it.


A wonderful
this work, and


blessing seems to rest on all


wonderful


pleasure


it brings


Feeding and clothing hungry children is such a real work
-a work that very small children can understand; and it


seems


quite worth while to give


only a


penny, when it


will pay for


one breakfast.


And fourpence seems quite


a large sum when it will feed a nestling for a whole day.
And then, when a party of children form themselves into


an association, and collect enough for
of one or two children, they feel all t


the entire support
:he responsibility of


fathers and mothers, and all sorts of little plans are devised


for the good of." our nestling."


Even


the very little


ones can help to make a patchwork quilt to cover its


bed,


and the boys can knit stockings for it, or make a scrap-


book;


and all can save or collect money.


In our great Children's


of workers.
in one view.


Association there are all sorts


[ often think I should like to see them all
I can only imagine what a sight it would


88


year






THE CHILDREN'S ASSOCIATION. 89

be. We should see a little girl in a beautiful castle; she
is learning to hem; it is hard work, but for every half-
yard she will get a penny to put in her Birds' Nest box.
We should see a sick little boy in a garret in London; he
is hoarding up farthings, and trying to fill a little bag for
the nestlings. We should see many groups of children to
whom God has given bounteously: they are gathered
around some kind friend, busy sewing, and on the table
lies the money box, into which they have put their weekly
contributions, and beside it a letter, in large characters,
written by their own nestling. We should see classes of
little children in infants' schools trying to put very little
stitches into their bits of calico, for they are to be sewed
together one-day to make a quilt to send to the Birds'
Nest. We should see happy parties preparing Christmas
tree sales, and lonely children doing what they can.
And better than all, we should see little groups met for
prayer.
Dear children, you who have enrolled yourselves mem-
bers of this great Children's Association, don't look upon
your work as small or unimportant. It is your Father's
business "-the work He has given you to do. He has
need of your services. You want Jesus to save you, and
make you ready for His glorious home; and Jesus wants
you to minister to His poor. Oh! it is a blessed service,





THE CHILDREN'S ASSOCIATION.


enough to make any one happy who enlists in it;


but it


must be done from a right motive,-to be real service it
must begin with the heart. If you listen to Jesus -saying,
" My son, give me thy heart," and you obey Him in that,
you will soon give Him your hands too.
Sometimes children and young people take up a cause
in great earnestness, and work with zeal for a while, and


then-they forget-or they d<
there is something else to do.


onit


like the trouble-or


Their


kindness passes


away.
I was very much struck one day by a remark of one of


our little nestlings.
at the Nest. Th


We had a great number of collectors


ere was a "Holly and


Ivy"


tea-party,


and after the tea there was a magic-lantern with 'dissolving
views. A large group of the little nestlings was gathered
on a raised platform behind the sheet, and I was sitting


amongst them, very much amused at their


delight.


little thing who was sitting close beside me kept stroking
my hand, and manifesting her affection in many childish


ways.


She watched


the


pictures


melting


one into


another for some time.


Then she suddenly looked up at


me and


said,


"Don't


'oo go and change."


" Why,"


"how could I change?" "
It was a wonderful saying.


with a feeling


'Oo so kind now,"


she


I looked at the child


of reverence, and I said to myself, I must


One


said,
said.


go







THE CHILDREN'S ASSOCIATION. 91

give this message to the members of the Children's
Association, for the nestlings look upon me as the
messenger sent to them by all of you; and now I say to
you, "Don't 'oo go and change." If you have begun in
the right way by giving your heart to Jesus, I do not
fear for you. I only fear for those who have only sand
for a foundation to their good works.
Of the many children who have joined our Children's
Association, some are not with us now. In the midst
of their young labours they have heard the secret
message, "The Master is come, and calleth for thee."
And they have gone up higher. Short was their working
day, but long will be their joyful rest, for of each of these
dear ones we have full confidence that they belonged to
the fold of the Good Shepherd.
Could these glorified little ones look down upon us
from their happy home, I think they would say, We
did not work hard enough for Jesus; do you who are left
work harder." I think they would say, "' Oh, heaven is
such a glorious place; do what you can to bring the
poor children here." I think they would say, "There
is nothing on earth worth doing compared with serving
our dear Redeemer."
Are there any reading this little book who will take
their place amongst the workers? Jesus is looking down






THE CHILDREN'S ASSOCIATION.


upon


you now,


and longing to have


you


for His own.


He says to you,


"My


says to you, too, "Son,


yard."
knows


There


is a multitude


son, give me


thine heart."


go work to-day in my


to be fed-only


how it is to be done; but are


you who are like the lad who had fiv


He
vine-,
Jesus


there not many of
re barley loaves and


two small fishes?"


Well, bring them to Jesus;


He will


accept, and make them sufficient.
We must never leave our rescued


children unfed,


unclothed,


and uncomforted.


Our "Holly and Ivy"


must


be


true evergreen,


sparkling brighter, for
the desolation around.


only


looking


the depth of the


fresher,


and


winter time, and


But it does not grow of itself, therefore we want many


hands to gather and bring it.


If you want useful work-


if you want pleasant work-come and help us to brighten
up the lives of desolate little children; come and help to
supply THE HOLLY AND IVY.


92







THE CHILDREN'S ASSOCIATION. 93.

LITTLE ONES LIKE ME.
"JEsvs, when he left the sky,
And for sinners came to die,
In his mercy passed not by
Little ones like nie.
Mothers then, as mothers ought, ,
In the places where He taught,
Unto Him their children brought.
Little ones like me.
Did the Saviour say, then, nay?
No He kindly bid them stay,
Suffered none to turn away
Little ones like me.
When into Jerusalem,
Meekly riding, Jesus came,
Children hailed His blessed name,
Little ones like me.
In the glorious heaven above,
Through the gracious Saviour's love,
Children bliss and glory prove,
Little ones like me.
'Twas for them His life He gave,
To redeem them from the grave;
Jesus. died from hell to save
Little ones like me.
Children, then, should love Him now,
Strive His holy will to do,
Pray to Him, and praise Him too,
Little ones like me."




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