• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Historic note
 Introduction
 Corn clubs
 Peanut clubs
 Pig clubs
 Meetings and picnics
 County contests
 Agricultural short course
 How to measure an acre of land
 Measuring corn
 Measuring peanuts














Group Title: Bulletin - University of Florida. Division of Agricultural Extension ; no. 16
Title: Boys' agricultural clubs
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00026112/00001
 Material Information
Title: Boys' agricultural clubs
Series Title: Bulletin
Physical Description: 16 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Herrington, G. L ( Garvin Leon )
Publisher: University of Florida, Division of Agricultural Extension
Place of Publication: <Gainesville Fla.>
Publication Date: 1919
 Subjects
Subject: Agricultural education -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural extension work -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by G.L. Herrington.
General Note: "February, 1919".
Funding: Bulletin (University of Florida. Agricultural Extension Division)
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00026112
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002569296
oclc - 47285060
notis - AMT5598

Table of Contents
    Historic note
        Unnumbered ( 1 )
    Introduction
        Page 1
    Corn clubs
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Peanut clubs
        Page 5
    Pig clubs
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Meetings and picnics
        Page 9
    County contests
        Page 9
    Agricultural short course
        Page 10
        Page 11
    How to measure an acre of land
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Measuring corn
        Page 14
    Measuring peanuts
        Page 14
        Page 15
Full Text





HISTORIC NOTE


The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
represent the historic publishing
record of the Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
Electronic Data Information Source
(EDIS)

site maintained by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service.






Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University
of Florida







February, 1919


COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN
AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA DIVISION OF AGRICULTURAL
EXTENSION AND UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT
OF AGRICULTURE COOPERATING
P. H. ROLFS, Director




BOYS' AGRICULTURAL CLUBS

By G. L. HERRINGTON, Boys' Club Agent


Fig. 1.-Corn, Peanut and Pig Club Boys


General rules for the boys' agricultural clubs are given by
the United States Department of Agriculture in Bulletin A-74.
Other bulletins on the cultivation of corn and peanuts and how
to raise pigs are issued by the University of Florida and sent to
all club members.
The purpose of this bulletin is to discuss some of the interest-
ing club activities, suggesting a few minor changes in the general
rules so they will apply more to Florida conditions. A partial
report for 1918 is also given, together with suggestions for still
better results in the future.


Bulletin 16







Florida Cooperative Extension


The club organization is composed of an army of volunteer
workers. There are great opportunities for all boys who will
join the clubs and try to succeed. The success that many have
already made in all sections of the State is only an example of
what others can do.
As you read of this work you should know that it is the
result of an organization of 3,276 of the most enterprising boys
from the farms of Florida. It is a big organization and the
results accomplished are in the same proportion, but when we
remember that there are 26,000 boys between 10 and 18 years of
age living on the farms of Florida, we realize how much more
there is to be done..
Three main divisions of the agricultural clubs have been
followed, namely: corn clubs, peanut clubs, and pig clubs. A
miscellaneous group embraces a fewr who are growing cotton,
potatoes, and raising calves.
The table on the opposite page shows the standing of each
county with respect to the number of boys in all clubs.

CORN CLUBS
In some respects 1918 was not a favorable season for a big
corn crop. While the total production was 15,073,000 bushels,
the yield per acre was only 14 bushels. However, the average
market price of corn November first was $1.43, making this
the most valuable of any crop produced in the State in 1918,
in spite of the low yield per acre.
There are 1333 boys who have used improved methods of
growing corn. The club plats serve to demonstrate good methods
of cultivation and fertilization. The corn clubs are helping to
increase our total production as well as the yield per acre.
It was not possible to collect many reports from the corn
club boys in the usual way. This was due to an epidemic of
influenza in the fall at the time the county contests were to have
been held. The contests were postponed several weeks and some
had to be abandoned entirely.
In checking over the reports of the 316 boys who sent in
their reports it was found that they grew 11,899.5 bushels of corn
or an average of 37.7 bushels per acre. The records also indi-
cated that it cost an average of 50 cents a bushel to grow the
corn.
With a yield of 37.7 bushels per acre costing 50 cents a
bushel the 316 acres were produced at an average cost of $18.85









Bulletin 16, Boys' Agricultural Clubs


ENROLLMENT OF CLUB BOYS IN 1918


County E
o w

Alachua ....--.....-...... 46 15
Baker ...................... 43 .........
B ay ........................ 4 ... .........
Bradford ................ 18 ....................
Brevard .................. 6 .................
Broward ................. ----..................... ..
Calhoun ................. 19 ....................
Citrus ........-- ........-.. 4 1
Clay ....................... 59 1
Columbia ............-- ..........-----........... .....
Dade .......................--- 2 2
DeSoto ................... 18 ....................
D uval ..................... 25 ....................
Escambia ................ 24 10
Flagler .................... 12 ....................
Franklin ...............- ....................--- ......
Gadsden .................. 6 .......
Hamilton ............... 21 1
Hernando ............. 34 1
Hillsboro ...........--- 66 1
Holmes .................... 93 61
Jackson ..........----- 82 21
Jefferson ................ 6 ....................
LaFayette ................................ ....................
Lake ........................ 20 3
Lee .......................... 4 1
Leon ........................ 6 .....
Levy ........................ 45 3
Liberty .................... 27 3
Madison ..............-... 53 32
Manatee ................. 44 46
Marion .................... 54 37
Monroe ........-- ......................
Nassau ......-.....--...... 41 .................
Okaloosa ..-............ 18 14
Okeechobee ........ .... .....................
Orange .................... 29 1
Osceola .................. 6 ....................
Palm Beach .......... 42 24
Pasco ...................... 1 ....................
Pinellas ....... ..................
Polk ........................ 50 4
Putnam .................. 40 ....................
Santa Rosa ............ 33 10
Seminole ................ 1
Sumter .................... 64 1
Suwannee .............. 15 13
St. Johns ................ 28 ...................
St. Lucie ................ 1 ....................
Taylor .................... 16 7
Volusia .. ..... .....................................
Wakulla .... ........ 20 18
Walton .................... 35 1
Washington ............ 52 1
Total ..--.......... 1333 I 333


.P

62
19
16
50


13
6
30

33
46
41
50
4

1
10
15
6
45
109

22
15
30
48
8
13
97
56
93

9
13

24
20
11
63

27
39
26
2
78
63
65
37
20

1
17
43
1496


4 127
.................... 62
1 21
1 69
.................. 6
7 7
.................... 32
3 14
3 93
1 1
................... 37
.................... 64
.......... 66
1 85
.................... 16
.................... 16

.................... 32
32
45 95
1 74
............ 199
1 213
.................... 6
.. .. .. .. .-.. 2 2
.................... 38
38
4 39
............ 54
............ 56
1 44
.................... 182
............ 146
7 191

3 53
.................... 45

2 56
2 28
.................... 77
1 65

5 86
1 80
7 76
.............. 3
8 151
.................... 91
.................... 93
.................... 38
.................... 43
..... ..... .. .... ......
2 41
1 54
2 98
114 3276








4 Florida Cooperative Extension


each. The value of the corn at $1.43 a bushel was $49.01, leaving
a net profit of $30.16 per acre. This is very profitable farming.
The boys from Holmes county sent in 45 reports on their
corn demonstrations, making their county stand at the head
of the list. The Hillsboro county boys also maintain a good
record. Nineteen boys in Nassau county grew an average of 60
bushels each. These are splendid yields.
The highest yield in each county is reported in a table giving
the summary of 316 reports. The highest yields from each of
the 29 counties included in the report average 60.3 bushels per
acre. This is proof that high yields are not limited to any one
part of the State.
Lawton Martin of Marion county again produced more than
100 bushels on his acre. His yield was 115 bushels. This is the
third year in succession he has produced more than 100 bushels
per acre and it is a splendid record.
Following is a summary of the corn reports sent in to the
Extension Division of the University:

SUMMARY OF 316 CORN CLUB REPORTS



Ss .2 g0 "& a
County 0




Hillsboro .......................... 35 1078.5 38.1 .46 76.2 .17
Hernando ........................ 24 883.2 6 8 .32 56.0 .43
Polk .................................. 20 820.3 41.1 .45 79.5 .22
Nassau ............................ 19 1180.3 62.1 .56 90.0 .39
Santa Rosa .................. 19 585.8 30.8 .64 50.3 .60
Baker ............................ 17 638.4 37.6 .54 73.0 .22
Madison .............................. 15 721.1 48.0 .32 68.3 .23
Alachua ........................ 14 558.4 39. .46 75.1 .40
Orange ...................... 11 331.1 30.1 .63 39.7 .77
Hamilton ....................... 9 436.6 48.5 .47 80.0 .21
Marion .......................... 9 433.6 48.3 .32 115.0 .12
Washington ................. 9 295 5 32.8 .55 50.0 .38
Walton .......................... 9 286.3 31.8 .62 60.8 .27
Duval ......................... ... 8 276.2 34.5 .61 54.8 .39
Lake ................................ 7 357.3 51.0 .43 64.5 .35
Putnam ........................... 7 306.1 43.7 .37 84.0 .21
Okaloosa .......................... 7 222.5 31.7 .75 53.0 .18
DeSoto ............................. 6 178.0 29.7 .70 38.5 .21
Jefferson ......................... 6 162.8 27.1 .42 57.0 .30
St. Johns ........................ 5 227.3 45.5 .36 64.0 .43
Sumter ..................... 4 232.7 56.3 .28 74.3 .25
Manatee ......................... 109.7 36.7 .63 40.0 .25
Levy .......................... 2 106.0 58.0 .21 88.0 .26
Escambia .......................... 2 7. 38.8 .41 40.0 .83
Calhoun ..................... 1 76.8 76.8 .31 76.8 .31
Plagler ............... 1 70.0 70.0 .37 70.0 .37
Osceola .................... 1 61.0 61.0 .29 61.0 .29
Wakulla .. ............ 1 15.0 15.0 .25 15.0 .25
Total ................ 316 11899.5 37.7 .50 60.3 .31








Bulletin 16, Boys' Agricultural Clubs


PEANUT CLUBS
The peanut clubs have made good progress and many boys
find this to be the most profitable crop they can raise. There
were 333 who conducted demonstrations in growing peanuts.
Each demonstration was one acre in size and they were distrib-
uted over the State as will be seen from the table giving the
enrollment.
The peanut crop has recently become very important in
Florida. There is a good market for peanuts and they make an
excellent feed for livestock when properly used.
Some of the boys harvested their crops and sold them as seed
or to the oil mills. Others used the peanuts and hay as feed. It
is not possible to know what each boy produced, since only a few
reports were sent in.
John Bernath of Santa Rosa county grew 111 bushels of
peanuts on one acre. This is perhaps one of the best yields made
by any club member. His report was signed by two witnesses
and is given as follows:
"The acre on which I grew my peanuts is dark soil about 7 inches deep
with yellow, sandy subsoil. It has been in cultivation three years and last
year produced a crop of corn and velvet beans. I broke it 6 inches deep
with a one-horse plow on February 24. It was then harrowed well and left
in good condition. May 11 I laid off rows 3% feet wide and dropped pea-
nuts by hand 18 inches apart in the drill. They were covered with a culti-
vator and in a few days came up a medium stand. Before planting I
applied 500 pounds of lime and 200 pounds of acid phosphate. Then when
the peanuts were a few inches high another application of 200 pounds acid
phosphate was given.
"I cultivated 4 times with a scrape and harrow. The yield was 111
bushels, while the average yield in this community with usual methods of
cultivation is about 30 bushels per acre. I used the Virginia running
variety.
"The County Agent came to see me three times this year and this is
my second year as a club member. I have learned that a thoro preparation
is necessary for a good crop.
"I sold 100 bushels of peanuts, which leaves me 11 bushels. I have:
bought War Savings Stamps with all the profits realized from my peanut
crop. EXPENSES
"Rent of land. .................... ....................... .... ........................$ 5.00
Preparation of seed bed and planting ................... ............................ 2.10
Seed ................................. ... .... ... --.. --................. ................ 2.60
F fertilizer .................................. ............................. ................... 7.70
Cultivation ........................ ... ................... .. .... ................... 1.40
Gathering .......- .... ........ .- ...................---. ....- ... .............. 3.70
Total cost ...................... .......... ..................... ................ ..............- $22.50
Net cost per bushel ............................ ............- .-.............. .20
RECEIPTS
"Number of bushels ............................ ............ 111
Numbe: of pounds of hay ......-.......... .......... -- 3,000
Value of nuts at market price ......--..................-. .................... $293.04
Value of hay at market price ........... .......................... 48.00
Net profit ..-..-.................. ......... .......... 318.54"







Florida Cooperative Extension


PIG CLUBS
The pig clubs have grown to be the largest branch of the
agricultural clubs. There are now 1,496 active members and at
least 1,009 of these were enrolled during 1918. Those who
entered before this year have mature sows and have been raising
more pigs and selling them to club boys and farmers. Many have



i














Fig. 2.-Judging a Dairy Cow at Boys' Short Course

made large profits on their investments within 15 months after
beginning.
The banks thruout the State have been liberal in loaning
money to boys on very easy terms. This has made it possible for
many to enter the pig club who could not have done so without
some assistance in paying for the pigs.
Many bankers have stated that they appreciate the prompt
and businesslike methods the boys have adopted in paying these
accounts when due. As long as the club members keep up this
record it will be possible to increase the size of the club and to
continue purchasing stock of the best breeding.
An important point in the pig club work is the keeping of
records of each animal's feed and growth. Most boys fail to
consider the reports of much importance, and it is true that good
animals can be raised without keeping any data. But in all
places where accurate accounts are kept such as amount of feed
used and the number pounds the animals have gained each month,







Bulletin 16, Boys' Agricultural Clubs


the pigs are better than where this information is not kept.
The reason for this is that the one who keeps this information
becomes more interested in the development of his pig, and will
give it the very best attention. The other boys in.his community
who keep this information make it possible for him to compare
his work with theirs. It creates a great incentive to do good
work and see who can produce the best animals. This is a much
better plan than to put your pig with the others on the farm,
keep no records, and give it no extra attention.
The Bradford county boys have kept excellent records, and
have done splendid work. The business men and all the citizens
of the county speak well of the work because the County Agent,
Mr. C. D. Gunn, can furnish definite figures at any time of the
year as to the progress the pigs are making. Sixteen boys in this
county raised purebred pigs in 1918. The average weight of the
pigs at the beginning of the contest was 38 pounds, and 167
pounds at the close of the contest, a net gain of 129 pounds
each. These pigs were fed an average of 151 days, gaining .86
pounds a day at a cost of .048c a pound.
The following table gives some interesting figures on the
work done by five of the most successful pig club members in
Bradford county:

FIVE BRADFORD COUNTY PIG CLUB REPORTS


Carrie Lee Green................
Ben Roebuck----....................
Reuben Shaw ...............
Richard Harris ...--............
Clarence Rhoden ........
Total .......................
Average ..................


ca 4. .^
W W b
r Cd 0 0
45 295 250 144 1.74 $ .02
40 179 139 144 1.00 .023
26 167 141 120 .85 .032
43 186 143 144 1.00 .043
41 191 150 144 1.04 .055
195 | 1018 823 696 5.63 I $ .173
39 1 203.61 164.61 139.2 1 1.13 | .035


Madison county has about the strongest pig club in the
State. The boys there are keeping records too. They became
interested in their work from observing the records kept on some
of the best animals. A large percent of the boys are keeping
notes on their work every month and all are raising good hogs.
No better pig club show has ever been held in the State
than Mr. C. E. Matthews, the County Agent, and his boys had













I
I


Fig. 3.-A Field Meeting of Club Boys


.4


*- **-**







Florida Cooperative Extension


in Madison last November. There were 50 pigs in the exhibit.
At the beginning of the feeding period they weighed an average
of 25.7 pounds each. They were fed 184 days, and on the day of
the contest weighed an average of 200.3 pounds. The net gain
was 170.7 pounds in 184 days or an average of .95 pounds a
day. The records also showed that the cost per pound of gain
was only 6 cents.
Following is a summary of the reports of five most success-
ful pig club members in Madison county:
FIVE MADISON COUNTY PIG CLUB REPORTS


'd



Albert Glass 2 26 248 187 1.32 .07
S S C3 o
Thurston Raines ......... 30 281 251 188 1.83 $ .051
Minnie Thomas ............. 17 236 219 170 1.29 .05
Cora Hicks .-.............. 23 286 263 187 1.41 .076
Albert Glass .................. 28 276 248 187 1.32 .07
Dorris Young ................... 34 276 242 185 1.31 .073
Total .................. -- 132- 1355 J 1223 917 6.60 $ .32
Average ..-............. 26.41 271 244.6 183.4 1.32 $ .064
MEETINGS AND PICNICS
It is a good plan for the club boys in each county to meet at
least once during the spring and once during the midsummer.
Following is a good plan for these meetings.
Locate the meeting place near the beach or a lake if pos-
sible, and preferably not far from the homes of some boys who
are growing good corn, peanuts, and pigs. A program should be
rendered during the forenoon, the boys taking an active part.
Every one who has been assigned a subject should prepare a good
paper and read it to the other boys.
All boys should bring a basket lunch and have a picnic or
else a fish fry. When dinner is over, a visit to the farms of some
club boys who are doing good work will be interesting. Later
in the afternoon a bathing party will finish up the day's outing
with the greatest amount of fun. It is desirable to hold joint
meetings of this kind with the canning club girls.

COUNTY CONTESTS
A series of county contests thruout the State is held every
fall. Every boy prepares exhibits of the crops he has grown,







Florida Cooperative Extension


in Madison last November. There were 50 pigs in the exhibit.
At the beginning of the feeding period they weighed an average
of 25.7 pounds each. They were fed 184 days, and on the day of
the contest weighed an average of 200.3 pounds. The net gain
was 170.7 pounds in 184 days or an average of .95 pounds a
day. The records also showed that the cost per pound of gain
was only 6 cents.
Following is a summary of the reports of five most success-
ful pig club members in Madison county:
FIVE MADISON COUNTY PIG CLUB REPORTS


'd



Albert Glass 2 26 248 187 1.32 .07
S S C3 o
Thurston Raines ......... 30 281 251 188 1.83 $ .051
Minnie Thomas ............. 17 236 219 170 1.29 .05
Cora Hicks .-.............. 23 286 263 187 1.41 .076
Albert Glass .................. 28 276 248 187 1.32 .07
Dorris Young ................... 34 276 242 185 1.31 .073
Total .................. -- 132- 1355 J 1223 917 6.60 $ .32
Average ..-............. 26.41 271 244.6 183.4 1.32 $ .064
MEETINGS AND PICNICS
It is a good plan for the club boys in each county to meet at
least once during the spring and once during the midsummer.
Following is a good plan for these meetings.
Locate the meeting place near the beach or a lake if pos-
sible, and preferably not far from the homes of some boys who
are growing good corn, peanuts, and pigs. A program should be
rendered during the forenoon, the boys taking an active part.
Every one who has been assigned a subject should prepare a good
paper and read it to the other boys.
All boys should bring a basket lunch and have a picnic or
else a fish fry. When dinner is over, a visit to the farms of some
club boys who are doing good work will be interesting. Later
in the afternoon a bathing party will finish up the day's outing
with the greatest amount of fun. It is desirable to hold joint
meetings of this kind with the canning club girls.

COUNTY CONTESTS
A series of county contests thruout the State is held every
fall. Every boy prepares exhibits of the crops he has grown,







Bulletin 16, Boys' Agricultural Clubs


together with a complete record of the year's work. When the
pig club contest is held, each boy exhibits his pig and brings
a complete record of his work in raising it. All products are
judged and the records graded by committees so that the win-
ners in the contest may be determined.
The boy who fails to bring his exhibit and report to the
contest because his crop failed to be as good as expected, makes a
mistake. A quitter is certain to win nothing, but there is always
a chance for one who keeps on trying.
An example of the determination of some, however, is shown
by a corn club boy who started out with the hope of a large yield.
He did his work well and had a promising acre of corn, but in
midsummer a storm blew it down and he harvested only 6 bush-
els. He selected ten of the best ears for his exhibit, wrote up his
notes neatly and came on to the contest as if he had produced the
highest yield in tht county. The same boy was awarded a nice
prize by the committee. He had followed proper methods and
his exhibit and the reports gave him the prize.
AGRICULTURAL SHORT COURSE
The University of Florida offers to the club boys a short
course in agriculture annually. It is the custom to hold this
course for one week during the early part of December. Its


Fig. 4.-Short Course Boys Receiving Silo and Silage Instruction







Florida Cooperative Extension


rapid growth indicates how popular it has become and everyone
is fortunate who has an opportunity to attend. The boys' short
course was held in connection with the farmers' short course in
1915 and nine boys attended. In 1916 the first short course for
boys was attended by 73 club members, and in 1917 by 112.
Plans were made for 150 boys to attend in 1918 and no doubt
that number would have been present if the influenza had not
interfered, making it possible for only 83 to come.
No part of the club work is more helpful to the boys than a
trip to the short course. The instructors in the College of Agri-
culture take great interest in giving the boys a good and interest-
ing course in agriculture. Those who attended the short course
are among the most successful club members in the State. The
boys not only receive valuable instruction, but learn what the
other fellow is doing, and this is worth a great deal. They return
home able to do much better club work the following year.
This course is also offered boys who for some reason could
not take up the club work at home. The only expenses are rail-
road fare to Gainesville and return home and board while in
Gainesville.
The social feature is not overlooked, and the boys have a
good time while attending the course. This was especially true
in 1918. On opening day the boy scouts of Gainesville came out
to the University and welcomed the club boys to their city. That
same evening the entire crowd of club boys and scouts attended a
picture show together. One night the scouts entertained their
club boy visitors at a chicken pillau and fish fry. During the
course ball games, wrestling, and boxing were among the lead-
ing sports.
Several hikes were taken during the week. A visit was made
to the peanut oil mill near Gainesville, to the livestock barns,
the dairy barns, over the Experiment Station and many other
places of interest. Such trips are very instructive and at the
same time enjoyable.

THE ANNUAL BANQUET

At the close of the short course each year a banquet is held
for the club boys, boy scouts of Gainesville and many of the
instructors at the University.
Every club member at the banquet is presented with a nice
certificate of honor and merit for the club work he has accom-







Bulletin 16, Boys' Agricultural Clubs


polished. His name is on the certificate and it states what county
he is from.
WINNERS OF STATE PRIZES
The State prizes are awarded at the close of the banquet.
They are exciting moments just at the time to know who will be
the winners. In 1918 Lawton Martin of Marion county won
the first prize, which was a purebred Shorthorn bull, donated
by the American Shorthorn Breeders' Association. Harold Link
of Orange county won second prize, the $200 scholarship to the
College of Agriculture, which was donated by the Florida Bank-
ers' Association. Richard McGrath of Putnam county won third
prize, which was a purebred Shorthorn bull, donated by Mr. 0.
E. Cobb, of Boyds, Alabama. Jesse Lee Driggers of Hillsboro
county won the fourth prize, which was $50, donated by the Flor-
ida Federation of Women's Clubs.

HOW TO MEASURE AN ACRE OF LAND
The club rules require that every acre of land where corn or
peanuts are grown be measured by two disinterested parties or
the County Agent (see page 6, Bulletin A-74). The following
rules may be used and are given here so that every club member
may learn them.
There are 43,560 square feet in one acre of land, and if it
is square each side must be 209 feet. To find the area of a
square, multiply one side by itself. Example: 209 X 209 -
43,681. This is the closest we can get to a square acre without
using fractions.
If the acre must be rectangular, measure off the width you
expect to.make it. The number of feet in width divided into
the number of square feet in an acre will indicate the length the
rectangle must be to contain one acre. Suppose it is 120 feet
wide, how long must it be to contain one acre? Example:
43,560 120 = 363. Proof: 120 X 363 = 43,560.
If the acre is in the shape of a triangle, you should at least
make it a right triangle. Suppose the perpendicular or short
side of the triangle is 240 feet. You will divide half its length
into the number of square feet in one acre in order to determine
how long the acre must be. Example: 240 2 = 120. 43,560
- 120 = 363.
An acre may have any dimensions. The figures suggested
above are only used for illustration. Always use a tapeline in
measuring.








Florida Cooperative Extension


209 feet
Diagram of square acre of land


*


363 feet
Diagram of rectangular acre of land


363 feet
Diagram of triangular acre of land







Bulletin 16, Boys' Agricultural Clubs


MEASURING CORN

Bulletin A-74, page 8, gives specific rules for measuring
corn. It says in part: "The entire crop of the corn club acre in
the husk should first be weighed when it is in a dry condition.
Then weigh out 100 pounds separately. Husk and shell this 100
pounds and weigh the shelled corn. Multiply the weight of all
the corn in the husk by the weight of this shelled corn. Point
off the two right hand figures and divide by 56. The results will
be the yield in bushels of shelled corn. In every case where there
is prospective yields of 100 bushels or more, notice should be
sent to the State Agent in charge of boys' clubs before har-
vesting."
Suppose when your corn is weighed up in the shuck you have
6,000 pounds. Then you take 100 pounds and shell it and the
shelled corn weighs 77 pounds. You will now calculate as fol-
lows: 6,000 X 77 = 462,000. Pointing off the two right hand
ciphers: 4,620 56 = 82.5. The yield then would be 8?.5
bushels of corn.

MEASURING PEANUTS

The rule for measuring peanuts has been changed to comply
with Florida conditions and is as follows: To determine the
yield in bushels, weigh the peanuts in the vine when they have
been thoroly cured. Then weigh out 100 pounds separately.
Pick the peanuts from this 100 pounds and weigh the picked
nuts. Multiply the weight of all the peanuts and vines by the
weight of the picked nuts. Point off the two right hand figures
and divide by 25, if the Spanish or Valencia varieties were grown,
and by 22 if the Florida Runner or other light varieties were
grown. The results will be the yield in bushels of picked pea-
nuts. Subtract the results obtained after pointing off two right
hand figures in the above from the entire weight of the hay.
If all the peanuts are picked off it is more accurate to
weigh the entire crop of picked nuts and divide by the number
of pounds in one bushel. This is a better plan when you have
access to a picker. The hay may be estimated where you have no
scales large enough to weigh it and when all the picked nuts are
weighed.







Bulletin 16, Boys' Agricultural Clubs


MEASURING CORN

Bulletin A-74, page 8, gives specific rules for measuring
corn. It says in part: "The entire crop of the corn club acre in
the husk should first be weighed when it is in a dry condition.
Then weigh out 100 pounds separately. Husk and shell this 100
pounds and weigh the shelled corn. Multiply the weight of all
the corn in the husk by the weight of this shelled corn. Point
off the two right hand figures and divide by 56. The results will
be the yield in bushels of shelled corn. In every case where there
is prospective yields of 100 bushels or more, notice should be
sent to the State Agent in charge of boys' clubs before har-
vesting."
Suppose when your corn is weighed up in the shuck you have
6,000 pounds. Then you take 100 pounds and shell it and the
shelled corn weighs 77 pounds. You will now calculate as fol-
lows: 6,000 X 77 = 462,000. Pointing off the two right hand
ciphers: 4,620 56 = 82.5. The yield then would be 8?.5
bushels of corn.

MEASURING PEANUTS

The rule for measuring peanuts has been changed to comply
with Florida conditions and is as follows: To determine the
yield in bushels, weigh the peanuts in the vine when they have
been thoroly cured. Then weigh out 100 pounds separately.
Pick the peanuts from this 100 pounds and weigh the picked
nuts. Multiply the weight of all the peanuts and vines by the
weight of the picked nuts. Point off the two right hand figures
and divide by 25, if the Spanish or Valencia varieties were grown,
and by 22 if the Florida Runner or other light varieties were
grown. The results will be the yield in bushels of picked pea-
nuts. Subtract the results obtained after pointing off two right
hand figures in the above from the entire weight of the hay.
If all the peanuts are picked off it is more accurate to
weigh the entire crop of picked nuts and divide by the number
of pounds in one bushel. This is a better plan when you have
access to a picker. The hay may be estimated where you have no
scales large enough to weigh it and when all the picked nuts are
weighed.







16 Florida Cooperative Extension

The laws of Florida state that 22 pounds of peanuts make
a bushel, but no distinction is made between varieties. We will
use 25 pounds of Spanish or Valencia varieties as a bushel, and
22 pounds of Florida Runner and other similar varieties as a
bushel.




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