• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Historic note
 Title Page
 County cooperative demonstration...
 Corn clubs
 Pig clubs
 Peanut clubs
 Club contests, meetings and...














Group Title: Bulletin - University of Florida. Agricultural Extension Division ; no. 8
Title: Boys' club work in Florida
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00026110/00001
 Material Information
Title: Boys' club work in Florida
Series Title: Bulletin
Physical Description: 16 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Herrington, G. L ( Garvin Leon )
Publisher: University of Florida, Division of Agricultural Extension
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1917
 Subjects
Subject: Agricultural education -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural extension work -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: G. L. Herrington.
General Note: "April, 1917".
Funding: Bulletin (University of Florida. Agricultural Extension Division)
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00026110
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002569284
oclc - 47284931
notis - AMT5586

Table of Contents
    Historic note
        Unnumbered ( 1 )
    Title Page
        Page 1
    County cooperative demonstration agents
        Page 2
    Corn clubs
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Pig clubs
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Peanut clubs
        Page 14
    Club contests, meetings and prizes
        Page 15
        Page 16
Full Text





HISTORIC NOTE


The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
represent the historic publishing
record of the Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
Electronic Data Information Source
(EDIS)

site maintained by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service.






Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University
of Florida







April, 1917


COOPERATIVE DEMONSTRATION WORK
In
AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA DIVISION OE AGRICULTURAL
EXTENSION AND UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT
OF AGRICULTURE COOPERATING

P. H. ROLFS, Director





BOYS' CLUB WORK IN FLORIDA

G. L. HERRINGTON
Boys' Agricultural Club Agent


Fig. 1.-Prize-winning exhibit in Marion county corn club contest.


Bulletins will be sent free on application to the Extension Division, Gainesville, Fla.


Bulletin 8
















COUNTY COOPERATIVE DEMONSTRATION AGENTS


Agent
................ W E. Brown......
............... J. S. Johns......
-....-..-...-... A. R. Nielson ..
-----.... J. E. Yon.......
-...-. ....... W E. Allen.......
..-...-... W. T. Nettles ..
...-.---.- F. J. McKinley_
.......-...- W. L. Watson....
............... C. A. Fulford.....


Gadsden........ .......... M. N. Smith.......
Hernando.........----.....-J. T. Daniel........
Hillsboro-..............R. T. Kelley......
Holmes .....J........--..... J.J Sechrist......
Jackson... ............ S. W. Hiatt........
Lake............................. ..W Gomme .....


Lee............
Leon..................
Levy --...........
Liberty..........
Madison............
Manatee........
Marion..........
Nassau .............
Orange..............
Osceola............
Palm Beach.....
Pasco..............
Polk............
Putnam...........
Santa Rosa.....
Seminole...........
Suwannee.......
St. Johns.........
St. Lucie.........
Taylor..........
Volusia............
Wakulla............
Washington....


... .----.-... -- J. M. Boring......
.............. R. Godbey..........
.. ...............D P. Coffin.......
A. W. Turner ...
..C. D. Gunn..-......
.................. 1I. G. Clayton....
.......R. W. Blacklock
Tames Shaw......
.....--C. H. Baker....
.......B. E. Evans.....
......... ...R. N. W ilson....
---............ R. T. Weaver....
......... ......... 4. A Lewis....
--....... L. Cantrell.......
-......-..-.......- E. M. Manning..
.------...... .. C. M. Berry......
....-------....O0. W. Caswell ..
.............- .J. E. Cheatham.
............Alfred Warren..
-............. .... R. I. M atthews..
..... ----R. E. Lenfest....-
................ W T. Green......
........ __.D. G. McQuagge


County
Alachua.........
Baker... .......--
Brevard...........
Calhoun..............
Citrus...... ..
Clay -..............
Dade............
Duval-............
Escambia...........


Address
. ............... ... Gainesville
..-..........- Macclenny
... .. ... Melbourne
...... ...............Blountstown
............ .... Lecanto
..-.. -...... Green Cove Springs
..... ..................M iam i
.. ..........-...-- ... Jacksonville
.-...-..--.. -..-.... ... Pensacola
...-......-.-.-.-...... River Junction
-.........-- ..- .......-Brooksville
.............-..-...-..Plant City
-............-.-.... Bonifay
-.....--......-......- Marianna
..-..............-... .. Tavares
..-....-... .... ......Ft. Myers
........................ Tallahassee
-..............-..-...... Bronson
...-..........-........ Bristol
--..----....... Madison
--......-.--......... Bradentown
.....--..- ..... Ocala
....... .. .... H illiard
--~..-...-..--.... .- Orlando
..................... -Kissim m ee
.- ...-.-.-.-......- West Palm Beach
-....-......Dade City
......Kathleen
.. Palatka
....... --.....M ilton
......... ..-.Sanford
....... Live Oak
-.-.------. ......Hastings
.-..--.........- .. -Ft. Pierce
....... ..-- ...... Perry
.... ...-... DeLand
.-...- ..........Arran
... .... .....Chipley










BOYS' CLUB WORK IN FLORIDA
BY G. L. HERRINGTON

The organization for boys' club work in Florida is made up
of farm boys between the ages of ten and eighteen years, the
purpose of which is to study and practice scientific methods of
farming and stock raising. It is conducted thru the Extension
Division of the University of Florida, in cooperation with the
United States Department of Agriculture. The work deals espe-
cially with the growing of corn, peanuts, and hogs, and has the
hearty approval of every public-spirited citizen.
The boy who conducts a successful demonstration in pro-
ducing crops or livestock is a credit to his state. Many boys
meet with discouraging conditions. Not every one has an acre
of productive soil nor good teams and implements to use; most
of them have the same difficulties that all farmers have. In
spite of these disadvantages a large percent of the Florida club
boys complete their work, make an exhibit, and report their
results. This type of boy makes the club work a success and
derives the greatest benefit from it.
The census of 1915 shows that 26,000 boys between ten and
eighteen years old are living on farms in Florida. The oppor-
tunity is extended to every one of them to join the club work
and benefit himself by its teachings.

CORN CLUBS
In 1916 the corn clubs extended into 41 counties with a
total membership of 1,911. Reports were collected from 450
boys, and the average yield of corn per acre was 42.1 bushels.
The corn was produced at a cost of 38 cents per bushel, or about
$16.00 an acre. It was worth 90 cents or more a bushel, which
would make a net profit of $21.90 per acre.
THE BEST THREE YIELDS IN 1916
The methods followed in producing the best yields are de-
scribed in the three following essays written by the boys:
PORT W. GEIGER, NASSAU COUNTY
"The acre I cultivated to corn is a dark sandy loam with dark brown
subsoil. It has been in cultivation four years and last year was cultivated
half to corn and half to cane. The first of February, I broke it 6 inches
deep with a turning plow and prepared it for planting with harrow and
drag. April 4th I planted Hastings Prolific variety of corn. The rows









Cooperative Extension Work


were laid off 5 feet wide with a shovel plow and the corn was covered
with a scooter. 'It came up a fairly good stand and was thinned out to
18 inches in the drill.
"I applied 400 pounds
of acid phosphate, 400
pounds of tankage, and
200 pounds of cotton seed
meal, all well mixed. This
gave a formula of 8.4 per
cent phosphoric acid, 5.5
per cent ammonia, and 0.4
per cent potash.
May 2nd and May 8th
I cultivated the corn with
small shovels on the dou-
blestock. It was cultivated
with sweeps May 18th, 25th,
June 5th and 20th. I cul-
tivated shallow and left
the land almost level. A
nice rain came May 15th
the first time since t h e
corn came up. A heavy
rain came May 23rd and
several others came be-
tween June 14th and 20th,
but later in the season a
drought did some damage.
The yield was 119.6 bush-
els, while the average
Fig. 2.-The three boys who produced more els, while the average
yield on common land
than 100 bushels of corn, each. Left to right around here is 25 bushels
-Lawton Martin, Port Geiger, Lewis Lee. p
per acre."

LAWTON MARTIN, MARION COUNTY
"I had been hearing of the corn club and decided to join. I sent my
name to the county agent in January. My father let me have an acre of
rich muck land. On March the 6th I broke it 6 inches deep and harrowed
it well. March 11th I disked and let it lay until the 20th when I planted
it with a planter. The corn was planted 8 inches in the drill and came up
a good stand, tho the wire worms damaged it about 4 per cent.
"The corn grew off fast and so did the grass and weeds. I cultivated
three times with a cultivator and twice with a disk and hoed twice. July
23rd we had a storm that broke it down badly, causing a loss of about 8
per cent. Before gathering I went thru and selected seed for next year
from stalks bearing two or three ears."

LEWIS LEE, HERNANDO COUNTY
"The acre on which I grew my corn is a sandy loam soil about 8
inches deep with clay subsoil. It has been in cultivation 6 years and last
year was in corn with a small part in snap beans.








Bulletin 8, Boys' Club Work in Florida 5

"It was broken with a one-horse turning plow to a depth of 8 inches,
January 18th and then disked. Then I broadcasted 6 two-horse loads of
manure and disked it in, leaving the land in very good condition.
"April 3rd I laid off rows 5 feet wide and dropped the corn by hand
12 inches apart in the drill, covering with a turning plow. Hastings Pro-
lific variety of corn was used. Four days later it was harrowed across the
rows with an acme harrow. It came up a good stand but some small pigs
got in the field and rooted up a part of it when it was too late to replant.
When the corn was a few inches high I put along the side of the rows 200
pounds blood and bone and plowed it in.
"I cultivated 7 times with a 30-inch sweep and once with a spike-
tooth harrow at intervals of about 10 days. By this time it was in full
silk and tassel, but was blown down by a heavy wind and damaged 10 per
cent. The yield was 100.6 bushels while the average yield per acre with
ordinary methods of cultivation is 30 bushels. This fall I shall plant a
winter cover crop and hope to make a larger yield with less cost next year
The county agent came to see me 6 times during the year.
During my two years of club work I have learned that to obtain the
highest yield we must have thoro preparation of the land before planting
and frequent shallow cultivation."

Following is a tabulation of the reports that accompanied
the foregoing essays:
COSTS AND PROFITS FOR BEST THREE YIELDS
EXPENSES Geiger Martin Lee
Rent of land..................... ................ $ 5.00 $ 5.00 $ 5.00
Preparation of seed bed................................- 1.60 2.50 2.00
Cost of seed........................... .... .. .30 .25 .50
Cost of planting.....................--.. 1.20 .30 .65
Cost of manure.............. ...........--- ....... .......... 12.00
Cost of fertilizer......................... ........ 16.50 .......... 4.00
Cost of cultivations..................-. .- ........ 5.15 3.33 4.45
Cost of gathering.............. ..... ... ........... ..... .2.20 3.75 3.20
Total........................ ..... .. $32.00 $15.13 $31.80
Average cost per bushel.. .. ....... .. ............. .26 .13 .31
Hours of manual labor .............. ............ .... 76 56 63
Hours of horse labor............................. ... ... 50 33 56
RECEIPTS
Total number of bushels............. .............. 119.6 115 100.6
Total value at 90 cents a bushel..................... $107.64 $103.50 $90.54
Less expenses ................... .. ...... .... 32.00 15.13 31.80
Net profits.. ... ... .... ..... ... $ 75.64 $ 88.37 $58.74

These were the highest three yields made in the corn clubs.
It is interesting to note that two of them were produced on
sandy land. The highest yield in the State came from a sandy
loam soil, while the largest net profit was made on muck land.
It is frequently suggested that the boys in the corn clubs have
two separate contests; one for those using muck and hammock







Cooperative Extension Work


and the other for those using sandy soils. An examination of
the record books shows that a large percentage of the best crops
come from sandy soil. This is evidence that the few who use
muck and hammock soils have very little, if any, advantage over
the others.
METHODS
The club member should select the best acre of land he can
get and then give it the best of attention. It should be broken
deep early in the season and all weeds and grass turned under
rather than to burn them off. Some have turned under large
crops of velvet beans for the purpose of building up the soil.
Any vegetation added to the soil will give a greater water
holding capacity and furnish plant food.

CROP ROTATION
The planting of cowpeas or some other legume with the
corn for the purpose of building up the soil and furnishing feed
for livestock is advised. More boys follow this plan every year.
Valuable demonstrations in fall breaking and planting winter
cover crops have been conducted by club members.
A few boys had adopted a two-year system of crop rotation.
While one acre was in corn this year another acre was being
prepared for a better crop of corn next year. Velvet beans and
cowpeas were grown and turned under in the fall. Oats or rye
was then sowed and used for winter pastures. In the following
spring, when the winter crop was turned under, the land was in
ideal condition for a good crop of corn. The good results of the




L 7 A.L L,_. '
'~~~~ t-.- ,,_


Fig. 3.-County agent and corn-club boy, Joseph Braswell, Jefferson
county. Yield on this acre, 67 bushels.







Bulletin 8, Boys' Club Work in Florida


Fig. 4.-Twelve boys at the short course who made more than 75
bushels of corn to the acre. Left to right-Front row: Edwin
Brown, Nassau; Gordon Roulerson, Polk; Lawton Martin, Marion;
Lewis Lee, Hernando; John Hubner, Putnam. Rear Row: Fred
Evers, Hillsboro; Pasco Fouracker, Nassau; Tom Fussell, Sumter;
Malvern Smithwick, Lake; Port Geiger, Nassau; Chauncey Row-
land, Volusia.

club work are due to these painstaking efforts of some of our
most intelligent farm boys.

FERTILIZATION
Barnyard manure is the best fertilizer to apply to corn
land. It is recommended that any amount up to fifteen tons per
acre be applied broadcast during preparation of the land. Some
boys pen cattle at night during the fall and winter months to
enrich their soil.
The high cost of commercial fertilizers limits the amount
that can be used with profit. Lands with a clay subsoil con-
taining a good supply of humus, or muck lands that have been
drained, will grow good crops of corn without fertilizers. On
poorer grades of land it is advisable to apply 400 to 600 pounds
of fertilizer that will analyze about 8 percent phosphoric acid
and 5 percent ammonia. In applying commercial fertilizers one
might be governed by the following suggestions:
On lands with firni subsoil apply the full amount before
planting. If more than 500 pounds are used it should be broad-
casted; less quantities should be drilled in ten days before plant-







Cooperative Extension Work


ing. Where the subsoil is sandy and leaching occurs it is better
to make two applications of the fertilizer if more than 500
pounds per acre are used. The acid phosphate and one-half of
the ammonia fertilizer may be drilled in and mixed with the soil
just before planting. The remainder of the ammonia should be
applied when the corn is 12 to 18 inches high.

CULTIVATION
Much time is lost by using narrow cultivators that go too
deep. Since the cultivations should be shallow and the land
kept as nearly level as possible, wide implements may be used.
When the corn is 3 or 4 inches high it can be cultivated across
the rows with a weeder. This implement runs very shallow,
breaks the crust on the surface and destroys the weeds as soon
as they sprout, which saves much hoeing. This may be repeated
several times before the corn is too large. Two-horse cultivators
may be used until the corn is 4 feet high, but the late cultiva-
tions must be given with one-horse implements. The heelsweep
on the Georgia stock, or the 14-tooth harrow is a good imple-
ment for the late cultivations.
To produce corn cheaply is no less important than to pro-
duce large yields. Small implements that do inferior work
make the cost of cultivation too expensive. The net profit of
$21.90 per acre, which was the average for the corn-club boys
in 1916, is evidence that the methods used by them are practical
and economical.
SEED CORN
The club members realize the value of good seed corn; 52
percent of all corn grown by the boys in 1916 was from im-
proved varieties. The exhibits at the county contests and fairs
show that much progress is made in selecting better corn for
planting and for show purposes. Some have selected seed corn
in the field and sold it to neighboring farmers for good prices.
It is recommended that all corn-club boys in one county use
one variety of seed corn. Where this has been done it has
proved an excellent plan. The seed can be purchased cheaper in
large quantities and there will be more uniformity in the ex-
hibits and results if one variety is used.
CORN CLUB WORK, 1916
The following table shows the results of the corn club work
in thirty-five counties in 1916:









Bulletin 8, Boys' Club Work in Florida 9

TABLE I.-SUMMARY OF CORN-CLUB WORK


b.C

COUNTY

EZ


Hiil sboro .................... 40
Hernando .............. 37
Madison ..................... 34
Nassau ..................... 30
Marion ....................... 28
Polk ............................ 25
Washington ................ 20
Suwannee ................. 18
Taylor ...................... 16
Citrus ................... 16
Sumter ..................- 15
Liberty .................. 15
Putnam ..................... 14
St. Johns .................... 12
Clay ....................... 12
Escambia .................... 12
Duval ....................... 11
Leon ......................... 11
Holmes -..................... 11
Hamilton ................ 8
Walton .................... 8
Wakulla ..................... 8
Jefferson ................. 7
Calhoun ................. 5
Pasco ........... 5
DeSoto ............. 5
Osceola ................ 4
Volusia .............. 4
Baker ............... 4
Lake ............... .... 4
Bradford .. 2
Jackson ....... 2
Columbia ............... 2
Orange ..................... 1
Brevard ................... 1


*C 2





$0.31 97.5
.33 100.6
.28 96.9
.33 119.6
.37 115.0
.32 82.0
.43 87.3
.65 52.0
.35 85.0
.44 75.4
.34 94.5
.36 57.4
.32 77.1
.34 71.0
.37 71.0
.52 72.9
.52 88.0
.32 63.3
.46 55.2
.43 72.0
.44 85.0
.49 36.0
.36 81.0
.27 76.1
.40 58.0
.43 41.8
.59 40.0
.39 79.5
.35 52.8
.46 84.8
.23 80.4
.34 46.2
.30 45.7
.67 43.0
.75 31.0


PIG CLUBS

The Boys' Pig Clubs were organized in Florida in 1916.
This part of the club work has taken a firm hold on the farm-
ing and livestock interests of the State. The much needed
distribution of thorobred breeding stock is now in a fair way,
as a direct result of the pig-club work, to give every county in
the State a good supply of purebred hogs of several popular
breeds. The bankers of Florida can see in this a great oppor-
tunity to stimulate the needed interest in pork production. They


-2o






.31
.17
.26
.13
.13
.45
.52
.14
.27
.24
.26
.16
.27
.20
.17
.33
.16
.27
.38
.35
.37
.41
.16
.26
.42
.73
.27
.33
.23
.16
.38
.21
.67
.75







Cooperative Extension Work


Fig. 5.-Crop rotation. Velvet beans and cowpeas in foreground.
Corn club acre in background. Nassau county.

have generously placed at the disposal of the boys practically all
the money needed at a low rate of interest to buy these pigs
and they permit the boys to return the money after making
sales from the breeding stock secured. One of the public-spir-
ited citizens of Jacksonville presented the pigs to the club mem-
bers of Duval County and requested that they feed and care for
them according to the instructions of the county demonstration
agent.
The county agents have taken on themselves the responsi-
bility of selecting the pigs, directing the boys in feeding bal-
anced rations and requiring them to grow pasture crops and
keep the pigs free from lice and worms. They have taken
special precautions to vaccinate the pigs and avoid hog cholera,
and to teach the boys how to keep them healthy.

BREEDS OF PIGS USED
Three hundred and thirty-six purebred pigs were raised by
the club boys and the breeds represented were as follows: Du-
roc-Jerseys 182, Poland Chinas 38, Berkshires 35, Hampshires
33, Yorkshires 3, Tamworths 3, and grade Berkshires 42. There
is but little superiority of any one breed over another, and the
four breeds first mentioned are growing in popularity. It is
recommended that all boys living in the same community or
county adopt one breed for the advantage it gives in breeding
and marketing.







Bulletin 8, Boys' Club Work in Florida


SOME PIG-CLUB RESULTS

In Suwannee County 23 pigs made an average daily gain
of 1.08 pounds, costing 4 1-3 cents a pound. They were pur-
chased when three months old and were cared for five months
before the records were complete. These pigs were given good
attention, and several of them made an average gain of one and
a half pounds a day.
In Marion County 23 boys purchased bred gilts at a cost
of $40 each. These gilts farrowed an average of six pigs to the
litter and all could have been sold at weaning time. If all had
been sold at the average price received for those that were sold,
the net profit over the cost of the sow and all other expenses
would have been $21.03 for each boy.
One hundred and two pigs were exhibited at county con-
tests and fairs and accurate reports were secured. They made
an average daily gain of three quarters of a pound, costing 4.7
cents a pound. This does not include the cost of labor. It was
not advisable in some counties to have the pigs exhibited, owing
to the danger from cholera and possible injury in transit.
Hillsboro and Hernando were among the leading counties
in the pig-club work. Other successful counties were Duval,
Escambia, and Broward. The following table gives details of
the work in counties from which reports were obtained:


Fig. 6.-Duroc-Jersey pig 10 months old, weight 310 pounds. Raised
by Claude Brown, Hernando county.








Cooperative Extension Work


TABLE II.-SOME AVERAGE GAINS AND COSTS


COUNTIES a -


Number of Pigs............... 30 9 2 23 8 24 6 102
Average daily gains, lbs... .66 .57 .58 1.24 .65 .65 .65 .75
Average cost per lb., cts... 4.1 8.6 6.0 4.3 4.0 4.5 5.1 4.7

The best records were made with those pigs that were pas-
tured during the summer and fed during the fall on peanuts or
velvet beans with some corn or sweet potatoes.
One of the difficult problems in the pig-club work has been
to find enough purebred pigs of good quality to supply the de-
mand. In every case where common stock have come into com-
petition with improved breeds the latter were found much more
profitable when given proper attention.

BANKERS HAVE HELPED
The bankers over the State have cooperated liberally in
making the pig clubs successful. Any boy who complies with


Fig. 7.-County agent's sons and their Duroc-Jersey gilts.
Hernando county.







Bulletin 8, Boys' Club Work in Florida


Fig. 8.-Marion county Hampshires.

the rules can borrow money from his local banker for a year
and a half at six percent interest and purchase a well-bred pig.
This gives time to carry it to maturity, raise a litter of pigs
and sell enough to pay the note by the time it is due. This plan
affords opportunities for many boys to join the pig clubs who
would be unable to do so otherwise.
The following form is used as a contract between the
bankers and club member:

COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK
in
AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
STATE OF FLORIDA
AGREEMENT BETWEEN MEMBERS OF THE PIG CLUB
AND JOHN DOE, TRUSTEE.
Gainesville, Fla., April 8, 1917.
This is to certify that James Smith has joined the Pig Club in
Alachua County, and has agreed to follow the advice and instructions of
the County Demonstration Agent with respect to the care of one pig which
has been purchased by John Doe, as Trustee for certain banks in Alachua
County. If the club member fails to follow the instructions of the County
Demonstration Agent or neglects the pig in any way that will impair
growth and development, the County Agent may take the pig and dispose
of it in the best way to refund the banks. In consideration of the con-
fidence placed in me, I agree to pay John Doe, Trustee, within 18 months
from date $12.00 with interest at 6% from date.
JAMES SMITH.
(Signature of club member.)
This agreement, when properly signed by any club member selected
by the County Demonstration Agent, becomes an order for the amount
named therein.
JOHN DOE, Trustee.







14 Cooperative Extension Work




















Fig. 9.-Weeder, useful in cultivating small corn.
PEANUT CLUBS
The Peanut Clubs are being organized for the first time
this year. This is an extension of the club work and is intended
primarily to stimulate the growing of peanuts, chiefly for the
production of pork, or for any other purpose that peanuts may
be used. The plan is similar to that of the corn-club work.
That is, each member grows an acre of peanuts, keeps a record of
his work and expenses and at the close of the year is required
to bring an exhibit of his crop to the fall club contest.
Where peanut clubs have been organized in other states, it
has been a requirement that each member bring one peck of
clean seed and ten vines, together with a report and essay on
his work. In Florida, however, this plan may be modified to
suit conditions. Similar to the pig, and corn clubs, the peanut
club is under the direct supervision of the county demonstration
agent.
PEANUT CULTURE
Peanuts should be shelled before planting; it requires 8 to
12 quarts of shelled nuts to plant an acre. The rows should be
about three and a half feet apart and the plants 6 to 18 inches
in the drill depending on the variety. The upright varieties,
such as the Spanish, should be close in the drill, while the run-
ning varieties may be farther apart.







Bulletin 8, Boys' Club Work in Florida


The methods of cultivating are very similar to the methods
used in cultivating corn. They will produce on land that is
rather thin for growing corn, but club members are advised to
select productive land if possible. Most of the uplands in the
State are adapted to growing peanuts, but the low land that is
not drained will not produce large crops.
Peanuts, like other legumes, will usually produce more if
lime is applied to the soil. Apply about two tons of ground
limestone per acre before planting.
A large percent of the peanut crop in Florida is used for
fattening hogs, still there is a good market for all peanuts har-
vested. Some of the peanuts grown by boys will be harvested
and sold for seed while others will pasture their pigs on them.
Those who harvest the crop for seed can also make good hay
with the vines. For all necessary information on growing pea-
nuts, the club members are referred to Extension Bulletin No. 6.

DIRECTION OF THE WORK
Circular letters of instruction, bulletins, and record books
are furnished to each member of the clubs thru the Extension
Division of the University. The clubs are organized and are
under the direct supervision of the county agent, who visits the
schools to organize the work and give instruction relative to
the plans for the season. Thruout the season the county agents
visit the boys' plots and direct the work in the same way as the
corn-club work is managed. Each member has a chance to keep
directly in touch with all the club activities.
The county superintendents of schools and the teachers en-
courage the club work and give great assistance. Agriculture is
taught in the public schools of Florida and the club work should
be considered a practical laboratory for the student. It gives
him a chance to put into practice some of the things he studies
in the text book.

CLUB CONTESTS, MEETINGS AND PRIZES
The county contests are held in the fall. The corn-club
work is judged according to the following scale: Yield 30%,
profit 30%, exhibit 20%, and essay and record 20%. The rules
require that two disinterested persons measure the land and the
corn and sign the boy's report. The peanut clubs are scored
according to the same scale used for the corn club. The pig-
club work is judged as follows: Best pig 40%, lowest cost of







Cooperative Extension Work


production 25%, daily gains 15%, record and essay 20%. The
records are examined and attested by two disinterested per-
sons. By following these rules every boy is protected and the
results are accurate.
PRIZES AWARDED
It is a custom to award prizes to the boys who make a
success in their work. The State Bankers' Association gives
as a prize a $200 scholarship to the University. The Florida
Federation of Women's Clubs gives $50 to the boy making the
highest percentage in the corn club. The Florida East Coast
Railroad gave 16 scholarships to the boys' short course in agri-
culture. The Georgia Southern & Florida gives annually a pure-
bred pig in every county traversed by their lines.
Mandalay Farm, Middleburg, Fla., offered twenty-eight
purebred Duroc-Jersey pigs in as many counties. Other valu-
able prizes in every county are contributed by business men,
railroads, county commissioners, and county fairs. The best
prizes are scholarships, livestock, merchandise, and implements.
BOYS' SHORT COURSE
Club members have been attending the farmers' short
course in agriculture at the University heretofore, but the in-
creased attendance last year made it necessary to provide a
separate course for them. The boys' short course in agriculture
was held for one week in December when 73 successful and en-
thusiastic club members enrolled from 31 counties. Lectures
were given every morning, and the afternoons were spent in
the laboratories of the Agricultural College and Experimental
Station studying and judging livestock. The entire meeting was
interesting and full of enthusiasm. The boys were entertained
in the homes of the members of the faculty and friends of the
University of Florida. The Gainesville bankers gave the boys a
banquet the last night in the students' dining hall of the Univer-
sity. Each boy was given a diploma, or certificate of honor and
merit. The State prizes were also presented at that time.
BOYS' CLUB MEETINGS
Regular meetings of the clubs are held during the spring
and summer seasons. Two meetings or more a year are planned
in every county. These are planned so as to have a short, in-
teresting program during the forenoon. A picnic dinner, a trip
to the beach, a ball game, or some other diversion is provided
for the afternoon.




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