• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 How to use the soil survey...
 Table of Contents
 General nature of the area
 Agriculture
 Soil series and their relation...
 Soil associations
 Descriptions of soils
 Management
 Common use and management
 Crops
 Formation and classification of...
 Soil survey methods and defini...
 Literature cited
 Tables
 Map
 Soil association map
 Index to map sheets






Title: Soil survey, Hillsborough County, Florida
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00026081/00001
 Material Information
Title: Soil survey, Hillsborough County, Florida
Series Title: United States Soil Conservation Service. Soil survey
Physical Description: 68 p. : illus. 98 maps (part fold. col.) ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Leighty, R. G ( Ralph George ), 1912-
Publisher: United States Department of Agriculture, Soil Conservation Service For sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. Govt. Print. Off.
Place of Publication: Washington
Publication Date: 1958
 Subjects
Subject: Soil surveys -- Florida -- Hillsborough County   ( lcsh )
Soils -- Maps -- Florida -- Hillsborough County   ( lcsh )
 Notes
Bibliography: "Literature cited": p. 59.
Statement of Responsibility: by Ralph G. Leighty and others. Correlation by Irving L. Martin.
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: In cooperation with the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station.
General Note: "Issued September 1958."
Funding: U.S. Department of Agriculture Soil Surveys
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00026081
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Government Documents Department, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000375898
oclc - 01246986
notis - ACB5497
lccn - agr58000366

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover
    How to use the soil survey report
        Page i
    Table of Contents
        Page ii
        Page iii
    General nature of the area
        Page 1
        Location and extent
            Page 1
        Physiography, relief, and drainage
            Page 1
        Climate
            Page 2
        Water supply
            Page 3
        Native vegetation
            Page 3
        Social and industrial development
            Page 3
            Organization and population
                Page 3
            Industries
                Page 4
            Transportation and markets
                Page 4
            Schools, churches, and hospitals
                Page 4
            Recreational facilities
                Page 4
    Agriculture
        Page 4
        Farm income
            Page 4
        Land use
            Page 5
        Types and sizes of farms
            Page 5
        Crops
            Page 5
        Livestock and livestock products
            Page 6
        Farm tenure
            Page 7
        Farm power and mechanical equipment
            Page 7
        Farm and home improvements
            Page 7
    Soil series and their relationship
        Page 7
        Excessively drained soils
            Page 7
        Somewhat excessively drained to moderately well drained soils
            Page 7
        Well drained to somewhat poorly drained soils
            Page 7
        Moderately well drained to somewhat poorly drained soils
            Page 8
        Somewhat poorly drained soils
            Page 8
        Poorly drained to very poorly drained soils
            Page 8
        Very poorly drained organic soils
            Page 9
        Miscellaneous land types
            Page 9
    Soil associations
        Page 9
        Excessively drained or well drained deep sands
            Page 9
        Well-drained deep sands
            Page 10
        Well-drained sands mixed with phosphatic materials
            Page 10
        Somewhat poorly drained, dark-colored sands
            Page 10
        Somewhat poorly drained sands over a calcareous substratum
            Page 10
        Somewhat poorly drained sands with organic hardpan
            Page 11
        Poorly drained acid sands
            Page 11
        Poorly drained neutral to alkaline sands and sandy clays
            Page 11
        Very poorly drained organic soils
            Page 11
        Bottom lands, swamps, and ponds
            Page 11
        Somewhat poorly drained sands with organic hardpan
            Page 11
        Tidal lands
            Page 12
        Mines, pits, and dumps and made land
            Page 12
    Descriptions of soils
        Page 12
        Adamsville fine sand
            Page 13
        Alachua loamy fine sand
            Page 13
        Alluvial land
            Page 14
        Arredondo fine sand
            Page 14
            Level phase land
                Page 14
            Gently undulating phase
                Page 14
        Blanton fine sand
            Page 14
            Level phase
                Page 14
            Gently undulating phase
                Page 15
            Undulating phase
                Page 15
            Brown-layer phase
                Page 15
        Blichton fine sand
            Page 15
        Bradenton fine sand
            Page 16
            Think surface phase
                Page 16
        Brighton peat
            Page 17
        Brighton mucky peat
            Page 17
        Broward fine sand
            Page 17
        Charlotte fine sand
            Page 17
        Delray fine sand
            Page 18
            Shallow phase
                Page 18
        Eustic fine sand
            Page 18
            Level phase
                Page 18
            Gently undulating phase
                Page 18
        Felda fine sand
            Page 19
        Fellowship loamy fine sand
            Page 19
        Fort Meade loamy fine sand
            Page 20
            Level phase
                Page 20
            Undulating phase
                Page 20
        Fresh water swamp (unclassified soils)
            Page 20
        Gainesville loamy fine sand
            Page 21
            Level phase
                Page 21
            Gently undulating phase
                Page 21
        Immokalee fine sand
            Page 22
            Alkaline variant
                Page 22
        Istokpoga peat
            Page 22
        Istokpoga mucky peat
            Page 22
        Kanapaha fine sand
            Page 23
        Keri fine sand
            Page 23
        Lakeland fine sand
            Page 23
            Level phase
                Page 23
            Gently undulating phase
                Page 24
            Undulating phase
                Page 24
            Shallow phase
                Page 25
            Level deep phase
                Page 25
            Undulating deep phase
                Page 25
        Lakewood fine sand
            Page 25
        Leon fine sand
            Page 26
            Heavy substratum phase
                Page 27
            Light-colored surface phase
                Page 27
        Made land
            Page 27
        Manatee fine sandy loam
            Page 27
        Manatee loamy fine sand
            Page 28
        Manatee fine sandy clay, heavy variant
            Page 28
        Mines, pits, and dumps
            Page 28
        Mixed alluvium, high bottom phase
            Page 29
        Ona fine sand
            Page 29
            Light-colored surface phase
                Page 30
        Orlando fine sand
            Page 30
        Pamlico muck
            Page 30
        Parkwood fine sand
            Page 31
        Peace river soils
            Page 31
        Plummer fine sand
            Page 31
            Shallow phase
                Page 32
        Pomello fine sand
            Page 32
        Pompano fine sand
            Page 32
            Shallow phase
                Page 33
        Portsmouth fine sand
            Page 33
        Portsmouth mucky fine sand
            Page 33
        Rains fine sand
            Page 33
        Ruskin fine sand
            Page 34
        Rutlege fine sand
            Page 35
            Shallow phase
                Page 35
        Rutlege mucky fine sand
            Page 36
        St. Lucie fine sand
            Page 36
        Sandy local alluvium
            Page 36
        Scranton fine sand
            Page 37
        Shallow ponds with grass
            Page 38
        Sunniland fine sand
            Page 38
            Moderately shallow over marl
                Page 38
            Shallow over marl
                Page 38
        Terra Ceia peaty muck
            Page 39
        Tidal marsh (unclassified soils)
            Page 39
        Tidal swamp (unclassified soils)
            Page 39
    Management
        Page 39
        Capability classification
            Page 40
        Capability classification of Hillsborough County soils
            Page 40
        Management of capability units
            Page 41
            Capability unit IIe-1
                Page 41
            Capability unit IIw-1
                Page 41
            Capability unit IIs-1
                Page 41
            Capability unit IIs-2
                Page 41
            Capability unit IIIs-1
                Page 41
            Capability unit IIIs-2
                Page 42
            Capability unit IIIs-3
                Page 42
            Capability unit IIIs-4
                Page 42
            Capability unit IVs-1
                Page 42
            Capability unit IVs-2
                Page 43
            Capability unit IVs-3
                Page 43
            Capability unit IVs-4
                Page 43
            Capability unit Vw-1
                Page 43
            Capability unit Vs-1
                Page 44
            Capability unit VIIs-1
                Page 44
            Unclassified mapping units
                Page 44
    Common use and management
        Page 44
        Water control
            Page 44
        Drainage
            Page 44
        Irrigation
            Page 44
        Rotations
            Page 45
        Soil amendments
            Page 45
    Crops
        Page 45
        Vegetables and truck crops
            Page 45
            Citrus fruits
                Page 46
            Cover crops
                Page 46
        Patures
            Page 46
        Forests
            Page 47
            Page 48
            Page 49
        Estimated yields
            Page 50
    Formation and classification of soils
        Page 50
        Factors of soil formation
            Page 50
            Parent materials
                Page 50
            Climate
                Page 51
            Vegetation
                Page 52
            Togography
                Page 52
            Time
                Page 52
                Page 53
        Classification of soils by higher categories
            Page 52
            Intrazonal soils
                Page 52
                Ground-water podzols
                    Page 52
                    Page 53
                Low-Humic Gley soils
                    Page 54
                Humic Gley soils
                    Page 55
                Bog soils
                    Page 56
            Azonal soils
                Page 57
                Regosols soils
                    Page 57
                Alluvial soils
                    Page 58
            Miscellaneous land types
                Page 58
    Soil survey methods and definitions
        Page 58
    Literature cited
        Page 59
    Tables
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
    Map
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
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        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
    Soil association map
        Page 98
    Index to map sheets
        Page 99
        Page 100
Full Text
Series 1950, No. 3 Issued September 1958

SOIL SURVEY



Hillsborough County

Florida





E OUR SOIL OUR STRENGTH S-








UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Soil Conservation Service
In cooperation with
FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION












How to Use THE soL SURVEY REPORT

THIS SURVEY of Hillsborough County noted differences in growth of crops, weeds,
will help you plan the kind of farming brush, or trees; and, in fact, recorded all
that will protect your soils and provide good the things about the soils that they believed
yields. It describes the soils; shows their might affect their suitability for farming.
location on a map; and tells what they will After they mapped and studied the soils,
do under different kinds of management. the scientists talked with farmers and oth-
ers about the use and management each soil
should have and its capabilities for use.
Find Your Farm on the Map They then placed it in a capability unit, or
management group. A capability unit is a
In using this survey, you start with the group of similar soils that need and respond
soil map, which consists of the 97 sheets to about the same kind of management. For
bound in the back of this report. These example, Adamsville fine sand is in capabil-
sheets, if laid together, make a large pho- ity unit IVs-2. Turn to the section, Manage-
tographic map of the county as it looks from ment of Capability Units, and read what is
an airplane. You can see woods, fields, said about soils of capability and unit IVs-2.
roads, rivers, and many other landmarks on You will want to study the table, which tells
this map. you how much you can expect to harvest
To find your farm on the large map, you from Adamsville fine sand under two levels
use the index to map sheets. This is a small of management.
map of the county on which numbered rec-
tangles have been drawn to show where
each sheet of the large map is located. Make a Farm Plan
When you have found the map sheet for
your farm, you will notice that boundaries For the soils on your farm, compare your
of the soils have been outlined in red, and yields and farm practices with those given
that there is a symbol for each kind of soil. in this report. Look at your fields for signs
All areas marked with the same symbol are of runoff and erosion. Then decide whether
the same kind of soil, wherever they appear or not you need to change your methods.
on the map. The choice, of course, must be yours. This
Suppose you have found on your farm an survey will aid you in planning new meth-
area marked with the symbol Aa. You learn ods, but it is not a plant of management for
the name of the soil this symbol represents your farm or for any other farm in the
by looking at the map legend. The symbol county.
Aa identifies Adamsville fine sand. If you find that you need help in farm
planning, consult the local representative of
the Soil Conservation Service or the county
Learn About the Soils on Your Farm agricultural agent. Members of your State
Experiment Station staff and others familiar
Adamsville fine sand and all the other with farming in your county will also be glad
soils mapped are described in the section, to help you.
Descriptions of Soils. Soil scientists, as Fieldwork for this soil survey was com-
they walked over the fields and through the pleted in 1950. Unless otherwise specifically
woodlands, described and mapped the soils; indicated, all statements in this publication
dug holes and examined surface soils and refer to conditions in Hillsborough County
subsoils; measured slopes with a hand level; at that time.


For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C.














Contents


Page Page
General nature of the area ----------------------------...... 1 Descriptions of Soils-Continued.
Location and extent ------------------------------ 1 Eustis fine sand:
Physiography, relief, and drainage ----------------- 1 Level phase ---------------------------- 18
Climate ------------------------ 2 Gently undulating phase ------ --------------- 18
Water supply ---------------------3 Felda fine sand ---------------------------------- 19
Native vegetation--------------- 3 Fellowship loamy fine sand -- --------------- 19
Social and industrial development ---------- 3 Fort Meade loamy fine sand:
Organization and population---------- 3 Level phase -------------------- ------------ 20
Industries --4 Undulating phase --------------------------- 20
Transportation and markets ------------------- 4 Fresh water swamp (unclassified soils) ------------ 20
Schools, churches, and hospitals --------------- 4 Gainesville loamy fine sand:
Recreational facilities -------------- 4 Level phase --------------------------------- 21
Agriculture ------------------------ 4 Gently undulating phase ---------------------- 21
Farm income ----------------------------------- 4 Immokalee fine sand ------------------------------ 22
Land use --------------------------------------- 5 Alkaline variant ----------------------------... ..... 22
Types and sizes of farms ------------------------- 5 Istokpoga peat ---------------------------------- 22
Crops ------------------------------------------ 5 Istokpoga mucky peat ---------------------------- 22
Livestock and livestock products ------------------ 6 Kanapaha fine sand --------.........---------------------..... 23
Farm tenure ------------------------------------ 7 Keri fine sand ----------------------------------- 23
Farm power and mechanical equipment ------------ 7 Lakeland fine sand:
Farm and home improvements --------------------- 7 Level phase ----...----------------------------- 23
Soil series and their relationship ---------------------- 7 Gently undulating phase ---------------------- 24
Excessively drained soils -------------------------- 7 Undulating phase --------------------------- 24
Somewhat excessively drained to moderately well Shallow phase -------------------------- --- 25
drained soils --------------------------------- 7 Level deep phase............ ----------------- 25
Well drained to somewhat poorly drained soils --- 7 Undulating deep phase ----------------------- 25
Moderately well drained to somewhat poorly drained Lakewood fine sand ------------------------------ 25
soils ----------------------------------.---- 8 Leon fine sand --------------------- -------------....... 26
Somewhat poorly drained soils -------------------- 8 Heavy substratum phase --------------------- 27
Poorly drained to very poorly drained soils --------. 8 Light-colored surface phase ------------------- 27
Very poorly drained organic soils ------------------ 9 Made land -------------------------------------- 27
Miscellaneous land types -------------------------- 9 Manatee fine sandy loam ------------------------- 27
Soil associations ------------------------------------- 9 Manatee loamy fine sand ------------------------- 28
Excessively drained or well drained deep sands ...-- 9 Manatee fine sandy clay, heavy variant ------------ 28
Well-drained deep sands ------------------------ 10 Mines, pits, and dumps --------------------------- 28
Well-drained sands mixed with phosphatic materials- 10 Mixed alluvium, high bottom phase ---------------- 29
Somewhat poorly drained, dark-colored sands ----...... 10 Ona fine sand ----------------------------------- 29
Somewhat poorly drained sands over a calcareous Light-colored surface phase ------------------- 30
substratum --......--------------------------------- 10 Orlando fine sand ------------------------------- 30
Somewhat poorly drained sands with organic hard- Pamlico muck ------------------30
pan ------------------------------------------ 11 Parkwood fine sand------------------------------ 31
Poorly drained acid sands------------------------ 11 Peace River soils ---------------------- --------- 31
Poorly drained neutral to alkaline sands and sandy Plummer fine sand ------------------------------ 31
clays ---------------------------------------- 11 Shallow phase ------------------------------ 32
Very poorly drained organic soils ----------------- 11 Pomello fine sand ------------------------------- 32
Bottom lands, swamps, and ponds ------------- 11 Pompano fine sand ------------------------------ 32
Tidal lands ------------------------------------ 12 Shallow phase -------------------33
Mines, pits, and dumps and Made land ------------ 12 Portsmouth fine sand ----------------------------- 33
Descriptions of soils -------------------------------- 12 Portsmouth mucky fine sand ---------------------- 33
Adamsville fine sand ----------------------------- 13 Rains fine sand --------------------------------- 33
Alachua loamy fine sand -------------------------- 13 Ruskin fine sand ---------------------------------34
Alluvial land ----------------------------------- 14 Rutlege fine sand 35---------------- ---- 35
Arredondo fine sand: Shallow phase ------------------------------ 35
Level phase ---------------------------- 14 Rutlege mucky fine sand -------------------------- 36
Gently undulating phase ---------------------- 14 St. Lucie fine sand ------------------------36
Blanton fine sand: Sandy local alluvium ------------------------36
Level phase --------------------------------- 14 Scranton fine sand ------------------------37
Gently undulating phase ---------------------- 15 Shallow ponds with grass -------------- 38
Undulating phase --------------------------- 15 Sunniland fine sand:
Brown-layer phase -------------------------- 15 Moderately shallow over marl ----------------- 38
Blichton fine sand ------------------------------- 15 Shallow over marl --------------------------- 38
Bradenton fine sand ------------------------------ 16 Terra Ceia peaty muck --------------------------- 39
Thin surface phase -------------------------- 16 Tidal marsh (unclassified soils) ------------------- 39
Brighton peat ---------------------------------- 17 Tidal swamp (unclassified soils)--------- 39
Brighton mucky peat -----------------------------17 Management ---------------------- 39
Broward fine sand ------------------------------- 17 Capability classification ---------------40
Charlotte fine sand -------------------------------17 Capability classification of Hillsborough County soils 40
Delray fine sand -------- ......-------------------------18 Management of capability units ------------------- 41
Shallow phase ------------------------------ 18 Capability unit IIe-1 ------------------------- 41







Page Page
Management-Continued. Crops-Continued.
Capability unit IIw-1 ------------- 41 Citrus fruits ------------------------------ 46
Capability unit IIs-1 ------------------------- 41 Cover crops --------------------------------- 46
Capability unit IIs-2 ------------------------- 41 Pastures -------------------------------------- 46
Capability unit IIIs-1 -----------------41 Forests ---------------------------- -------------47
Capability unit IIIs-2 ----------------------- 42 Estimated yields ---------------------50
Capability unit IIIs-3 ------------------------ 42 Formation and classification of soils ------------------- 50
Capability unit IIIs-4 ------------------------ 42 Factors of soil formation ------------------------- 50
Capability unit IVs-1 --------------- 42 Parent materials --------------50
Capability unit IVs-2 ------------- 43 Climate -------------------- 51
Capability unit IVs-3 -------------- 43 Vegetation --------------------52
Capability unit IVs-4 --------------- 43 Topography ------------------ 52
Capability unit Vw-1_ -------------- 43 Time ---------------------- 52
Capability unit Vs-------------------------- 44 Classification of soils by higher categories --------- 52
Capability unit VIIs-1 44 Intrazonal soils ----------------------------- 52
Unclassified mapping units -------------------- 44 Ground-Water Podzols------------------- 52
Common use and management ----------- 44 ow-umic Gley soils -------------------- 54
Humic Gley soils ------------------------- 55
Water control ----------------- 44 Bog soils ------------------------------- 56
Drainage --------------------------- 44 Azonal soils ------------------- 57
Irrigation ---------------------------------- 44 Regosols ------------------- 57
Rotations ---------------------45 Alluvial soils ------------------------- 58
Soil amendments ----------------- 45 Miscellaneous land types --------------------- 58
Crops ---------------------------------- 45 Soil survey methods and definitions -------------------- 58
Vegetables and truck crops ----------- 45 Literature cited ------------------------------------- 59
















































Series 1950, No. 3 Issued September 1958







SOIL SURVEY OF HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA
By RALPH G. LEIGHTY, in Charge, and VICTOR W. CARLISLE, ORLANDO E. CRUZ, JAMES H. WALKER, JEAN BEEM, R. E.
CALDWELL, and J. B. CROMARTIE, Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, and JOSEPH L. HUBER, E. D. MATTHEWS, and
Z. T. MILLSAP, Soil Conservation Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture
Correlation by IRVING L. MARTIN, Soil Survey,' U. S. Department of Agriculture
United States Department of Agriculture in cooperation with the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


General Nature of the Area and Hillsboro Bay by a peninsula that extends south-
ward from Tampa.
H ILLSBOROUGH COUNTY is one of the few places In the western, southern, and northeastern parts of
in the United States where fruits and vegetables the county, there are large, nearly level plains, com-
can be grown in winter. Nearly 60 percent of the only called flatwoods. These plains rise gradually
county is in farms, and from these farms citrus fruits from the coast to elevations of more than 100 feet in
and vegetables are sent to northern markets. In ad- the eastern part of the county. Numerous intermit-
dition large quantities of poultry and dairy products tent ponds, swamps, marshes, and a few permanent
are shipped to local markets or to markets in nearby lakes occupy areas in the flatwoods. There are many
counties. Many large areas are still covered by the permanent lakes and intermittent ponds in the north-
natural vegetation and are used mainly as range pas- western and north-central parts of the county. Some
ture. Some of these areas could be cleared and used of the larger lakes are Lake Thonotosassa, Lake Val-
for crops or for improved pasture. On many of them, rico, Mango Lake, Keystone Lake, and Lake Magda-
however, drainage would be a problem, for if the lene.
water level is lowered too much in one area, nearby Elevations in the county range from sea level, along
soils may be drained excessively. Furthermore, nearly the coast, to about 144 feet at a point about 3.4 miles
all of the soils of Hillsborough County need heavy fer- east of Plant City (6). Tampa is at an elevation of
tilization, some of them with the minor elements. about 19 feet.
Each farmer needs to weigh the possible returns The surface drainage is towards Old Tampa Bay,
against the cost of clearing the land and preparing it Hillsboro Bay, and Tampa Bay. The principal streams
for crops, before he decides whether clearing will be are the Hillsborough, Alafia, and Little Manatee Riv-
justified. ers and Rocky, Sweetwater, Sixmile, and Bullfrog
Creeks. Many ditches and small bays extend inland
from the coast for short distances.
Location and Extent
Hillsborough County occupies approximately 1,040
square miles, or 665,600 acres, in the west-central part
of Florida (fig. 1). It is bounded on the south by TALLAHASSEE
Manatee County, on the east by Polk County, on the JSONVILLE
north by Pasco County, and on the west by Pinellas
County and Tampa Bay. Except for the irregular
coastline on the west, the county is nearly square.
Tampa, the county seat, is in the west-central part. It
is 205 miles southeast of Tallahassee, 210 miles north-
west of Miami, and 170 miles southwest of Jackson-
ville.


Physiography, Relief, and Drainage I
Hillsborough County is within the Floridian section -
of the Atlantic Coastal Plain (4).2 Cooke (3) in-
cludes the western and southern parts of the county
in the Coastal Lowlands and the eastern part in the
Central Highlands. The Coastal Lowlands are low, MIAMI I
nearly level plains that lie next to the coast. The
Central Highlands are the gently undulating to roll-
ing areas in the eastern part of the county. .**
In the southwestern part of the county, Tampa -...................... o*'" "_
Bay extends for a considerable distance inland. Its
northern section is separated into Old Tampa Bay Figure 1.-Location of Hillsborough County in Florida.
1 Fieldwork for this survey was done when Soil Survey was part of the Bureau of Plant Industry, Soils, and Agricultural
Engineering. Soil Survey was transferred to the Soil Conservation Service on November 15, 1952.
2 Italic numbers in parentheses refer to Literature Cited, p. 59.
1







SOIL SURVEY OF HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA
By RALPH G. LEIGHTY, in Charge, and VICTOR W. CARLISLE, ORLANDO E. CRUZ, JAMES H. WALKER, JEAN BEEM, R. E.
CALDWELL, and J. B. CROMARTIE, Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, and JOSEPH L. HUBER, E. D. MATTHEWS, and
Z. T. MILLSAP, Soil Conservation Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture
Correlation by IRVING L. MARTIN, Soil Survey,' U. S. Department of Agriculture
United States Department of Agriculture in cooperation with the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


General Nature of the Area and Hillsboro Bay by a peninsula that extends south-
ward from Tampa.
H ILLSBOROUGH COUNTY is one of the few places In the western, southern, and northeastern parts of
in the United States where fruits and vegetables the county, there are large, nearly level plains, com-
can be grown in winter. Nearly 60 percent of the only called flatwoods. These plains rise gradually
county is in farms, and from these farms citrus fruits from the coast to elevations of more than 100 feet in
and vegetables are sent to northern markets. In ad- the eastern part of the county. Numerous intermit-
dition large quantities of poultry and dairy products tent ponds, swamps, marshes, and a few permanent
are shipped to local markets or to markets in nearby lakes occupy areas in the flatwoods. There are many
counties. Many large areas are still covered by the permanent lakes and intermittent ponds in the north-
natural vegetation and are used mainly as range pas- western and north-central parts of the county. Some
ture. Some of these areas could be cleared and used of the larger lakes are Lake Thonotosassa, Lake Val-
for crops or for improved pasture. On many of them, rico, Mango Lake, Keystone Lake, and Lake Magda-
however, drainage would be a problem, for if the lene.
water level is lowered too much in one area, nearby Elevations in the county range from sea level, along
soils may be drained excessively. Furthermore, nearly the coast, to about 144 feet at a point about 3.4 miles
all of the soils of Hillsborough County need heavy fer- east of Plant City (6). Tampa is at an elevation of
tilization, some of them with the minor elements. about 19 feet.
Each farmer needs to weigh the possible returns The surface drainage is towards Old Tampa Bay,
against the cost of clearing the land and preparing it Hillsboro Bay, and Tampa Bay. The principal streams
for crops, before he decides whether clearing will be are the Hillsborough, Alafia, and Little Manatee Riv-
justified. ers and Rocky, Sweetwater, Sixmile, and Bullfrog
Creeks. Many ditches and small bays extend inland
from the coast for short distances.
Location and Extent
Hillsborough County occupies approximately 1,040
square miles, or 665,600 acres, in the west-central part
of Florida (fig. 1). It is bounded on the south by TALLAHASSEE
Manatee County, on the east by Polk County, on the JSONVILLE
north by Pasco County, and on the west by Pinellas
County and Tampa Bay. Except for the irregular
coastline on the west, the county is nearly square.
Tampa, the county seat, is in the west-central part. It
is 205 miles southeast of Tallahassee, 210 miles north-
west of Miami, and 170 miles southwest of Jackson-
ville.


Physiography, Relief, and Drainage I
Hillsborough County is within the Floridian section -
of the Atlantic Coastal Plain (4).2 Cooke (3) in-
cludes the western and southern parts of the county
in the Coastal Lowlands and the eastern part in the
Central Highlands. The Coastal Lowlands are low, MIAMI I
nearly level plains that lie next to the coast. The
Central Highlands are the gently undulating to roll-
ing areas in the eastern part of the county. .**
In the southwestern part of the county, Tampa -...................... o*'" "_
Bay extends for a considerable distance inland. Its
northern section is separated into Old Tampa Bay Figure 1.-Location of Hillsborough County in Florida.
1 Fieldwork for this survey was done when Soil Survey was part of the Bureau of Plant Industry, Soils, and Agricultural
Engineering. Soil Survey was transferred to the Soil Conservation Service on November 15, 1952.
2 Italic numbers in parentheses refer to Literature Cited, p. 59.
1







SOIL SURVEY OF HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA
By RALPH G. LEIGHTY, in Charge, and VICTOR W. CARLISLE, ORLANDO E. CRUZ, JAMES H. WALKER, JEAN BEEM, R. E.
CALDWELL, and J. B. CROMARTIE, Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, and JOSEPH L. HUBER, E. D. MATTHEWS, and
Z. T. MILLSAP, Soil Conservation Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture
Correlation by IRVING L. MARTIN, Soil Survey,' U. S. Department of Agriculture
United States Department of Agriculture in cooperation with the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


General Nature of the Area and Hillsboro Bay by a peninsula that extends south-
ward from Tampa.
H ILLSBOROUGH COUNTY is one of the few places In the western, southern, and northeastern parts of
in the United States where fruits and vegetables the county, there are large, nearly level plains, com-
can be grown in winter. Nearly 60 percent of the only called flatwoods. These plains rise gradually
county is in farms, and from these farms citrus fruits from the coast to elevations of more than 100 feet in
and vegetables are sent to northern markets. In ad- the eastern part of the county. Numerous intermit-
dition large quantities of poultry and dairy products tent ponds, swamps, marshes, and a few permanent
are shipped to local markets or to markets in nearby lakes occupy areas in the flatwoods. There are many
counties. Many large areas are still covered by the permanent lakes and intermittent ponds in the north-
natural vegetation and are used mainly as range pas- western and north-central parts of the county. Some
ture. Some of these areas could be cleared and used of the larger lakes are Lake Thonotosassa, Lake Val-
for crops or for improved pasture. On many of them, rico, Mango Lake, Keystone Lake, and Lake Magda-
however, drainage would be a problem, for if the lene.
water level is lowered too much in one area, nearby Elevations in the county range from sea level, along
soils may be drained excessively. Furthermore, nearly the coast, to about 144 feet at a point about 3.4 miles
all of the soils of Hillsborough County need heavy fer- east of Plant City (6). Tampa is at an elevation of
tilization, some of them with the minor elements. about 19 feet.
Each farmer needs to weigh the possible returns The surface drainage is towards Old Tampa Bay,
against the cost of clearing the land and preparing it Hillsboro Bay, and Tampa Bay. The principal streams
for crops, before he decides whether clearing will be are the Hillsborough, Alafia, and Little Manatee Riv-
justified. ers and Rocky, Sweetwater, Sixmile, and Bullfrog
Creeks. Many ditches and small bays extend inland
from the coast for short distances.
Location and Extent
Hillsborough County occupies approximately 1,040
square miles, or 665,600 acres, in the west-central part
of Florida (fig. 1). It is bounded on the south by TALLAHASSEE
Manatee County, on the east by Polk County, on the JSONVILLE
north by Pasco County, and on the west by Pinellas
County and Tampa Bay. Except for the irregular
coastline on the west, the county is nearly square.
Tampa, the county seat, is in the west-central part. It
is 205 miles southeast of Tallahassee, 210 miles north-
west of Miami, and 170 miles southwest of Jackson-
ville.


Physiography, Relief, and Drainage I
Hillsborough County is within the Floridian section -
of the Atlantic Coastal Plain (4).2 Cooke (3) in-
cludes the western and southern parts of the county
in the Coastal Lowlands and the eastern part in the
Central Highlands. The Coastal Lowlands are low, MIAMI I
nearly level plains that lie next to the coast. The
Central Highlands are the gently undulating to roll-
ing areas in the eastern part of the county. .**
In the southwestern part of the county, Tampa -...................... o*'" "_
Bay extends for a considerable distance inland. Its
northern section is separated into Old Tampa Bay Figure 1.-Location of Hillsborough County in Florida.
1 Fieldwork for this survey was done when Soil Survey was part of the Bureau of Plant Industry, Soils, and Agricultural
Engineering. Soil Survey was transferred to the Soil Conservation Service on November 15, 1952.
2 Italic numbers in parentheses refer to Literature Cited, p. 59.
1






2 SOIL SURVEY SERIES 1950, NO. 3

Only a few streams flow through the gently un- TABLE 1.-Normal temperatures and precipitation at
dulating uplands in the north-central part of the two weather stations
county. Many depressions, some of which contain PLANT CITY, (Elevation 121 feet)
water that has drained or seeped from surrounding
soils, occur in these areas. Drainage is slow in the Temperature 1 Precipitation 2
flatwoods. It is provided by the slight depressions
occupied by swamps and sloughs and by the few large
streams that pass through the areas. The depres- Month Abso- Abso-
thai wastrug the we T h dur Aver- lute lute Average Total for Total for
sions contain water during the wet season; during age maxi- mini- the driest the wet-
the dry season, most of the water evaporates, mum mum year test year
Several canals and many ditches have been dug to -- F. F. Ics ne nh
remove excess surface water. In only a few of these F. F. Inches Inches Inches
has provision been made for controlling the rate of December-.. 61.0 91 19 2.17 1.62 1.68
runoff. Dams or locks would be desirable in the January ------- 61.0 88 15 2.38 1.43 1.02
ditches or canals. They would help to control the February .-- 62.1 90 21 2.44 .76 4.79
rate of runoff and would thus help to regulate the Winter 61.4 91 15 6.99 3.81 7.49
water table in soils next to the drainage areas. --= -== -- -=
March -------- 66.5 99 26 2.81 2.80 5.76
April --------70.7 97 32 1.95 1.35 6.36
Climate May ---------74.3 101 41 4.53 2.91 4.87
Spring------ 70.5 101 26 9.29 7.06 16.99
The climate of Hillsborough County is subtropical. June 79.8 104 49 7.58 4.95 11.00
The temperatures are modified, however, by winds July ----------81.0 100 60 7.69 7.09 10.00
that sweep across the peninsula from the Gulf of August -------.. 82.8 101 58 8.25 11.56 8.67
Mexico. The long summers are warm and humid,
but thundershowers occur almost every afternoon and Summer- 81.2 104 49 23.52 23.60 29.67
prevent temperatures from becoming extremely high. September--- 79.6 98 51 5.94 .75 17.09
Winters are short and mild; many of the days are October ------- 73.6 98 38 2.97 .62 3.55
bright and sunny, and little rain falls. Cold spells, November--. 66.0 90 24 1.50 .52 4.41
accompanied by cold winds, can be expected only a Fall -------- 73.1 98 24 10.41 1.89 25.05
few times during the year, and they last for only a
few days. Occasionally, thin ice forms, and a few Year-..... 71.5 104 15 50.21 3 36.36 479.20
flakes of snow fall at long intervals.
Data on climate for Hillsborough County are given TAMPA, (Elevation 19 feet)
in table 1. This information was compiled from rec-
ords taken at the United States Weather Bureau Sta- December-.. 62.7 84 19 1.96 0.39 0.56
tions at Plant City and Tampa, Fla. January------.... 61.5 83 23 1.99 2.14 2.60
The average length of growing season varies some- February ----.. 62.9 86 22 2.50 1.10 1.00
what between Plant City and Tampa. According to winter 62.4 86 19 6.45 3.63 4.16
the 1941 Yearbook of Agriculture (8), the growing= === =----=-
season is about 301 days at Plant City and about 348 March -------.. 66.0 92 32 3.12 .08 3.20
days at Tampa. Many kinds of vegetables and fruits April ------ 71.5 91 38 2.51 2.07 1.90
can be grown during fall and winter in Hillsborough May--------76.5 94 52 3.29 1.81 8.85
County. Frosts severe enough to damage tender veg- Spring ------ 71.3 94 32 8.92 3.96 13.95
tables and some fruits come about once every 2 years. --- .-- -- 1
Though not usual, frosts have occurred as late as Juy ---------81.7 96 65 8.11 2.75 24.52
March 18 and as early as November 14 at Plant City, August -------. 82.0 97 66 8.06 7.48 23.40
and as late as March 19 and as early as November 21
at Tampa. Wiregrass, carpetgrass, and other grasses Summer=81.4 98 59 23.94 16.41 54.64
can be grazed continuously throughout the year, and September.-- 80.5 96 54 6.45 5.73 7.76
shelters for livestock are unnecessary. October ------- 74.6 93 43 3.14 1.18 4.80
The average annual precipitation is about the same November- 66.7 88 32 1.04 1.34 4.56
at both weather stations. It is 50.21 inches at Plant Fall --------73.9 96 32 10.63 8.25 17.11
City and 49.94 inches at Tampa. Generally the rainy- = -- -
season begins in June and continues into September. Year-..-- 72.2 98 19 49.94 532.25 6 89.86
During this period the rainfall comes mainly in the ---
form of heavy thunderstorms that generally last for 1 Plant City: Average temperature based on a 59-year record,
1 or 2 hours. The average rainfall at Plant City dur- through 1955; highest temperature on a 53-year and lowest temperature
ing these 4 months is 29.46 inches, and that at Tampa on a 52-year record, through 1952. Tampa: Average temperature based
is 30.39 inches. In some years no rain has fallen dur- on a 66-year record, through 1955; highest and lowest temperatures
ing an entire month in the period from December on a 41-year record, through 1930.
ing an entire month in the period from December 2 Plant City: Average precipitation based on a 59-year record,
through April. through 1955; wettest and driest years based on a 57-year record, in the
Moderately high winds and -accompanying thunder- period 1892-1955. Tampa: Average precipitation based on a 66-
year record, through 1955; wettest and driest years based on a 95-
storms occur at all seasons of the year. From August year record, in the period 1840-1955. 3 In 1909. 4 In 1947.
through November, occasional disturbances of vary- s In 1908. 6 In 1840.






HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 3

ing intensity, but of hurricane force, move northward huckleberry bushes, gallberry bushes, runner oaks,
from the tropics across the county. The heavy rains and grasses. Cabbage palmettos, live oaks, myrtle
that accompany these storms are usually more damag- bushes, and vines also grow on the soils that consist
ing than the wind. partly of calcareous materials.
Mixed forests of cypress, gum, elm, hickory, live
oak, water oak, maple, ironwood, cabbage palmetto,
Water Supply and vines, shrubs, and grasses grow in the swamps in
the interior of the county. Sedges, rushes, grasses,
The county is well supplied with water. Numerous and a few pines grow on the wet prairies. On some
ponds, lakes, streams, and swamps supply water for of the wetter prairie areas, there are lilies, bonnets,
livestock on the range or on the improved pastures arrowheads, pickerelweeds, and other aquatic plants.
that have been established in various parts of the In a narrow strip along the coast, where the areas are
county. Shallow wells, 20 to 40 feet deep, are easily sometimes covered by high tides, mangrove trees and
driven or drilled in the sands and clays. These pro- salt-tolerant plants form the vegetative cover.
vide additional water for livestock and for some
homes. Many farms and schools have drilled wells
that are 60 to 100 feet deep. Electric power is gener- Social and Industrial Development
ally used to pump the water, but some gasoline mo-
wators arer. used Most of the farm homes have rer.nning It was about 1820 when the first American settlers
Strawberries, most vegetable crops, and some of moved into this area. They found some small commu-
the citrus groves are irrigated. The water is pumped cities of Spanish-speaking settlers already established.
from shallow ponds or from natural or artificial lakes, Few Americans came for some time, because trans-
or from driven or drilled wells if other sources are not portation was poor and there was no industrial devel-
available. In the vicinity of Ruskin, water for irriga- opment.
tion is obtained from flowing artesian wells. The early settlers planted orange trees near Lake
Thonotosassa, but they had no markets for the fruit.
Some grew corn, vegetables, sugarcane, oats, rice, and
Native Vegetation cotton for their own use. Fish and game also were a
Native Vegetation source of food. A few hogs and cattle were pastured
Hillsborough County was once covered by thick for- on the open range.
Hillsborough County was once covered b ny thick for Larger numbers of settlers came after the Seminole
ests, mainly of pine. These forests have all been cut, War ended in 1842. After the railroads were built,
except for a few of the original trees that still grow about 1884, commerce and industry developed in
in the swamps. In the scattered second- and third- Tampa and agriculture expanded in the rural sec-
growth forests now growing in the county, the trees tons. Vegetables were first shipped to northern mar-
are generally small. kets about 1900. Since that time the production of
In large part, the well drained and somewhat poorly winter vegetables, strawberries, and citrus fruits for
drained soils have been cleared. They are used to nor markets has cread and these r
grow vegetables and citrus fruits or have been seeded the northern markets has increased, and these prod-
to pasture grasses. Some areas that were once cul- ucts are now a major source of income.
tivated are now grown up to weeds, broomsedge, per-
simmon trees, oaks, and pines. A few areas have
been replanted to pine trees. Organization and population
Originally, longleaf pines and a few shrubs and
grasses were the principal vegetation on the well- The county was organized in 1834 by the governor
drained deep sands. Since the longleaf pines were and the legislative council of the Territory of Florida
cut, turkey oaks and bluejack oaks have grown up, (5). The county was originally much larger than it
and live oaks grow on some of the wetter areas. The is today. Soon after Florida became a State, in 1845,
undergrowth consists mainly of wiregrass and a few a large part of Hillsborough County was taken to
shrubs. The well-drained deep sands and phosphatic form the counties of Pasco, Polk, Manatee, Sarasota,
materials now have a cover of oak, hickory, magnolia, DeSoto, Charlotte, Highlands, and Hardee. The pres-
and longleaf pine and a fairly thick undergrowth of ent boundaries of Hillsborough County were not fixed
shrubs and grasses. until 1911, when another part of the area was taken
Scrub vegetation covers the excessively drained to form Pinellas County.
deep sands. This consists of scrub live oak, sand pine, The railroads brought rapid expansion in the popu-
rosemary, a few turkey oaks and bluejack oaks, saw- lation. According to the Federal census, the popula-
palmettos, and grasses. tion in 1950 was 249,894, of which about 25 percent
The somewhat poorly drained dark-colored soils was rural. The population of Tampa was 124,681 in
have a cover of pines, live oaks and bluejack oaks, 1950; that of Plant City, 9,230; and that of Port
hickory, a few saw-palmettos, shrubs, and wiregrass Tampa, 1,497. Smaller towns and agricultural trad-
and some other grasses. ing centers are Ruskin, Wimauma, Sun City, Brandon,
The flatwood areas, which make up a large part of Gibsonton, Riverview, Mango, Seffner, Dover, Valrico,
the county, have a cover of pines, saw-palmettos, Thonotosassa, Lutz, and Citrus Park.






HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 3

ing intensity, but of hurricane force, move northward huckleberry bushes, gallberry bushes, runner oaks,
from the tropics across the county. The heavy rains and grasses. Cabbage palmettos, live oaks, myrtle
that accompany these storms are usually more damag- bushes, and vines also grow on the soils that consist
ing than the wind. partly of calcareous materials.
Mixed forests of cypress, gum, elm, hickory, live
oak, water oak, maple, ironwood, cabbage palmetto,
Water Supply and vines, shrubs, and grasses grow in the swamps in
the interior of the county. Sedges, rushes, grasses,
The county is well supplied with water. Numerous and a few pines grow on the wet prairies. On some
ponds, lakes, streams, and swamps supply water for of the wetter prairie areas, there are lilies, bonnets,
livestock on the range or on the improved pastures arrowheads, pickerelweeds, and other aquatic plants.
that have been established in various parts of the In a narrow strip along the coast, where the areas are
county. Shallow wells, 20 to 40 feet deep, are easily sometimes covered by high tides, mangrove trees and
driven or drilled in the sands and clays. These pro- salt-tolerant plants form the vegetative cover.
vide additional water for livestock and for some
homes. Many farms and schools have drilled wells
that are 60 to 100 feet deep. Electric power is gener- Social and Industrial Development
ally used to pump the water, but some gasoline mo-
wators arer. used Most of the farm homes have rer.nning It was about 1820 when the first American settlers
Strawberries, most vegetable crops, and some of moved into this area. They found some small commu-
the citrus groves are irrigated. The water is pumped cities of Spanish-speaking settlers already established.
from shallow ponds or from natural or artificial lakes, Few Americans came for some time, because trans-
or from driven or drilled wells if other sources are not portation was poor and there was no industrial devel-
available. In the vicinity of Ruskin, water for irriga- opment.
tion is obtained from flowing artesian wells. The early settlers planted orange trees near Lake
Thonotosassa, but they had no markets for the fruit.
Some grew corn, vegetables, sugarcane, oats, rice, and
Native Vegetation cotton for their own use. Fish and game also were a
Native Vegetation source of food. A few hogs and cattle were pastured
Hillsborough County was once covered by thick for- on the open range.
Hillsborough County was once covered b ny thick for Larger numbers of settlers came after the Seminole
ests, mainly of pine. These forests have all been cut, War ended in 1842. After the railroads were built,
except for a few of the original trees that still grow about 1884, commerce and industry developed in
in the swamps. In the scattered second- and third- Tampa and agriculture expanded in the rural sec-
growth forests now growing in the county, the trees tons. Vegetables were first shipped to northern mar-
are generally small. kets about 1900. Since that time the production of
In large part, the well drained and somewhat poorly winter vegetables, strawberries, and citrus fruits for
drained soils have been cleared. They are used to nor markets has cread and these r
grow vegetables and citrus fruits or have been seeded the northern markets has increased, and these prod-
to pasture grasses. Some areas that were once cul- ucts are now a major source of income.
tivated are now grown up to weeds, broomsedge, per-
simmon trees, oaks, and pines. A few areas have
been replanted to pine trees. Organization and population
Originally, longleaf pines and a few shrubs and
grasses were the principal vegetation on the well- The county was organized in 1834 by the governor
drained deep sands. Since the longleaf pines were and the legislative council of the Territory of Florida
cut, turkey oaks and bluejack oaks have grown up, (5). The county was originally much larger than it
and live oaks grow on some of the wetter areas. The is today. Soon after Florida became a State, in 1845,
undergrowth consists mainly of wiregrass and a few a large part of Hillsborough County was taken to
shrubs. The well-drained deep sands and phosphatic form the counties of Pasco, Polk, Manatee, Sarasota,
materials now have a cover of oak, hickory, magnolia, DeSoto, Charlotte, Highlands, and Hardee. The pres-
and longleaf pine and a fairly thick undergrowth of ent boundaries of Hillsborough County were not fixed
shrubs and grasses. until 1911, when another part of the area was taken
Scrub vegetation covers the excessively drained to form Pinellas County.
deep sands. This consists of scrub live oak, sand pine, The railroads brought rapid expansion in the popu-
rosemary, a few turkey oaks and bluejack oaks, saw- lation. According to the Federal census, the popula-
palmettos, and grasses. tion in 1950 was 249,894, of which about 25 percent
The somewhat poorly drained dark-colored soils was rural. The population of Tampa was 124,681 in
have a cover of pines, live oaks and bluejack oaks, 1950; that of Plant City, 9,230; and that of Port
hickory, a few saw-palmettos, shrubs, and wiregrass Tampa, 1,497. Smaller towns and agricultural trad-
and some other grasses. ing centers are Ruskin, Wimauma, Sun City, Brandon,
The flatwood areas, which make up a large part of Gibsonton, Riverview, Mango, Seffner, Dover, Valrico,
the county, have a cover of pines, saw-palmettos, Thonotosassa, Lutz, and Citrus Park.






HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 3

ing intensity, but of hurricane force, move northward huckleberry bushes, gallberry bushes, runner oaks,
from the tropics across the county. The heavy rains and grasses. Cabbage palmettos, live oaks, myrtle
that accompany these storms are usually more damag- bushes, and vines also grow on the soils that consist
ing than the wind. partly of calcareous materials.
Mixed forests of cypress, gum, elm, hickory, live
oak, water oak, maple, ironwood, cabbage palmetto,
Water Supply and vines, shrubs, and grasses grow in the swamps in
the interior of the county. Sedges, rushes, grasses,
The county is well supplied with water. Numerous and a few pines grow on the wet prairies. On some
ponds, lakes, streams, and swamps supply water for of the wetter prairie areas, there are lilies, bonnets,
livestock on the range or on the improved pastures arrowheads, pickerelweeds, and other aquatic plants.
that have been established in various parts of the In a narrow strip along the coast, where the areas are
county. Shallow wells, 20 to 40 feet deep, are easily sometimes covered by high tides, mangrove trees and
driven or drilled in the sands and clays. These pro- salt-tolerant plants form the vegetative cover.
vide additional water for livestock and for some
homes. Many farms and schools have drilled wells
that are 60 to 100 feet deep. Electric power is gener- Social and Industrial Development
ally used to pump the water, but some gasoline mo-
wators arer. used Most of the farm homes have rer.nning It was about 1820 when the first American settlers
Strawberries, most vegetable crops, and some of moved into this area. They found some small commu-
the citrus groves are irrigated. The water is pumped cities of Spanish-speaking settlers already established.
from shallow ponds or from natural or artificial lakes, Few Americans came for some time, because trans-
or from driven or drilled wells if other sources are not portation was poor and there was no industrial devel-
available. In the vicinity of Ruskin, water for irriga- opment.
tion is obtained from flowing artesian wells. The early settlers planted orange trees near Lake
Thonotosassa, but they had no markets for the fruit.
Some grew corn, vegetables, sugarcane, oats, rice, and
Native Vegetation cotton for their own use. Fish and game also were a
Native Vegetation source of food. A few hogs and cattle were pastured
Hillsborough County was once covered by thick for- on the open range.
Hillsborough County was once covered b ny thick for Larger numbers of settlers came after the Seminole
ests, mainly of pine. These forests have all been cut, War ended in 1842. After the railroads were built,
except for a few of the original trees that still grow about 1884, commerce and industry developed in
in the swamps. In the scattered second- and third- Tampa and agriculture expanded in the rural sec-
growth forests now growing in the county, the trees tons. Vegetables were first shipped to northern mar-
are generally small. kets about 1900. Since that time the production of
In large part, the well drained and somewhat poorly winter vegetables, strawberries, and citrus fruits for
drained soils have been cleared. They are used to nor markets has cread and these r
grow vegetables and citrus fruits or have been seeded the northern markets has increased, and these prod-
to pasture grasses. Some areas that were once cul- ucts are now a major source of income.
tivated are now grown up to weeds, broomsedge, per-
simmon trees, oaks, and pines. A few areas have
been replanted to pine trees. Organization and population
Originally, longleaf pines and a few shrubs and
grasses were the principal vegetation on the well- The county was organized in 1834 by the governor
drained deep sands. Since the longleaf pines were and the legislative council of the Territory of Florida
cut, turkey oaks and bluejack oaks have grown up, (5). The county was originally much larger than it
and live oaks grow on some of the wetter areas. The is today. Soon after Florida became a State, in 1845,
undergrowth consists mainly of wiregrass and a few a large part of Hillsborough County was taken to
shrubs. The well-drained deep sands and phosphatic form the counties of Pasco, Polk, Manatee, Sarasota,
materials now have a cover of oak, hickory, magnolia, DeSoto, Charlotte, Highlands, and Hardee. The pres-
and longleaf pine and a fairly thick undergrowth of ent boundaries of Hillsborough County were not fixed
shrubs and grasses. until 1911, when another part of the area was taken
Scrub vegetation covers the excessively drained to form Pinellas County.
deep sands. This consists of scrub live oak, sand pine, The railroads brought rapid expansion in the popu-
rosemary, a few turkey oaks and bluejack oaks, saw- lation. According to the Federal census, the popula-
palmettos, and grasses. tion in 1950 was 249,894, of which about 25 percent
The somewhat poorly drained dark-colored soils was rural. The population of Tampa was 124,681 in
have a cover of pines, live oaks and bluejack oaks, 1950; that of Plant City, 9,230; and that of Port
hickory, a few saw-palmettos, shrubs, and wiregrass Tampa, 1,497. Smaller towns and agricultural trad-
and some other grasses. ing centers are Ruskin, Wimauma, Sun City, Brandon,
The flatwood areas, which make up a large part of Gibsonton, Riverview, Mango, Seffner, Dover, Valrico,
the county, have a cover of pines, saw-palmettos, Thonotosassa, Lutz, and Citrus Park.






HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 3

ing intensity, but of hurricane force, move northward huckleberry bushes, gallberry bushes, runner oaks,
from the tropics across the county. The heavy rains and grasses. Cabbage palmettos, live oaks, myrtle
that accompany these storms are usually more damag- bushes, and vines also grow on the soils that consist
ing than the wind. partly of calcareous materials.
Mixed forests of cypress, gum, elm, hickory, live
oak, water oak, maple, ironwood, cabbage palmetto,
Water Supply and vines, shrubs, and grasses grow in the swamps in
the interior of the county. Sedges, rushes, grasses,
The county is well supplied with water. Numerous and a few pines grow on the wet prairies. On some
ponds, lakes, streams, and swamps supply water for of the wetter prairie areas, there are lilies, bonnets,
livestock on the range or on the improved pastures arrowheads, pickerelweeds, and other aquatic plants.
that have been established in various parts of the In a narrow strip along the coast, where the areas are
county. Shallow wells, 20 to 40 feet deep, are easily sometimes covered by high tides, mangrove trees and
driven or drilled in the sands and clays. These pro- salt-tolerant plants form the vegetative cover.
vide additional water for livestock and for some
homes. Many farms and schools have drilled wells
that are 60 to 100 feet deep. Electric power is gener- Social and Industrial Development
ally used to pump the water, but some gasoline mo-
wators arer. used Most of the farm homes have rer.nning It was about 1820 when the first American settlers
Strawberries, most vegetable crops, and some of moved into this area. They found some small commu-
the citrus groves are irrigated. The water is pumped cities of Spanish-speaking settlers already established.
from shallow ponds or from natural or artificial lakes, Few Americans came for some time, because trans-
or from driven or drilled wells if other sources are not portation was poor and there was no industrial devel-
available. In the vicinity of Ruskin, water for irriga- opment.
tion is obtained from flowing artesian wells. The early settlers planted orange trees near Lake
Thonotosassa, but they had no markets for the fruit.
Some grew corn, vegetables, sugarcane, oats, rice, and
Native Vegetation cotton for their own use. Fish and game also were a
Native Vegetation source of food. A few hogs and cattle were pastured
Hillsborough County was once covered by thick for- on the open range.
Hillsborough County was once covered b ny thick for Larger numbers of settlers came after the Seminole
ests, mainly of pine. These forests have all been cut, War ended in 1842. After the railroads were built,
except for a few of the original trees that still grow about 1884, commerce and industry developed in
in the swamps. In the scattered second- and third- Tampa and agriculture expanded in the rural sec-
growth forests now growing in the county, the trees tons. Vegetables were first shipped to northern mar-
are generally small. kets about 1900. Since that time the production of
In large part, the well drained and somewhat poorly winter vegetables, strawberries, and citrus fruits for
drained soils have been cleared. They are used to nor markets has cread and these r
grow vegetables and citrus fruits or have been seeded the northern markets has increased, and these prod-
to pasture grasses. Some areas that were once cul- ucts are now a major source of income.
tivated are now grown up to weeds, broomsedge, per-
simmon trees, oaks, and pines. A few areas have
been replanted to pine trees. Organization and population
Originally, longleaf pines and a few shrubs and
grasses were the principal vegetation on the well- The county was organized in 1834 by the governor
drained deep sands. Since the longleaf pines were and the legislative council of the Territory of Florida
cut, turkey oaks and bluejack oaks have grown up, (5). The county was originally much larger than it
and live oaks grow on some of the wetter areas. The is today. Soon after Florida became a State, in 1845,
undergrowth consists mainly of wiregrass and a few a large part of Hillsborough County was taken to
shrubs. The well-drained deep sands and phosphatic form the counties of Pasco, Polk, Manatee, Sarasota,
materials now have a cover of oak, hickory, magnolia, DeSoto, Charlotte, Highlands, and Hardee. The pres-
and longleaf pine and a fairly thick undergrowth of ent boundaries of Hillsborough County were not fixed
shrubs and grasses. until 1911, when another part of the area was taken
Scrub vegetation covers the excessively drained to form Pinellas County.
deep sands. This consists of scrub live oak, sand pine, The railroads brought rapid expansion in the popu-
rosemary, a few turkey oaks and bluejack oaks, saw- lation. According to the Federal census, the popula-
palmettos, and grasses. tion in 1950 was 249,894, of which about 25 percent
The somewhat poorly drained dark-colored soils was rural. The population of Tampa was 124,681 in
have a cover of pines, live oaks and bluejack oaks, 1950; that of Plant City, 9,230; and that of Port
hickory, a few saw-palmettos, shrubs, and wiregrass Tampa, 1,497. Smaller towns and agricultural trad-
and some other grasses. ing centers are Ruskin, Wimauma, Sun City, Brandon,
The flatwood areas, which make up a large part of Gibsonton, Riverview, Mango, Seffner, Dover, Valrico,
the county, have a cover of pines, saw-palmettos, Thonotosassa, Lutz, and Citrus Park.






4 SOIL SURVEY SERIES 1950, NO. 3
Industries ply on distant markets, are shipped by air. Gladioli
blossoms are shipped by air or by motortruck to the
After railroads were built, industry developed rap- northern cities. Several airlines connect Tampa with
idly in Tampa. In January 1886 two cigar factories other cities in Florida and with the major cities in the
located at Ybor City, in the eastern part of Tampa. United States. The Tampa International Airport is
Today Tampa is considered the "Clear Havana" cigar located about 41/2 miles northwest of the center of
center of the world. Phosphate mining was begun Tampa, and the MacDill Army Air Base is located in
early in the 20th century. It has progressed until the southwestern part of that city. There are several
now more than 75 percent of the phosphate exported smaller airports near Tampa and in Plant City and
from the United States is shipped from Tampa. Ruskin.
Other important industrial establishments in the
Tampa area are packing plants for processing vege-
tables, strawberries, and citrus fruits; slaughterhouses Schools, churches, and hospitals
for processing beef cattle and swine; breweries; bot-
tling plants; and lumber companies. Factories are Students are transported from outlying areas by
numerous. They produce building supplies, including bus to the consolidated schools located in the larger
aluminum window casements, cement, and paints; communities throughout the county. Several high
trailers; many types of containers; fertilizers; feeds; schools are located in Tampa, and there are high
furniture; heaters; mattresses; and batteries, schools at Plant City, Brandon, Wimauma, Turkey
In addition to the packing plants at Tampa, a State Creek, and Pinecrest. A vocational school, several
Farmers' Market and a farmers' cooperative, located parochial and private schools, and the University of
in Plant City, receive and pack many vegetables and Tampa, a private institution, are located at Tampa.
truck crops. A privately owned packinghouse at Rus- Several of the schools in the eastern part of the county
kin processes and packs vegetables and trucks them to are called "strawberry schools." This is because the
northern markets. school term extends from April to December so that
Dairying and poultry raising have become important the children can pick strawberries and vegetables dur-
in Hillsborough County. Beef cattle have been raised ing the winter months.
more extensively during the past few years. Churches are conveniently located in most commu-
nities. There are two municipal hospitals in Tampa.
In addition, small children are given dental care by
Transportation and markets means of a "Dentomobile," and the county health de-
partment operates a "Healthmobile." Other health
Hillsborough County has good transportation facili- services are provided by the county clinic.
ties. The Seaboard Air Line Railroad and the Atlantic
Coast Line Railroad have a number of branches in the .
county, so that nearly all sections are within a few Recreational facilities
miles of railway freight stations. T
Several Federal highways connect Tampa with other Tampa Bay and the numerous lakes and rivers in
cities. Highway 41 crosses from north to south the county provide excellent facilities for boating, fish-
through the central part of the county. It passes ing, and swimming. Because of the mild climate, these
through Lutz, Tampa, and Gibsonton and extends activities can be carried on during most of the year.
southward from Tampa to Ruskin and beyond. High- The Hillsborough River State Park, located in the
way 92 joins Tampa with Plant City and extends northern part of the county along United States High-
eastward from Plant City. Highway 301 enters the way 301, provides additional opportunities for recrea-
county near Hillsborough River State Park, and it tion.
extends in a southwesterly direction to Tampa and
from there southward.
Many State highways connect the various parts of Agriculture
the county, and there are some hard-surfaced roads in The agriculture of Hillsborough County is based on
most agricultural communities. The connecting graded the growing of citrus fruits and winter vegetables and
roads are kept in fair condition all year. the raising of livestock. On the following pages the
Passenger buses operate over all of the Federal high- more outstanding features of this agriculture are
ways and over several of the State highways. Motor- pointed out. The statistics used are from reports pub-
trucks, operating over thfe hard-surfaced roads, are listed by the United States Bureau of the Census.
used to transport a large part of the agricultural
products to outside markets.
Facilities for traveling by water or air are excel- Farm Income
lent in Hillsborough County. About 15 steamship
lines maintain offices in Tampa. Ships of these and In 1950, total income derived through sale of farm
other lines dock at Tampa and Port Tampa to load products was divided as follows:
and unload passengers and large volumes of freight.
Vegetables, truck crops, strawberries, and citrus fruits Percent
are trucked or shipped by rail to northern markets. Crop s land nuts: _-- 29.2
Some products, harvested when they are in short su- VeFruietables and n__ ----------------------------- 249.24
Some products, harvested when they are in short sup- Vegetables------------------24.4






4 SOIL SURVEY SERIES 1950, NO. 3
Industries ply on distant markets, are shipped by air. Gladioli
blossoms are shipped by air or by motortruck to the
After railroads were built, industry developed rap- northern cities. Several airlines connect Tampa with
idly in Tampa. In January 1886 two cigar factories other cities in Florida and with the major cities in the
located at Ybor City, in the eastern part of Tampa. United States. The Tampa International Airport is
Today Tampa is considered the "Clear Havana" cigar located about 41/2 miles northwest of the center of
center of the world. Phosphate mining was begun Tampa, and the MacDill Army Air Base is located in
early in the 20th century. It has progressed until the southwestern part of that city. There are several
now more than 75 percent of the phosphate exported smaller airports near Tampa and in Plant City and
from the United States is shipped from Tampa. Ruskin.
Other important industrial establishments in the
Tampa area are packing plants for processing vege-
tables, strawberries, and citrus fruits; slaughterhouses Schools, churches, and hospitals
for processing beef cattle and swine; breweries; bot-
tling plants; and lumber companies. Factories are Students are transported from outlying areas by
numerous. They produce building supplies, including bus to the consolidated schools located in the larger
aluminum window casements, cement, and paints; communities throughout the county. Several high
trailers; many types of containers; fertilizers; feeds; schools are located in Tampa, and there are high
furniture; heaters; mattresses; and batteries, schools at Plant City, Brandon, Wimauma, Turkey
In addition to the packing plants at Tampa, a State Creek, and Pinecrest. A vocational school, several
Farmers' Market and a farmers' cooperative, located parochial and private schools, and the University of
in Plant City, receive and pack many vegetables and Tampa, a private institution, are located at Tampa.
truck crops. A privately owned packinghouse at Rus- Several of the schools in the eastern part of the county
kin processes and packs vegetables and trucks them to are called "strawberry schools." This is because the
northern markets. school term extends from April to December so that
Dairying and poultry raising have become important the children can pick strawberries and vegetables dur-
in Hillsborough County. Beef cattle have been raised ing the winter months.
more extensively during the past few years. Churches are conveniently located in most commu-
nities. There are two municipal hospitals in Tampa.
In addition, small children are given dental care by
Transportation and markets means of a "Dentomobile," and the county health de-
partment operates a "Healthmobile." Other health
Hillsborough County has good transportation facili- services are provided by the county clinic.
ties. The Seaboard Air Line Railroad and the Atlantic
Coast Line Railroad have a number of branches in the .
county, so that nearly all sections are within a few Recreational facilities
miles of railway freight stations. T
Several Federal highways connect Tampa with other Tampa Bay and the numerous lakes and rivers in
cities. Highway 41 crosses from north to south the county provide excellent facilities for boating, fish-
through the central part of the county. It passes ing, and swimming. Because of the mild climate, these
through Lutz, Tampa, and Gibsonton and extends activities can be carried on during most of the year.
southward from Tampa to Ruskin and beyond. High- The Hillsborough River State Park, located in the
way 92 joins Tampa with Plant City and extends northern part of the county along United States High-
eastward from Plant City. Highway 301 enters the way 301, provides additional opportunities for recrea-
county near Hillsborough River State Park, and it tion.
extends in a southwesterly direction to Tampa and
from there southward.
Many State highways connect the various parts of Agriculture
the county, and there are some hard-surfaced roads in The agriculture of Hillsborough County is based on
most agricultural communities. The connecting graded the growing of citrus fruits and winter vegetables and
roads are kept in fair condition all year. the raising of livestock. On the following pages the
Passenger buses operate over all of the Federal high- more outstanding features of this agriculture are
ways and over several of the State highways. Motor- pointed out. The statistics used are from reports pub-
trucks, operating over thfe hard-surfaced roads, are listed by the United States Bureau of the Census.
used to transport a large part of the agricultural
products to outside markets.
Facilities for traveling by water or air are excel- Farm Income
lent in Hillsborough County. About 15 steamship
lines maintain offices in Tampa. Ships of these and In 1950, total income derived through sale of farm
other lines dock at Tampa and Port Tampa to load products was divided as follows:
and unload passengers and large volumes of freight.
Vegetables, truck crops, strawberries, and citrus fruits Percent
are trucked or shipped by rail to northern markets. Crop s land nuts: _-- 29.2
Some products, harvested when they are in short su- VeFruietables and n__ ----------------------------- 249.24
Some products, harvested when they are in short sup- Vegetables------------------24.4






4 SOIL SURVEY SERIES 1950, NO. 3
Industries ply on distant markets, are shipped by air. Gladioli
blossoms are shipped by air or by motortruck to the
After railroads were built, industry developed rap- northern cities. Several airlines connect Tampa with
idly in Tampa. In January 1886 two cigar factories other cities in Florida and with the major cities in the
located at Ybor City, in the eastern part of Tampa. United States. The Tampa International Airport is
Today Tampa is considered the "Clear Havana" cigar located about 41/2 miles northwest of the center of
center of the world. Phosphate mining was begun Tampa, and the MacDill Army Air Base is located in
early in the 20th century. It has progressed until the southwestern part of that city. There are several
now more than 75 percent of the phosphate exported smaller airports near Tampa and in Plant City and
from the United States is shipped from Tampa. Ruskin.
Other important industrial establishments in the
Tampa area are packing plants for processing vege-
tables, strawberries, and citrus fruits; slaughterhouses Schools, churches, and hospitals
for processing beef cattle and swine; breweries; bot-
tling plants; and lumber companies. Factories are Students are transported from outlying areas by
numerous. They produce building supplies, including bus to the consolidated schools located in the larger
aluminum window casements, cement, and paints; communities throughout the county. Several high
trailers; many types of containers; fertilizers; feeds; schools are located in Tampa, and there are high
furniture; heaters; mattresses; and batteries, schools at Plant City, Brandon, Wimauma, Turkey
In addition to the packing plants at Tampa, a State Creek, and Pinecrest. A vocational school, several
Farmers' Market and a farmers' cooperative, located parochial and private schools, and the University of
in Plant City, receive and pack many vegetables and Tampa, a private institution, are located at Tampa.
truck crops. A privately owned packinghouse at Rus- Several of the schools in the eastern part of the county
kin processes and packs vegetables and trucks them to are called "strawberry schools." This is because the
northern markets. school term extends from April to December so that
Dairying and poultry raising have become important the children can pick strawberries and vegetables dur-
in Hillsborough County. Beef cattle have been raised ing the winter months.
more extensively during the past few years. Churches are conveniently located in most commu-
nities. There are two municipal hospitals in Tampa.
In addition, small children are given dental care by
Transportation and markets means of a "Dentomobile," and the county health de-
partment operates a "Healthmobile." Other health
Hillsborough County has good transportation facili- services are provided by the county clinic.
ties. The Seaboard Air Line Railroad and the Atlantic
Coast Line Railroad have a number of branches in the .
county, so that nearly all sections are within a few Recreational facilities
miles of railway freight stations. T
Several Federal highways connect Tampa with other Tampa Bay and the numerous lakes and rivers in
cities. Highway 41 crosses from north to south the county provide excellent facilities for boating, fish-
through the central part of the county. It passes ing, and swimming. Because of the mild climate, these
through Lutz, Tampa, and Gibsonton and extends activities can be carried on during most of the year.
southward from Tampa to Ruskin and beyond. High- The Hillsborough River State Park, located in the
way 92 joins Tampa with Plant City and extends northern part of the county along United States High-
eastward from Plant City. Highway 301 enters the way 301, provides additional opportunities for recrea-
county near Hillsborough River State Park, and it tion.
extends in a southwesterly direction to Tampa and
from there southward.
Many State highways connect the various parts of Agriculture
the county, and there are some hard-surfaced roads in The agriculture of Hillsborough County is based on
most agricultural communities. The connecting graded the growing of citrus fruits and winter vegetables and
roads are kept in fair condition all year. the raising of livestock. On the following pages the
Passenger buses operate over all of the Federal high- more outstanding features of this agriculture are
ways and over several of the State highways. Motor- pointed out. The statistics used are from reports pub-
trucks, operating over thfe hard-surfaced roads, are listed by the United States Bureau of the Census.
used to transport a large part of the agricultural
products to outside markets.
Facilities for traveling by water or air are excel- Farm Income
lent in Hillsborough County. About 15 steamship
lines maintain offices in Tampa. Ships of these and In 1950, total income derived through sale of farm
other lines dock at Tampa and Port Tampa to load products was divided as follows:
and unload passengers and large volumes of freight.
Vegetables, truck crops, strawberries, and citrus fruits Percent
are trucked or shipped by rail to northern markets. Crop s land nuts: _-- 29.2
Some products, harvested when they are in short su- VeFruietables and n__ ----------------------------- 249.24
Some products, harvested when they are in short sup- Vegetables------------------24.4






4 SOIL SURVEY SERIES 1950, NO. 3
Industries ply on distant markets, are shipped by air. Gladioli
blossoms are shipped by air or by motortruck to the
After railroads were built, industry developed rap- northern cities. Several airlines connect Tampa with
idly in Tampa. In January 1886 two cigar factories other cities in Florida and with the major cities in the
located at Ybor City, in the eastern part of Tampa. United States. The Tampa International Airport is
Today Tampa is considered the "Clear Havana" cigar located about 41/2 miles northwest of the center of
center of the world. Phosphate mining was begun Tampa, and the MacDill Army Air Base is located in
early in the 20th century. It has progressed until the southwestern part of that city. There are several
now more than 75 percent of the phosphate exported smaller airports near Tampa and in Plant City and
from the United States is shipped from Tampa. Ruskin.
Other important industrial establishments in the
Tampa area are packing plants for processing vege-
tables, strawberries, and citrus fruits; slaughterhouses Schools, churches, and hospitals
for processing beef cattle and swine; breweries; bot-
tling plants; and lumber companies. Factories are Students are transported from outlying areas by
numerous. They produce building supplies, including bus to the consolidated schools located in the larger
aluminum window casements, cement, and paints; communities throughout the county. Several high
trailers; many types of containers; fertilizers; feeds; schools are located in Tampa, and there are high
furniture; heaters; mattresses; and batteries, schools at Plant City, Brandon, Wimauma, Turkey
In addition to the packing plants at Tampa, a State Creek, and Pinecrest. A vocational school, several
Farmers' Market and a farmers' cooperative, located parochial and private schools, and the University of
in Plant City, receive and pack many vegetables and Tampa, a private institution, are located at Tampa.
truck crops. A privately owned packinghouse at Rus- Several of the schools in the eastern part of the county
kin processes and packs vegetables and trucks them to are called "strawberry schools." This is because the
northern markets. school term extends from April to December so that
Dairying and poultry raising have become important the children can pick strawberries and vegetables dur-
in Hillsborough County. Beef cattle have been raised ing the winter months.
more extensively during the past few years. Churches are conveniently located in most commu-
nities. There are two municipal hospitals in Tampa.
In addition, small children are given dental care by
Transportation and markets means of a "Dentomobile," and the county health de-
partment operates a "Healthmobile." Other health
Hillsborough County has good transportation facili- services are provided by the county clinic.
ties. The Seaboard Air Line Railroad and the Atlantic
Coast Line Railroad have a number of branches in the .
county, so that nearly all sections are within a few Recreational facilities
miles of railway freight stations. T
Several Federal highways connect Tampa with other Tampa Bay and the numerous lakes and rivers in
cities. Highway 41 crosses from north to south the county provide excellent facilities for boating, fish-
through the central part of the county. It passes ing, and swimming. Because of the mild climate, these
through Lutz, Tampa, and Gibsonton and extends activities can be carried on during most of the year.
southward from Tampa to Ruskin and beyond. High- The Hillsborough River State Park, located in the
way 92 joins Tampa with Plant City and extends northern part of the county along United States High-
eastward from Plant City. Highway 301 enters the way 301, provides additional opportunities for recrea-
county near Hillsborough River State Park, and it tion.
extends in a southwesterly direction to Tampa and
from there southward.
Many State highways connect the various parts of Agriculture
the county, and there are some hard-surfaced roads in The agriculture of Hillsborough County is based on
most agricultural communities. The connecting graded the growing of citrus fruits and winter vegetables and
roads are kept in fair condition all year. the raising of livestock. On the following pages the
Passenger buses operate over all of the Federal high- more outstanding features of this agriculture are
ways and over several of the State highways. Motor- pointed out. The statistics used are from reports pub-
trucks, operating over thfe hard-surfaced roads, are listed by the United States Bureau of the Census.
used to transport a large part of the agricultural
products to outside markets.
Facilities for traveling by water or air are excel- Farm Income
lent in Hillsborough County. About 15 steamship
lines maintain offices in Tampa. Ships of these and In 1950, total income derived through sale of farm
other lines dock at Tampa and Port Tampa to load products was divided as follows:
and unload passengers and large volumes of freight.
Vegetables, truck crops, strawberries, and citrus fruits Percent
are trucked or shipped by rail to northern markets. Crop s land nuts: _-- 29.2
Some products, harvested when they are in short su- VeFruietables and n__ ----------------------------- 249.24
Some products, harvested when they are in short sup- Vegetables------------------24.4






4 SOIL SURVEY SERIES 1950, NO. 3
Industries ply on distant markets, are shipped by air. Gladioli
blossoms are shipped by air or by motortruck to the
After railroads were built, industry developed rap- northern cities. Several airlines connect Tampa with
idly in Tampa. In January 1886 two cigar factories other cities in Florida and with the major cities in the
located at Ybor City, in the eastern part of Tampa. United States. The Tampa International Airport is
Today Tampa is considered the "Clear Havana" cigar located about 41/2 miles northwest of the center of
center of the world. Phosphate mining was begun Tampa, and the MacDill Army Air Base is located in
early in the 20th century. It has progressed until the southwestern part of that city. There are several
now more than 75 percent of the phosphate exported smaller airports near Tampa and in Plant City and
from the United States is shipped from Tampa. Ruskin.
Other important industrial establishments in the
Tampa area are packing plants for processing vege-
tables, strawberries, and citrus fruits; slaughterhouses Schools, churches, and hospitals
for processing beef cattle and swine; breweries; bot-
tling plants; and lumber companies. Factories are Students are transported from outlying areas by
numerous. They produce building supplies, including bus to the consolidated schools located in the larger
aluminum window casements, cement, and paints; communities throughout the county. Several high
trailers; many types of containers; fertilizers; feeds; schools are located in Tampa, and there are high
furniture; heaters; mattresses; and batteries, schools at Plant City, Brandon, Wimauma, Turkey
In addition to the packing plants at Tampa, a State Creek, and Pinecrest. A vocational school, several
Farmers' Market and a farmers' cooperative, located parochial and private schools, and the University of
in Plant City, receive and pack many vegetables and Tampa, a private institution, are located at Tampa.
truck crops. A privately owned packinghouse at Rus- Several of the schools in the eastern part of the county
kin processes and packs vegetables and trucks them to are called "strawberry schools." This is because the
northern markets. school term extends from April to December so that
Dairying and poultry raising have become important the children can pick strawberries and vegetables dur-
in Hillsborough County. Beef cattle have been raised ing the winter months.
more extensively during the past few years. Churches are conveniently located in most commu-
nities. There are two municipal hospitals in Tampa.
In addition, small children are given dental care by
Transportation and markets means of a "Dentomobile," and the county health de-
partment operates a "Healthmobile." Other health
Hillsborough County has good transportation facili- services are provided by the county clinic.
ties. The Seaboard Air Line Railroad and the Atlantic
Coast Line Railroad have a number of branches in the .
county, so that nearly all sections are within a few Recreational facilities
miles of railway freight stations. T
Several Federal highways connect Tampa with other Tampa Bay and the numerous lakes and rivers in
cities. Highway 41 crosses from north to south the county provide excellent facilities for boating, fish-
through the central part of the county. It passes ing, and swimming. Because of the mild climate, these
through Lutz, Tampa, and Gibsonton and extends activities can be carried on during most of the year.
southward from Tampa to Ruskin and beyond. High- The Hillsborough River State Park, located in the
way 92 joins Tampa with Plant City and extends northern part of the county along United States High-
eastward from Plant City. Highway 301 enters the way 301, provides additional opportunities for recrea-
county near Hillsborough River State Park, and it tion.
extends in a southwesterly direction to Tampa and
from there southward.
Many State highways connect the various parts of Agriculture
the county, and there are some hard-surfaced roads in The agriculture of Hillsborough County is based on
most agricultural communities. The connecting graded the growing of citrus fruits and winter vegetables and
roads are kept in fair condition all year. the raising of livestock. On the following pages the
Passenger buses operate over all of the Federal high- more outstanding features of this agriculture are
ways and over several of the State highways. Motor- pointed out. The statistics used are from reports pub-
trucks, operating over thfe hard-surfaced roads, are listed by the United States Bureau of the Census.
used to transport a large part of the agricultural
products to outside markets.
Facilities for traveling by water or air are excel- Farm Income
lent in Hillsborough County. About 15 steamship
lines maintain offices in Tampa. Ships of these and In 1950, total income derived through sale of farm
other lines dock at Tampa and Port Tampa to load products was divided as follows:
and unload passengers and large volumes of freight.
Vegetables, truck crops, strawberries, and citrus fruits Percent
are trucked or shipped by rail to northern markets. Crop s land nuts: _-- 29.2
Some products, harvested when they are in short su- VeFruietables and n__ ----------------------------- 249.24
Some products, harvested when they are in short sup- Vegetables------------------24.4






4 SOIL SURVEY SERIES 1950, NO. 3
Industries ply on distant markets, are shipped by air. Gladioli
blossoms are shipped by air or by motortruck to the
After railroads were built, industry developed rap- northern cities. Several airlines connect Tampa with
idly in Tampa. In January 1886 two cigar factories other cities in Florida and with the major cities in the
located at Ybor City, in the eastern part of Tampa. United States. The Tampa International Airport is
Today Tampa is considered the "Clear Havana" cigar located about 41/2 miles northwest of the center of
center of the world. Phosphate mining was begun Tampa, and the MacDill Army Air Base is located in
early in the 20th century. It has progressed until the southwestern part of that city. There are several
now more than 75 percent of the phosphate exported smaller airports near Tampa and in Plant City and
from the United States is shipped from Tampa. Ruskin.
Other important industrial establishments in the
Tampa area are packing plants for processing vege-
tables, strawberries, and citrus fruits; slaughterhouses Schools, churches, and hospitals
for processing beef cattle and swine; breweries; bot-
tling plants; and lumber companies. Factories are Students are transported from outlying areas by
numerous. They produce building supplies, including bus to the consolidated schools located in the larger
aluminum window casements, cement, and paints; communities throughout the county. Several high
trailers; many types of containers; fertilizers; feeds; schools are located in Tampa, and there are high
furniture; heaters; mattresses; and batteries, schools at Plant City, Brandon, Wimauma, Turkey
In addition to the packing plants at Tampa, a State Creek, and Pinecrest. A vocational school, several
Farmers' Market and a farmers' cooperative, located parochial and private schools, and the University of
in Plant City, receive and pack many vegetables and Tampa, a private institution, are located at Tampa.
truck crops. A privately owned packinghouse at Rus- Several of the schools in the eastern part of the county
kin processes and packs vegetables and trucks them to are called "strawberry schools." This is because the
northern markets. school term extends from April to December so that
Dairying and poultry raising have become important the children can pick strawberries and vegetables dur-
in Hillsborough County. Beef cattle have been raised ing the winter months.
more extensively during the past few years. Churches are conveniently located in most commu-
nities. There are two municipal hospitals in Tampa.
In addition, small children are given dental care by
Transportation and markets means of a "Dentomobile," and the county health de-
partment operates a "Healthmobile." Other health
Hillsborough County has good transportation facili- services are provided by the county clinic.
ties. The Seaboard Air Line Railroad and the Atlantic
Coast Line Railroad have a number of branches in the .
county, so that nearly all sections are within a few Recreational facilities
miles of railway freight stations. T
Several Federal highways connect Tampa with other Tampa Bay and the numerous lakes and rivers in
cities. Highway 41 crosses from north to south the county provide excellent facilities for boating, fish-
through the central part of the county. It passes ing, and swimming. Because of the mild climate, these
through Lutz, Tampa, and Gibsonton and extends activities can be carried on during most of the year.
southward from Tampa to Ruskin and beyond. High- The Hillsborough River State Park, located in the
way 92 joins Tampa with Plant City and extends northern part of the county along United States High-
eastward from Plant City. Highway 301 enters the way 301, provides additional opportunities for recrea-
county near Hillsborough River State Park, and it tion.
extends in a southwesterly direction to Tampa and
from there southward.
Many State highways connect the various parts of Agriculture
the county, and there are some hard-surfaced roads in The agriculture of Hillsborough County is based on
most agricultural communities. The connecting graded the growing of citrus fruits and winter vegetables and
roads are kept in fair condition all year. the raising of livestock. On the following pages the
Passenger buses operate over all of the Federal high- more outstanding features of this agriculture are
ways and over several of the State highways. Motor- pointed out. The statistics used are from reports pub-
trucks, operating over thfe hard-surfaced roads, are listed by the United States Bureau of the Census.
used to transport a large part of the agricultural
products to outside markets.
Facilities for traveling by water or air are excel- Farm Income
lent in Hillsborough County. About 15 steamship
lines maintain offices in Tampa. Ships of these and In 1950, total income derived through sale of farm
other lines dock at Tampa and Port Tampa to load products was divided as follows:
and unload passengers and large volumes of freight.
Vegetables, truck crops, strawberries, and citrus fruits Percent
are trucked or shipped by rail to northern markets. Crop s land nuts: _-- 29.2
Some products, harvested when they are in short su- VeFruietables and n__ ----------------------------- 249.24
Some products, harvested when they are in short sup- Vegetables------------------24.4






HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 5

Horticultural specialties ------------4.0 The poultry farms are principally on well-drained
Field crops ----------------------------------- 1.7 soils near Tampa, Mango, Seffner, Valrico, and Plant
Livestock and livestock products sold:
Dairy products ------------------------------ 20.6 City; the dairy farms are near Tampa and Plant City;
Poultry and poultry products------------------- 8.8 the general farms are in various parts of the county;
Other livestock and livestock products ----------- 10.9 and the livestock farms, or ranches, are in the north-
Forest products and other products sold ------ .4 western, northeastern, and southern parts of the
As indicated in this list, crops account for about 60 county.
percent of sales off the farms, and livestock, for about Farms ranged in size from less than 10 acres to
40 percent. more than 1,000 acres in 1950. Of the 3,753 farms in
the county, 38.3 percent were between 10 and 29 acres
in size, and 26.7 percent were less than 10 acres. There
Land Use were 65 farms of 1,000 acres or more. The average
size of farms in the county was 106.1 acres in 1950.
Hillsborough County covers about 665,600 acres, and Many of the smaller farms are near Plant City.
in 1950 approximately 60 percent of this was land in They are located mainly on Scranton and Ona soils
farms. Of the land in farms, only about 18 percent and on small areas of Leon and Blanton soils. Many
was cropland in 1950. A large part of the cropland of the larger farms are in the southwestern part of
is used to grow citrus fruits, vegetables, and truck the county. Soils of the Ruskin and Adamsville series
crops. are the principal soils in these farms.
Between 1930 and 1950 the area of land in farms Most of the citrus groves are 20 to 50 acres in size.
increased from 98,029 acres to 398,171 acres. Most They are generally the main source of income on larger
of the added acreage has been used to grow citrus farms where other types of farming are also carried
trees and vegetables or has been seeded to pasture on.
grasses. Land not in farms is in forest, range, or Most of the cattle ranches are 1,000 acres or more
building sites, or is included in the Hillsborough River in size. They are generally on Leon, Blanton, Pomello,
State Park or in other recreational areas. Immokalee, and Ona soils, in the southern, northeast-
Some tracts have been cropped for a few years and ern and northwestern parts of the county.
then seeded to pasture grasses. After being pastured
for a time, the areas will again be used for crops.
Only a few areas once cultivated or used for pasture Crops
have been reforested.
The following list shows how land in farms was The climate of Hillsborough County is well suited
used in 1949: to winter vegetables and to many of the subtropical
Acres fruits. Vegetables are grown principally near Plant
Cropland harvested -------------- 36,801 City and Ruskin. Tree fruits are grown mainly on
Cropland used only for pasture ------------------ 17,160 the well-drained soils near Thonotosassa, Brandon,
Cropland not harvested and not pastured---------- 16,224 i o
Woodland pastured ----------------------------254,207 Valrico, Plant City, Lutz, Citrus Park, and Tampa.
Woodland not pastured -------------26,197 The acreage of the principal crops and the number
Other pasture (not cropland and not woodland) -- 22,674 of bearing fruit trees, nut trees, and grapevines in
Other land (house lots, roads, wasteland, etc.) ------ 24,908 Hillsborough County are shown in table 2 for 1929,
Cropland, total 70,185
Land pastured, total 294,041 1939, and 1949.
Woodland, total --------------- 280,404 The principal vegetables and truck crops are toma-
toes, peppers, strawberries, sweet corn, snapbeans,
green limabeans, cucumbers, squash, and watermelons.
Types and Sizes of Farms These crops are usually shipped by truck, but the early
produce is shipped by air. Some of the vegetables are
Of the 3,753 farms in Hillsborough County in 1950, processed by local canneries, and some are sold on
1,723 were miscellaneous and unclassified. The re- local markets.
maining farms were listed by type as follows: The tree fruits grown in the county are principally
Number oranges, grapefruit, and tangerines. Lemons, limes,
Vegetable farms ------------------582 avocados, peaches, and grapes are also grown to some
Fruit and nut farms ----------------------------- 756 extent.
Field-crop farms other than vegetable and A fairly large acreage of cowpeas has been grown
fruit and nut---------------------------------- 20 during the past few years. The corn acreage is not
Poultry farms -----------------------------------256d
Dairy farms ------------------------------- 110 large; the corn is used to feed animals on the farm.
Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry ---- 144 Small grains and hay are grown on only a small acre-
General farms ------------------- 162 age. The oats and rye are mainly used for winter
Most of the vegetable farms are located within 12 grazing.
miles of Plant City or near Ruskin. The farms that Sugarcane was once grown fairly extensively for
grow fruits or nuts, principally citrus fruits, are sirup. The acreage has decreased, and in 1949 only
mainly in the vicinity of Thonotosassa, Brandon, Val- 22 acres of sugarcane and sorghum was harvested for
rico, Citrus Park, Lutz, Tampa, and Plant City. sirup.






HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 5

Horticultural specialties ------------4.0 The poultry farms are principally on well-drained
Field crops ----------------------------------- 1.7 soils near Tampa, Mango, Seffner, Valrico, and Plant
Livestock and livestock products sold:
Dairy products ------------------------------ 20.6 City; the dairy farms are near Tampa and Plant City;
Poultry and poultry products------------------- 8.8 the general farms are in various parts of the county;
Other livestock and livestock products ----------- 10.9 and the livestock farms, or ranches, are in the north-
Forest products and other products sold ------ .4 western, northeastern, and southern parts of the
As indicated in this list, crops account for about 60 county.
percent of sales off the farms, and livestock, for about Farms ranged in size from less than 10 acres to
40 percent. more than 1,000 acres in 1950. Of the 3,753 farms in
the county, 38.3 percent were between 10 and 29 acres
in size, and 26.7 percent were less than 10 acres. There
Land Use were 65 farms of 1,000 acres or more. The average
size of farms in the county was 106.1 acres in 1950.
Hillsborough County covers about 665,600 acres, and Many of the smaller farms are near Plant City.
in 1950 approximately 60 percent of this was land in They are located mainly on Scranton and Ona soils
farms. Of the land in farms, only about 18 percent and on small areas of Leon and Blanton soils. Many
was cropland in 1950. A large part of the cropland of the larger farms are in the southwestern part of
is used to grow citrus fruits, vegetables, and truck the county. Soils of the Ruskin and Adamsville series
crops. are the principal soils in these farms.
Between 1930 and 1950 the area of land in farms Most of the citrus groves are 20 to 50 acres in size.
increased from 98,029 acres to 398,171 acres. Most They are generally the main source of income on larger
of the added acreage has been used to grow citrus farms where other types of farming are also carried
trees and vegetables or has been seeded to pasture on.
grasses. Land not in farms is in forest, range, or Most of the cattle ranches are 1,000 acres or more
building sites, or is included in the Hillsborough River in size. They are generally on Leon, Blanton, Pomello,
State Park or in other recreational areas. Immokalee, and Ona soils, in the southern, northeast-
Some tracts have been cropped for a few years and ern and northwestern parts of the county.
then seeded to pasture grasses. After being pastured
for a time, the areas will again be used for crops.
Only a few areas once cultivated or used for pasture Crops
have been reforested.
The following list shows how land in farms was The climate of Hillsborough County is well suited
used in 1949: to winter vegetables and to many of the subtropical
Acres fruits. Vegetables are grown principally near Plant
Cropland harvested -------------- 36,801 City and Ruskin. Tree fruits are grown mainly on
Cropland used only for pasture ------------------ 17,160 the well-drained soils near Thonotosassa, Brandon,
Cropland not harvested and not pastured---------- 16,224 i o
Woodland pastured ----------------------------254,207 Valrico, Plant City, Lutz, Citrus Park, and Tampa.
Woodland not pastured -------------26,197 The acreage of the principal crops and the number
Other pasture (not cropland and not woodland) -- 22,674 of bearing fruit trees, nut trees, and grapevines in
Other land (house lots, roads, wasteland, etc.) ------ 24,908 Hillsborough County are shown in table 2 for 1929,
Cropland, total 70,185
Land pastured, total 294,041 1939, and 1949.
Woodland, total --------------- 280,404 The principal vegetables and truck crops are toma-
toes, peppers, strawberries, sweet corn, snapbeans,
green limabeans, cucumbers, squash, and watermelons.
Types and Sizes of Farms These crops are usually shipped by truck, but the early
produce is shipped by air. Some of the vegetables are
Of the 3,753 farms in Hillsborough County in 1950, processed by local canneries, and some are sold on
1,723 were miscellaneous and unclassified. The re- local markets.
maining farms were listed by type as follows: The tree fruits grown in the county are principally
Number oranges, grapefruit, and tangerines. Lemons, limes,
Vegetable farms ------------------582 avocados, peaches, and grapes are also grown to some
Fruit and nut farms ----------------------------- 756 extent.
Field-crop farms other than vegetable and A fairly large acreage of cowpeas has been grown
fruit and nut---------------------------------- 20 during the past few years. The corn acreage is not
Poultry farms -----------------------------------256d
Dairy farms ------------------------------- 110 large; the corn is used to feed animals on the farm.
Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry ---- 144 Small grains and hay are grown on only a small acre-
General farms ------------------- 162 age. The oats and rye are mainly used for winter
Most of the vegetable farms are located within 12 grazing.
miles of Plant City or near Ruskin. The farms that Sugarcane was once grown fairly extensively for
grow fruits or nuts, principally citrus fruits, are sirup. The acreage has decreased, and in 1949 only
mainly in the vicinity of Thonotosassa, Brandon, Val- 22 acres of sugarcane and sorghum was harvested for
rico, Citrus Park, Lutz, Tampa, and Plant City. sirup.






HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 5

Horticultural specialties ------------4.0 The poultry farms are principally on well-drained
Field crops ----------------------------------- 1.7 soils near Tampa, Mango, Seffner, Valrico, and Plant
Livestock and livestock products sold:
Dairy products ------------------------------ 20.6 City; the dairy farms are near Tampa and Plant City;
Poultry and poultry products------------------- 8.8 the general farms are in various parts of the county;
Other livestock and livestock products ----------- 10.9 and the livestock farms, or ranches, are in the north-
Forest products and other products sold ------ .4 western, northeastern, and southern parts of the
As indicated in this list, crops account for about 60 county.
percent of sales off the farms, and livestock, for about Farms ranged in size from less than 10 acres to
40 percent. more than 1,000 acres in 1950. Of the 3,753 farms in
the county, 38.3 percent were between 10 and 29 acres
in size, and 26.7 percent were less than 10 acres. There
Land Use were 65 farms of 1,000 acres or more. The average
size of farms in the county was 106.1 acres in 1950.
Hillsborough County covers about 665,600 acres, and Many of the smaller farms are near Plant City.
in 1950 approximately 60 percent of this was land in They are located mainly on Scranton and Ona soils
farms. Of the land in farms, only about 18 percent and on small areas of Leon and Blanton soils. Many
was cropland in 1950. A large part of the cropland of the larger farms are in the southwestern part of
is used to grow citrus fruits, vegetables, and truck the county. Soils of the Ruskin and Adamsville series
crops. are the principal soils in these farms.
Between 1930 and 1950 the area of land in farms Most of the citrus groves are 20 to 50 acres in size.
increased from 98,029 acres to 398,171 acres. Most They are generally the main source of income on larger
of the added acreage has been used to grow citrus farms where other types of farming are also carried
trees and vegetables or has been seeded to pasture on.
grasses. Land not in farms is in forest, range, or Most of the cattle ranches are 1,000 acres or more
building sites, or is included in the Hillsborough River in size. They are generally on Leon, Blanton, Pomello,
State Park or in other recreational areas. Immokalee, and Ona soils, in the southern, northeast-
Some tracts have been cropped for a few years and ern and northwestern parts of the county.
then seeded to pasture grasses. After being pastured
for a time, the areas will again be used for crops.
Only a few areas once cultivated or used for pasture Crops
have been reforested.
The following list shows how land in farms was The climate of Hillsborough County is well suited
used in 1949: to winter vegetables and to many of the subtropical
Acres fruits. Vegetables are grown principally near Plant
Cropland harvested -------------- 36,801 City and Ruskin. Tree fruits are grown mainly on
Cropland used only for pasture ------------------ 17,160 the well-drained soils near Thonotosassa, Brandon,
Cropland not harvested and not pastured---------- 16,224 i o
Woodland pastured ----------------------------254,207 Valrico, Plant City, Lutz, Citrus Park, and Tampa.
Woodland not pastured -------------26,197 The acreage of the principal crops and the number
Other pasture (not cropland and not woodland) -- 22,674 of bearing fruit trees, nut trees, and grapevines in
Other land (house lots, roads, wasteland, etc.) ------ 24,908 Hillsborough County are shown in table 2 for 1929,
Cropland, total 70,185
Land pastured, total 294,041 1939, and 1949.
Woodland, total --------------- 280,404 The principal vegetables and truck crops are toma-
toes, peppers, strawberries, sweet corn, snapbeans,
green limabeans, cucumbers, squash, and watermelons.
Types and Sizes of Farms These crops are usually shipped by truck, but the early
produce is shipped by air. Some of the vegetables are
Of the 3,753 farms in Hillsborough County in 1950, processed by local canneries, and some are sold on
1,723 were miscellaneous and unclassified. The re- local markets.
maining farms were listed by type as follows: The tree fruits grown in the county are principally
Number oranges, grapefruit, and tangerines. Lemons, limes,
Vegetable farms ------------------582 avocados, peaches, and grapes are also grown to some
Fruit and nut farms ----------------------------- 756 extent.
Field-crop farms other than vegetable and A fairly large acreage of cowpeas has been grown
fruit and nut---------------------------------- 20 during the past few years. The corn acreage is not
Poultry farms -----------------------------------256d
Dairy farms ------------------------------- 110 large; the corn is used to feed animals on the farm.
Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry ---- 144 Small grains and hay are grown on only a small acre-
General farms ------------------- 162 age. The oats and rye are mainly used for winter
Most of the vegetable farms are located within 12 grazing.
miles of Plant City or near Ruskin. The farms that Sugarcane was once grown fairly extensively for
grow fruits or nuts, principally citrus fruits, are sirup. The acreage has decreased, and in 1949 only
mainly in the vicinity of Thonotosassa, Brandon, Val- 22 acres of sugarcane and sorghum was harvested for
rico, Citrus Park, Lutz, Tampa, and Plant City. sirup.






6 SOIL SURVEY SERIES 1950, NO. 3

TABLE 2. Acreage of principal crops and number of of whole milk was sold. In contrast, the number of
bearing fruit trees, nut trees, and grapevines in cows and heifers milked in 1929 was 5,341, and only
1929, 1939, and 1949 1,990,436 gallons of whole milk was sold. Though
some of the milk is trucked to towns in nearby coun-
Crop 1929 1939 1949 ties, most of the dairy products are sold within the
county.
Acres Acres Acres Second to dairying in importance is poultry raising.
Corn for all purposes ----------- 5,418 5,563 1,306 White Leghorns and New Hampshire Reds are the
Sugarcane or sorghum harvested most common breeds. In 1949, 663,734 chickens and
for sirup -------------------- 83 6 22 1,534,971 dozen eggs were sold in Hillsborough
Cowpeas for all purposes, grown County. Other poultry raised included 8,801 Bronze
alone----------------------- 500 1,212 2,241 County. Other poultry r icd 8,801 Bronze
Peanuts for all purposes, grown and Beltsville White turkeys and 2,901 ducks.
alone ----------------------- 101 352 120 Beef cattle are increasing in Hillsborough County.
Velvetbeans for all purposes, These animals are raised on the range or on improved
Al hay ne------------------ 2 1,033 2 1,054 3 299 pastures, mainly in the southern, northeastern, and
Vegetables and truck crops: northwestern parts of the county. The range gener-
Cabbage ------------------ 188 128 385 ally supplies only a fair amount of forage. The im-
Cucumbers ---------------- 243 257 976 proved pastures have been cleared of palmettos and
Eggplant ----------------- 34 172 312
Green beans (snap, wax, 41,013 1,625 790 other shrubs, fertilized, and seeded to pasture grasses.
string) Most of the beef cattle are grade animals. Since
Green limabeans ----------- 8 561 598 1935, the stock has been improved by using Brahman
Lettuce -------------------.. 24 52 345 bulls or bulls of the English beef breeds, such as Here-
Okra ---------------------- 69 154 478
Peas, green --------------- 146 664 96 ford, Aberdeen-Angus, and Shorthorn. A few of the
Peppers, sweet and pimiento- 577 1,450 2,112 herds are of purebred Brahman or English beef breeds.
Potatoes, Irish ----------- 314 257 584 Most of the beef animals are bought by packers and
Squash ------------------- 41 416 1,537
Strawberries -------------- 2,486 4,219 1,632 slaughtered at packinghouses in and near Tampa.
Sweet corn ---------------- 218 728 1,783 In 1950 there were 5,688 swine in the county.
Sweetpotatoes ------------- 243 100 104 Though a few farms have registered Duroc-Jersey or
Tomatoes ---------------- 995 1,995 2,440 Hampshire swine, most are grade animals. The swine
Number 6 Number 6 Number 6 are generally not turned on the range pastures. Many
Orange trees ------------------456,284 686,624 659,849
Grapefruit trees ------------- 113,358 156,536 135,944
Lemon trees--.--------------- 858 2,516 1,614
Lime trees ------------------- 236 3,490 2,632 TABLE 3.-Number of domestic animals on farms and
Tangerine and mandarin trees--- 7 40,089 48,420 32,054 livestock and livestock products sold in stated years
Avocado trees----------------- 638 149 456
Fig trees ---------------------- 192 153 445 LIVESTOCK ON FARMS
Pear trees ------------- -------- 43 505 93
Peach trees...------------------.. 542 1,063 1,262 -
Plum and prune trees .....---------- 86 191 25 Livestock 1930 1940 1950
Pecan trees---......---------------- 155 833 746 Livestock 1930 1940 1950
Grapevines ------------ ------- 2,818 2,670 2,055 Number Number Number
_____Horses and colts ------------ 806 1 853 1,532
1 Includes vetches, mungbeans, and horsebeans. Mules and mule colts ...------ 955 1 1,228 854
2 Does not include sorghum hay. Cattle and calves ----------- 14,224 128,520 41,313
3 Does not include cowpeas and peanuts grown for hay. Hogs and pigs ------------...--.... 7,688 2 6,510 5,688
4 Does not include waxbeans. Sheep and lambs ------------.... 2 3 92 37
5 Does not include acres for farms with less than 15 bushels har- Chickens ---------------- 1131,980 2 149,495 1 243,944
vested. Turkeys raised 4 ------------ 2,751 3,253 8,801
6 Number in the census year, which is 1 year later than the crop Beehives ------------------- 1, 099 1, 981 4 1, 039
year given at the head of the column._ __
i Includes Satsuma oranges.
LIVESTOCK AND LIVESTOCK PRODUCTS SOLD

Livestock and Livestock Products
Item 1929 1939 1949
The number of domestic animals on farms and
ranches and the quantity of livestock and livestock Cattle and calves -number (5) 7,857 20,777
products sold in stated years are shown in table 3. Hogs and pigs .. number_ (5) 2,434 5,910
Dairy cattle are predominant. Jersey, Holstein, Guern- Chickens -------- number 127,616 230,501 663,734
Diy Milk, whole ------- gallons___ 1,990,436 2,979,978 5,728,802
sey, and Brown Swiss are the most common breeds. Chicken eggs ....---- dozens_- 848,216 6 1,189,826 1,534,971
Most of the dairy farms are located near Tampa and Honey -----------pounds- 14,079 64,849 17,686
in rural settlements extending southward to the Alafia
River. 1 Over 3 months old.
Because of increased local demand for dairy prod- 2 Over 4 months old.
ucts, the number of milk cows has increased consider- 2 Over 6 months old.
4 In year preceding census year.
ably during the past few years. In 1949 there were 5 Not reported.
11,181 milk cows in the county, and 5,728,802 gallons 6 Total produced.






HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 7

are fed sterilized garbage and sour milk. Most of the farm produce are generally the only buildings needed
swine are sold to local slaughterhouses for processing. besides the dwelling.
The 1,039 hives of bees in the county in 1949 pro- In 1950, 3,164 of the farm homes in the county had
duced 17,686 pounds of honey. The bees also help to electricity and 2,320 had running water. Telephones
pollinate the vegetables and fruits. Additional apiaries were in 1,026 of the farm homes. All parts of the
are needed in the county to help pollinize the citrus county were served by rural mail routes.
trees and vegetable crops.

Soil Series and Their Relationship
Farm Tenure
The soils of Hillsborough County are similar in some
In 1950, nearly 80 percent of the farms in the county characteristics and qualities, but vary greatly in others.
were operated by full owners, and nearly 9 percent, by As a consequence, they have a wide range of suitability
part owners. The rest were operated mainly by ten- for agricultural use. In general, they are nearly level
ants, though 28 farms were operated by managers. or gently sloping, acid, very sandy, very permeable,
Of the 404 tenants who operated farms in Hills- low in clay, low in organic matter, and low in plant
borough County in 1950, 176 paid cash rent and 110 nutrients. Their natural drainage, however, ranges
were croppers. The rest were unclassified. In addi- from very poor to excessive. Some are underlain by
tion to the rent, cash tenants pay the expenses of plant- calcareous materials, and some have loose acid sand to
ing, cultivating, fertilizing, and harvesting the crop. a depth of several feet. Approximately 176,000 acres
If the farm is sharecropped, the owner generally pays of soil have a brown-stained pan at depths of 14 to 42
for the seed, fertilizer, and spraying materials. The inches, whereas other soils are entirely free of this
sharecropper supplies the necessary labor and power. layer.
The harvested crop is divided equally between the
owner and the sharecropper.
Excessively Drained Soils
Farm Power and Mechanical Equipment Excessively drained Lakewood and St. Lucie soils
occupy about 1.6 percent of the county. These soils
Horses and mules are used to some extent as a source were derived from thick beds of sand. They have sur-
of power. The animals are of small to medium size. face layers of light gray or gray fine sand. The areas
They are used to draw one-horse implements-seeders, are generally nearly level, but there are a few gentle
rollers, double-shovel cultivators, and the like. Many slopes.
farms have no mules or horses. Most farms that have
work stock keep from 1 to 4 animals.
Tractors are used for most heavy farmwork. In Somewhat Excessively Drained to
1950 there were 1,299 tractors on 1,012 farms. The
tractors are mainly the all-purpose type, but some Moderately Well Drained Soils
farms have caterpillar tractors. On some tractors, the
engine is elevated so that the body of the tractor will About 16.2 percent of the county is occupied by
pass over the stakes in the tomato fields. These spe- somewhat excessively drained to moderately well
cial-built tractors are also used to draw equipment for drained soils. This group consists of the Blanton,
fertilizing, cultivating, and spraying corn and other Eustis, Lakeland, and Orlando soils and of Sandy local
tall-growing plants. Moldboard plows, diskplows, disk alluvium.
harrows, cultivators, cultipackers, dusting and spray- In most places these soils are fine sand to depths
ing apparatus, potato diggers, seeding drills, and roll- greater than 42 inches. In a few areas of the Lake-
ing choppers are common equipment on many farms. land soils,- sandy clay loam occurs at depths between
In 1950, 1,553 farms had 1,912 motortrucks. These 30 and 42 inches. The topography is nearly level to
trucks are used to haul seed, fertilizer, implements, undulating, but there are a few short steeper slopes
and workers to the fields. They are also used to trans- near streams, sinkholes, ponds, or lakes. Sandy local
port the farm products to packinghouses and markets. alluvium occurs in depressions or at the bases of slopes.
Some of the larger producers and cooperatives have
power-driven machinery for use in washing and grad-
ing vegetables and citrus fruits. Well Drained to Somewhat
Poorly Drained Soils

Farm and Home Improvements Soils that are well drained to somewhat poorly
drained occupy about 4.6 percent of the county. These
Most of the farm dwellings in the county are one- soils belong to the Arredondo, Blichton, Fellowship,
story wooden structures. Because of the mild climate, Fort Meade, Gainesville, Kanapaha, and Alachua se-
expensive farm buildings are not needed. Milking ries. All have developed from sand that overlies beds
barns, a place to care for the milk, and sheds in which of phosphatic materials. Small phosphate pebbles
to store the more expensive machinery and pack the occur on the surface and throughout the profiles.






HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 7

are fed sterilized garbage and sour milk. Most of the farm produce are generally the only buildings needed
swine are sold to local slaughterhouses for processing. besides the dwelling.
The 1,039 hives of bees in the county in 1949 pro- In 1950, 3,164 of the farm homes in the county had
duced 17,686 pounds of honey. The bees also help to electricity and 2,320 had running water. Telephones
pollinate the vegetables and fruits. Additional apiaries were in 1,026 of the farm homes. All parts of the
are needed in the county to help pollinize the citrus county were served by rural mail routes.
trees and vegetable crops.

Soil Series and Their Relationship
Farm Tenure
The soils of Hillsborough County are similar in some
In 1950, nearly 80 percent of the farms in the county characteristics and qualities, but vary greatly in others.
were operated by full owners, and nearly 9 percent, by As a consequence, they have a wide range of suitability
part owners. The rest were operated mainly by ten- for agricultural use. In general, they are nearly level
ants, though 28 farms were operated by managers. or gently sloping, acid, very sandy, very permeable,
Of the 404 tenants who operated farms in Hills- low in clay, low in organic matter, and low in plant
borough County in 1950, 176 paid cash rent and 110 nutrients. Their natural drainage, however, ranges
were croppers. The rest were unclassified. In addi- from very poor to excessive. Some are underlain by
tion to the rent, cash tenants pay the expenses of plant- calcareous materials, and some have loose acid sand to
ing, cultivating, fertilizing, and harvesting the crop. a depth of several feet. Approximately 176,000 acres
If the farm is sharecropped, the owner generally pays of soil have a brown-stained pan at depths of 14 to 42
for the seed, fertilizer, and spraying materials. The inches, whereas other soils are entirely free of this
sharecropper supplies the necessary labor and power. layer.
The harvested crop is divided equally between the
owner and the sharecropper.
Excessively Drained Soils
Farm Power and Mechanical Equipment Excessively drained Lakewood and St. Lucie soils
occupy about 1.6 percent of the county. These soils
Horses and mules are used to some extent as a source were derived from thick beds of sand. They have sur-
of power. The animals are of small to medium size. face layers of light gray or gray fine sand. The areas
They are used to draw one-horse implements-seeders, are generally nearly level, but there are a few gentle
rollers, double-shovel cultivators, and the like. Many slopes.
farms have no mules or horses. Most farms that have
work stock keep from 1 to 4 animals.
Tractors are used for most heavy farmwork. In Somewhat Excessively Drained to
1950 there were 1,299 tractors on 1,012 farms. The
tractors are mainly the all-purpose type, but some Moderately Well Drained Soils
farms have caterpillar tractors. On some tractors, the
engine is elevated so that the body of the tractor will About 16.2 percent of the county is occupied by
pass over the stakes in the tomato fields. These spe- somewhat excessively drained to moderately well
cial-built tractors are also used to draw equipment for drained soils. This group consists of the Blanton,
fertilizing, cultivating, and spraying corn and other Eustis, Lakeland, and Orlando soils and of Sandy local
tall-growing plants. Moldboard plows, diskplows, disk alluvium.
harrows, cultivators, cultipackers, dusting and spray- In most places these soils are fine sand to depths
ing apparatus, potato diggers, seeding drills, and roll- greater than 42 inches. In a few areas of the Lake-
ing choppers are common equipment on many farms. land soils,- sandy clay loam occurs at depths between
In 1950, 1,553 farms had 1,912 motortrucks. These 30 and 42 inches. The topography is nearly level to
trucks are used to haul seed, fertilizer, implements, undulating, but there are a few short steeper slopes
and workers to the fields. They are also used to trans- near streams, sinkholes, ponds, or lakes. Sandy local
port the farm products to packinghouses and markets. alluvium occurs in depressions or at the bases of slopes.
Some of the larger producers and cooperatives have
power-driven machinery for use in washing and grad-
ing vegetables and citrus fruits. Well Drained to Somewhat
Poorly Drained Soils

Farm and Home Improvements Soils that are well drained to somewhat poorly
drained occupy about 4.6 percent of the county. These
Most of the farm dwellings in the county are one- soils belong to the Arredondo, Blichton, Fellowship,
story wooden structures. Because of the mild climate, Fort Meade, Gainesville, Kanapaha, and Alachua se-
expensive farm buildings are not needed. Milking ries. All have developed from sand that overlies beds
barns, a place to care for the milk, and sheds in which of phosphatic materials. Small phosphate pebbles
to store the more expensive machinery and pack the occur on the surface and throughout the profiles.






HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 7

are fed sterilized garbage and sour milk. Most of the farm produce are generally the only buildings needed
swine are sold to local slaughterhouses for processing. besides the dwelling.
The 1,039 hives of bees in the county in 1949 pro- In 1950, 3,164 of the farm homes in the county had
duced 17,686 pounds of honey. The bees also help to electricity and 2,320 had running water. Telephones
pollinate the vegetables and fruits. Additional apiaries were in 1,026 of the farm homes. All parts of the
are needed in the county to help pollinize the citrus county were served by rural mail routes.
trees and vegetable crops.

Soil Series and Their Relationship
Farm Tenure
The soils of Hillsborough County are similar in some
In 1950, nearly 80 percent of the farms in the county characteristics and qualities, but vary greatly in others.
were operated by full owners, and nearly 9 percent, by As a consequence, they have a wide range of suitability
part owners. The rest were operated mainly by ten- for agricultural use. In general, they are nearly level
ants, though 28 farms were operated by managers. or gently sloping, acid, very sandy, very permeable,
Of the 404 tenants who operated farms in Hills- low in clay, low in organic matter, and low in plant
borough County in 1950, 176 paid cash rent and 110 nutrients. Their natural drainage, however, ranges
were croppers. The rest were unclassified. In addi- from very poor to excessive. Some are underlain by
tion to the rent, cash tenants pay the expenses of plant- calcareous materials, and some have loose acid sand to
ing, cultivating, fertilizing, and harvesting the crop. a depth of several feet. Approximately 176,000 acres
If the farm is sharecropped, the owner generally pays of soil have a brown-stained pan at depths of 14 to 42
for the seed, fertilizer, and spraying materials. The inches, whereas other soils are entirely free of this
sharecropper supplies the necessary labor and power. layer.
The harvested crop is divided equally between the
owner and the sharecropper.
Excessively Drained Soils
Farm Power and Mechanical Equipment Excessively drained Lakewood and St. Lucie soils
occupy about 1.6 percent of the county. These soils
Horses and mules are used to some extent as a source were derived from thick beds of sand. They have sur-
of power. The animals are of small to medium size. face layers of light gray or gray fine sand. The areas
They are used to draw one-horse implements-seeders, are generally nearly level, but there are a few gentle
rollers, double-shovel cultivators, and the like. Many slopes.
farms have no mules or horses. Most farms that have
work stock keep from 1 to 4 animals.
Tractors are used for most heavy farmwork. In Somewhat Excessively Drained to
1950 there were 1,299 tractors on 1,012 farms. The
tractors are mainly the all-purpose type, but some Moderately Well Drained Soils
farms have caterpillar tractors. On some tractors, the
engine is elevated so that the body of the tractor will About 16.2 percent of the county is occupied by
pass over the stakes in the tomato fields. These spe- somewhat excessively drained to moderately well
cial-built tractors are also used to draw equipment for drained soils. This group consists of the Blanton,
fertilizing, cultivating, and spraying corn and other Eustis, Lakeland, and Orlando soils and of Sandy local
tall-growing plants. Moldboard plows, diskplows, disk alluvium.
harrows, cultivators, cultipackers, dusting and spray- In most places these soils are fine sand to depths
ing apparatus, potato diggers, seeding drills, and roll- greater than 42 inches. In a few areas of the Lake-
ing choppers are common equipment on many farms. land soils,- sandy clay loam occurs at depths between
In 1950, 1,553 farms had 1,912 motortrucks. These 30 and 42 inches. The topography is nearly level to
trucks are used to haul seed, fertilizer, implements, undulating, but there are a few short steeper slopes
and workers to the fields. They are also used to trans- near streams, sinkholes, ponds, or lakes. Sandy local
port the farm products to packinghouses and markets. alluvium occurs in depressions or at the bases of slopes.
Some of the larger producers and cooperatives have
power-driven machinery for use in washing and grad-
ing vegetables and citrus fruits. Well Drained to Somewhat
Poorly Drained Soils

Farm and Home Improvements Soils that are well drained to somewhat poorly
drained occupy about 4.6 percent of the county. These
Most of the farm dwellings in the county are one- soils belong to the Arredondo, Blichton, Fellowship,
story wooden structures. Because of the mild climate, Fort Meade, Gainesville, Kanapaha, and Alachua se-
expensive farm buildings are not needed. Milking ries. All have developed from sand that overlies beds
barns, a place to care for the milk, and sheds in which of phosphatic materials. Small phosphate pebbles
to store the more expensive machinery and pack the occur on the surface and throughout the profiles.






HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 7

are fed sterilized garbage and sour milk. Most of the farm produce are generally the only buildings needed
swine are sold to local slaughterhouses for processing. besides the dwelling.
The 1,039 hives of bees in the county in 1949 pro- In 1950, 3,164 of the farm homes in the county had
duced 17,686 pounds of honey. The bees also help to electricity and 2,320 had running water. Telephones
pollinate the vegetables and fruits. Additional apiaries were in 1,026 of the farm homes. All parts of the
are needed in the county to help pollinize the citrus county were served by rural mail routes.
trees and vegetable crops.

Soil Series and Their Relationship
Farm Tenure
The soils of Hillsborough County are similar in some
In 1950, nearly 80 percent of the farms in the county characteristics and qualities, but vary greatly in others.
were operated by full owners, and nearly 9 percent, by As a consequence, they have a wide range of suitability
part owners. The rest were operated mainly by ten- for agricultural use. In general, they are nearly level
ants, though 28 farms were operated by managers. or gently sloping, acid, very sandy, very permeable,
Of the 404 tenants who operated farms in Hills- low in clay, low in organic matter, and low in plant
borough County in 1950, 176 paid cash rent and 110 nutrients. Their natural drainage, however, ranges
were croppers. The rest were unclassified. In addi- from very poor to excessive. Some are underlain by
tion to the rent, cash tenants pay the expenses of plant- calcareous materials, and some have loose acid sand to
ing, cultivating, fertilizing, and harvesting the crop. a depth of several feet. Approximately 176,000 acres
If the farm is sharecropped, the owner generally pays of soil have a brown-stained pan at depths of 14 to 42
for the seed, fertilizer, and spraying materials. The inches, whereas other soils are entirely free of this
sharecropper supplies the necessary labor and power. layer.
The harvested crop is divided equally between the
owner and the sharecropper.
Excessively Drained Soils
Farm Power and Mechanical Equipment Excessively drained Lakewood and St. Lucie soils
occupy about 1.6 percent of the county. These soils
Horses and mules are used to some extent as a source were derived from thick beds of sand. They have sur-
of power. The animals are of small to medium size. face layers of light gray or gray fine sand. The areas
They are used to draw one-horse implements-seeders, are generally nearly level, but there are a few gentle
rollers, double-shovel cultivators, and the like. Many slopes.
farms have no mules or horses. Most farms that have
work stock keep from 1 to 4 animals.
Tractors are used for most heavy farmwork. In Somewhat Excessively Drained to
1950 there were 1,299 tractors on 1,012 farms. The
tractors are mainly the all-purpose type, but some Moderately Well Drained Soils
farms have caterpillar tractors. On some tractors, the
engine is elevated so that the body of the tractor will About 16.2 percent of the county is occupied by
pass over the stakes in the tomato fields. These spe- somewhat excessively drained to moderately well
cial-built tractors are also used to draw equipment for drained soils. This group consists of the Blanton,
fertilizing, cultivating, and spraying corn and other Eustis, Lakeland, and Orlando soils and of Sandy local
tall-growing plants. Moldboard plows, diskplows, disk alluvium.
harrows, cultivators, cultipackers, dusting and spray- In most places these soils are fine sand to depths
ing apparatus, potato diggers, seeding drills, and roll- greater than 42 inches. In a few areas of the Lake-
ing choppers are common equipment on many farms. land soils,- sandy clay loam occurs at depths between
In 1950, 1,553 farms had 1,912 motortrucks. These 30 and 42 inches. The topography is nearly level to
trucks are used to haul seed, fertilizer, implements, undulating, but there are a few short steeper slopes
and workers to the fields. They are also used to trans- near streams, sinkholes, ponds, or lakes. Sandy local
port the farm products to packinghouses and markets. alluvium occurs in depressions or at the bases of slopes.
Some of the larger producers and cooperatives have
power-driven machinery for use in washing and grad-
ing vegetables and citrus fruits. Well Drained to Somewhat
Poorly Drained Soils

Farm and Home Improvements Soils that are well drained to somewhat poorly
drained occupy about 4.6 percent of the county. These
Most of the farm dwellings in the county are one- soils belong to the Arredondo, Blichton, Fellowship,
story wooden structures. Because of the mild climate, Fort Meade, Gainesville, Kanapaha, and Alachua se-
expensive farm buildings are not needed. Milking ries. All have developed from sand that overlies beds
barns, a place to care for the milk, and sheds in which of phosphatic materials. Small phosphate pebbles
to store the more expensive machinery and pack the occur on the surface and throughout the profiles.






HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 7

are fed sterilized garbage and sour milk. Most of the farm produce are generally the only buildings needed
swine are sold to local slaughterhouses for processing. besides the dwelling.
The 1,039 hives of bees in the county in 1949 pro- In 1950, 3,164 of the farm homes in the county had
duced 17,686 pounds of honey. The bees also help to electricity and 2,320 had running water. Telephones
pollinate the vegetables and fruits. Additional apiaries were in 1,026 of the farm homes. All parts of the
are needed in the county to help pollinize the citrus county were served by rural mail routes.
trees and vegetable crops.

Soil Series and Their Relationship
Farm Tenure
The soils of Hillsborough County are similar in some
In 1950, nearly 80 percent of the farms in the county characteristics and qualities, but vary greatly in others.
were operated by full owners, and nearly 9 percent, by As a consequence, they have a wide range of suitability
part owners. The rest were operated mainly by ten- for agricultural use. In general, they are nearly level
ants, though 28 farms were operated by managers. or gently sloping, acid, very sandy, very permeable,
Of the 404 tenants who operated farms in Hills- low in clay, low in organic matter, and low in plant
borough County in 1950, 176 paid cash rent and 110 nutrients. Their natural drainage, however, ranges
were croppers. The rest were unclassified. In addi- from very poor to excessive. Some are underlain by
tion to the rent, cash tenants pay the expenses of plant- calcareous materials, and some have loose acid sand to
ing, cultivating, fertilizing, and harvesting the crop. a depth of several feet. Approximately 176,000 acres
If the farm is sharecropped, the owner generally pays of soil have a brown-stained pan at depths of 14 to 42
for the seed, fertilizer, and spraying materials. The inches, whereas other soils are entirely free of this
sharecropper supplies the necessary labor and power. layer.
The harvested crop is divided equally between the
owner and the sharecropper.
Excessively Drained Soils
Farm Power and Mechanical Equipment Excessively drained Lakewood and St. Lucie soils
occupy about 1.6 percent of the county. These soils
Horses and mules are used to some extent as a source were derived from thick beds of sand. They have sur-
of power. The animals are of small to medium size. face layers of light gray or gray fine sand. The areas
They are used to draw one-horse implements-seeders, are generally nearly level, but there are a few gentle
rollers, double-shovel cultivators, and the like. Many slopes.
farms have no mules or horses. Most farms that have
work stock keep from 1 to 4 animals.
Tractors are used for most heavy farmwork. In Somewhat Excessively Drained to
1950 there were 1,299 tractors on 1,012 farms. The
tractors are mainly the all-purpose type, but some Moderately Well Drained Soils
farms have caterpillar tractors. On some tractors, the
engine is elevated so that the body of the tractor will About 16.2 percent of the county is occupied by
pass over the stakes in the tomato fields. These spe- somewhat excessively drained to moderately well
cial-built tractors are also used to draw equipment for drained soils. This group consists of the Blanton,
fertilizing, cultivating, and spraying corn and other Eustis, Lakeland, and Orlando soils and of Sandy local
tall-growing plants. Moldboard plows, diskplows, disk alluvium.
harrows, cultivators, cultipackers, dusting and spray- In most places these soils are fine sand to depths
ing apparatus, potato diggers, seeding drills, and roll- greater than 42 inches. In a few areas of the Lake-
ing choppers are common equipment on many farms. land soils,- sandy clay loam occurs at depths between
In 1950, 1,553 farms had 1,912 motortrucks. These 30 and 42 inches. The topography is nearly level to
trucks are used to haul seed, fertilizer, implements, undulating, but there are a few short steeper slopes
and workers to the fields. They are also used to trans- near streams, sinkholes, ponds, or lakes. Sandy local
port the farm products to packinghouses and markets. alluvium occurs in depressions or at the bases of slopes.
Some of the larger producers and cooperatives have
power-driven machinery for use in washing and grad-
ing vegetables and citrus fruits. Well Drained to Somewhat
Poorly Drained Soils

Farm and Home Improvements Soils that are well drained to somewhat poorly
drained occupy about 4.6 percent of the county. These
Most of the farm dwellings in the county are one- soils belong to the Arredondo, Blichton, Fellowship,
story wooden structures. Because of the mild climate, Fort Meade, Gainesville, Kanapaha, and Alachua se-
expensive farm buildings are not needed. Milking ries. All have developed from sand that overlies beds
barns, a place to care for the milk, and sheds in which of phosphatic materials. Small phosphate pebbles
to store the more expensive machinery and pack the occur on the surface and throughout the profiles.






HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 7

are fed sterilized garbage and sour milk. Most of the farm produce are generally the only buildings needed
swine are sold to local slaughterhouses for processing. besides the dwelling.
The 1,039 hives of bees in the county in 1949 pro- In 1950, 3,164 of the farm homes in the county had
duced 17,686 pounds of honey. The bees also help to electricity and 2,320 had running water. Telephones
pollinate the vegetables and fruits. Additional apiaries were in 1,026 of the farm homes. All parts of the
are needed in the county to help pollinize the citrus county were served by rural mail routes.
trees and vegetable crops.

Soil Series and Their Relationship
Farm Tenure
The soils of Hillsborough County are similar in some
In 1950, nearly 80 percent of the farms in the county characteristics and qualities, but vary greatly in others.
were operated by full owners, and nearly 9 percent, by As a consequence, they have a wide range of suitability
part owners. The rest were operated mainly by ten- for agricultural use. In general, they are nearly level
ants, though 28 farms were operated by managers. or gently sloping, acid, very sandy, very permeable,
Of the 404 tenants who operated farms in Hills- low in clay, low in organic matter, and low in plant
borough County in 1950, 176 paid cash rent and 110 nutrients. Their natural drainage, however, ranges
were croppers. The rest were unclassified. In addi- from very poor to excessive. Some are underlain by
tion to the rent, cash tenants pay the expenses of plant- calcareous materials, and some have loose acid sand to
ing, cultivating, fertilizing, and harvesting the crop. a depth of several feet. Approximately 176,000 acres
If the farm is sharecropped, the owner generally pays of soil have a brown-stained pan at depths of 14 to 42
for the seed, fertilizer, and spraying materials. The inches, whereas other soils are entirely free of this
sharecropper supplies the necessary labor and power. layer.
The harvested crop is divided equally between the
owner and the sharecropper.
Excessively Drained Soils
Farm Power and Mechanical Equipment Excessively drained Lakewood and St. Lucie soils
occupy about 1.6 percent of the county. These soils
Horses and mules are used to some extent as a source were derived from thick beds of sand. They have sur-
of power. The animals are of small to medium size. face layers of light gray or gray fine sand. The areas
They are used to draw one-horse implements-seeders, are generally nearly level, but there are a few gentle
rollers, double-shovel cultivators, and the like. Many slopes.
farms have no mules or horses. Most farms that have
work stock keep from 1 to 4 animals.
Tractors are used for most heavy farmwork. In Somewhat Excessively Drained to
1950 there were 1,299 tractors on 1,012 farms. The
tractors are mainly the all-purpose type, but some Moderately Well Drained Soils
farms have caterpillar tractors. On some tractors, the
engine is elevated so that the body of the tractor will About 16.2 percent of the county is occupied by
pass over the stakes in the tomato fields. These spe- somewhat excessively drained to moderately well
cial-built tractors are also used to draw equipment for drained soils. This group consists of the Blanton,
fertilizing, cultivating, and spraying corn and other Eustis, Lakeland, and Orlando soils and of Sandy local
tall-growing plants. Moldboard plows, diskplows, disk alluvium.
harrows, cultivators, cultipackers, dusting and spray- In most places these soils are fine sand to depths
ing apparatus, potato diggers, seeding drills, and roll- greater than 42 inches. In a few areas of the Lake-
ing choppers are common equipment on many farms. land soils,- sandy clay loam occurs at depths between
In 1950, 1,553 farms had 1,912 motortrucks. These 30 and 42 inches. The topography is nearly level to
trucks are used to haul seed, fertilizer, implements, undulating, but there are a few short steeper slopes
and workers to the fields. They are also used to trans- near streams, sinkholes, ponds, or lakes. Sandy local
port the farm products to packinghouses and markets. alluvium occurs in depressions or at the bases of slopes.
Some of the larger producers and cooperatives have
power-driven machinery for use in washing and grad-
ing vegetables and citrus fruits. Well Drained to Somewhat
Poorly Drained Soils

Farm and Home Improvements Soils that are well drained to somewhat poorly
drained occupy about 4.6 percent of the county. These
Most of the farm dwellings in the county are one- soils belong to the Arredondo, Blichton, Fellowship,
story wooden structures. Because of the mild climate, Fort Meade, Gainesville, Kanapaha, and Alachua se-
expensive farm buildings are not needed. Milking ries. All have developed from sand that overlies beds
barns, a place to care for the milk, and sheds in which of phosphatic materials. Small phosphate pebbles
to store the more expensive machinery and pack the occur on the surface and throughout the profiles.






HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 7

are fed sterilized garbage and sour milk. Most of the farm produce are generally the only buildings needed
swine are sold to local slaughterhouses for processing. besides the dwelling.
The 1,039 hives of bees in the county in 1949 pro- In 1950, 3,164 of the farm homes in the county had
duced 17,686 pounds of honey. The bees also help to electricity and 2,320 had running water. Telephones
pollinate the vegetables and fruits. Additional apiaries were in 1,026 of the farm homes. All parts of the
are needed in the county to help pollinize the citrus county were served by rural mail routes.
trees and vegetable crops.

Soil Series and Their Relationship
Farm Tenure
The soils of Hillsborough County are similar in some
In 1950, nearly 80 percent of the farms in the county characteristics and qualities, but vary greatly in others.
were operated by full owners, and nearly 9 percent, by As a consequence, they have a wide range of suitability
part owners. The rest were operated mainly by ten- for agricultural use. In general, they are nearly level
ants, though 28 farms were operated by managers. or gently sloping, acid, very sandy, very permeable,
Of the 404 tenants who operated farms in Hills- low in clay, low in organic matter, and low in plant
borough County in 1950, 176 paid cash rent and 110 nutrients. Their natural drainage, however, ranges
were croppers. The rest were unclassified. In addi- from very poor to excessive. Some are underlain by
tion to the rent, cash tenants pay the expenses of plant- calcareous materials, and some have loose acid sand to
ing, cultivating, fertilizing, and harvesting the crop. a depth of several feet. Approximately 176,000 acres
If the farm is sharecropped, the owner generally pays of soil have a brown-stained pan at depths of 14 to 42
for the seed, fertilizer, and spraying materials. The inches, whereas other soils are entirely free of this
sharecropper supplies the necessary labor and power. layer.
The harvested crop is divided equally between the
owner and the sharecropper.
Excessively Drained Soils
Farm Power and Mechanical Equipment Excessively drained Lakewood and St. Lucie soils
occupy about 1.6 percent of the county. These soils
Horses and mules are used to some extent as a source were derived from thick beds of sand. They have sur-
of power. The animals are of small to medium size. face layers of light gray or gray fine sand. The areas
They are used to draw one-horse implements-seeders, are generally nearly level, but there are a few gentle
rollers, double-shovel cultivators, and the like. Many slopes.
farms have no mules or horses. Most farms that have
work stock keep from 1 to 4 animals.
Tractors are used for most heavy farmwork. In Somewhat Excessively Drained to
1950 there were 1,299 tractors on 1,012 farms. The
tractors are mainly the all-purpose type, but some Moderately Well Drained Soils
farms have caterpillar tractors. On some tractors, the
engine is elevated so that the body of the tractor will About 16.2 percent of the county is occupied by
pass over the stakes in the tomato fields. These spe- somewhat excessively drained to moderately well
cial-built tractors are also used to draw equipment for drained soils. This group consists of the Blanton,
fertilizing, cultivating, and spraying corn and other Eustis, Lakeland, and Orlando soils and of Sandy local
tall-growing plants. Moldboard plows, diskplows, disk alluvium.
harrows, cultivators, cultipackers, dusting and spray- In most places these soils are fine sand to depths
ing apparatus, potato diggers, seeding drills, and roll- greater than 42 inches. In a few areas of the Lake-
ing choppers are common equipment on many farms. land soils,- sandy clay loam occurs at depths between
In 1950, 1,553 farms had 1,912 motortrucks. These 30 and 42 inches. The topography is nearly level to
trucks are used to haul seed, fertilizer, implements, undulating, but there are a few short steeper slopes
and workers to the fields. They are also used to trans- near streams, sinkholes, ponds, or lakes. Sandy local
port the farm products to packinghouses and markets. alluvium occurs in depressions or at the bases of slopes.
Some of the larger producers and cooperatives have
power-driven machinery for use in washing and grad-
ing vegetables and citrus fruits. Well Drained to Somewhat
Poorly Drained Soils

Farm and Home Improvements Soils that are well drained to somewhat poorly
drained occupy about 4.6 percent of the county. These
Most of the farm dwellings in the county are one- soils belong to the Arredondo, Blichton, Fellowship,
story wooden structures. Because of the mild climate, Fort Meade, Gainesville, Kanapaha, and Alachua se-
expensive farm buildings are not needed. Milking ries. All have developed from sand that overlies beds
barns, a place to care for the milk, and sheds in which of phosphatic materials. Small phosphate pebbles
to store the more expensive machinery and pack the occur on the surface and throughout the profiles.






8 SOIL SURVEY SERIES 1950, NO. 3

The Arredondo, Blichton, Fellowship, Fort Meade, fine sandy clay loam and shelly marl. In most places
and Gainesville soils are nearly level to undulating, the marl occurs at depths of less than 42 inches.
although a few areas have slopes of as much as 15 The Sunniland soils are somewhat similar to the
percent. The Kanapaha soil is nearly level, and the Ruskin. Sunniland fine sand, moderately shallow over
Alachua occurs in depressions or at the bases of slopes marl, is underlain at depths of 40 to 48 inches by marl
occupied by areas of Arredondo, Fort Meade, and that has a sandy clay loam or sandy clay texture.
Gainesville soils. Sunniland fine sand, shallow over marl, is underlain
The surface layers of the Arredondo, Blichton, and at depths between 22 and 40 inches by marl that has
Kanapaha soils are fine sand. The Fellowship, Fort a fine sandy clay texture.
Meade, Gainesville, and Alachua soils have surface Somewhat poorly drained soils derived from thick
layers of loamy fine sand. beds of sands.-About 29.2 percent of the county is
occupied by the somewhat poorly drained Immokalee
and Leon soils, which were derived from thick beds of
Moderately Well Drained to sands. An organic pan is characteristic of these soils.
In the Leon soils the pan occurs at depths between
Somewhat Poorly Drained Soils 14 and 30 inches, and in the Immokalee soils it is at
depths of more than 30 inches. The areas are gener-
The Pomello soil is the only moderately well drained ally level or nearly level, but there are occasional slopes
to somewhat poorly drained soil of the county. It of as much as 5 percent. The soils have gray or dark-
occupies about 2.3 percent of the county. It was de- gray surface layers of fine sand.
rived from thick beds of sand. The surface layer is
gray or light-gray fine sand. The fine sand extends
to depths greater than 42 inches. The topography is
nearly level. Poorly Drained to Very
Poorly Drained Soils

Somewhat Poorly Drained Soils The poorly drained to very poorly drained soils have
been separated into four subgroups according to dif-
Many of the soils of Hillsborough County are some- ferences in their parent materials.
what poorly drained. These soils have been separated Poorly drained to very poorly drained soils derived
into three subgroups according to differences in parent from moderately thick beds of noncalcareous sands.-
material. The poorly drained Plummer and Rutlege soils were
Somewhat poorly drained soils derived from moder- derived from moderately thick beds of noncalcareous
ately thick beds of sands.-Somewhat poorly drained sands. These soils occupy about 7.5 percent of the
soils derived from moderately thick beds of sands oc- county. They occur on level areas or in depressions.
cupy about 7.5 percent of Hillsborough County. These Plummer fine sand has a surface layer of dark-
soils belong to the Ona and Scranton series. Most of gray or gray fine sand and a lower horizon of light-
the areas are nearly level to level, but some occupy gray fine sand that extends to depths of more than 42
slopes of as much as 5 percent. Ona fine sand has a inches. The inextensive shallow phase of Plummer
black or dark-gray surface layer. Ona fine sand, light- fine sand is underlain at depths of 30 to 42 inches by
colored surface phase, has a surface layer that is light fine sandy clay loam or fine sandy clay.
gray or gray. A brown, organic-stained layer occurs Rutlege fine sand has a surface layer of black fine
in the Ona soils within 14 inches of the surface. The sand, which is underlain by lighter colored fine sand
Scranton soil has a black or very dark gray surface that extends to depths of more than 42 inches. The
layer. inextensive shallow phase of Rutlege fine sand has
Somewhat poorly drained soils derived from sands clayey materials at depths between 30 and 42 inches.
over calcareous materials.-About 4.9 percent of the Rutlege mucky fine sand has considerably more or-
county is occupied by somewhat poorly drained soils ganic matter in the surface layer than typical Rutlege
derived from sands over calcareous materials. These fine sand.
soils belong to the Adamsville, Bradenton, Broward, Poorly drained to very poorly drained soils derived
Keri, Parkwood, Ruskin, and Sunniland series. They from thin beds of sands over noncalcareous clays.-
occur mainly along the coast and near some of the The poorly drained to very poorly drained Portsmouth
larger streams. Generally, these soils have gray or and Rains soils were derived from thin beds of sands
,dark-gray surface layers of fine sand. over noncalcareous clays. These soils occupy only
The Adamsville soil consists of neutral or alkaline about 0.14 percent of the county. Fine-textured mate-
fine sand throughout its 42-inch profile. The Braden- rials begin at depths of about 30 inches.
ton soil has a sandy clay layer underlain by marl Portsmouth fine sand has a surface layer of black
of a fine sandy clay or sandy clay loam texture. The to very dark gray fine sand. It has less organic mat-
Broward soil consists of fine sand over limestone. The ter in the surface layer than Portsmouth mucky fine
Keri soil has a thin layer of marl, 6 to 12 inches thick, sand.
beginning at depths of 12 to 24 inches. The marl is The Rains soil has a surface layer of dark-gray or
underlain by fine sands. gray fine sand. The finer textured lower layers are
The Parkwood soil consists of fine sand over a thick streaked or mottled with shades of yellow and brown.
bed of marl. The Ruskin soil consists of fine sand over Poorly drained to very poorly drained soils derived






8 SOIL SURVEY SERIES 1950, NO. 3

The Arredondo, Blichton, Fellowship, Fort Meade, fine sandy clay loam and shelly marl. In most places
and Gainesville soils are nearly level to undulating, the marl occurs at depths of less than 42 inches.
although a few areas have slopes of as much as 15 The Sunniland soils are somewhat similar to the
percent. The Kanapaha soil is nearly level, and the Ruskin. Sunniland fine sand, moderately shallow over
Alachua occurs in depressions or at the bases of slopes marl, is underlain at depths of 40 to 48 inches by marl
occupied by areas of Arredondo, Fort Meade, and that has a sandy clay loam or sandy clay texture.
Gainesville soils. Sunniland fine sand, shallow over marl, is underlain
The surface layers of the Arredondo, Blichton, and at depths between 22 and 40 inches by marl that has
Kanapaha soils are fine sand. The Fellowship, Fort a fine sandy clay texture.
Meade, Gainesville, and Alachua soils have surface Somewhat poorly drained soils derived from thick
layers of loamy fine sand. beds of sands.-About 29.2 percent of the county is
occupied by the somewhat poorly drained Immokalee
and Leon soils, which were derived from thick beds of
Moderately Well Drained to sands. An organic pan is characteristic of these soils.
In the Leon soils the pan occurs at depths between
Somewhat Poorly Drained Soils 14 and 30 inches, and in the Immokalee soils it is at
depths of more than 30 inches. The areas are gener-
The Pomello soil is the only moderately well drained ally level or nearly level, but there are occasional slopes
to somewhat poorly drained soil of the county. It of as much as 5 percent. The soils have gray or dark-
occupies about 2.3 percent of the county. It was de- gray surface layers of fine sand.
rived from thick beds of sand. The surface layer is
gray or light-gray fine sand. The fine sand extends
to depths greater than 42 inches. The topography is
nearly level. Poorly Drained to Very
Poorly Drained Soils

Somewhat Poorly Drained Soils The poorly drained to very poorly drained soils have
been separated into four subgroups according to dif-
Many of the soils of Hillsborough County are some- ferences in their parent materials.
what poorly drained. These soils have been separated Poorly drained to very poorly drained soils derived
into three subgroups according to differences in parent from moderately thick beds of noncalcareous sands.-
material. The poorly drained Plummer and Rutlege soils were
Somewhat poorly drained soils derived from moder- derived from moderately thick beds of noncalcareous
ately thick beds of sands.-Somewhat poorly drained sands. These soils occupy about 7.5 percent of the
soils derived from moderately thick beds of sands oc- county. They occur on level areas or in depressions.
cupy about 7.5 percent of Hillsborough County. These Plummer fine sand has a surface layer of dark-
soils belong to the Ona and Scranton series. Most of gray or gray fine sand and a lower horizon of light-
the areas are nearly level to level, but some occupy gray fine sand that extends to depths of more than 42
slopes of as much as 5 percent. Ona fine sand has a inches. The inextensive shallow phase of Plummer
black or dark-gray surface layer. Ona fine sand, light- fine sand is underlain at depths of 30 to 42 inches by
colored surface phase, has a surface layer that is light fine sandy clay loam or fine sandy clay.
gray or gray. A brown, organic-stained layer occurs Rutlege fine sand has a surface layer of black fine
in the Ona soils within 14 inches of the surface. The sand, which is underlain by lighter colored fine sand
Scranton soil has a black or very dark gray surface that extends to depths of more than 42 inches. The
layer. inextensive shallow phase of Rutlege fine sand has
Somewhat poorly drained soils derived from sands clayey materials at depths between 30 and 42 inches.
over calcareous materials.-About 4.9 percent of the Rutlege mucky fine sand has considerably more or-
county is occupied by somewhat poorly drained soils ganic matter in the surface layer than typical Rutlege
derived from sands over calcareous materials. These fine sand.
soils belong to the Adamsville, Bradenton, Broward, Poorly drained to very poorly drained soils derived
Keri, Parkwood, Ruskin, and Sunniland series. They from thin beds of sands over noncalcareous clays.-
occur mainly along the coast and near some of the The poorly drained to very poorly drained Portsmouth
larger streams. Generally, these soils have gray or and Rains soils were derived from thin beds of sands
,dark-gray surface layers of fine sand. over noncalcareous clays. These soils occupy only
The Adamsville soil consists of neutral or alkaline about 0.14 percent of the county. Fine-textured mate-
fine sand throughout its 42-inch profile. The Braden- rials begin at depths of about 30 inches.
ton soil has a sandy clay layer underlain by marl Portsmouth fine sand has a surface layer of black
of a fine sandy clay or sandy clay loam texture. The to very dark gray fine sand. It has less organic mat-
Broward soil consists of fine sand over limestone. The ter in the surface layer than Portsmouth mucky fine
Keri soil has a thin layer of marl, 6 to 12 inches thick, sand.
beginning at depths of 12 to 24 inches. The marl is The Rains soil has a surface layer of dark-gray or
underlain by fine sands. gray fine sand. The finer textured lower layers are
The Parkwood soil consists of fine sand over a thick streaked or mottled with shades of yellow and brown.
bed of marl. The Ruskin soil consists of fine sand over Poorly drained to very poorly drained soils derived






8 SOIL SURVEY SERIES 1950, NO. 3

The Arredondo, Blichton, Fellowship, Fort Meade, fine sandy clay loam and shelly marl. In most places
and Gainesville soils are nearly level to undulating, the marl occurs at depths of less than 42 inches.
although a few areas have slopes of as much as 15 The Sunniland soils are somewhat similar to the
percent. The Kanapaha soil is nearly level, and the Ruskin. Sunniland fine sand, moderately shallow over
Alachua occurs in depressions or at the bases of slopes marl, is underlain at depths of 40 to 48 inches by marl
occupied by areas of Arredondo, Fort Meade, and that has a sandy clay loam or sandy clay texture.
Gainesville soils. Sunniland fine sand, shallow over marl, is underlain
The surface layers of the Arredondo, Blichton, and at depths between 22 and 40 inches by marl that has
Kanapaha soils are fine sand. The Fellowship, Fort a fine sandy clay texture.
Meade, Gainesville, and Alachua soils have surface Somewhat poorly drained soils derived from thick
layers of loamy fine sand. beds of sands.-About 29.2 percent of the county is
occupied by the somewhat poorly drained Immokalee
and Leon soils, which were derived from thick beds of
Moderately Well Drained to sands. An organic pan is characteristic of these soils.
In the Leon soils the pan occurs at depths between
Somewhat Poorly Drained Soils 14 and 30 inches, and in the Immokalee soils it is at
depths of more than 30 inches. The areas are gener-
The Pomello soil is the only moderately well drained ally level or nearly level, but there are occasional slopes
to somewhat poorly drained soil of the county. It of as much as 5 percent. The soils have gray or dark-
occupies about 2.3 percent of the county. It was de- gray surface layers of fine sand.
rived from thick beds of sand. The surface layer is
gray or light-gray fine sand. The fine sand extends
to depths greater than 42 inches. The topography is
nearly level. Poorly Drained to Very
Poorly Drained Soils

Somewhat Poorly Drained Soils The poorly drained to very poorly drained soils have
been separated into four subgroups according to dif-
Many of the soils of Hillsborough County are some- ferences in their parent materials.
what poorly drained. These soils have been separated Poorly drained to very poorly drained soils derived
into three subgroups according to differences in parent from moderately thick beds of noncalcareous sands.-
material. The poorly drained Plummer and Rutlege soils were
Somewhat poorly drained soils derived from moder- derived from moderately thick beds of noncalcareous
ately thick beds of sands.-Somewhat poorly drained sands. These soils occupy about 7.5 percent of the
soils derived from moderately thick beds of sands oc- county. They occur on level areas or in depressions.
cupy about 7.5 percent of Hillsborough County. These Plummer fine sand has a surface layer of dark-
soils belong to the Ona and Scranton series. Most of gray or gray fine sand and a lower horizon of light-
the areas are nearly level to level, but some occupy gray fine sand that extends to depths of more than 42
slopes of as much as 5 percent. Ona fine sand has a inches. The inextensive shallow phase of Plummer
black or dark-gray surface layer. Ona fine sand, light- fine sand is underlain at depths of 30 to 42 inches by
colored surface phase, has a surface layer that is light fine sandy clay loam or fine sandy clay.
gray or gray. A brown, organic-stained layer occurs Rutlege fine sand has a surface layer of black fine
in the Ona soils within 14 inches of the surface. The sand, which is underlain by lighter colored fine sand
Scranton soil has a black or very dark gray surface that extends to depths of more than 42 inches. The
layer. inextensive shallow phase of Rutlege fine sand has
Somewhat poorly drained soils derived from sands clayey materials at depths between 30 and 42 inches.
over calcareous materials.-About 4.9 percent of the Rutlege mucky fine sand has considerably more or-
county is occupied by somewhat poorly drained soils ganic matter in the surface layer than typical Rutlege
derived from sands over calcareous materials. These fine sand.
soils belong to the Adamsville, Bradenton, Broward, Poorly drained to very poorly drained soils derived
Keri, Parkwood, Ruskin, and Sunniland series. They from thin beds of sands over noncalcareous clays.-
occur mainly along the coast and near some of the The poorly drained to very poorly drained Portsmouth
larger streams. Generally, these soils have gray or and Rains soils were derived from thin beds of sands
,dark-gray surface layers of fine sand. over noncalcareous clays. These soils occupy only
The Adamsville soil consists of neutral or alkaline about 0.14 percent of the county. Fine-textured mate-
fine sand throughout its 42-inch profile. The Braden- rials begin at depths of about 30 inches.
ton soil has a sandy clay layer underlain by marl Portsmouth fine sand has a surface layer of black
of a fine sandy clay or sandy clay loam texture. The to very dark gray fine sand. It has less organic mat-
Broward soil consists of fine sand over limestone. The ter in the surface layer than Portsmouth mucky fine
Keri soil has a thin layer of marl, 6 to 12 inches thick, sand.
beginning at depths of 12 to 24 inches. The marl is The Rains soil has a surface layer of dark-gray or
underlain by fine sands. gray fine sand. The finer textured lower layers are
The Parkwood soil consists of fine sand over a thick streaked or mottled with shades of yellow and brown.
bed of marl. The Ruskin soil consists of fine sand over Poorly drained to very poorly drained soils derived






HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 9

from moderately thick beds of nearly neutral or alka- layer of varying textures. This is underlain by cal-
line sands.-The Charlotte, Delray, and Pompano soils careous fine sandy clay. The other mapping units con-
are poorly drained to very poorly drained. They were sist of mixed soil materials, generally ranging from
derived from moderately thick beds of nearly neutral dark gray to light gray in color and from fine sand to
or alkaline sands. These soils occupy about 1.0 per- sandy clay in texture. Some areas have a thin cover-
cent of the county. They occur on level areas or in ing of muck or peat. Many areas are under water for
depressions and are often under water for long periods, long periods. Tidal marsh (unclassified soils) and
Poorly drained to very poorly drained soils derived Tidal swamp (unclassified soils) occupy low-lying
from thin deposits of sands over neutral or alkaline areas next to Tampa Bay, Hillsboro Bay, and Old
clays.-The poorly drained to very poorly drained soils Tampa Bay. These areas may be covered by salt water
of the Felda and Manatee series were derived from during high tides.
thin deposits of sands over neutral or alkaline clays. Mines, pits, and dumps and Made land consist chiefly
These soils occupy about 0.7 percent of the county. of the overburden and waste materials that remained
They occur on level areas or in depressions. after the phosphate gravels were washed. These ma-
The Felda soil has a very dark gray or dark gray trials were returned to the excavations or were
surface layer of fine sand, 3 to 9 inches thick. Sandy dumped on nearby soils.
clay loam occurs within 30 inches of the surface. Made land consists of the leveled areas of waste
Manatee fine sandy loam and Manatee loamy fine materials and of areas raised by additions of materials
sand have black surface layers. Manatee fine sandy dredged from the streambeds when stream channels
clay, heavy variant, has a very dark gray or dark gray were widened.
surface layer. In the Manatee soils, fine sandy clay Airports and the urban areas of Greater Tampa
occurs within 30 inches of the surface. In many places were not mapped. These areas account for approxi-
a layer of marl underlies the sandy clay. mately 5.4 percent of the county.


Very Poorly Drained Organic Soils Soil Associations

The very poorly drained organic soils occupy about Soils that normally occur together in a characteristic
0.6 percent of the county. They belong to the Brighton, geographic pattern may be shown in a small-scale map
Istokpoga, Pamlico, and Terra Ceia series. The soils on the basis of their close association. An association
occupy level areas or depressions. They are under may contain many soils or only a few. It may include
water many months of the year. soils that are unlike each other in many ways but that
The Brighton soils have a very dark brown or black share the quality of relationship in occurrence or asso-
peat or muck surface layer. The surface layer of ciation. The nature of the soil association influences
Brighton peat consists of fibrous peat, and the fibrous not only the type of agriculture but also the agricul-
materials extend downward to depths of 20 to 48 tural practices required for proper use and mainte-
inches. The surface layer of Brighton mucky peat is nance of the soils.
nonfibrous mucky peat, 6 to 10 inches thick, underlain The soils of Hillsborough County have been placed
by fibrous organic material, in 12 associations. These are described below in terms
Istokpoga peat and Istokpoga mucky peat are some- of the kind of major soils in the association. These
what similar to the Brighton soils. They were derived associations have been delineated and are shown by
from woody plants, however, and small pieces of hard number and color on a small map in the back of this
wood occur in their surface layers. report. Such a grouping should be helpful in under-
Pamlico muck has a surface layer of black muck 12 standing the broad pattern of soil development and
to 15 inches thick, that is underlain by gray or light- use in the county and in guiding county-wide agricul-
gray fine sand. tural planning.
Terra Ceia peaty muck has a black nonfibrous sur-
face layer, 12 to 20 inches thick. The underlying black
or dark-gray sandy clay loam contains small shells. Excessively Drained or Well-Drained Deep Sands

This soil association, number 6 on the soil associa-
Miscellaneous Land Types tion map, is made up of excessively drained or well
drained deep sands. Pomello, St. Lucie, and Lakewood
Miscellaneous land types occupy about 18.4 percent soils are the principal constituents, but the association
of the county. They consist of materials that vary in may include areas of Blanton, Immokalee, and Leon
composition, texture, color, and thickness. The land soils that are too small to be shown separately on a
types mapped in the county are Alluvial land; Fresh map of the scale used. The Pomello, St. Lucie, and
water swamp (unclassified soils) ; Mines, pits, and Lakewood soils occur on nearly level areas throughout
dumps; Mixed alluvium, high bottom phase; Peace the association.
River soils; Shallow ponds with grass; Tidal marsh The texture of all the soils is fine sand. The St.
(unclassified soils) ; and Tidal swamp (unclassified Lucie and Lakewood are excessively drained, and the
soils). Pomello is well drained to imperfectly drained.
The Peace River soils have a nearly black surface Grazing is poor on the soils of this association, and






HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 9

from moderately thick beds of nearly neutral or alka- layer of varying textures. This is underlain by cal-
line sands.-The Charlotte, Delray, and Pompano soils careous fine sandy clay. The other mapping units con-
are poorly drained to very poorly drained. They were sist of mixed soil materials, generally ranging from
derived from moderately thick beds of nearly neutral dark gray to light gray in color and from fine sand to
or alkaline sands. These soils occupy about 1.0 per- sandy clay in texture. Some areas have a thin cover-
cent of the county. They occur on level areas or in ing of muck or peat. Many areas are under water for
depressions and are often under water for long periods, long periods. Tidal marsh (unclassified soils) and
Poorly drained to very poorly drained soils derived Tidal swamp (unclassified soils) occupy low-lying
from thin deposits of sands over neutral or alkaline areas next to Tampa Bay, Hillsboro Bay, and Old
clays.-The poorly drained to very poorly drained soils Tampa Bay. These areas may be covered by salt water
of the Felda and Manatee series were derived from during high tides.
thin deposits of sands over neutral or alkaline clays. Mines, pits, and dumps and Made land consist chiefly
These soils occupy about 0.7 percent of the county. of the overburden and waste materials that remained
They occur on level areas or in depressions. after the phosphate gravels were washed. These ma-
The Felda soil has a very dark gray or dark gray trials were returned to the excavations or were
surface layer of fine sand, 3 to 9 inches thick. Sandy dumped on nearby soils.
clay loam occurs within 30 inches of the surface. Made land consists of the leveled areas of waste
Manatee fine sandy loam and Manatee loamy fine materials and of areas raised by additions of materials
sand have black surface layers. Manatee fine sandy dredged from the streambeds when stream channels
clay, heavy variant, has a very dark gray or dark gray were widened.
surface layer. In the Manatee soils, fine sandy clay Airports and the urban areas of Greater Tampa
occurs within 30 inches of the surface. In many places were not mapped. These areas account for approxi-
a layer of marl underlies the sandy clay. mately 5.4 percent of the county.


Very Poorly Drained Organic Soils Soil Associations

The very poorly drained organic soils occupy about Soils that normally occur together in a characteristic
0.6 percent of the county. They belong to the Brighton, geographic pattern may be shown in a small-scale map
Istokpoga, Pamlico, and Terra Ceia series. The soils on the basis of their close association. An association
occupy level areas or depressions. They are under may contain many soils or only a few. It may include
water many months of the year. soils that are unlike each other in many ways but that
The Brighton soils have a very dark brown or black share the quality of relationship in occurrence or asso-
peat or muck surface layer. The surface layer of ciation. The nature of the soil association influences
Brighton peat consists of fibrous peat, and the fibrous not only the type of agriculture but also the agricul-
materials extend downward to depths of 20 to 48 tural practices required for proper use and mainte-
inches. The surface layer of Brighton mucky peat is nance of the soils.
nonfibrous mucky peat, 6 to 10 inches thick, underlain The soils of Hillsborough County have been placed
by fibrous organic material, in 12 associations. These are described below in terms
Istokpoga peat and Istokpoga mucky peat are some- of the kind of major soils in the association. These
what similar to the Brighton soils. They were derived associations have been delineated and are shown by
from woody plants, however, and small pieces of hard number and color on a small map in the back of this
wood occur in their surface layers. report. Such a grouping should be helpful in under-
Pamlico muck has a surface layer of black muck 12 standing the broad pattern of soil development and
to 15 inches thick, that is underlain by gray or light- use in the county and in guiding county-wide agricul-
gray fine sand. tural planning.
Terra Ceia peaty muck has a black nonfibrous sur-
face layer, 12 to 20 inches thick. The underlying black
or dark-gray sandy clay loam contains small shells. Excessively Drained or Well-Drained Deep Sands

This soil association, number 6 on the soil associa-
Miscellaneous Land Types tion map, is made up of excessively drained or well
drained deep sands. Pomello, St. Lucie, and Lakewood
Miscellaneous land types occupy about 18.4 percent soils are the principal constituents, but the association
of the county. They consist of materials that vary in may include areas of Blanton, Immokalee, and Leon
composition, texture, color, and thickness. The land soils that are too small to be shown separately on a
types mapped in the county are Alluvial land; Fresh map of the scale used. The Pomello, St. Lucie, and
water swamp (unclassified soils) ; Mines, pits, and Lakewood soils occur on nearly level areas throughout
dumps; Mixed alluvium, high bottom phase; Peace the association.
River soils; Shallow ponds with grass; Tidal marsh The texture of all the soils is fine sand. The St.
(unclassified soils) ; and Tidal swamp (unclassified Lucie and Lakewood are excessively drained, and the
soils). Pomello is well drained to imperfectly drained.
The Peace River soils have a nearly black surface Grazing is poor on the soils of this association, and






HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 9

from moderately thick beds of nearly neutral or alka- layer of varying textures. This is underlain by cal-
line sands.-The Charlotte, Delray, and Pompano soils careous fine sandy clay. The other mapping units con-
are poorly drained to very poorly drained. They were sist of mixed soil materials, generally ranging from
derived from moderately thick beds of nearly neutral dark gray to light gray in color and from fine sand to
or alkaline sands. These soils occupy about 1.0 per- sandy clay in texture. Some areas have a thin cover-
cent of the county. They occur on level areas or in ing of muck or peat. Many areas are under water for
depressions and are often under water for long periods, long periods. Tidal marsh (unclassified soils) and
Poorly drained to very poorly drained soils derived Tidal swamp (unclassified soils) occupy low-lying
from thin deposits of sands over neutral or alkaline areas next to Tampa Bay, Hillsboro Bay, and Old
clays.-The poorly drained to very poorly drained soils Tampa Bay. These areas may be covered by salt water
of the Felda and Manatee series were derived from during high tides.
thin deposits of sands over neutral or alkaline clays. Mines, pits, and dumps and Made land consist chiefly
These soils occupy about 0.7 percent of the county. of the overburden and waste materials that remained
They occur on level areas or in depressions. after the phosphate gravels were washed. These ma-
The Felda soil has a very dark gray or dark gray trials were returned to the excavations or were
surface layer of fine sand, 3 to 9 inches thick. Sandy dumped on nearby soils.
clay loam occurs within 30 inches of the surface. Made land consists of the leveled areas of waste
Manatee fine sandy loam and Manatee loamy fine materials and of areas raised by additions of materials
sand have black surface layers. Manatee fine sandy dredged from the streambeds when stream channels
clay, heavy variant, has a very dark gray or dark gray were widened.
surface layer. In the Manatee soils, fine sandy clay Airports and the urban areas of Greater Tampa
occurs within 30 inches of the surface. In many places were not mapped. These areas account for approxi-
a layer of marl underlies the sandy clay. mately 5.4 percent of the county.


Very Poorly Drained Organic Soils Soil Associations

The very poorly drained organic soils occupy about Soils that normally occur together in a characteristic
0.6 percent of the county. They belong to the Brighton, geographic pattern may be shown in a small-scale map
Istokpoga, Pamlico, and Terra Ceia series. The soils on the basis of their close association. An association
occupy level areas or depressions. They are under may contain many soils or only a few. It may include
water many months of the year. soils that are unlike each other in many ways but that
The Brighton soils have a very dark brown or black share the quality of relationship in occurrence or asso-
peat or muck surface layer. The surface layer of ciation. The nature of the soil association influences
Brighton peat consists of fibrous peat, and the fibrous not only the type of agriculture but also the agricul-
materials extend downward to depths of 20 to 48 tural practices required for proper use and mainte-
inches. The surface layer of Brighton mucky peat is nance of the soils.
nonfibrous mucky peat, 6 to 10 inches thick, underlain The soils of Hillsborough County have been placed
by fibrous organic material, in 12 associations. These are described below in terms
Istokpoga peat and Istokpoga mucky peat are some- of the kind of major soils in the association. These
what similar to the Brighton soils. They were derived associations have been delineated and are shown by
from woody plants, however, and small pieces of hard number and color on a small map in the back of this
wood occur in their surface layers. report. Such a grouping should be helpful in under-
Pamlico muck has a surface layer of black muck 12 standing the broad pattern of soil development and
to 15 inches thick, that is underlain by gray or light- use in the county and in guiding county-wide agricul-
gray fine sand. tural planning.
Terra Ceia peaty muck has a black nonfibrous sur-
face layer, 12 to 20 inches thick. The underlying black
or dark-gray sandy clay loam contains small shells. Excessively Drained or Well-Drained Deep Sands

This soil association, number 6 on the soil associa-
Miscellaneous Land Types tion map, is made up of excessively drained or well
drained deep sands. Pomello, St. Lucie, and Lakewood
Miscellaneous land types occupy about 18.4 percent soils are the principal constituents, but the association
of the county. They consist of materials that vary in may include areas of Blanton, Immokalee, and Leon
composition, texture, color, and thickness. The land soils that are too small to be shown separately on a
types mapped in the county are Alluvial land; Fresh map of the scale used. The Pomello, St. Lucie, and
water swamp (unclassified soils) ; Mines, pits, and Lakewood soils occur on nearly level areas throughout
dumps; Mixed alluvium, high bottom phase; Peace the association.
River soils; Shallow ponds with grass; Tidal marsh The texture of all the soils is fine sand. The St.
(unclassified soils) ; and Tidal swamp (unclassified Lucie and Lakewood are excessively drained, and the
soils). Pomello is well drained to imperfectly drained.
The Peace River soils have a nearly black surface Grazing is poor on the soils of this association, and






HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 9

from moderately thick beds of nearly neutral or alka- layer of varying textures. This is underlain by cal-
line sands.-The Charlotte, Delray, and Pompano soils careous fine sandy clay. The other mapping units con-
are poorly drained to very poorly drained. They were sist of mixed soil materials, generally ranging from
derived from moderately thick beds of nearly neutral dark gray to light gray in color and from fine sand to
or alkaline sands. These soils occupy about 1.0 per- sandy clay in texture. Some areas have a thin cover-
cent of the county. They occur on level areas or in ing of muck or peat. Many areas are under water for
depressions and are often under water for long periods, long periods. Tidal marsh (unclassified soils) and
Poorly drained to very poorly drained soils derived Tidal swamp (unclassified soils) occupy low-lying
from thin deposits of sands over neutral or alkaline areas next to Tampa Bay, Hillsboro Bay, and Old
clays.-The poorly drained to very poorly drained soils Tampa Bay. These areas may be covered by salt water
of the Felda and Manatee series were derived from during high tides.
thin deposits of sands over neutral or alkaline clays. Mines, pits, and dumps and Made land consist chiefly
These soils occupy about 0.7 percent of the county. of the overburden and waste materials that remained
They occur on level areas or in depressions. after the phosphate gravels were washed. These ma-
The Felda soil has a very dark gray or dark gray trials were returned to the excavations or were
surface layer of fine sand, 3 to 9 inches thick. Sandy dumped on nearby soils.
clay loam occurs within 30 inches of the surface. Made land consists of the leveled areas of waste
Manatee fine sandy loam and Manatee loamy fine materials and of areas raised by additions of materials
sand have black surface layers. Manatee fine sandy dredged from the streambeds when stream channels
clay, heavy variant, has a very dark gray or dark gray were widened.
surface layer. In the Manatee soils, fine sandy clay Airports and the urban areas of Greater Tampa
occurs within 30 inches of the surface. In many places were not mapped. These areas account for approxi-
a layer of marl underlies the sandy clay. mately 5.4 percent of the county.


Very Poorly Drained Organic Soils Soil Associations

The very poorly drained organic soils occupy about Soils that normally occur together in a characteristic
0.6 percent of the county. They belong to the Brighton, geographic pattern may be shown in a small-scale map
Istokpoga, Pamlico, and Terra Ceia series. The soils on the basis of their close association. An association
occupy level areas or depressions. They are under may contain many soils or only a few. It may include
water many months of the year. soils that are unlike each other in many ways but that
The Brighton soils have a very dark brown or black share the quality of relationship in occurrence or asso-
peat or muck surface layer. The surface layer of ciation. The nature of the soil association influences
Brighton peat consists of fibrous peat, and the fibrous not only the type of agriculture but also the agricul-
materials extend downward to depths of 20 to 48 tural practices required for proper use and mainte-
inches. The surface layer of Brighton mucky peat is nance of the soils.
nonfibrous mucky peat, 6 to 10 inches thick, underlain The soils of Hillsborough County have been placed
by fibrous organic material, in 12 associations. These are described below in terms
Istokpoga peat and Istokpoga mucky peat are some- of the kind of major soils in the association. These
what similar to the Brighton soils. They were derived associations have been delineated and are shown by
from woody plants, however, and small pieces of hard number and color on a small map in the back of this
wood occur in their surface layers. report. Such a grouping should be helpful in under-
Pamlico muck has a surface layer of black muck 12 standing the broad pattern of soil development and
to 15 inches thick, that is underlain by gray or light- use in the county and in guiding county-wide agricul-
gray fine sand. tural planning.
Terra Ceia peaty muck has a black nonfibrous sur-
face layer, 12 to 20 inches thick. The underlying black
or dark-gray sandy clay loam contains small shells. Excessively Drained or Well-Drained Deep Sands

This soil association, number 6 on the soil associa-
Miscellaneous Land Types tion map, is made up of excessively drained or well
drained deep sands. Pomello, St. Lucie, and Lakewood
Miscellaneous land types occupy about 18.4 percent soils are the principal constituents, but the association
of the county. They consist of materials that vary in may include areas of Blanton, Immokalee, and Leon
composition, texture, color, and thickness. The land soils that are too small to be shown separately on a
types mapped in the county are Alluvial land; Fresh map of the scale used. The Pomello, St. Lucie, and
water swamp (unclassified soils) ; Mines, pits, and Lakewood soils occur on nearly level areas throughout
dumps; Mixed alluvium, high bottom phase; Peace the association.
River soils; Shallow ponds with grass; Tidal marsh The texture of all the soils is fine sand. The St.
(unclassified soils) ; and Tidal swamp (unclassified Lucie and Lakewood are excessively drained, and the
soils). Pomello is well drained to imperfectly drained.
The Peace River soils have a nearly black surface Grazing is poor on the soils of this association, and






10 SOIL SURVEY SERIES 1950, NO. 3

the forest products are of poor quality. Under good ville soils occur near Brandon, Valrico, and Blooming-
management smooth areas of Lakewood soils can be dale, and north of Plant City. The areas are used to
used to grow citrus trees. grow citrus fruits, general crops, and vegetables. Some
are in pasture or in forest. Most of the soils are some-
what drought and require irrigation for good yields.
Well-Drained Deep Sands

This soil association, number 1 on the soil associa- Somewhat Poorly Drained, Dark-Colored Sands
tion map, consists of well-drained deep sandy soils. It
is dominated by the Blanton and Lakeland soils; Eustis This soil association group, which is number 3 on
and Orlando soils are also extensive. Small areas of the soil association map, is comprised of somewhat
somewhat poorly drained Leon, Ona, Plummer, Po- poorly drained, dark-colored sandy soils. Most of the
mello, Rutlege, and Scranton soils that are too small association consists of Ona and Scranton soils. Small
to show separately on a map of the scale used may be areas of Blanton, Leon, Plummer, Pomello, and Rutlege
included. The Blanton, Lakeland, Eustis, and Orlando soils, too small to be shown separately on a map of the
soils occupy areas that are nearly level to undulating. scale used, may be included. The Ona and Scranton
A few short, steeper slopes occur near streams, sink- soils are level or nearly level or occupy short slopes
holes, ponds, or lakes. Most of the association is in of as much as 5 percent.
the north-central and northwestern parts of the county. The surface layer of the Ona and Scranton soils is
The Blanton, Lakeland, Eustis, and Orlando soils black to dark-gray fine sand. A brown-stained layer
generally consist of fine sand to depths of more than occurs within 14 inches of the surface in the Ona soils.
42 inches. In a few areas of Lakeland soils, however, The Ona and Scranton soils are used to grow straw-
a sandy clay layer occurs at depths between 30 and 42 berries, vegetables, and general crops. Some better
inches. drained areas, mainly of the Scranton soil, are used
Large areas of the soils in this association are used to grow citrus fruits. Large areas of the Ona soils in
to grow citrus fruits or are covered by forests. Smaller the southern and southeastern parts of the county are
areas are pastured or are used to grow general crops used for range pasture. Under good management,
or for poultry farms. The soils are drought, and crops yield very well on these soils. During dry periods
some crops need irrigation during dry spells. Where portable or stationary sprinkling systems are used to
water and equipment are available, portable sprinkling irrigate many of the crops.
systems are used to irrigate. Pine trees grow very well on the soils of this asso-
The dominant soils of this group are well suited to ciation.
citrus trees, general farm crops, watermelons, im-
proved pastures, and forest. The soils need fertiliza-
tion and the maximum use of soil-building crops to Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands
obtain and maintain high productivity. Over a Calcareous Substratum
This soil association, number 4 on the soil associa-
Well-Drained Sands Mixed tion map, consists of somewhat poorly drained sandy
with Phosphatic Materials soils that overlie calcareous material. It is comprised
of large areas of Ruskin, Sunniland, Adamsville, and
This soil association, number 2 on the soil associa- Bradenton soils and of less extensive areas of Broward,
tion map, consists of well-drained sandy soils that con- Keri, and Parkwood soils. Small areas of poorly
tain a few phosphatic pebbles. Nearly half of the drained Delray, Felda, Manatee, and Pompano soils,
association is made up of Arredondo soils; Fort Meade and of somewhat poorly drained Immokalee and Leon
soils are extensive; and Gainesville, Blichton, Alachua, soils, may be included because they are too small to
Fellowship, and Kanapaha soils occur to a lesser ex- show separately on a map of the scale used.
tent. Small areas of Blanton, Eustis, Lakeland, Leon, This soil association occurs mainly along the coast
and Scranton soils, too small to show separately on a and near some of the major streams. The Ruskin
map of the scale used, may be included, soil occupies areas between Sun City and Tampa. The
The Arredondo, Fort Meade, Gainesville, Blichton, Sunniland soils occur mainly along the Hillsborough
and Fellowship soils are nearly level to undulating, but River in the northern part of the county. The Adams-
a few slopes as steep as 15 percent are included. The ville, Keri, and Parkwood soils occur along Tampa
Kanapaha soil is nearly level, and the Alachua soil Bay, and the Bradenton and Broward along Tampa
occupies depressions or occurs at the bases of slopes. Bay and farther inland.
The Arredondo, Blichton, and Kanapaha soils con- The Ruskin and Adamsville soils between Sun City
sist of fine sands; the Fort Meade, Fellowship, and and the Alafia River are used mainly to grow vege-
Alachua soils are loamy fine sands. In most places tables. Gladiolus are grown to a small extent. Some
the Gainesville soils are loamy fine sand throughout, areas have been seeded to improved pasture grasses.
but in small areas sandy clay loam occurs at depths Most of the areas of Sunniland, Broward, and Keri
between 30 and 42 inches. Small phosphatic pebbles soils are used as range pasture or are covered by pine
are scattered on the surface and occur throughout the forests.
profiles of these soils. Under good management, yields of vegetables and
Large areas of Arredondo, Fort Meade, and Gaines- other crops are high on the soils of this association.






10 SOIL SURVEY SERIES 1950, NO. 3

the forest products are of poor quality. Under good ville soils occur near Brandon, Valrico, and Blooming-
management smooth areas of Lakewood soils can be dale, and north of Plant City. The areas are used to
used to grow citrus trees. grow citrus fruits, general crops, and vegetables. Some
are in pasture or in forest. Most of the soils are some-
what drought and require irrigation for good yields.
Well-Drained Deep Sands

This soil association, number 1 on the soil associa- Somewhat Poorly Drained, Dark-Colored Sands
tion map, consists of well-drained deep sandy soils. It
is dominated by the Blanton and Lakeland soils; Eustis This soil association group, which is number 3 on
and Orlando soils are also extensive. Small areas of the soil association map, is comprised of somewhat
somewhat poorly drained Leon, Ona, Plummer, Po- poorly drained, dark-colored sandy soils. Most of the
mello, Rutlege, and Scranton soils that are too small association consists of Ona and Scranton soils. Small
to show separately on a map of the scale used may be areas of Blanton, Leon, Plummer, Pomello, and Rutlege
included. The Blanton, Lakeland, Eustis, and Orlando soils, too small to be shown separately on a map of the
soils occupy areas that are nearly level to undulating. scale used, may be included. The Ona and Scranton
A few short, steeper slopes occur near streams, sink- soils are level or nearly level or occupy short slopes
holes, ponds, or lakes. Most of the association is in of as much as 5 percent.
the north-central and northwestern parts of the county. The surface layer of the Ona and Scranton soils is
The Blanton, Lakeland, Eustis, and Orlando soils black to dark-gray fine sand. A brown-stained layer
generally consist of fine sand to depths of more than occurs within 14 inches of the surface in the Ona soils.
42 inches. In a few areas of Lakeland soils, however, The Ona and Scranton soils are used to grow straw-
a sandy clay layer occurs at depths between 30 and 42 berries, vegetables, and general crops. Some better
inches. drained areas, mainly of the Scranton soil, are used
Large areas of the soils in this association are used to grow citrus fruits. Large areas of the Ona soils in
to grow citrus fruits or are covered by forests. Smaller the southern and southeastern parts of the county are
areas are pastured or are used to grow general crops used for range pasture. Under good management,
or for poultry farms. The soils are drought, and crops yield very well on these soils. During dry periods
some crops need irrigation during dry spells. Where portable or stationary sprinkling systems are used to
water and equipment are available, portable sprinkling irrigate many of the crops.
systems are used to irrigate. Pine trees grow very well on the soils of this asso-
The dominant soils of this group are well suited to ciation.
citrus trees, general farm crops, watermelons, im-
proved pastures, and forest. The soils need fertiliza-
tion and the maximum use of soil-building crops to Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands
obtain and maintain high productivity. Over a Calcareous Substratum
This soil association, number 4 on the soil associa-
Well-Drained Sands Mixed tion map, consists of somewhat poorly drained sandy
with Phosphatic Materials soils that overlie calcareous material. It is comprised
of large areas of Ruskin, Sunniland, Adamsville, and
This soil association, number 2 on the soil associa- Bradenton soils and of less extensive areas of Broward,
tion map, consists of well-drained sandy soils that con- Keri, and Parkwood soils. Small areas of poorly
tain a few phosphatic pebbles. Nearly half of the drained Delray, Felda, Manatee, and Pompano soils,
association is made up of Arredondo soils; Fort Meade and of somewhat poorly drained Immokalee and Leon
soils are extensive; and Gainesville, Blichton, Alachua, soils, may be included because they are too small to
Fellowship, and Kanapaha soils occur to a lesser ex- show separately on a map of the scale used.
tent. Small areas of Blanton, Eustis, Lakeland, Leon, This soil association occurs mainly along the coast
and Scranton soils, too small to show separately on a and near some of the major streams. The Ruskin
map of the scale used, may be included, soil occupies areas between Sun City and Tampa. The
The Arredondo, Fort Meade, Gainesville, Blichton, Sunniland soils occur mainly along the Hillsborough
and Fellowship soils are nearly level to undulating, but River in the northern part of the county. The Adams-
a few slopes as steep as 15 percent are included. The ville, Keri, and Parkwood soils occur along Tampa
Kanapaha soil is nearly level, and the Alachua soil Bay, and the Bradenton and Broward along Tampa
occupies depressions or occurs at the bases of slopes. Bay and farther inland.
The Arredondo, Blichton, and Kanapaha soils con- The Ruskin and Adamsville soils between Sun City
sist of fine sands; the Fort Meade, Fellowship, and and the Alafia River are used mainly to grow vege-
Alachua soils are loamy fine sands. In most places tables. Gladiolus are grown to a small extent. Some
the Gainesville soils are loamy fine sand throughout, areas have been seeded to improved pasture grasses.
but in small areas sandy clay loam occurs at depths Most of the areas of Sunniland, Broward, and Keri
between 30 and 42 inches. Small phosphatic pebbles soils are used as range pasture or are covered by pine
are scattered on the surface and occur throughout the forests.
profiles of these soils. Under good management, yields of vegetables and
Large areas of Arredondo, Fort Meade, and Gaines- other crops are high on the soils of this association.






10 SOIL SURVEY SERIES 1950, NO. 3

the forest products are of poor quality. Under good ville soils occur near Brandon, Valrico, and Blooming-
management smooth areas of Lakewood soils can be dale, and north of Plant City. The areas are used to
used to grow citrus trees. grow citrus fruits, general crops, and vegetables. Some
are in pasture or in forest. Most of the soils are some-
what drought and require irrigation for good yields.
Well-Drained Deep Sands

This soil association, number 1 on the soil associa- Somewhat Poorly Drained, Dark-Colored Sands
tion map, consists of well-drained deep sandy soils. It
is dominated by the Blanton and Lakeland soils; Eustis This soil association group, which is number 3 on
and Orlando soils are also extensive. Small areas of the soil association map, is comprised of somewhat
somewhat poorly drained Leon, Ona, Plummer, Po- poorly drained, dark-colored sandy soils. Most of the
mello, Rutlege, and Scranton soils that are too small association consists of Ona and Scranton soils. Small
to show separately on a map of the scale used may be areas of Blanton, Leon, Plummer, Pomello, and Rutlege
included. The Blanton, Lakeland, Eustis, and Orlando soils, too small to be shown separately on a map of the
soils occupy areas that are nearly level to undulating. scale used, may be included. The Ona and Scranton
A few short, steeper slopes occur near streams, sink- soils are level or nearly level or occupy short slopes
holes, ponds, or lakes. Most of the association is in of as much as 5 percent.
the north-central and northwestern parts of the county. The surface layer of the Ona and Scranton soils is
The Blanton, Lakeland, Eustis, and Orlando soils black to dark-gray fine sand. A brown-stained layer
generally consist of fine sand to depths of more than occurs within 14 inches of the surface in the Ona soils.
42 inches. In a few areas of Lakeland soils, however, The Ona and Scranton soils are used to grow straw-
a sandy clay layer occurs at depths between 30 and 42 berries, vegetables, and general crops. Some better
inches. drained areas, mainly of the Scranton soil, are used
Large areas of the soils in this association are used to grow citrus fruits. Large areas of the Ona soils in
to grow citrus fruits or are covered by forests. Smaller the southern and southeastern parts of the county are
areas are pastured or are used to grow general crops used for range pasture. Under good management,
or for poultry farms. The soils are drought, and crops yield very well on these soils. During dry periods
some crops need irrigation during dry spells. Where portable or stationary sprinkling systems are used to
water and equipment are available, portable sprinkling irrigate many of the crops.
systems are used to irrigate. Pine trees grow very well on the soils of this asso-
The dominant soils of this group are well suited to ciation.
citrus trees, general farm crops, watermelons, im-
proved pastures, and forest. The soils need fertiliza-
tion and the maximum use of soil-building crops to Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands
obtain and maintain high productivity. Over a Calcareous Substratum
This soil association, number 4 on the soil associa-
Well-Drained Sands Mixed tion map, consists of somewhat poorly drained sandy
with Phosphatic Materials soils that overlie calcareous material. It is comprised
of large areas of Ruskin, Sunniland, Adamsville, and
This soil association, number 2 on the soil associa- Bradenton soils and of less extensive areas of Broward,
tion map, consists of well-drained sandy soils that con- Keri, and Parkwood soils. Small areas of poorly
tain a few phosphatic pebbles. Nearly half of the drained Delray, Felda, Manatee, and Pompano soils,
association is made up of Arredondo soils; Fort Meade and of somewhat poorly drained Immokalee and Leon
soils are extensive; and Gainesville, Blichton, Alachua, soils, may be included because they are too small to
Fellowship, and Kanapaha soils occur to a lesser ex- show separately on a map of the scale used.
tent. Small areas of Blanton, Eustis, Lakeland, Leon, This soil association occurs mainly along the coast
and Scranton soils, too small to show separately on a and near some of the major streams. The Ruskin
map of the scale used, may be included, soil occupies areas between Sun City and Tampa. The
The Arredondo, Fort Meade, Gainesville, Blichton, Sunniland soils occur mainly along the Hillsborough
and Fellowship soils are nearly level to undulating, but River in the northern part of the county. The Adams-
a few slopes as steep as 15 percent are included. The ville, Keri, and Parkwood soils occur along Tampa
Kanapaha soil is nearly level, and the Alachua soil Bay, and the Bradenton and Broward along Tampa
occupies depressions or occurs at the bases of slopes. Bay and farther inland.
The Arredondo, Blichton, and Kanapaha soils con- The Ruskin and Adamsville soils between Sun City
sist of fine sands; the Fort Meade, Fellowship, and and the Alafia River are used mainly to grow vege-
Alachua soils are loamy fine sands. In most places tables. Gladiolus are grown to a small extent. Some
the Gainesville soils are loamy fine sand throughout, areas have been seeded to improved pasture grasses.
but in small areas sandy clay loam occurs at depths Most of the areas of Sunniland, Broward, and Keri
between 30 and 42 inches. Small phosphatic pebbles soils are used as range pasture or are covered by pine
are scattered on the surface and occur throughout the forests.
profiles of these soils. Under good management, yields of vegetables and
Large areas of Arredondo, Fort Meade, and Gaines- other crops are high on the soils of this association.






10 SOIL SURVEY SERIES 1950, NO. 3

the forest products are of poor quality. Under good ville soils occur near Brandon, Valrico, and Blooming-
management smooth areas of Lakewood soils can be dale, and north of Plant City. The areas are used to
used to grow citrus trees. grow citrus fruits, general crops, and vegetables. Some
are in pasture or in forest. Most of the soils are some-
what drought and require irrigation for good yields.
Well-Drained Deep Sands

This soil association, number 1 on the soil associa- Somewhat Poorly Drained, Dark-Colored Sands
tion map, consists of well-drained deep sandy soils. It
is dominated by the Blanton and Lakeland soils; Eustis This soil association group, which is number 3 on
and Orlando soils are also extensive. Small areas of the soil association map, is comprised of somewhat
somewhat poorly drained Leon, Ona, Plummer, Po- poorly drained, dark-colored sandy soils. Most of the
mello, Rutlege, and Scranton soils that are too small association consists of Ona and Scranton soils. Small
to show separately on a map of the scale used may be areas of Blanton, Leon, Plummer, Pomello, and Rutlege
included. The Blanton, Lakeland, Eustis, and Orlando soils, too small to be shown separately on a map of the
soils occupy areas that are nearly level to undulating. scale used, may be included. The Ona and Scranton
A few short, steeper slopes occur near streams, sink- soils are level or nearly level or occupy short slopes
holes, ponds, or lakes. Most of the association is in of as much as 5 percent.
the north-central and northwestern parts of the county. The surface layer of the Ona and Scranton soils is
The Blanton, Lakeland, Eustis, and Orlando soils black to dark-gray fine sand. A brown-stained layer
generally consist of fine sand to depths of more than occurs within 14 inches of the surface in the Ona soils.
42 inches. In a few areas of Lakeland soils, however, The Ona and Scranton soils are used to grow straw-
a sandy clay layer occurs at depths between 30 and 42 berries, vegetables, and general crops. Some better
inches. drained areas, mainly of the Scranton soil, are used
Large areas of the soils in this association are used to grow citrus fruits. Large areas of the Ona soils in
to grow citrus fruits or are covered by forests. Smaller the southern and southeastern parts of the county are
areas are pastured or are used to grow general crops used for range pasture. Under good management,
or for poultry farms. The soils are drought, and crops yield very well on these soils. During dry periods
some crops need irrigation during dry spells. Where portable or stationary sprinkling systems are used to
water and equipment are available, portable sprinkling irrigate many of the crops.
systems are used to irrigate. Pine trees grow very well on the soils of this asso-
The dominant soils of this group are well suited to ciation.
citrus trees, general farm crops, watermelons, im-
proved pastures, and forest. The soils need fertiliza-
tion and the maximum use of soil-building crops to Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands
obtain and maintain high productivity. Over a Calcareous Substratum
This soil association, number 4 on the soil associa-
Well-Drained Sands Mixed tion map, consists of somewhat poorly drained sandy
with Phosphatic Materials soils that overlie calcareous material. It is comprised
of large areas of Ruskin, Sunniland, Adamsville, and
This soil association, number 2 on the soil associa- Bradenton soils and of less extensive areas of Broward,
tion map, consists of well-drained sandy soils that con- Keri, and Parkwood soils. Small areas of poorly
tain a few phosphatic pebbles. Nearly half of the drained Delray, Felda, Manatee, and Pompano soils,
association is made up of Arredondo soils; Fort Meade and of somewhat poorly drained Immokalee and Leon
soils are extensive; and Gainesville, Blichton, Alachua, soils, may be included because they are too small to
Fellowship, and Kanapaha soils occur to a lesser ex- show separately on a map of the scale used.
tent. Small areas of Blanton, Eustis, Lakeland, Leon, This soil association occurs mainly along the coast
and Scranton soils, too small to show separately on a and near some of the major streams. The Ruskin
map of the scale used, may be included, soil occupies areas between Sun City and Tampa. The
The Arredondo, Fort Meade, Gainesville, Blichton, Sunniland soils occur mainly along the Hillsborough
and Fellowship soils are nearly level to undulating, but River in the northern part of the county. The Adams-
a few slopes as steep as 15 percent are included. The ville, Keri, and Parkwood soils occur along Tampa
Kanapaha soil is nearly level, and the Alachua soil Bay, and the Bradenton and Broward along Tampa
occupies depressions or occurs at the bases of slopes. Bay and farther inland.
The Arredondo, Blichton, and Kanapaha soils con- The Ruskin and Adamsville soils between Sun City
sist of fine sands; the Fort Meade, Fellowship, and and the Alafia River are used mainly to grow vege-
Alachua soils are loamy fine sands. In most places tables. Gladiolus are grown to a small extent. Some
the Gainesville soils are loamy fine sand throughout, areas have been seeded to improved pasture grasses.
but in small areas sandy clay loam occurs at depths Most of the areas of Sunniland, Broward, and Keri
between 30 and 42 inches. Small phosphatic pebbles soils are used as range pasture or are covered by pine
are scattered on the surface and occur throughout the forests.
profiles of these soils. Under good management, yields of vegetables and
Large areas of Arredondo, Fort Meade, and Gaines- other crops are high on the soils of this association.







HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 11

Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands sandy soils that overlie calcareous material. They are
with Organic Hardpan near the coast and along the Hillsborough River.
The soils of this group are used primarily for graz-
This soil association, number 5 on the soil associa- ing and forest. Small areas of these soils included in
tion map, is comprised of somewhat poorly drained fields of Ruskin and Adamsville soils are used to grow
sandy soils. The principal soils contain organic pans. vegetables. Under proper management, which in-
The Leon soils dominate this association, but Immo- cludes control of water and application of suitable
kalee soils are also extensive. Small areas of Ona, fertilizers, good yields of vegetables are obtained. The
Plummer, Pomello, and Rutlege soils, and Alluvial quality of the pastures and forests is fair to good.
land, Shallow ponds with grass, and organic soils may
be included, because they are too small to be shown
separately on a map of the scale used. The Leon and Very Poorly Drained Organic Soils
Immokalee soils occur throughout the association.
They occupy level or nearly level areas, though a few This soil association, number 9 on the soil associa-
slopes are as steep as 5 percent. tion map, consists of very poorly drained organic soils.
A dark-brown or black organic pan, at depths be- It is the least extensive in the county. It consists
tween 14 and 42 inches, is typical of the Leon and mainly of Brighton, Terra Ceia, Istokpoga, and Pam-
Immokalee soils. lico soils. A few small areas of Manatee, Delray, Felda,
The soils of this association are used mainly for and Rutlege soils, Shallow ponds with grass, and Fresh
range, improved pasture, and forest. Some small areas water swamp (unclassified soils) may be included.
are used to grow vegetables and strawberries. Fair The soils of this association are covered with water
yields of vegetables can be produced under a good during many months of the year. The Brighton, Istok-
management system that includes using liberal appli- poga, and Pamlico soils are acid in reaction. The Terra
cations of fertilizers and lime and controlling the Ceia is neutral or alkaline. Except for the Terra Ceia
water table. The range provides fair to poor grazing, soil, which occurs mainly near the intersection of
and the quality of the timber is fair to good, although United States Highways 92 and 301, the soils occur
the trees grow slowly. Good pastures can be estab- throughout the county.
lished under good management. The soils of this association are used mainly for
pasture. They provide good grazing when they are
not under water. Some of the areas provide organic
Poorly Drained Acid Sands materials for use on lawns, as a compost, or as a filler
for fertilizer.
This soil association, number 7 on the soil associa- Under favorable weather conditions and good man-
tion map, is made up of poorly drained acid sands. It agement practices, which include using applications of
consists mainly of Rutlege and Plummer soils and of fertilizers and controlling water adequately, good
lesser areas of Portsmouth and Rains soils. Areas of yields are obtained from many truck and special crops
Leon and Ona soils, Shallow ponds with grass, and and from improved pasture on these soils.
organic soils may be included because they are too
small to be shown separately on a map of the scale
used. Bottom Lands, Swamps, and Ponds
The soils of this association are used primarily for
range pasture and forest. Grazing is fair to good on This association of land types, number 10 on the soil
the range, and it is good on some areas that have been association map, consists of bottom lands, swamps, and
seeded to improved grasses. The forests consist largely ponds. The principal constituents are Peace River
of pines mixed with some hardwoods. Tree growth is soils; Alluvial land; Fresh water swamp (unclassified
fair to good. On cultivated areas, where water has soils); Mixed alluvium, high bottom phase; and Shal-
been controlled and good management has been prac- low ponds with grass. Small areas of Leon, Rutlege,
ticed, good yields of vegetables have been obtained, and Plummer soils may be included. Areas of the
association occur throughout the county. In many
places they are covered by water for long periods.
Poorly Drained Neutral to Alkaline The Peace River soils have a nearly black surface
layer of varying texture, underlain by calcareous sandy
Sands and Sandy Clays clay. The other mapping units consist of mixed soil
materials that range from dark gray to light gray in
This soil association, number 8 on the soil associa- color and from fine sand to sandy clay in texture.
tion map, is made up of poorly drained neutral to alka- Some areas are covered by a thin layer of muck or peat.
line soils of sandy and sandy clay textures. It consists The bottom lands, swamps, and ponds are used
mainly of Pompano, Felda, Manatee, Delray, and Char- mainly for pasture or are under forest. The grasses
lotte soils, but may include areas of Leon and Ona and shrubs provide some grazing for cattle and hogs.
soils, Shallow ponds with grass, and organic soils, too The forests, which consist mainly of cypress, hard-
small to show separately on a map of the scale used. woods, and pine, provide a habitat for wildlife. The
The soils and miscellaneous land types occur within higher lying areas of the association should provide
larger areas of, or next to, somewhat poorly drained good grazing if seeded to improved grasses.







HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 11

Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands sandy soils that overlie calcareous material. They are
with Organic Hardpan near the coast and along the Hillsborough River.
The soils of this group are used primarily for graz-
This soil association, number 5 on the soil associa- ing and forest. Small areas of these soils included in
tion map, is comprised of somewhat poorly drained fields of Ruskin and Adamsville soils are used to grow
sandy soils. The principal soils contain organic pans. vegetables. Under proper management, which in-
The Leon soils dominate this association, but Immo- cludes control of water and application of suitable
kalee soils are also extensive. Small areas of Ona, fertilizers, good yields of vegetables are obtained. The
Plummer, Pomello, and Rutlege soils, and Alluvial quality of the pastures and forests is fair to good.
land, Shallow ponds with grass, and organic soils may
be included, because they are too small to be shown
separately on a map of the scale used. The Leon and Very Poorly Drained Organic Soils
Immokalee soils occur throughout the association.
They occupy level or nearly level areas, though a few This soil association, number 9 on the soil associa-
slopes are as steep as 5 percent. tion map, consists of very poorly drained organic soils.
A dark-brown or black organic pan, at depths be- It is the least extensive in the county. It consists
tween 14 and 42 inches, is typical of the Leon and mainly of Brighton, Terra Ceia, Istokpoga, and Pam-
Immokalee soils. lico soils. A few small areas of Manatee, Delray, Felda,
The soils of this association are used mainly for and Rutlege soils, Shallow ponds with grass, and Fresh
range, improved pasture, and forest. Some small areas water swamp (unclassified soils) may be included.
are used to grow vegetables and strawberries. Fair The soils of this association are covered with water
yields of vegetables can be produced under a good during many months of the year. The Brighton, Istok-
management system that includes using liberal appli- poga, and Pamlico soils are acid in reaction. The Terra
cations of fertilizers and lime and controlling the Ceia is neutral or alkaline. Except for the Terra Ceia
water table. The range provides fair to poor grazing, soil, which occurs mainly near the intersection of
and the quality of the timber is fair to good, although United States Highways 92 and 301, the soils occur
the trees grow slowly. Good pastures can be estab- throughout the county.
lished under good management. The soils of this association are used mainly for
pasture. They provide good grazing when they are
not under water. Some of the areas provide organic
Poorly Drained Acid Sands materials for use on lawns, as a compost, or as a filler
for fertilizer.
This soil association, number 7 on the soil associa- Under favorable weather conditions and good man-
tion map, is made up of poorly drained acid sands. It agement practices, which include using applications of
consists mainly of Rutlege and Plummer soils and of fertilizers and controlling water adequately, good
lesser areas of Portsmouth and Rains soils. Areas of yields are obtained from many truck and special crops
Leon and Ona soils, Shallow ponds with grass, and and from improved pasture on these soils.
organic soils may be included because they are too
small to be shown separately on a map of the scale
used. Bottom Lands, Swamps, and Ponds
The soils of this association are used primarily for
range pasture and forest. Grazing is fair to good on This association of land types, number 10 on the soil
the range, and it is good on some areas that have been association map, consists of bottom lands, swamps, and
seeded to improved grasses. The forests consist largely ponds. The principal constituents are Peace River
of pines mixed with some hardwoods. Tree growth is soils; Alluvial land; Fresh water swamp (unclassified
fair to good. On cultivated areas, where water has soils); Mixed alluvium, high bottom phase; and Shal-
been controlled and good management has been prac- low ponds with grass. Small areas of Leon, Rutlege,
ticed, good yields of vegetables have been obtained, and Plummer soils may be included. Areas of the
association occur throughout the county. In many
places they are covered by water for long periods.
Poorly Drained Neutral to Alkaline The Peace River soils have a nearly black surface
layer of varying texture, underlain by calcareous sandy
Sands and Sandy Clays clay. The other mapping units consist of mixed soil
materials that range from dark gray to light gray in
This soil association, number 8 on the soil associa- color and from fine sand to sandy clay in texture.
tion map, is made up of poorly drained neutral to alka- Some areas are covered by a thin layer of muck or peat.
line soils of sandy and sandy clay textures. It consists The bottom lands, swamps, and ponds are used
mainly of Pompano, Felda, Manatee, Delray, and Char- mainly for pasture or are under forest. The grasses
lotte soils, but may include areas of Leon and Ona and shrubs provide some grazing for cattle and hogs.
soils, Shallow ponds with grass, and organic soils, too The forests, which consist mainly of cypress, hard-
small to show separately on a map of the scale used. woods, and pine, provide a habitat for wildlife. The
The soils and miscellaneous land types occur within higher lying areas of the association should provide
larger areas of, or next to, somewhat poorly drained good grazing if seeded to improved grasses.







HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 11

Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands sandy soils that overlie calcareous material. They are
with Organic Hardpan near the coast and along the Hillsborough River.
The soils of this group are used primarily for graz-
This soil association, number 5 on the soil associa- ing and forest. Small areas of these soils included in
tion map, is comprised of somewhat poorly drained fields of Ruskin and Adamsville soils are used to grow
sandy soils. The principal soils contain organic pans. vegetables. Under proper management, which in-
The Leon soils dominate this association, but Immo- cludes control of water and application of suitable
kalee soils are also extensive. Small areas of Ona, fertilizers, good yields of vegetables are obtained. The
Plummer, Pomello, and Rutlege soils, and Alluvial quality of the pastures and forests is fair to good.
land, Shallow ponds with grass, and organic soils may
be included, because they are too small to be shown
separately on a map of the scale used. The Leon and Very Poorly Drained Organic Soils
Immokalee soils occur throughout the association.
They occupy level or nearly level areas, though a few This soil association, number 9 on the soil associa-
slopes are as steep as 5 percent. tion map, consists of very poorly drained organic soils.
A dark-brown or black organic pan, at depths be- It is the least extensive in the county. It consists
tween 14 and 42 inches, is typical of the Leon and mainly of Brighton, Terra Ceia, Istokpoga, and Pam-
Immokalee soils. lico soils. A few small areas of Manatee, Delray, Felda,
The soils of this association are used mainly for and Rutlege soils, Shallow ponds with grass, and Fresh
range, improved pasture, and forest. Some small areas water swamp (unclassified soils) may be included.
are used to grow vegetables and strawberries. Fair The soils of this association are covered with water
yields of vegetables can be produced under a good during many months of the year. The Brighton, Istok-
management system that includes using liberal appli- poga, and Pamlico soils are acid in reaction. The Terra
cations of fertilizers and lime and controlling the Ceia is neutral or alkaline. Except for the Terra Ceia
water table. The range provides fair to poor grazing, soil, which occurs mainly near the intersection of
and the quality of the timber is fair to good, although United States Highways 92 and 301, the soils occur
the trees grow slowly. Good pastures can be estab- throughout the county.
lished under good management. The soils of this association are used mainly for
pasture. They provide good grazing when they are
not under water. Some of the areas provide organic
Poorly Drained Acid Sands materials for use on lawns, as a compost, or as a filler
for fertilizer.
This soil association, number 7 on the soil associa- Under favorable weather conditions and good man-
tion map, is made up of poorly drained acid sands. It agement practices, which include using applications of
consists mainly of Rutlege and Plummer soils and of fertilizers and controlling water adequately, good
lesser areas of Portsmouth and Rains soils. Areas of yields are obtained from many truck and special crops
Leon and Ona soils, Shallow ponds with grass, and and from improved pasture on these soils.
organic soils may be included because they are too
small to be shown separately on a map of the scale
used. Bottom Lands, Swamps, and Ponds
The soils of this association are used primarily for
range pasture and forest. Grazing is fair to good on This association of land types, number 10 on the soil
the range, and it is good on some areas that have been association map, consists of bottom lands, swamps, and
seeded to improved grasses. The forests consist largely ponds. The principal constituents are Peace River
of pines mixed with some hardwoods. Tree growth is soils; Alluvial land; Fresh water swamp (unclassified
fair to good. On cultivated areas, where water has soils); Mixed alluvium, high bottom phase; and Shal-
been controlled and good management has been prac- low ponds with grass. Small areas of Leon, Rutlege,
ticed, good yields of vegetables have been obtained, and Plummer soils may be included. Areas of the
association occur throughout the county. In many
places they are covered by water for long periods.
Poorly Drained Neutral to Alkaline The Peace River soils have a nearly black surface
layer of varying texture, underlain by calcareous sandy
Sands and Sandy Clays clay. The other mapping units consist of mixed soil
materials that range from dark gray to light gray in
This soil association, number 8 on the soil associa- color and from fine sand to sandy clay in texture.
tion map, is made up of poorly drained neutral to alka- Some areas are covered by a thin layer of muck or peat.
line soils of sandy and sandy clay textures. It consists The bottom lands, swamps, and ponds are used
mainly of Pompano, Felda, Manatee, Delray, and Char- mainly for pasture or are under forest. The grasses
lotte soils, but may include areas of Leon and Ona and shrubs provide some grazing for cattle and hogs.
soils, Shallow ponds with grass, and organic soils, too The forests, which consist mainly of cypress, hard-
small to show separately on a map of the scale used. woods, and pine, provide a habitat for wildlife. The
The soils and miscellaneous land types occur within higher lying areas of the association should provide
larger areas of, or next to, somewhat poorly drained good grazing if seeded to improved grasses.







HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 11

Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands sandy soils that overlie calcareous material. They are
with Organic Hardpan near the coast and along the Hillsborough River.
The soils of this group are used primarily for graz-
This soil association, number 5 on the soil associa- ing and forest. Small areas of these soils included in
tion map, is comprised of somewhat poorly drained fields of Ruskin and Adamsville soils are used to grow
sandy soils. The principal soils contain organic pans. vegetables. Under proper management, which in-
The Leon soils dominate this association, but Immo- cludes control of water and application of suitable
kalee soils are also extensive. Small areas of Ona, fertilizers, good yields of vegetables are obtained. The
Plummer, Pomello, and Rutlege soils, and Alluvial quality of the pastures and forests is fair to good.
land, Shallow ponds with grass, and organic soils may
be included, because they are too small to be shown
separately on a map of the scale used. The Leon and Very Poorly Drained Organic Soils
Immokalee soils occur throughout the association.
They occupy level or nearly level areas, though a few This soil association, number 9 on the soil associa-
slopes are as steep as 5 percent. tion map, consists of very poorly drained organic soils.
A dark-brown or black organic pan, at depths be- It is the least extensive in the county. It consists
tween 14 and 42 inches, is typical of the Leon and mainly of Brighton, Terra Ceia, Istokpoga, and Pam-
Immokalee soils. lico soils. A few small areas of Manatee, Delray, Felda,
The soils of this association are used mainly for and Rutlege soils, Shallow ponds with grass, and Fresh
range, improved pasture, and forest. Some small areas water swamp (unclassified soils) may be included.
are used to grow vegetables and strawberries. Fair The soils of this association are covered with water
yields of vegetables can be produced under a good during many months of the year. The Brighton, Istok-
management system that includes using liberal appli- poga, and Pamlico soils are acid in reaction. The Terra
cations of fertilizers and lime and controlling the Ceia is neutral or alkaline. Except for the Terra Ceia
water table. The range provides fair to poor grazing, soil, which occurs mainly near the intersection of
and the quality of the timber is fair to good, although United States Highways 92 and 301, the soils occur
the trees grow slowly. Good pastures can be estab- throughout the county.
lished under good management. The soils of this association are used mainly for
pasture. They provide good grazing when they are
not under water. Some of the areas provide organic
Poorly Drained Acid Sands materials for use on lawns, as a compost, or as a filler
for fertilizer.
This soil association, number 7 on the soil associa- Under favorable weather conditions and good man-
tion map, is made up of poorly drained acid sands. It agement practices, which include using applications of
consists mainly of Rutlege and Plummer soils and of fertilizers and controlling water adequately, good
lesser areas of Portsmouth and Rains soils. Areas of yields are obtained from many truck and special crops
Leon and Ona soils, Shallow ponds with grass, and and from improved pasture on these soils.
organic soils may be included because they are too
small to be shown separately on a map of the scale
used. Bottom Lands, Swamps, and Ponds
The soils of this association are used primarily for
range pasture and forest. Grazing is fair to good on This association of land types, number 10 on the soil
the range, and it is good on some areas that have been association map, consists of bottom lands, swamps, and
seeded to improved grasses. The forests consist largely ponds. The principal constituents are Peace River
of pines mixed with some hardwoods. Tree growth is soils; Alluvial land; Fresh water swamp (unclassified
fair to good. On cultivated areas, where water has soils); Mixed alluvium, high bottom phase; and Shal-
been controlled and good management has been prac- low ponds with grass. Small areas of Leon, Rutlege,
ticed, good yields of vegetables have been obtained, and Plummer soils may be included. Areas of the
association occur throughout the county. In many
places they are covered by water for long periods.
Poorly Drained Neutral to Alkaline The Peace River soils have a nearly black surface
layer of varying texture, underlain by calcareous sandy
Sands and Sandy Clays clay. The other mapping units consist of mixed soil
materials that range from dark gray to light gray in
This soil association, number 8 on the soil associa- color and from fine sand to sandy clay in texture.
tion map, is made up of poorly drained neutral to alka- Some areas are covered by a thin layer of muck or peat.
line soils of sandy and sandy clay textures. It consists The bottom lands, swamps, and ponds are used
mainly of Pompano, Felda, Manatee, Delray, and Char- mainly for pasture or are under forest. The grasses
lotte soils, but may include areas of Leon and Ona and shrubs provide some grazing for cattle and hogs.
soils, Shallow ponds with grass, and organic soils, too The forests, which consist mainly of cypress, hard-
small to show separately on a map of the scale used. woods, and pine, provide a habitat for wildlife. The
The soils and miscellaneous land types occur within higher lying areas of the association should provide
larger areas of, or next to, somewhat poorly drained good grazing if seeded to improved grasses.







HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 11

Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands sandy soils that overlie calcareous material. They are
with Organic Hardpan near the coast and along the Hillsborough River.
The soils of this group are used primarily for graz-
This soil association, number 5 on the soil associa- ing and forest. Small areas of these soils included in
tion map, is comprised of somewhat poorly drained fields of Ruskin and Adamsville soils are used to grow
sandy soils. The principal soils contain organic pans. vegetables. Under proper management, which in-
The Leon soils dominate this association, but Immo- cludes control of water and application of suitable
kalee soils are also extensive. Small areas of Ona, fertilizers, good yields of vegetables are obtained. The
Plummer, Pomello, and Rutlege soils, and Alluvial quality of the pastures and forests is fair to good.
land, Shallow ponds with grass, and organic soils may
be included, because they are too small to be shown
separately on a map of the scale used. The Leon and Very Poorly Drained Organic Soils
Immokalee soils occur throughout the association.
They occupy level or nearly level areas, though a few This soil association, number 9 on the soil associa-
slopes are as steep as 5 percent. tion map, consists of very poorly drained organic soils.
A dark-brown or black organic pan, at depths be- It is the least extensive in the county. It consists
tween 14 and 42 inches, is typical of the Leon and mainly of Brighton, Terra Ceia, Istokpoga, and Pam-
Immokalee soils. lico soils. A few small areas of Manatee, Delray, Felda,
The soils of this association are used mainly for and Rutlege soils, Shallow ponds with grass, and Fresh
range, improved pasture, and forest. Some small areas water swamp (unclassified soils) may be included.
are used to grow vegetables and strawberries. Fair The soils of this association are covered with water
yields of vegetables can be produced under a good during many months of the year. The Brighton, Istok-
management system that includes using liberal appli- poga, and Pamlico soils are acid in reaction. The Terra
cations of fertilizers and lime and controlling the Ceia is neutral or alkaline. Except for the Terra Ceia
water table. The range provides fair to poor grazing, soil, which occurs mainly near the intersection of
and the quality of the timber is fair to good, although United States Highways 92 and 301, the soils occur
the trees grow slowly. Good pastures can be estab- throughout the county.
lished under good management. The soils of this association are used mainly for
pasture. They provide good grazing when they are
not under water. Some of the areas provide organic
Poorly Drained Acid Sands materials for use on lawns, as a compost, or as a filler
for fertilizer.
This soil association, number 7 on the soil associa- Under favorable weather conditions and good man-
tion map, is made up of poorly drained acid sands. It agement practices, which include using applications of
consists mainly of Rutlege and Plummer soils and of fertilizers and controlling water adequately, good
lesser areas of Portsmouth and Rains soils. Areas of yields are obtained from many truck and special crops
Leon and Ona soils, Shallow ponds with grass, and and from improved pasture on these soils.
organic soils may be included because they are too
small to be shown separately on a map of the scale
used. Bottom Lands, Swamps, and Ponds
The soils of this association are used primarily for
range pasture and forest. Grazing is fair to good on This association of land types, number 10 on the soil
the range, and it is good on some areas that have been association map, consists of bottom lands, swamps, and
seeded to improved grasses. The forests consist largely ponds. The principal constituents are Peace River
of pines mixed with some hardwoods. Tree growth is soils; Alluvial land; Fresh water swamp (unclassified
fair to good. On cultivated areas, where water has soils); Mixed alluvium, high bottom phase; and Shal-
been controlled and good management has been prac- low ponds with grass. Small areas of Leon, Rutlege,
ticed, good yields of vegetables have been obtained, and Plummer soils may be included. Areas of the
association occur throughout the county. In many
places they are covered by water for long periods.
Poorly Drained Neutral to Alkaline The Peace River soils have a nearly black surface
layer of varying texture, underlain by calcareous sandy
Sands and Sandy Clays clay. The other mapping units consist of mixed soil
materials that range from dark gray to light gray in
This soil association, number 8 on the soil associa- color and from fine sand to sandy clay in texture.
tion map, is made up of poorly drained neutral to alka- Some areas are covered by a thin layer of muck or peat.
line soils of sandy and sandy clay textures. It consists The bottom lands, swamps, and ponds are used
mainly of Pompano, Felda, Manatee, Delray, and Char- mainly for pasture or are under forest. The grasses
lotte soils, but may include areas of Leon and Ona and shrubs provide some grazing for cattle and hogs.
soils, Shallow ponds with grass, and organic soils, too The forests, which consist mainly of cypress, hard-
small to show separately on a map of the scale used. woods, and pine, provide a habitat for wildlife. The
The soils and miscellaneous land types occur within higher lying areas of the association should provide
larger areas of, or next to, somewhat poorly drained good grazing if seeded to improved grasses.







HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 11

Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands sandy soils that overlie calcareous material. They are
with Organic Hardpan near the coast and along the Hillsborough River.
The soils of this group are used primarily for graz-
This soil association, number 5 on the soil associa- ing and forest. Small areas of these soils included in
tion map, is comprised of somewhat poorly drained fields of Ruskin and Adamsville soils are used to grow
sandy soils. The principal soils contain organic pans. vegetables. Under proper management, which in-
The Leon soils dominate this association, but Immo- cludes control of water and application of suitable
kalee soils are also extensive. Small areas of Ona, fertilizers, good yields of vegetables are obtained. The
Plummer, Pomello, and Rutlege soils, and Alluvial quality of the pastures and forests is fair to good.
land, Shallow ponds with grass, and organic soils may
be included, because they are too small to be shown
separately on a map of the scale used. The Leon and Very Poorly Drained Organic Soils
Immokalee soils occur throughout the association.
They occupy level or nearly level areas, though a few This soil association, number 9 on the soil associa-
slopes are as steep as 5 percent. tion map, consists of very poorly drained organic soils.
A dark-brown or black organic pan, at depths be- It is the least extensive in the county. It consists
tween 14 and 42 inches, is typical of the Leon and mainly of Brighton, Terra Ceia, Istokpoga, and Pam-
Immokalee soils. lico soils. A few small areas of Manatee, Delray, Felda,
The soils of this association are used mainly for and Rutlege soils, Shallow ponds with grass, and Fresh
range, improved pasture, and forest. Some small areas water swamp (unclassified soils) may be included.
are used to grow vegetables and strawberries. Fair The soils of this association are covered with water
yields of vegetables can be produced under a good during many months of the year. The Brighton, Istok-
management system that includes using liberal appli- poga, and Pamlico soils are acid in reaction. The Terra
cations of fertilizers and lime and controlling the Ceia is neutral or alkaline. Except for the Terra Ceia
water table. The range provides fair to poor grazing, soil, which occurs mainly near the intersection of
and the quality of the timber is fair to good, although United States Highways 92 and 301, the soils occur
the trees grow slowly. Good pastures can be estab- throughout the county.
lished under good management. The soils of this association are used mainly for
pasture. They provide good grazing when they are
not under water. Some of the areas provide organic
Poorly Drained Acid Sands materials for use on lawns, as a compost, or as a filler
for fertilizer.
This soil association, number 7 on the soil associa- Under favorable weather conditions and good man-
tion map, is made up of poorly drained acid sands. It agement practices, which include using applications of
consists mainly of Rutlege and Plummer soils and of fertilizers and controlling water adequately, good
lesser areas of Portsmouth and Rains soils. Areas of yields are obtained from many truck and special crops
Leon and Ona soils, Shallow ponds with grass, and and from improved pasture on these soils.
organic soils may be included because they are too
small to be shown separately on a map of the scale
used. Bottom Lands, Swamps, and Ponds
The soils of this association are used primarily for
range pasture and forest. Grazing is fair to good on This association of land types, number 10 on the soil
the range, and it is good on some areas that have been association map, consists of bottom lands, swamps, and
seeded to improved grasses. The forests consist largely ponds. The principal constituents are Peace River
of pines mixed with some hardwoods. Tree growth is soils; Alluvial land; Fresh water swamp (unclassified
fair to good. On cultivated areas, where water has soils); Mixed alluvium, high bottom phase; and Shal-
been controlled and good management has been prac- low ponds with grass. Small areas of Leon, Rutlege,
ticed, good yields of vegetables have been obtained, and Plummer soils may be included. Areas of the
association occur throughout the county. In many
places they are covered by water for long periods.
Poorly Drained Neutral to Alkaline The Peace River soils have a nearly black surface
layer of varying texture, underlain by calcareous sandy
Sands and Sandy Clays clay. The other mapping units consist of mixed soil
materials that range from dark gray to light gray in
This soil association, number 8 on the soil associa- color and from fine sand to sandy clay in texture.
tion map, is made up of poorly drained neutral to alka- Some areas are covered by a thin layer of muck or peat.
line soils of sandy and sandy clay textures. It consists The bottom lands, swamps, and ponds are used
mainly of Pompano, Felda, Manatee, Delray, and Char- mainly for pasture or are under forest. The grasses
lotte soils, but may include areas of Leon and Ona and shrubs provide some grazing for cattle and hogs.
soils, Shallow ponds with grass, and organic soils, too The forests, which consist mainly of cypress, hard-
small to show separately on a map of the scale used. woods, and pine, provide a habitat for wildlife. The
The soils and miscellaneous land types occur within higher lying areas of the association should provide
larger areas of, or next to, somewhat poorly drained good grazing if seeded to improved grasses.







12 SOIL SURVEY SERIES 1950, NO. 3

Tidal Lands the eastern part of the county, where phosphate has
been mined. Made land was formed by dredgings
This group of land types, number 11 on the soil brought up when channels were widened in Tampa
association map, consists of tidal land, mainly Tidal Bay.
swamp (unclassified soils) and Tidal marsh (unclassi- Most of this association is wasteland, but grasses,
fled soils). It includes a narrow strip of coastal beach, shrubs, and pines grow on some of the older areas.
which is not mapped separately in Hillsborough This vegetation provides some grazing. Some areas
County. These low-lying areas occur next to Tampa have been leveled, fertilized lightly, and planted to im-
Bay and are covered by salt water during the high proved grasses.
tides.
The marsh supports salt-tolerant grasses and a few
shrubs. The swamp supports a dense growth of man- Descriptions of Soils
grove trees. These areas are used mainly for wildlife.
The coastal beach is used mainly for recreational This section contains detailed descriptions of the
purposes. soils mapped in Hillsborough County. After the name
of each soil is the letter symbol that identifies that
Mines, Pits, and Dumps and Made Land particular soil on the map placed in the back of this
report. Under the subheading, Use and Management,
This group of land types, number 12 on the soil the capability classification of each soil is given. The
association map, consists of Mines, pits, and dumps approximate acreage and proportionate extent of each
and Made land. The Mines, pits, and dumps are in mapping unit are shown in table 4.

TABLE 4.-Approximate acreage and proportionate extent of the soils

Soil Acreage tionate Soil Acreage Propor-
Propat- Stionate
extent extent

Percent Percent
Adamsville fine sand----------------- 6,767 1.0
Alachua loamy fine sand-------------- 224 (1) Undulating deep phase-------------- 527 0.1
Alluvial land ----------------------- 27,965 4.2 Lakewood fine sand ------------------ 1,025 .2
Arredondo fine sand: Leon fine sand ------------------__--- 154,107 23.2
Level phase ----------------------- 10,251 1.5 Heavy substratum phase---------- -- 4,976 7
Gently undulating phase ------------ 4,777 .7 Light-colored surface phase --------- 17,117 2.6
Blanton fine sand: Made land -----------------------------4,080 .6
Level phase ----------------------- 48,267 7.3 Manatee fine sandy loam------------- 1,120 .2
Gently undulating phase------------ 9,454 1.4 Manatee loamy fine sand ----- ---- 398 .1
Undulating phase --------------- 537 .1 Manatee fine sandy clay, heavy variant-- 692 .1
Brown-layer phase ---------------- 1,642 .2 Mines, pits, and dumps-------------- 3,384 .5
Blichton fine sand-------------------- 433 .1 Mixed alluvium, high bottom phase ----- 1,483 .2
Bradenton fine sand-------------------- 2,289 .3 Ona fine sand ------------- ---- 13,779 2.1
Thin surface phase ---------------- 83,682 .6 Light-colored surface phase ------ --- 16,510 2.5
Brighton peat --------------------- 1,707 .3 Orlando fine sand -------------------- 2,438 .3
Brighton mucky peat---------------- --- 423 .1 Pamlico muck ------------------------ 328 (1)
Broward fine sand------------------- 194 (1) Parkwood fine sand -------------------- 517 .1
Charlotte fine sand ------------------ 781 .1 Peace River soils -----------.---------- 15,824 2.4
Delray fine sand---------------------- 1,025 .2 Plummer fine sand --------------------- 18,431 2.8
Shallow phase ------------------ 199 (1) Shallow phase ------------ 458 .1
Eustis fine sand: Pomello fine sand ------------------ 15,276 2.2
Level phase --------------------- 1,234 .2 Pompano fine sand ------------ 4,249 .6
Gently undulating phase---------- 2,687 .4 Shallow phase ----------- 527 .1
Felda fine sand------------ ------ 2,632 .4 Portsmouth fine sand-------------- 398 .1
Fellowship loamy fine sand---------- 149 (1) Portsmouth mucky fine sand---------- 269 (1)
Fort Meade loamy fine sand: Rains fine sand------------------------ 264 (1)
Level phase ------------------- 8,360 1.3 Ruskin fine sand-------------------- 9,803 1.5
Undulating phase ------------------ 1,742 .3 Rutlege fine sand---------------- --- 26,771 4.0
Fresh water swamp (unclassified soils)-- 41,550 6.2 Shallow phase ----------------- 328 (1)
Gainesville loamy fine sand: Rutlege mucky fine sand------ -- 3,707 .6
Level phase ------------ 2,737 .4 St. Lucie fine sand -------------------- 9,355 1.4
Gently undulating phase ------------ 1.921 .3 Sandy local alluvium------------------- 350 (1)
Immokalee fine sand -------------------- 18,347 2.8 Scranton fine sand ------------------- 19,586 2.9
Alkaline variant ----------- 398 .1 Shallow ponds with grass--------------- 16,419 2.5
Istokpoga peat ------------------- 277 (1) Sunniland fine sand:
Istokpoga mucky peat ------------------- 100 (1) Moderately shallow over marl ------- 4,080 .6
Kanapaha fine sand ------------ 109 (1) Shallow over marl------------------ 3,792 .5
Keri fine sand ------------- 1,224 .2 Terra Ceia peaty muck ---------------- 846 .1
Lakeland fine sand: Tidal marsh (unclassified soils) ----4,817 .7
Level phase ------------- 15,227 2.3 Tidal swamp (unclassified soils) -------- 6,499 1.0
Gently undulating phase ------------22,392 3.4 Urban area of Greater Tampa and
Undulating phase ------------------ 1,229 .2 Airports ------ ---------- 36,406 5.5
Shallow phase --------------------- 239 (1)
Level deep phase ------------------- 1,493 .2 Total --------------------------- 665,600 100.0

1 Less than 0.1 percent.







12 SOIL SURVEY SERIES 1950, NO. 3

Tidal Lands the eastern part of the county, where phosphate has
been mined. Made land was formed by dredgings
This group of land types, number 11 on the soil brought up when channels were widened in Tampa
association map, consists of tidal land, mainly Tidal Bay.
swamp (unclassified soils) and Tidal marsh (unclassi- Most of this association is wasteland, but grasses,
fled soils). It includes a narrow strip of coastal beach, shrubs, and pines grow on some of the older areas.
which is not mapped separately in Hillsborough This vegetation provides some grazing. Some areas
County. These low-lying areas occur next to Tampa have been leveled, fertilized lightly, and planted to im-
Bay and are covered by salt water during the high proved grasses.
tides.
The marsh supports salt-tolerant grasses and a few
shrubs. The swamp supports a dense growth of man- Descriptions of Soils
grove trees. These areas are used mainly for wildlife.
The coastal beach is used mainly for recreational This section contains detailed descriptions of the
purposes. soils mapped in Hillsborough County. After the name
of each soil is the letter symbol that identifies that
Mines, Pits, and Dumps and Made Land particular soil on the map placed in the back of this
report. Under the subheading, Use and Management,
This group of land types, number 12 on the soil the capability classification of each soil is given. The
association map, consists of Mines, pits, and dumps approximate acreage and proportionate extent of each
and Made land. The Mines, pits, and dumps are in mapping unit are shown in table 4.

TABLE 4.-Approximate acreage and proportionate extent of the soils

Soil Acreage tionate Soil Acreage Propor-
Propat- Stionate
extent extent

Percent Percent
Adamsville fine sand----------------- 6,767 1.0
Alachua loamy fine sand-------------- 224 (1) Undulating deep phase-------------- 527 0.1
Alluvial land ----------------------- 27,965 4.2 Lakewood fine sand ------------------ 1,025 .2
Arredondo fine sand: Leon fine sand ------------------__--- 154,107 23.2
Level phase ----------------------- 10,251 1.5 Heavy substratum phase---------- -- 4,976 7
Gently undulating phase ------------ 4,777 .7 Light-colored surface phase --------- 17,117 2.6
Blanton fine sand: Made land -----------------------------4,080 .6
Level phase ----------------------- 48,267 7.3 Manatee fine sandy loam------------- 1,120 .2
Gently undulating phase------------ 9,454 1.4 Manatee loamy fine sand ----- ---- 398 .1
Undulating phase --------------- 537 .1 Manatee fine sandy clay, heavy variant-- 692 .1
Brown-layer phase ---------------- 1,642 .2 Mines, pits, and dumps-------------- 3,384 .5
Blichton fine sand-------------------- 433 .1 Mixed alluvium, high bottom phase ----- 1,483 .2
Bradenton fine sand-------------------- 2,289 .3 Ona fine sand ------------- ---- 13,779 2.1
Thin surface phase ---------------- 83,682 .6 Light-colored surface phase ------ --- 16,510 2.5
Brighton peat --------------------- 1,707 .3 Orlando fine sand -------------------- 2,438 .3
Brighton mucky peat---------------- --- 423 .1 Pamlico muck ------------------------ 328 (1)
Broward fine sand------------------- 194 (1) Parkwood fine sand -------------------- 517 .1
Charlotte fine sand ------------------ 781 .1 Peace River soils -----------.---------- 15,824 2.4
Delray fine sand---------------------- 1,025 .2 Plummer fine sand --------------------- 18,431 2.8
Shallow phase ------------------ 199 (1) Shallow phase ------------ 458 .1
Eustis fine sand: Pomello fine sand ------------------ 15,276 2.2
Level phase --------------------- 1,234 .2 Pompano fine sand ------------ 4,249 .6
Gently undulating phase---------- 2,687 .4 Shallow phase ----------- 527 .1
Felda fine sand------------ ------ 2,632 .4 Portsmouth fine sand-------------- 398 .1
Fellowship loamy fine sand---------- 149 (1) Portsmouth mucky fine sand---------- 269 (1)
Fort Meade loamy fine sand: Rains fine sand------------------------ 264 (1)
Level phase ------------------- 8,360 1.3 Ruskin fine sand-------------------- 9,803 1.5
Undulating phase ------------------ 1,742 .3 Rutlege fine sand---------------- --- 26,771 4.0
Fresh water swamp (unclassified soils)-- 41,550 6.2 Shallow phase ----------------- 328 (1)
Gainesville loamy fine sand: Rutlege mucky fine sand------ -- 3,707 .6
Level phase ------------ 2,737 .4 St. Lucie fine sand -------------------- 9,355 1.4
Gently undulating phase ------------ 1.921 .3 Sandy local alluvium------------------- 350 (1)
Immokalee fine sand -------------------- 18,347 2.8 Scranton fine sand ------------------- 19,586 2.9
Alkaline variant ----------- 398 .1 Shallow ponds with grass--------------- 16,419 2.5
Istokpoga peat ------------------- 277 (1) Sunniland fine sand:
Istokpoga mucky peat ------------------- 100 (1) Moderately shallow over marl ------- 4,080 .6
Kanapaha fine sand ------------ 109 (1) Shallow over marl------------------ 3,792 .5
Keri fine sand ------------- 1,224 .2 Terra Ceia peaty muck ---------------- 846 .1
Lakeland fine sand: Tidal marsh (unclassified soils) ----4,817 .7
Level phase ------------- 15,227 2.3 Tidal swamp (unclassified soils) -------- 6,499 1.0
Gently undulating phase ------------22,392 3.4 Urban area of Greater Tampa and
Undulating phase ------------------ 1,229 .2 Airports ------ ---------- 36,406 5.5
Shallow phase --------------------- 239 (1)
Level deep phase ------------------- 1,493 .2 Total --------------------------- 665,600 100.0

1 Less than 0.1 percent.







12 SOIL SURVEY SERIES 1950, NO. 3

Tidal Lands the eastern part of the county, where phosphate has
been mined. Made land was formed by dredgings
This group of land types, number 11 on the soil brought up when channels were widened in Tampa
association map, consists of tidal land, mainly Tidal Bay.
swamp (unclassified soils) and Tidal marsh (unclassi- Most of this association is wasteland, but grasses,
fled soils). It includes a narrow strip of coastal beach, shrubs, and pines grow on some of the older areas.
which is not mapped separately in Hillsborough This vegetation provides some grazing. Some areas
County. These low-lying areas occur next to Tampa have been leveled, fertilized lightly, and planted to im-
Bay and are covered by salt water during the high proved grasses.
tides.
The marsh supports salt-tolerant grasses and a few
shrubs. The swamp supports a dense growth of man- Descriptions of Soils
grove trees. These areas are used mainly for wildlife.
The coastal beach is used mainly for recreational This section contains detailed descriptions of the
purposes. soils mapped in Hillsborough County. After the name
of each soil is the letter symbol that identifies that
Mines, Pits, and Dumps and Made Land particular soil on the map placed in the back of this
report. Under the subheading, Use and Management,
This group of land types, number 12 on the soil the capability classification of each soil is given. The
association map, consists of Mines, pits, and dumps approximate acreage and proportionate extent of each
and Made land. The Mines, pits, and dumps are in mapping unit are shown in table 4.

TABLE 4.-Approximate acreage and proportionate extent of the soils

Soil Acreage tionate Soil Acreage Propor-
Propat- Stionate
extent extent

Percent Percent
Adamsville fine sand----------------- 6,767 1.0
Alachua loamy fine sand-------------- 224 (1) Undulating deep phase-------------- 527 0.1
Alluvial land ----------------------- 27,965 4.2 Lakewood fine sand ------------------ 1,025 .2
Arredondo fine sand: Leon fine sand ------------------__--- 154,107 23.2
Level phase ----------------------- 10,251 1.5 Heavy substratum phase---------- -- 4,976 7
Gently undulating phase ------------ 4,777 .7 Light-colored surface phase --------- 17,117 2.6
Blanton fine sand: Made land -----------------------------4,080 .6
Level phase ----------------------- 48,267 7.3 Manatee fine sandy loam------------- 1,120 .2
Gently undulating phase------------ 9,454 1.4 Manatee loamy fine sand ----- ---- 398 .1
Undulating phase --------------- 537 .1 Manatee fine sandy clay, heavy variant-- 692 .1
Brown-layer phase ---------------- 1,642 .2 Mines, pits, and dumps-------------- 3,384 .5
Blichton fine sand-------------------- 433 .1 Mixed alluvium, high bottom phase ----- 1,483 .2
Bradenton fine sand-------------------- 2,289 .3 Ona fine sand ------------- ---- 13,779 2.1
Thin surface phase ---------------- 83,682 .6 Light-colored surface phase ------ --- 16,510 2.5
Brighton peat --------------------- 1,707 .3 Orlando fine sand -------------------- 2,438 .3
Brighton mucky peat---------------- --- 423 .1 Pamlico muck ------------------------ 328 (1)
Broward fine sand------------------- 194 (1) Parkwood fine sand -------------------- 517 .1
Charlotte fine sand ------------------ 781 .1 Peace River soils -----------.---------- 15,824 2.4
Delray fine sand---------------------- 1,025 .2 Plummer fine sand --------------------- 18,431 2.8
Shallow phase ------------------ 199 (1) Shallow phase ------------ 458 .1
Eustis fine sand: Pomello fine sand ------------------ 15,276 2.2
Level phase --------------------- 1,234 .2 Pompano fine sand ------------ 4,249 .6
Gently undulating phase---------- 2,687 .4 Shallow phase ----------- 527 .1
Felda fine sand------------ ------ 2,632 .4 Portsmouth fine sand-------------- 398 .1
Fellowship loamy fine sand---------- 149 (1) Portsmouth mucky fine sand---------- 269 (1)
Fort Meade loamy fine sand: Rains fine sand------------------------ 264 (1)
Level phase ------------------- 8,360 1.3 Ruskin fine sand-------------------- 9,803 1.5
Undulating phase ------------------ 1,742 .3 Rutlege fine sand---------------- --- 26,771 4.0
Fresh water swamp (unclassified soils)-- 41,550 6.2 Shallow phase ----------------- 328 (1)
Gainesville loamy fine sand: Rutlege mucky fine sand------ -- 3,707 .6
Level phase ------------ 2,737 .4 St. Lucie fine sand -------------------- 9,355 1.4
Gently undulating phase ------------ 1.921 .3 Sandy local alluvium------------------- 350 (1)
Immokalee fine sand -------------------- 18,347 2.8 Scranton fine sand ------------------- 19,586 2.9
Alkaline variant ----------- 398 .1 Shallow ponds with grass--------------- 16,419 2.5
Istokpoga peat ------------------- 277 (1) Sunniland fine sand:
Istokpoga mucky peat ------------------- 100 (1) Moderately shallow over marl ------- 4,080 .6
Kanapaha fine sand ------------ 109 (1) Shallow over marl------------------ 3,792 .5
Keri fine sand ------------- 1,224 .2 Terra Ceia peaty muck ---------------- 846 .1
Lakeland fine sand: Tidal marsh (unclassified soils) ----4,817 .7
Level phase ------------- 15,227 2.3 Tidal swamp (unclassified soils) -------- 6,499 1.0
Gently undulating phase ------------22,392 3.4 Urban area of Greater Tampa and
Undulating phase ------------------ 1,229 .2 Airports ------ ---------- 36,406 5.5
Shallow phase --------------------- 239 (1)
Level deep phase ------------------- 1,493 .2 Total --------------------------- 665,600 100.0

1 Less than 0.1 percent.







HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 13

Adamsville fine sand (Aa).-This soil has developed plications of mixed fertilizer each year. Only 2 or 3
from moderately thick beds of sand that overlie finer acres of the improved pasture is needed to support
textured alkaline material or marl. It occupies level a cow for a year. In contrast, 15 to 40 acres of the
or nearly level areas along the coast. The areas ex- unimproved range pasture is needed to graze 1 cow.
tend from the county line on the south to the Pinellas Pine trees make fair to good growth on this soil.
County line in the northwest. Large areas extend This soil is in capability unit IVs-2 and in the soil
northwest from Tampa, along Old Tampa Bay. association of Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands Over
This soil occurs next to areas of Ruskin fine sand a Calcareous Substratum.
and Leon fine sand. In places it separates these two Alachua loamy fine sand (Ab).-This dark-colored,
soils. It is somewhat similar to the associated soils, well-drained soil consists of recent colluvium and allu-
but the texture throughout the profile is fine sand. In vium that has washed, rolled, or sloughed from areas
contrast, the Ruskin soil contains a layer of fine sandy of Arredondo, Fort Meade, and Gainesville soils.
clay loam or fine sandy loam and generally has some These materials have accumulated in depressions or at
shell marl within the profile. The Leon soils are char- the bases of slopes, or have spread over level areas.
acterized by an organic pan and are much more acid This soil occurs mainly in small patches in an area
than Adamsville fine sand. generally occupied by phosphatic soils. It occurs near
The natural vegetation consists of second-growth Brandon, Valrico, Bloomingdale, and Seffner, and
pine, saw-palmetto, an occasional cabbage palmetto, north and northeast of Plant City.
other shrubs, and wiregrass. The natural vegetation consists of live oak, hickory
Profile description: and some other hardwoods; pine; and a few shrubs
and grasses.
0 to 4 inches, dark-gray to gray loose fine sand, which has Profile description:
a salt-and-pepper appearance.e e
4 to 12 inches, light-gray loose fine sand. 0 to 10 inches, very dark grayish-brown to grayish-brown
12 to 24 inches, light yellowish-brown loose fine sand. loamy fine sand.
24 to 34 inches, yellowish-brown loose fine sand. 10 to 20 inches, dark-brown to pale-brown loamy fine sand.
34 to 42 inches +, brownish-yellow loose fine sand. 20 to 40 inches +, yellowish-brown or brown to strong-
In places the surface layer is very dark gray. The brown loamy fine sand.
horizon immediately below the surface layer ranges
from 6 to 30 inches in thickness. In places the light -
yellowish-brown horizon extends downward to depths
of as much as 30 inches. The brownish-yellow layer
is lacking in some profiles.
The surface layer of this soil is slightly acid. The
lower layers are neutral or alkaline. Drainage is
somewhat poor. Surface runoff is slow, and internal
drainage is rapid if not retarded by the high water
table.
Small areas of Keri fine sand, which occur near the
Pinellas County line, are mapped with Adamsville
fine sand. These areas, only about 25 to 50 feet in
diameter, are too small to be shown separately on the
soil map.
Also included with this mapping unit are small areas
where the layer of light-gray fine sand is underlain by
a layer that is stained brown or dark brown by or-
ganic matter. The brown layer begins at depths of
30 to 36 inches and is 6 to 12 inches thick. This in-
clusion is most common near the coast and in areas
transitional between Adamsville fine sand ahd Leon
fine sand, or between Ruskin fine sand and Leon fine
sand.
Use and management.-Several hundred acres of
this soil near Ruskin, Sun City, and Adamsville are
used to grow vegetables and truck crops (fig. 2).
Yields are good if the soil is well managed. Water
from flowing artesian wells is used for irrigation in
most of the areas. Liberal applications of fertilizers
containing the minor elements are needed.
The large areas of this soil in the northwestern
part of the county along Old Tampa Bay are generally
covered by pines, saw-palmettos, cabbage palmettos,
shrubs, wiregrass, and other grasses. This vegetation
provides poor grazing. Some small tracts have been .
cleared and seeded to pasture. These areas need ap- Figure 2.-Eggplant on Adamsville fine sand near the coast.







HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 13

Adamsville fine sand (Aa).-This soil has developed plications of mixed fertilizer each year. Only 2 or 3
from moderately thick beds of sand that overlie finer acres of the improved pasture is needed to support
textured alkaline material or marl. It occupies level a cow for a year. In contrast, 15 to 40 acres of the
or nearly level areas along the coast. The areas ex- unimproved range pasture is needed to graze 1 cow.
tend from the county line on the south to the Pinellas Pine trees make fair to good growth on this soil.
County line in the northwest. Large areas extend This soil is in capability unit IVs-2 and in the soil
northwest from Tampa, along Old Tampa Bay. association of Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands Over
This soil occurs next to areas of Ruskin fine sand a Calcareous Substratum.
and Leon fine sand. In places it separates these two Alachua loamy fine sand (Ab).-This dark-colored,
soils. It is somewhat similar to the associated soils, well-drained soil consists of recent colluvium and allu-
but the texture throughout the profile is fine sand. In vium that has washed, rolled, or sloughed from areas
contrast, the Ruskin soil contains a layer of fine sandy of Arredondo, Fort Meade, and Gainesville soils.
clay loam or fine sandy loam and generally has some These materials have accumulated in depressions or at
shell marl within the profile. The Leon soils are char- the bases of slopes, or have spread over level areas.
acterized by an organic pan and are much more acid This soil occurs mainly in small patches in an area
than Adamsville fine sand. generally occupied by phosphatic soils. It occurs near
The natural vegetation consists of second-growth Brandon, Valrico, Bloomingdale, and Seffner, and
pine, saw-palmetto, an occasional cabbage palmetto, north and northeast of Plant City.
other shrubs, and wiregrass. The natural vegetation consists of live oak, hickory
Profile description: and some other hardwoods; pine; and a few shrubs
and grasses.
0 to 4 inches, dark-gray to gray loose fine sand, which has Profile description:
a salt-and-pepper appearance.e e
4 to 12 inches, light-gray loose fine sand. 0 to 10 inches, very dark grayish-brown to grayish-brown
12 to 24 inches, light yellowish-brown loose fine sand. loamy fine sand.
24 to 34 inches, yellowish-brown loose fine sand. 10 to 20 inches, dark-brown to pale-brown loamy fine sand.
34 to 42 inches +, brownish-yellow loose fine sand. 20 to 40 inches +, yellowish-brown or brown to strong-
In places the surface layer is very dark gray. The brown loamy fine sand.
horizon immediately below the surface layer ranges
from 6 to 30 inches in thickness. In places the light -
yellowish-brown horizon extends downward to depths
of as much as 30 inches. The brownish-yellow layer
is lacking in some profiles.
The surface layer of this soil is slightly acid. The
lower layers are neutral or alkaline. Drainage is
somewhat poor. Surface runoff is slow, and internal
drainage is rapid if not retarded by the high water
table.
Small areas of Keri fine sand, which occur near the
Pinellas County line, are mapped with Adamsville
fine sand. These areas, only about 25 to 50 feet in
diameter, are too small to be shown separately on the
soil map.
Also included with this mapping unit are small areas
where the layer of light-gray fine sand is underlain by
a layer that is stained brown or dark brown by or-
ganic matter. The brown layer begins at depths of
30 to 36 inches and is 6 to 12 inches thick. This in-
clusion is most common near the coast and in areas
transitional between Adamsville fine sand ahd Leon
fine sand, or between Ruskin fine sand and Leon fine
sand.
Use and management.-Several hundred acres of
this soil near Ruskin, Sun City, and Adamsville are
used to grow vegetables and truck crops (fig. 2).
Yields are good if the soil is well managed. Water
from flowing artesian wells is used for irrigation in
most of the areas. Liberal applications of fertilizers
containing the minor elements are needed.
The large areas of this soil in the northwestern
part of the county along Old Tampa Bay are generally
covered by pines, saw-palmettos, cabbage palmettos,
shrubs, wiregrass, and other grasses. This vegetation
provides poor grazing. Some small tracts have been .
cleared and seeded to pasture. These areas need ap- Figure 2.-Eggplant on Adamsville fine sand near the coast.







14 SOIL SURVEY SERIES 1950, NO. 3

A few small pebbles occur on the surface and In places the surface layer is up to 8 inches thick.
throughout the profile. In places the surface layer is The color of the horizons below the surface layer
20 inches or more thick. In some areas the horizons ranges from light yellowish brown, yellowish brown,
below the surface soil are pale brown. or yellow, to brownish yellow.
Alachua loamy fine sand is medium acid through- This soil is medium acid to slightly acid through-
out. It is predominantly well drained. Both surface out. It is well drained. Surface runoff is medium,
runoff and internal drainage are medium. and internal drainage is rapid.
Use and managcnment.-This soil is used for pasture 'sc and mnanagcment.-Large areas of this soil are
or to grow general crops and a few vegetables. Dur- used to grow citrus fruits and general crops, or for
ing dry seasons vegetable crops need irrigation, pasture. Crops yield well if they are fertilized and
Yields are high and pastures are good if the soil is other management is good. The soil is drought;
fertilized and otherwise well managed. consequently, irrigation may be needed during dry
This soil is in capability unit IIw-1 and in the soil seasons.
association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos- This soil is in capability unit Ills-1 and in the soil
phatic Materials. association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos-
Alluvial land (Ac).-Because of the intricate pattern phatic Materials.
of soil materials and the dense undergrowth that cov- Arredondo fine sand, gently undulating phase (Ae).-
ers many areas, and because the land is so wet, it is In color and texture, this soil resembles Arredondo
impractical to map areas of Alluvial land by soil types fine sand, level phase, but it differs in relief. Slopes
and phases. The areas consist of alluvial materials of generally range from 2 to 5 percent, but short slopes
mixed origin that have been deposited near streams. near sinkholes and near major streams are steeper.
During much of the year, they are covered by water The soil is associated with Arredondo fine sand, level
from overflowing streams. Large areas occur along phase, and with Gainesville, Fort Meade, Lakeland,
the Alafia, Little Manatee, and Hillsborough Rivers; and Eustis soils. It occurs mainly near the towns of
along Rocky, Sweetwater, and Bullfrog Creeks; and Brandon, Valrico, Seffner, and Picnic; north of Dover;
along other streams in the county, and north and northeast of Plant City.
The vegetation is generally dense. It consists of Use and management.-Most of this soil is used to
shrubs, vines, hardwoods, cypress, and a few pine grow citrus fruits and general crops. Some is used
trees. for vegetables. Some areas are pastured or in forest.
Alluvial land is strongly acid to neutral or alkaline. Because of its gently undulating relief, air drainage
Its color ranges from nearly black to light gray, and is good; therefore the soil is slightly better suited to
its texture, from fine sand to fine sandy clay. In citrus fruits than the level phase. If the soil is fer-
places the land is underlain by limestone, tilized, irrigated during dry seasons, and otherwise
Use and management.-Alluvial land provides fair well managed, crops yield well and pastures will pro-
to poor grazing for cattle and hogs. Most areas are vide good grazing. Slopes steeper than 5 percent are
so wet and are covered by such a dense plant growth subject to erosion during heavy rains if cultivated and
that clearing them for improved pasture would be too should be managed as suggested for unit IIIs-1.
expensive to be practical. In addition, if these areas Pines and other trees make good growth on this soil.
were cleared and drained, the water table would be This soil is in capability unit Ills-1 and in the soil
lowered and vegetation on nearby higher lying soils association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos-
would be injured. The areas are suitable for wildlife phatic Materials.
refuges. Some of the timber of commercial value is Blanton fine sand, level phase (Ba).-This soil has
harvested, developed from thick beds of unconsolidated sands.
Alluvial land is in capability unit Vw-1 and in the It occurs throughout the county on low ridges and
group of miscellaneous land types of Bottom Lands, knolls in the flatwoods. Large areas occur near Cit-
Swamps, and Ponds. rus Park, Lutz, Riverview, Wimauma, Bloomingdale,
Arredondo fine sand, level phase (Ad).-This well- Tampa, Antioch, and Plant City.
drained, dark-colored soil has a few phosphatic peb- This soil is associated with Lakeland, St. Lucie,
bles throughout its profile. It has developed from Pomello, Scranton, and Leon soils. It lacks the dark
moderately thick beds of fine sand mixed with mate- grayish-brown or black organic pan that is typical of
rials from phosphatic limestone. It occurs principally the Leon soils. The surface layer is not so thick or so
near the towns of Seffner, Mango, Valrico, Brandon, dark colored as that of the Scranton soil.
Bloomingdale, and Knights. The natural vegetation consists of bluejack, tur-
The native vegetation consists of pine, live oak, key, and live oak; pine; a few saw-palmettos; and
bluejack oak, and other hardwoods, and various wiregrass.
grasses. Profile description:
Profile description: 0 to 6 inches, dark-gray or gray, nearly loose fine sand.
0 to 6 inches, very dark grayish-brown to grayish-brown 6 to 18 inches, grayish-brown to light brownish-gray loose
fine sand; contains a moderate amount of partly de- fine sand.
cayed organic matter and a few small rounded pebbles; 18 to 42 inches +, very pale brown or light gray loose fine
a few small rounded pebbles are scattered on the surface. sand, splotched with pale yellow or yellow.
6 to 28 inches, dark yellowish-brown to yellowish-brown In some places the surface layer is grayish brown,
fine sand; contains a few phosphatic pebbles, and in other places it is very dark gray. In thick-
28 to 42 inches +, yellowish-brown to brownish-yellow fine and other places it is very gray. In thick-
sand; contains a few phosphatic pebbles. ness it ranges from 4 to 8 inches. In places the hori-







14 SOIL SURVEY SERIES 1950, NO. 3

A few small pebbles occur on the surface and In places the surface layer is up to 8 inches thick.
throughout the profile. In places the surface layer is The color of the horizons below the surface layer
20 inches or more thick. In some areas the horizons ranges from light yellowish brown, yellowish brown,
below the surface soil are pale brown. or yellow, to brownish yellow.
Alachua loamy fine sand is medium acid through- This soil is medium acid to slightly acid through-
out. It is predominantly well drained. Both surface out. It is well drained. Surface runoff is medium,
runoff and internal drainage are medium. and internal drainage is rapid.
Use and managcnment.-This soil is used for pasture 'sc and mnanagcment.-Large areas of this soil are
or to grow general crops and a few vegetables. Dur- used to grow citrus fruits and general crops, or for
ing dry seasons vegetable crops need irrigation, pasture. Crops yield well if they are fertilized and
Yields are high and pastures are good if the soil is other management is good. The soil is drought;
fertilized and otherwise well managed. consequently, irrigation may be needed during dry
This soil is in capability unit IIw-1 and in the soil seasons.
association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos- This soil is in capability unit Ills-1 and in the soil
phatic Materials. association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos-
Alluvial land (Ac).-Because of the intricate pattern phatic Materials.
of soil materials and the dense undergrowth that cov- Arredondo fine sand, gently undulating phase (Ae).-
ers many areas, and because the land is so wet, it is In color and texture, this soil resembles Arredondo
impractical to map areas of Alluvial land by soil types fine sand, level phase, but it differs in relief. Slopes
and phases. The areas consist of alluvial materials of generally range from 2 to 5 percent, but short slopes
mixed origin that have been deposited near streams. near sinkholes and near major streams are steeper.
During much of the year, they are covered by water The soil is associated with Arredondo fine sand, level
from overflowing streams. Large areas occur along phase, and with Gainesville, Fort Meade, Lakeland,
the Alafia, Little Manatee, and Hillsborough Rivers; and Eustis soils. It occurs mainly near the towns of
along Rocky, Sweetwater, and Bullfrog Creeks; and Brandon, Valrico, Seffner, and Picnic; north of Dover;
along other streams in the county, and north and northeast of Plant City.
The vegetation is generally dense. It consists of Use and management.-Most of this soil is used to
shrubs, vines, hardwoods, cypress, and a few pine grow citrus fruits and general crops. Some is used
trees. for vegetables. Some areas are pastured or in forest.
Alluvial land is strongly acid to neutral or alkaline. Because of its gently undulating relief, air drainage
Its color ranges from nearly black to light gray, and is good; therefore the soil is slightly better suited to
its texture, from fine sand to fine sandy clay. In citrus fruits than the level phase. If the soil is fer-
places the land is underlain by limestone, tilized, irrigated during dry seasons, and otherwise
Use and management.-Alluvial land provides fair well managed, crops yield well and pastures will pro-
to poor grazing for cattle and hogs. Most areas are vide good grazing. Slopes steeper than 5 percent are
so wet and are covered by such a dense plant growth subject to erosion during heavy rains if cultivated and
that clearing them for improved pasture would be too should be managed as suggested for unit IIIs-1.
expensive to be practical. In addition, if these areas Pines and other trees make good growth on this soil.
were cleared and drained, the water table would be This soil is in capability unit Ills-1 and in the soil
lowered and vegetation on nearby higher lying soils association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos-
would be injured. The areas are suitable for wildlife phatic Materials.
refuges. Some of the timber of commercial value is Blanton fine sand, level phase (Ba).-This soil has
harvested, developed from thick beds of unconsolidated sands.
Alluvial land is in capability unit Vw-1 and in the It occurs throughout the county on low ridges and
group of miscellaneous land types of Bottom Lands, knolls in the flatwoods. Large areas occur near Cit-
Swamps, and Ponds. rus Park, Lutz, Riverview, Wimauma, Bloomingdale,
Arredondo fine sand, level phase (Ad).-This well- Tampa, Antioch, and Plant City.
drained, dark-colored soil has a few phosphatic peb- This soil is associated with Lakeland, St. Lucie,
bles throughout its profile. It has developed from Pomello, Scranton, and Leon soils. It lacks the dark
moderately thick beds of fine sand mixed with mate- grayish-brown or black organic pan that is typical of
rials from phosphatic limestone. It occurs principally the Leon soils. The surface layer is not so thick or so
near the towns of Seffner, Mango, Valrico, Brandon, dark colored as that of the Scranton soil.
Bloomingdale, and Knights. The natural vegetation consists of bluejack, tur-
The native vegetation consists of pine, live oak, key, and live oak; pine; a few saw-palmettos; and
bluejack oak, and other hardwoods, and various wiregrass.
grasses. Profile description:
Profile description: 0 to 6 inches, dark-gray or gray, nearly loose fine sand.
0 to 6 inches, very dark grayish-brown to grayish-brown 6 to 18 inches, grayish-brown to light brownish-gray loose
fine sand; contains a moderate amount of partly de- fine sand.
cayed organic matter and a few small rounded pebbles; 18 to 42 inches +, very pale brown or light gray loose fine
a few small rounded pebbles are scattered on the surface. sand, splotched with pale yellow or yellow.
6 to 28 inches, dark yellowish-brown to yellowish-brown In some places the surface layer is grayish brown,
fine sand; contains a few phosphatic pebbles, and in other places it is very dark gray. In thick-
28 to 42 inches +, yellowish-brown to brownish-yellow fine and other places it is very gray. In thick-
sand; contains a few phosphatic pebbles. ness it ranges from 4 to 8 inches. In places the hori-







14 SOIL SURVEY SERIES 1950, NO. 3

A few small pebbles occur on the surface and In places the surface layer is up to 8 inches thick.
throughout the profile. In places the surface layer is The color of the horizons below the surface layer
20 inches or more thick. In some areas the horizons ranges from light yellowish brown, yellowish brown,
below the surface soil are pale brown. or yellow, to brownish yellow.
Alachua loamy fine sand is medium acid through- This soil is medium acid to slightly acid through-
out. It is predominantly well drained. Both surface out. It is well drained. Surface runoff is medium,
runoff and internal drainage are medium. and internal drainage is rapid.
Use and managcnment.-This soil is used for pasture 'sc and mnanagcment.-Large areas of this soil are
or to grow general crops and a few vegetables. Dur- used to grow citrus fruits and general crops, or for
ing dry seasons vegetable crops need irrigation, pasture. Crops yield well if they are fertilized and
Yields are high and pastures are good if the soil is other management is good. The soil is drought;
fertilized and otherwise well managed. consequently, irrigation may be needed during dry
This soil is in capability unit IIw-1 and in the soil seasons.
association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos- This soil is in capability unit Ills-1 and in the soil
phatic Materials. association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos-
Alluvial land (Ac).-Because of the intricate pattern phatic Materials.
of soil materials and the dense undergrowth that cov- Arredondo fine sand, gently undulating phase (Ae).-
ers many areas, and because the land is so wet, it is In color and texture, this soil resembles Arredondo
impractical to map areas of Alluvial land by soil types fine sand, level phase, but it differs in relief. Slopes
and phases. The areas consist of alluvial materials of generally range from 2 to 5 percent, but short slopes
mixed origin that have been deposited near streams. near sinkholes and near major streams are steeper.
During much of the year, they are covered by water The soil is associated with Arredondo fine sand, level
from overflowing streams. Large areas occur along phase, and with Gainesville, Fort Meade, Lakeland,
the Alafia, Little Manatee, and Hillsborough Rivers; and Eustis soils. It occurs mainly near the towns of
along Rocky, Sweetwater, and Bullfrog Creeks; and Brandon, Valrico, Seffner, and Picnic; north of Dover;
along other streams in the county, and north and northeast of Plant City.
The vegetation is generally dense. It consists of Use and management.-Most of this soil is used to
shrubs, vines, hardwoods, cypress, and a few pine grow citrus fruits and general crops. Some is used
trees. for vegetables. Some areas are pastured or in forest.
Alluvial land is strongly acid to neutral or alkaline. Because of its gently undulating relief, air drainage
Its color ranges from nearly black to light gray, and is good; therefore the soil is slightly better suited to
its texture, from fine sand to fine sandy clay. In citrus fruits than the level phase. If the soil is fer-
places the land is underlain by limestone, tilized, irrigated during dry seasons, and otherwise
Use and management.-Alluvial land provides fair well managed, crops yield well and pastures will pro-
to poor grazing for cattle and hogs. Most areas are vide good grazing. Slopes steeper than 5 percent are
so wet and are covered by such a dense plant growth subject to erosion during heavy rains if cultivated and
that clearing them for improved pasture would be too should be managed as suggested for unit IIIs-1.
expensive to be practical. In addition, if these areas Pines and other trees make good growth on this soil.
were cleared and drained, the water table would be This soil is in capability unit Ills-1 and in the soil
lowered and vegetation on nearby higher lying soils association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos-
would be injured. The areas are suitable for wildlife phatic Materials.
refuges. Some of the timber of commercial value is Blanton fine sand, level phase (Ba).-This soil has
harvested, developed from thick beds of unconsolidated sands.
Alluvial land is in capability unit Vw-1 and in the It occurs throughout the county on low ridges and
group of miscellaneous land types of Bottom Lands, knolls in the flatwoods. Large areas occur near Cit-
Swamps, and Ponds. rus Park, Lutz, Riverview, Wimauma, Bloomingdale,
Arredondo fine sand, level phase (Ad).-This well- Tampa, Antioch, and Plant City.
drained, dark-colored soil has a few phosphatic peb- This soil is associated with Lakeland, St. Lucie,
bles throughout its profile. It has developed from Pomello, Scranton, and Leon soils. It lacks the dark
moderately thick beds of fine sand mixed with mate- grayish-brown or black organic pan that is typical of
rials from phosphatic limestone. It occurs principally the Leon soils. The surface layer is not so thick or so
near the towns of Seffner, Mango, Valrico, Brandon, dark colored as that of the Scranton soil.
Bloomingdale, and Knights. The natural vegetation consists of bluejack, tur-
The native vegetation consists of pine, live oak, key, and live oak; pine; a few saw-palmettos; and
bluejack oak, and other hardwoods, and various wiregrass.
grasses. Profile description:
Profile description: 0 to 6 inches, dark-gray or gray, nearly loose fine sand.
0 to 6 inches, very dark grayish-brown to grayish-brown 6 to 18 inches, grayish-brown to light brownish-gray loose
fine sand; contains a moderate amount of partly de- fine sand.
cayed organic matter and a few small rounded pebbles; 18 to 42 inches +, very pale brown or light gray loose fine
a few small rounded pebbles are scattered on the surface. sand, splotched with pale yellow or yellow.
6 to 28 inches, dark yellowish-brown to yellowish-brown In some places the surface layer is grayish brown,
fine sand; contains a few phosphatic pebbles, and in other places it is very dark gray. In thick-
28 to 42 inches +, yellowish-brown to brownish-yellow fine and other places it is very gray. In thick-
sand; contains a few phosphatic pebbles. ness it ranges from 4 to 8 inches. In places the hori-







14 SOIL SURVEY SERIES 1950, NO. 3

A few small pebbles occur on the surface and In places the surface layer is up to 8 inches thick.
throughout the profile. In places the surface layer is The color of the horizons below the surface layer
20 inches or more thick. In some areas the horizons ranges from light yellowish brown, yellowish brown,
below the surface soil are pale brown. or yellow, to brownish yellow.
Alachua loamy fine sand is medium acid through- This soil is medium acid to slightly acid through-
out. It is predominantly well drained. Both surface out. It is well drained. Surface runoff is medium,
runoff and internal drainage are medium. and internal drainage is rapid.
Use and managcnment.-This soil is used for pasture 'sc and mnanagcment.-Large areas of this soil are
or to grow general crops and a few vegetables. Dur- used to grow citrus fruits and general crops, or for
ing dry seasons vegetable crops need irrigation, pasture. Crops yield well if they are fertilized and
Yields are high and pastures are good if the soil is other management is good. The soil is drought;
fertilized and otherwise well managed. consequently, irrigation may be needed during dry
This soil is in capability unit IIw-1 and in the soil seasons.
association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos- This soil is in capability unit Ills-1 and in the soil
phatic Materials. association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos-
Alluvial land (Ac).-Because of the intricate pattern phatic Materials.
of soil materials and the dense undergrowth that cov- Arredondo fine sand, gently undulating phase (Ae).-
ers many areas, and because the land is so wet, it is In color and texture, this soil resembles Arredondo
impractical to map areas of Alluvial land by soil types fine sand, level phase, but it differs in relief. Slopes
and phases. The areas consist of alluvial materials of generally range from 2 to 5 percent, but short slopes
mixed origin that have been deposited near streams. near sinkholes and near major streams are steeper.
During much of the year, they are covered by water The soil is associated with Arredondo fine sand, level
from overflowing streams. Large areas occur along phase, and with Gainesville, Fort Meade, Lakeland,
the Alafia, Little Manatee, and Hillsborough Rivers; and Eustis soils. It occurs mainly near the towns of
along Rocky, Sweetwater, and Bullfrog Creeks; and Brandon, Valrico, Seffner, and Picnic; north of Dover;
along other streams in the county, and north and northeast of Plant City.
The vegetation is generally dense. It consists of Use and management.-Most of this soil is used to
shrubs, vines, hardwoods, cypress, and a few pine grow citrus fruits and general crops. Some is used
trees. for vegetables. Some areas are pastured or in forest.
Alluvial land is strongly acid to neutral or alkaline. Because of its gently undulating relief, air drainage
Its color ranges from nearly black to light gray, and is good; therefore the soil is slightly better suited to
its texture, from fine sand to fine sandy clay. In citrus fruits than the level phase. If the soil is fer-
places the land is underlain by limestone, tilized, irrigated during dry seasons, and otherwise
Use and management.-Alluvial land provides fair well managed, crops yield well and pastures will pro-
to poor grazing for cattle and hogs. Most areas are vide good grazing. Slopes steeper than 5 percent are
so wet and are covered by such a dense plant growth subject to erosion during heavy rains if cultivated and
that clearing them for improved pasture would be too should be managed as suggested for unit IIIs-1.
expensive to be practical. In addition, if these areas Pines and other trees make good growth on this soil.
were cleared and drained, the water table would be This soil is in capability unit Ills-1 and in the soil
lowered and vegetation on nearby higher lying soils association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos-
would be injured. The areas are suitable for wildlife phatic Materials.
refuges. Some of the timber of commercial value is Blanton fine sand, level phase (Ba).-This soil has
harvested, developed from thick beds of unconsolidated sands.
Alluvial land is in capability unit Vw-1 and in the It occurs throughout the county on low ridges and
group of miscellaneous land types of Bottom Lands, knolls in the flatwoods. Large areas occur near Cit-
Swamps, and Ponds. rus Park, Lutz, Riverview, Wimauma, Bloomingdale,
Arredondo fine sand, level phase (Ad).-This well- Tampa, Antioch, and Plant City.
drained, dark-colored soil has a few phosphatic peb- This soil is associated with Lakeland, St. Lucie,
bles throughout its profile. It has developed from Pomello, Scranton, and Leon soils. It lacks the dark
moderately thick beds of fine sand mixed with mate- grayish-brown or black organic pan that is typical of
rials from phosphatic limestone. It occurs principally the Leon soils. The surface layer is not so thick or so
near the towns of Seffner, Mango, Valrico, Brandon, dark colored as that of the Scranton soil.
Bloomingdale, and Knights. The natural vegetation consists of bluejack, tur-
The native vegetation consists of pine, live oak, key, and live oak; pine; a few saw-palmettos; and
bluejack oak, and other hardwoods, and various wiregrass.
grasses. Profile description:
Profile description: 0 to 6 inches, dark-gray or gray, nearly loose fine sand.
0 to 6 inches, very dark grayish-brown to grayish-brown 6 to 18 inches, grayish-brown to light brownish-gray loose
fine sand; contains a moderate amount of partly de- fine sand.
cayed organic matter and a few small rounded pebbles; 18 to 42 inches +, very pale brown or light gray loose fine
a few small rounded pebbles are scattered on the surface. sand, splotched with pale yellow or yellow.
6 to 28 inches, dark yellowish-brown to yellowish-brown In some places the surface layer is grayish brown,
fine sand; contains a few phosphatic pebbles, and in other places it is very dark gray. In thick-
28 to 42 inches +, yellowish-brown to brownish-yellow fine and other places it is very gray. In thick-
sand; contains a few phosphatic pebbles. ness it ranges from 4 to 8 inches. In places the hori-







14 SOIL SURVEY SERIES 1950, NO. 3

A few small pebbles occur on the surface and In places the surface layer is up to 8 inches thick.
throughout the profile. In places the surface layer is The color of the horizons below the surface layer
20 inches or more thick. In some areas the horizons ranges from light yellowish brown, yellowish brown,
below the surface soil are pale brown. or yellow, to brownish yellow.
Alachua loamy fine sand is medium acid through- This soil is medium acid to slightly acid through-
out. It is predominantly well drained. Both surface out. It is well drained. Surface runoff is medium,
runoff and internal drainage are medium. and internal drainage is rapid.
Use and managcnment.-This soil is used for pasture 'sc and mnanagcment.-Large areas of this soil are
or to grow general crops and a few vegetables. Dur- used to grow citrus fruits and general crops, or for
ing dry seasons vegetable crops need irrigation, pasture. Crops yield well if they are fertilized and
Yields are high and pastures are good if the soil is other management is good. The soil is drought;
fertilized and otherwise well managed. consequently, irrigation may be needed during dry
This soil is in capability unit IIw-1 and in the soil seasons.
association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos- This soil is in capability unit Ills-1 and in the soil
phatic Materials. association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos-
Alluvial land (Ac).-Because of the intricate pattern phatic Materials.
of soil materials and the dense undergrowth that cov- Arredondo fine sand, gently undulating phase (Ae).-
ers many areas, and because the land is so wet, it is In color and texture, this soil resembles Arredondo
impractical to map areas of Alluvial land by soil types fine sand, level phase, but it differs in relief. Slopes
and phases. The areas consist of alluvial materials of generally range from 2 to 5 percent, but short slopes
mixed origin that have been deposited near streams. near sinkholes and near major streams are steeper.
During much of the year, they are covered by water The soil is associated with Arredondo fine sand, level
from overflowing streams. Large areas occur along phase, and with Gainesville, Fort Meade, Lakeland,
the Alafia, Little Manatee, and Hillsborough Rivers; and Eustis soils. It occurs mainly near the towns of
along Rocky, Sweetwater, and Bullfrog Creeks; and Brandon, Valrico, Seffner, and Picnic; north of Dover;
along other streams in the county, and north and northeast of Plant City.
The vegetation is generally dense. It consists of Use and management.-Most of this soil is used to
shrubs, vines, hardwoods, cypress, and a few pine grow citrus fruits and general crops. Some is used
trees. for vegetables. Some areas are pastured or in forest.
Alluvial land is strongly acid to neutral or alkaline. Because of its gently undulating relief, air drainage
Its color ranges from nearly black to light gray, and is good; therefore the soil is slightly better suited to
its texture, from fine sand to fine sandy clay. In citrus fruits than the level phase. If the soil is fer-
places the land is underlain by limestone, tilized, irrigated during dry seasons, and otherwise
Use and management.-Alluvial land provides fair well managed, crops yield well and pastures will pro-
to poor grazing for cattle and hogs. Most areas are vide good grazing. Slopes steeper than 5 percent are
so wet and are covered by such a dense plant growth subject to erosion during heavy rains if cultivated and
that clearing them for improved pasture would be too should be managed as suggested for unit IIIs-1.
expensive to be practical. In addition, if these areas Pines and other trees make good growth on this soil.
were cleared and drained, the water table would be This soil is in capability unit Ills-1 and in the soil
lowered and vegetation on nearby higher lying soils association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos-
would be injured. The areas are suitable for wildlife phatic Materials.
refuges. Some of the timber of commercial value is Blanton fine sand, level phase (Ba).-This soil has
harvested, developed from thick beds of unconsolidated sands.
Alluvial land is in capability unit Vw-1 and in the It occurs throughout the county on low ridges and
group of miscellaneous land types of Bottom Lands, knolls in the flatwoods. Large areas occur near Cit-
Swamps, and Ponds. rus Park, Lutz, Riverview, Wimauma, Bloomingdale,
Arredondo fine sand, level phase (Ad).-This well- Tampa, Antioch, and Plant City.
drained, dark-colored soil has a few phosphatic peb- This soil is associated with Lakeland, St. Lucie,
bles throughout its profile. It has developed from Pomello, Scranton, and Leon soils. It lacks the dark
moderately thick beds of fine sand mixed with mate- grayish-brown or black organic pan that is typical of
rials from phosphatic limestone. It occurs principally the Leon soils. The surface layer is not so thick or so
near the towns of Seffner, Mango, Valrico, Brandon, dark colored as that of the Scranton soil.
Bloomingdale, and Knights. The natural vegetation consists of bluejack, tur-
The native vegetation consists of pine, live oak, key, and live oak; pine; a few saw-palmettos; and
bluejack oak, and other hardwoods, and various wiregrass.
grasses. Profile description:
Profile description: 0 to 6 inches, dark-gray or gray, nearly loose fine sand.
0 to 6 inches, very dark grayish-brown to grayish-brown 6 to 18 inches, grayish-brown to light brownish-gray loose
fine sand; contains a moderate amount of partly de- fine sand.
cayed organic matter and a few small rounded pebbles; 18 to 42 inches +, very pale brown or light gray loose fine
a few small rounded pebbles are scattered on the surface. sand, splotched with pale yellow or yellow.
6 to 28 inches, dark yellowish-brown to yellowish-brown In some places the surface layer is grayish brown,
fine sand; contains a few phosphatic pebbles, and in other places it is very dark gray. In thick-
28 to 42 inches +, yellowish-brown to brownish-yellow fine and other places it is very gray. In thick-
sand; contains a few phosphatic pebbles. ness it ranges from 4 to 8 inches. In places the hori-







14 SOIL SURVEY SERIES 1950, NO. 3

A few small pebbles occur on the surface and In places the surface layer is up to 8 inches thick.
throughout the profile. In places the surface layer is The color of the horizons below the surface layer
20 inches or more thick. In some areas the horizons ranges from light yellowish brown, yellowish brown,
below the surface soil are pale brown. or yellow, to brownish yellow.
Alachua loamy fine sand is medium acid through- This soil is medium acid to slightly acid through-
out. It is predominantly well drained. Both surface out. It is well drained. Surface runoff is medium,
runoff and internal drainage are medium. and internal drainage is rapid.
Use and managcnment.-This soil is used for pasture 'sc and mnanagcment.-Large areas of this soil are
or to grow general crops and a few vegetables. Dur- used to grow citrus fruits and general crops, or for
ing dry seasons vegetable crops need irrigation, pasture. Crops yield well if they are fertilized and
Yields are high and pastures are good if the soil is other management is good. The soil is drought;
fertilized and otherwise well managed. consequently, irrigation may be needed during dry
This soil is in capability unit IIw-1 and in the soil seasons.
association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos- This soil is in capability unit Ills-1 and in the soil
phatic Materials. association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos-
Alluvial land (Ac).-Because of the intricate pattern phatic Materials.
of soil materials and the dense undergrowth that cov- Arredondo fine sand, gently undulating phase (Ae).-
ers many areas, and because the land is so wet, it is In color and texture, this soil resembles Arredondo
impractical to map areas of Alluvial land by soil types fine sand, level phase, but it differs in relief. Slopes
and phases. The areas consist of alluvial materials of generally range from 2 to 5 percent, but short slopes
mixed origin that have been deposited near streams. near sinkholes and near major streams are steeper.
During much of the year, they are covered by water The soil is associated with Arredondo fine sand, level
from overflowing streams. Large areas occur along phase, and with Gainesville, Fort Meade, Lakeland,
the Alafia, Little Manatee, and Hillsborough Rivers; and Eustis soils. It occurs mainly near the towns of
along Rocky, Sweetwater, and Bullfrog Creeks; and Brandon, Valrico, Seffner, and Picnic; north of Dover;
along other streams in the county, and north and northeast of Plant City.
The vegetation is generally dense. It consists of Use and management.-Most of this soil is used to
shrubs, vines, hardwoods, cypress, and a few pine grow citrus fruits and general crops. Some is used
trees. for vegetables. Some areas are pastured or in forest.
Alluvial land is strongly acid to neutral or alkaline. Because of its gently undulating relief, air drainage
Its color ranges from nearly black to light gray, and is good; therefore the soil is slightly better suited to
its texture, from fine sand to fine sandy clay. In citrus fruits than the level phase. If the soil is fer-
places the land is underlain by limestone, tilized, irrigated during dry seasons, and otherwise
Use and management.-Alluvial land provides fair well managed, crops yield well and pastures will pro-
to poor grazing for cattle and hogs. Most areas are vide good grazing. Slopes steeper than 5 percent are
so wet and are covered by such a dense plant growth subject to erosion during heavy rains if cultivated and
that clearing them for improved pasture would be too should be managed as suggested for unit IIIs-1.
expensive to be practical. In addition, if these areas Pines and other trees make good growth on this soil.
were cleared and drained, the water table would be This soil is in capability unit Ills-1 and in the soil
lowered and vegetation on nearby higher lying soils association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos-
would be injured. The areas are suitable for wildlife phatic Materials.
refuges. Some of the timber of commercial value is Blanton fine sand, level phase (Ba).-This soil has
harvested, developed from thick beds of unconsolidated sands.
Alluvial land is in capability unit Vw-1 and in the It occurs throughout the county on low ridges and
group of miscellaneous land types of Bottom Lands, knolls in the flatwoods. Large areas occur near Cit-
Swamps, and Ponds. rus Park, Lutz, Riverview, Wimauma, Bloomingdale,
Arredondo fine sand, level phase (Ad).-This well- Tampa, Antioch, and Plant City.
drained, dark-colored soil has a few phosphatic peb- This soil is associated with Lakeland, St. Lucie,
bles throughout its profile. It has developed from Pomello, Scranton, and Leon soils. It lacks the dark
moderately thick beds of fine sand mixed with mate- grayish-brown or black organic pan that is typical of
rials from phosphatic limestone. It occurs principally the Leon soils. The surface layer is not so thick or so
near the towns of Seffner, Mango, Valrico, Brandon, dark colored as that of the Scranton soil.
Bloomingdale, and Knights. The natural vegetation consists of bluejack, tur-
The native vegetation consists of pine, live oak, key, and live oak; pine; a few saw-palmettos; and
bluejack oak, and other hardwoods, and various wiregrass.
grasses. Profile description:
Profile description: 0 to 6 inches, dark-gray or gray, nearly loose fine sand.
0 to 6 inches, very dark grayish-brown to grayish-brown 6 to 18 inches, grayish-brown to light brownish-gray loose
fine sand; contains a moderate amount of partly de- fine sand.
cayed organic matter and a few small rounded pebbles; 18 to 42 inches +, very pale brown or light gray loose fine
a few small rounded pebbles are scattered on the surface. sand, splotched with pale yellow or yellow.
6 to 28 inches, dark yellowish-brown to yellowish-brown In some places the surface layer is grayish brown,
fine sand; contains a few phosphatic pebbles, and in other places it is very dark gray. In thick-
28 to 42 inches +, yellowish-brown to brownish-yellow fine and other places it is very gray. In thick-
sand; contains a few phosphatic pebbles. ness it ranges from 4 to 8 inches. In places the hori-







HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 15




-------------M -" 1-----------------------------11STt.* ---







1: .. Figure 4.-At left., 6-year-old orange trees on well-drained
-r-' l Blanton fine sand, gently undulating phase. These trees have
made good growth: those on the somewhat poorly drained Leon
Figure 3.-Brahman cattle grazing Pensacola Bahiagrass on fine sand in center and at right are stunted.
Blanton fine sand, level phase, and Leon line sand: a cypress
pond is in background.
oak, bluejack oak, live oak, and a few pines grow on
zon immediately below the surface layer is yellow or the rest. The soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in
yellowish brown, but the color grades to light gray the soil association of Well-Drained Deep Sands.
or mottled light gray and pale yellow at increasing Blanton fine sand, brown-layer phase (Bd).-A brown-
depths. In small areas a faint, brown-stained layer stained layer, occurring at depths of 8 to 18 inches,
occurs at depths between 6 and 9 inches. distinguishes this soil from Blanton fine sand, level
This soil is medium acid throughout. It is well phase. This layer is 3 to 9 inches thick. The soil
drained to moderately well drained; surface runoff is occurs throughout the county, most extensively in the
slow, but internal drainage is rapid. flatwoods. In places it occupies low ridges or slight
Use and management.-This soil is used mainly to knolls that are surrounded by soils of the Leon series.
grow citrus fruits, general crops, and a few vegetables. In other places it occurs between areas of other Blan-
Some areas are used for improved pasture (fig. 3) or ton soils or between areas of Lakeland and Leon soils.
are in forest. If the soil is well managed, crop yields The natural vegetation consists of bluejack, turkey,
are fair to good and improved pastures are good. and runner oaks; a few pines; a few saw-palmettos;
Crops and pastures need liberal applications of mixed and grasses.
fertilizer each year, and citrus groves and pastures Profile description:
need lime every third or fourth year. Some crops 0 to 4 inches, dark-gray or gray, nearly loose fine sand,
need to be irrigated, which has a salt-and-pepper appearance.
Pines and hardwoods grow fairly well on this soil. 4 to 10 inches, gray or light brownish-gray fine sand.
This soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in the soil stained fine sandk graysh-rown to brown organc-
association of Well-Drained Deep Sands. 16 to 22 inches, grayish-brown or pale-brown fine sand.
Blanton fine sand, gently undulating phase (Bb).- 22 to 42 inches +, very pale brown or light gray fine sand,
Except that it occurs on slopes of 2 to 5 percent, this splotched with pale yellow.
soil resembles Blanton fine sand, level phase. It is This soil is not so well drained as the other phases
associated with other phases of Blanton fine sand and of Blanton fine sand. Surface runoff is slow. Inter-
with the Lakeland and Leon soils. nal drainage is medium.
Use and management.-Crops on this soil are about Use and management.-Because of the slightly
the same as those grown on the level phase, and man- lower position and poorer drainage of this soil, it is
agement is about the same. Large acreages are in less suitable for citrus fruits than the other phases of
citrus fruits. Because runoff is more rapid and air Blanton fine sand. The soil is suitable for many crops,
drainage is better, this soil is better suited to citrus however, and for improved pasture. Water control
fruits than the level phase (fig. 4). and liberal fertilization are necessary to obtain good
This soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in the soil crop yields and to maintain pastures of high carrying
association of Well-Drained Deep Sands. capacity.
Blanton fine sand, undulating phase (Bc).-This soil Pines and other trees grow well on this soil.
occurs on short slopes next to some of the sinkholes, This soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in the soil
ponds, lakes, and major streams in the central part of association of Well-Drained Deep Sands.
the county. It resembles Blanton fine sand, level phase, Blichton fine sand (Be).-This soil has developed from
in many ways, but the slope range is 5 to 12 percent. thin beds of fine sand over sandy clays that were
Slopes are mostly between 5 and 8 percent, but a few partly mixed with residuum from phosphatic lime-
acres are on slopes of 8 to 12 percent. Because of the stone. It occurs mainly in the north-central part of
fairly steep slopes, this soil will erode if unprotected the county. Relief is nearly level to undulating. The
during heavy rains, although its open, porous texture undulating areas occur near sinkholes and streams.
tends to keep damage to a minimum. This soil is associated with soils of the Fellowship,
Use and management.--Only a little of this soil is Arredondo, Gainesville, Blanton, and Lakeland series.
used to grow citrus fruits and other crops. Turkey In texture it differs from the associated Fellowship







HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 15




-------------M -" 1-----------------------------11STt.* ---







1: .. Figure 4.-At left., 6-year-old orange trees on well-drained
-r-' l Blanton fine sand, gently undulating phase. These trees have
made good growth: those on the somewhat poorly drained Leon
Figure 3.-Brahman cattle grazing Pensacola Bahiagrass on fine sand in center and at right are stunted.
Blanton fine sand, level phase, and Leon line sand: a cypress
pond is in background.
oak, bluejack oak, live oak, and a few pines grow on
zon immediately below the surface layer is yellow or the rest. The soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in
yellowish brown, but the color grades to light gray the soil association of Well-Drained Deep Sands.
or mottled light gray and pale yellow at increasing Blanton fine sand, brown-layer phase (Bd).-A brown-
depths. In small areas a faint, brown-stained layer stained layer, occurring at depths of 8 to 18 inches,
occurs at depths between 6 and 9 inches. distinguishes this soil from Blanton fine sand, level
This soil is medium acid throughout. It is well phase. This layer is 3 to 9 inches thick. The soil
drained to moderately well drained; surface runoff is occurs throughout the county, most extensively in the
slow, but internal drainage is rapid. flatwoods. In places it occupies low ridges or slight
Use and management.-This soil is used mainly to knolls that are surrounded by soils of the Leon series.
grow citrus fruits, general crops, and a few vegetables. In other places it occurs between areas of other Blan-
Some areas are used for improved pasture (fig. 3) or ton soils or between areas of Lakeland and Leon soils.
are in forest. If the soil is well managed, crop yields The natural vegetation consists of bluejack, turkey,
are fair to good and improved pastures are good. and runner oaks; a few pines; a few saw-palmettos;
Crops and pastures need liberal applications of mixed and grasses.
fertilizer each year, and citrus groves and pastures Profile description:
need lime every third or fourth year. Some crops 0 to 4 inches, dark-gray or gray, nearly loose fine sand,
need to be irrigated, which has a salt-and-pepper appearance.
Pines and hardwoods grow fairly well on this soil. 4 to 10 inches, gray or light brownish-gray fine sand.
This soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in the soil stained fine sandk graysh-rown to brown organc-
association of Well-Drained Deep Sands. 16 to 22 inches, grayish-brown or pale-brown fine sand.
Blanton fine sand, gently undulating phase (Bb).- 22 to 42 inches +, very pale brown or light gray fine sand,
Except that it occurs on slopes of 2 to 5 percent, this splotched with pale yellow.
soil resembles Blanton fine sand, level phase. It is This soil is not so well drained as the other phases
associated with other phases of Blanton fine sand and of Blanton fine sand. Surface runoff is slow. Inter-
with the Lakeland and Leon soils. nal drainage is medium.
Use and management.-Crops on this soil are about Use and management.-Because of the slightly
the same as those grown on the level phase, and man- lower position and poorer drainage of this soil, it is
agement is about the same. Large acreages are in less suitable for citrus fruits than the other phases of
citrus fruits. Because runoff is more rapid and air Blanton fine sand. The soil is suitable for many crops,
drainage is better, this soil is better suited to citrus however, and for improved pasture. Water control
fruits than the level phase (fig. 4). and liberal fertilization are necessary to obtain good
This soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in the soil crop yields and to maintain pastures of high carrying
association of Well-Drained Deep Sands. capacity.
Blanton fine sand, undulating phase (Bc).-This soil Pines and other trees grow well on this soil.
occurs on short slopes next to some of the sinkholes, This soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in the soil
ponds, lakes, and major streams in the central part of association of Well-Drained Deep Sands.
the county. It resembles Blanton fine sand, level phase, Blichton fine sand (Be).-This soil has developed from
in many ways, but the slope range is 5 to 12 percent. thin beds of fine sand over sandy clays that were
Slopes are mostly between 5 and 8 percent, but a few partly mixed with residuum from phosphatic lime-
acres are on slopes of 8 to 12 percent. Because of the stone. It occurs mainly in the north-central part of
fairly steep slopes, this soil will erode if unprotected the county. Relief is nearly level to undulating. The
during heavy rains, although its open, porous texture undulating areas occur near sinkholes and streams.
tends to keep damage to a minimum. This soil is associated with soils of the Fellowship,
Use and management.--Only a little of this soil is Arredondo, Gainesville, Blanton, and Lakeland series.
used to grow citrus fruits and other crops. Turkey In texture it differs from the associated Fellowship







HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 15




-------------M -" 1-----------------------------11STt.* ---







1: .. Figure 4.-At left., 6-year-old orange trees on well-drained
-r-' l Blanton fine sand, gently undulating phase. These trees have
made good growth: those on the somewhat poorly drained Leon
Figure 3.-Brahman cattle grazing Pensacola Bahiagrass on fine sand in center and at right are stunted.
Blanton fine sand, level phase, and Leon line sand: a cypress
pond is in background.
oak, bluejack oak, live oak, and a few pines grow on
zon immediately below the surface layer is yellow or the rest. The soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in
yellowish brown, but the color grades to light gray the soil association of Well-Drained Deep Sands.
or mottled light gray and pale yellow at increasing Blanton fine sand, brown-layer phase (Bd).-A brown-
depths. In small areas a faint, brown-stained layer stained layer, occurring at depths of 8 to 18 inches,
occurs at depths between 6 and 9 inches. distinguishes this soil from Blanton fine sand, level
This soil is medium acid throughout. It is well phase. This layer is 3 to 9 inches thick. The soil
drained to moderately well drained; surface runoff is occurs throughout the county, most extensively in the
slow, but internal drainage is rapid. flatwoods. In places it occupies low ridges or slight
Use and management.-This soil is used mainly to knolls that are surrounded by soils of the Leon series.
grow citrus fruits, general crops, and a few vegetables. In other places it occurs between areas of other Blan-
Some areas are used for improved pasture (fig. 3) or ton soils or between areas of Lakeland and Leon soils.
are in forest. If the soil is well managed, crop yields The natural vegetation consists of bluejack, turkey,
are fair to good and improved pastures are good. and runner oaks; a few pines; a few saw-palmettos;
Crops and pastures need liberal applications of mixed and grasses.
fertilizer each year, and citrus groves and pastures Profile description:
need lime every third or fourth year. Some crops 0 to 4 inches, dark-gray or gray, nearly loose fine sand,
need to be irrigated, which has a salt-and-pepper appearance.
Pines and hardwoods grow fairly well on this soil. 4 to 10 inches, gray or light brownish-gray fine sand.
This soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in the soil stained fine sandk graysh-rown to brown organc-
association of Well-Drained Deep Sands. 16 to 22 inches, grayish-brown or pale-brown fine sand.
Blanton fine sand, gently undulating phase (Bb).- 22 to 42 inches +, very pale brown or light gray fine sand,
Except that it occurs on slopes of 2 to 5 percent, this splotched with pale yellow.
soil resembles Blanton fine sand, level phase. It is This soil is not so well drained as the other phases
associated with other phases of Blanton fine sand and of Blanton fine sand. Surface runoff is slow. Inter-
with the Lakeland and Leon soils. nal drainage is medium.
Use and management.-Crops on this soil are about Use and management.-Because of the slightly
the same as those grown on the level phase, and man- lower position and poorer drainage of this soil, it is
agement is about the same. Large acreages are in less suitable for citrus fruits than the other phases of
citrus fruits. Because runoff is more rapid and air Blanton fine sand. The soil is suitable for many crops,
drainage is better, this soil is better suited to citrus however, and for improved pasture. Water control
fruits than the level phase (fig. 4). and liberal fertilization are necessary to obtain good
This soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in the soil crop yields and to maintain pastures of high carrying
association of Well-Drained Deep Sands. capacity.
Blanton fine sand, undulating phase (Bc).-This soil Pines and other trees grow well on this soil.
occurs on short slopes next to some of the sinkholes, This soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in the soil
ponds, lakes, and major streams in the central part of association of Well-Drained Deep Sands.
the county. It resembles Blanton fine sand, level phase, Blichton fine sand (Be).-This soil has developed from
in many ways, but the slope range is 5 to 12 percent. thin beds of fine sand over sandy clays that were
Slopes are mostly between 5 and 8 percent, but a few partly mixed with residuum from phosphatic lime-
acres are on slopes of 8 to 12 percent. Because of the stone. It occurs mainly in the north-central part of
fairly steep slopes, this soil will erode if unprotected the county. Relief is nearly level to undulating. The
during heavy rains, although its open, porous texture undulating areas occur near sinkholes and streams.
tends to keep damage to a minimum. This soil is associated with soils of the Fellowship,
Use and management.--Only a little of this soil is Arredondo, Gainesville, Blanton, and Lakeland series.
used to grow citrus fruits and other crops. Turkey In texture it differs from the associated Fellowship







HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 15




-------------M -" 1-----------------------------11STt.* ---







1: .. Figure 4.-At left., 6-year-old orange trees on well-drained
-r-' l Blanton fine sand, gently undulating phase. These trees have
made good growth: those on the somewhat poorly drained Leon
Figure 3.-Brahman cattle grazing Pensacola Bahiagrass on fine sand in center and at right are stunted.
Blanton fine sand, level phase, and Leon line sand: a cypress
pond is in background.
oak, bluejack oak, live oak, and a few pines grow on
zon immediately below the surface layer is yellow or the rest. The soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in
yellowish brown, but the color grades to light gray the soil association of Well-Drained Deep Sands.
or mottled light gray and pale yellow at increasing Blanton fine sand, brown-layer phase (Bd).-A brown-
depths. In small areas a faint, brown-stained layer stained layer, occurring at depths of 8 to 18 inches,
occurs at depths between 6 and 9 inches. distinguishes this soil from Blanton fine sand, level
This soil is medium acid throughout. It is well phase. This layer is 3 to 9 inches thick. The soil
drained to moderately well drained; surface runoff is occurs throughout the county, most extensively in the
slow, but internal drainage is rapid. flatwoods. In places it occupies low ridges or slight
Use and management.-This soil is used mainly to knolls that are surrounded by soils of the Leon series.
grow citrus fruits, general crops, and a few vegetables. In other places it occurs between areas of other Blan-
Some areas are used for improved pasture (fig. 3) or ton soils or between areas of Lakeland and Leon soils.
are in forest. If the soil is well managed, crop yields The natural vegetation consists of bluejack, turkey,
are fair to good and improved pastures are good. and runner oaks; a few pines; a few saw-palmettos;
Crops and pastures need liberal applications of mixed and grasses.
fertilizer each year, and citrus groves and pastures Profile description:
need lime every third or fourth year. Some crops 0 to 4 inches, dark-gray or gray, nearly loose fine sand,
need to be irrigated, which has a salt-and-pepper appearance.
Pines and hardwoods grow fairly well on this soil. 4 to 10 inches, gray or light brownish-gray fine sand.
This soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in the soil stained fine sandk graysh-rown to brown organc-
association of Well-Drained Deep Sands. 16 to 22 inches, grayish-brown or pale-brown fine sand.
Blanton fine sand, gently undulating phase (Bb).- 22 to 42 inches +, very pale brown or light gray fine sand,
Except that it occurs on slopes of 2 to 5 percent, this splotched with pale yellow.
soil resembles Blanton fine sand, level phase. It is This soil is not so well drained as the other phases
associated with other phases of Blanton fine sand and of Blanton fine sand. Surface runoff is slow. Inter-
with the Lakeland and Leon soils. nal drainage is medium.
Use and management.-Crops on this soil are about Use and management.-Because of the slightly
the same as those grown on the level phase, and man- lower position and poorer drainage of this soil, it is
agement is about the same. Large acreages are in less suitable for citrus fruits than the other phases of
citrus fruits. Because runoff is more rapid and air Blanton fine sand. The soil is suitable for many crops,
drainage is better, this soil is better suited to citrus however, and for improved pasture. Water control
fruits than the level phase (fig. 4). and liberal fertilization are necessary to obtain good
This soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in the soil crop yields and to maintain pastures of high carrying
association of Well-Drained Deep Sands. capacity.
Blanton fine sand, undulating phase (Bc).-This soil Pines and other trees grow well on this soil.
occurs on short slopes next to some of the sinkholes, This soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in the soil
ponds, lakes, and major streams in the central part of association of Well-Drained Deep Sands.
the county. It resembles Blanton fine sand, level phase, Blichton fine sand (Be).-This soil has developed from
in many ways, but the slope range is 5 to 12 percent. thin beds of fine sand over sandy clays that were
Slopes are mostly between 5 and 8 percent, but a few partly mixed with residuum from phosphatic lime-
acres are on slopes of 8 to 12 percent. Because of the stone. It occurs mainly in the north-central part of
fairly steep slopes, this soil will erode if unprotected the county. Relief is nearly level to undulating. The
during heavy rains, although its open, porous texture undulating areas occur near sinkholes and streams.
tends to keep damage to a minimum. This soil is associated with soils of the Fellowship,
Use and management.--Only a little of this soil is Arredondo, Gainesville, Blanton, and Lakeland series.
used to grow citrus fruits and other crops. Turkey In texture it differs from the associated Fellowship






16 SOIL SURVEY SERIES 1950, NO. 3

and Gainesville soils, which have surface layers of soils. In the Ruskin and Sunniland soils, the lower
loamy fine sand. Clay occurs at greater depths in horizons are mottled yellowish-brown and light-gray
this Blichton soil than in the Fellowship soil, and the fine sandy clay loam instead of gray clay. The Mana-
surface layer of the Blichton soil is a little lighter tee, Pompano, and Delray soils occur in wetter areas
colored than that of the Fellowship soil. The Blichton than the Bradenton soil. The Leon soils have an or-
soil is grayer in color than the Gainesville and Arre- ganic pan and commonly lack the clayey materials
dondo soils. The Blanton and Lakeland soils were not that occur in the Bradenton profile.
derived from phosphatic materials and do not have The natural vegetation on Brandenton fine sand con-
clayey materials common to the Blichton soil. sists of live oak, cabbage palmetto, saw-palmetto, pine,
The natural vegetation on Blichton fine sand con- vines, shrubs, and a few grasses.
sists of live oaks and other hardwoods, pines, shrubs, Profile description:
a few cabbage palmettos and saw-palmettos, and 0 to 4 inches, dark-gray fine sand; contains a small to a
grasses. moderate amount of organic matter; strongly acid.
Profile description: 4 to 14 inches, light grayish-brown or light-gray, nearly
loose fine sand; strongly acid to medium acid.
0 to 8 inches, dark-gray fine sand that contains a small to 14 to 20 inches, pale-brown or grayish-brown, nearly loose
moderate amount of organic matter; a few pebbles on fine sand; medium acid.
the surface. 20 to 32 inches, grayish-brown fine sandy clay, streaked in
8 to 25 inches, grayish-brown or gray loamy fine sand; a few places with yellowish brown; sticky and plastic
contains a few pebbles and rounded stones. when wet and hard when dry; slightly acid to neutral.
25 to 42 inches +, mottled light yellowish-brown and yel- :2 to 42 inches +, light-gray marl having a texture of fine
low fine sandy clay or fine sandy clay loam that contains sandy clay or sandy clay loam.
many pebbles and rounded stones.
The surface laer in gray, In some places the surface layer is very dark gray,
T sfeayer in places is very dark gray, and in other places it is grayish brown. The surface
or grayish brown and is 6 to 9 inches thick. In some laver ranges from -1 to 9 inches in thickness. The
areas the horizon immediately below the surface layer depth to the clayey materials ranges from 18 to 30
is light gray; this horizon ranges from fine sand to inches.
fine sandy loam in texture. Fine sandy clay or fine This soil is strongly acid to neutral. Drainage is
sandy clay loam occurs at depths of 18 to 36 inches. somewhat poor. Both surface runoff and internal
In some places many pebbles and rounded stones oc- rainage are slow medium.
cur on the surface; in others, the pebbles and stones r mdu
occur only in the clayey materials. Pebbles and stones Use and management.-Practically all of this soil is
are more numerous on the slopes than on nearby level covered by natural vegetation, which provides fair
areas grazing for cattle on the range pastures. A few areas
This soil is medium acid to strongly acid. Drainage are included in fields where vegetable crops and truck
is moderately good to somewhat poor. Both surface crops are grown, and yields are fair to good if fertil-
drainage and internal drainage are slow to medium. izer is applied liberally and water is controlled.
Use and management.-The more sloping areas of Pines and other trees grow well on this soil. If
this soil are generally planted to citrus trees. The rest well managed they produce valuable timber.
is range pasture or is used to grow general crops. This soil is in capability unit IIIs-2 and in the soil
Yields are fair to good if the soil is well managed. association of Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands Over
Liberal amounts of fertilizer and lime are needed, and a Calcareous Substratum.
irrigation is required on some cultivated areas. Cover Bradenton fine sand, thin surface phase (Bg).-
crops or grasses should be grown on the stronger Clayey materials occur at depths of less than 18 inches
slopes, or the natural growth of weeds should be al- in this soil. The marl horizon generally occurs at
lowed to remain when the soil is not covered by tilled depths between 20 and 30 inches; in a few areas,
crops. Otherwise, heavy rains may cause these areas however, it is lacking. Otherwise, this soil is similar
to erode slightly. to typical Bradenton fine sand.
The natural vegetation on the range pastures pro- This soil occupies level to nearly level areas near the
vides grazing of fair quality. Pines and hardwoods coast and near streams and fresh-water swamps in
grow well. the southern and northeastern parts of the county.
This soil is in capability unit IIe-1 and in the soil Drainage is somewhat poor.
association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos- The natural vegetation consists of live oak, gum,
phatic Materials. elm, hickory, magnolia, cabbage palmetto, a rank
Bradenton fine sand (Bf).-This somewhat poorly growth of saw-palmetto, shrubs, vines, and a few
drained soil has developed from thin beds of sand grasses.
that overlie clayey materials and marl. As a rule it Use and management.-Practically all of this soil is
occupies level or nearly level areas near the coast or used as range pasture. The natural vegetation fur-
near streams, but a few acres are on slopes of 2 to 5 nishes fair to good forage for cattle throughout the
percent. Most of the soil occurs near Sun City, Rus- year. Fair to good yields of many vegetable and truck
kin, and Gibsonton. crops could be obtained if the soil were cleared and
This soil is associated with soils of the Ruskin, well managed. The cost of removing the dense ham-
Adamsville, Sunniland, Keri, Broward, Leon, Manatee, mock vegetation would be high. Fertilizer and some
Pompano, and Delray series. The clayey materials, means of water control would be needed.
typical of this Bradenton soil do not occur in the pro- Trees grow rapidly on this soil. They can be grown
file of the associated Adamsville, Keri, and Broward profitably if good forestry management is practiced.






16 SOIL SURVEY SERIES 1950, NO. 3

and Gainesville soils, which have surface layers of soils. In the Ruskin and Sunniland soils, the lower
loamy fine sand. Clay occurs at greater depths in horizons are mottled yellowish-brown and light-gray
this Blichton soil than in the Fellowship soil, and the fine sandy clay loam instead of gray clay. The Mana-
surface layer of the Blichton soil is a little lighter tee, Pompano, and Delray soils occur in wetter areas
colored than that of the Fellowship soil. The Blichton than the Bradenton soil. The Leon soils have an or-
soil is grayer in color than the Gainesville and Arre- ganic pan and commonly lack the clayey materials
dondo soils. The Blanton and Lakeland soils were not that occur in the Bradenton profile.
derived from phosphatic materials and do not have The natural vegetation on Brandenton fine sand con-
clayey materials common to the Blichton soil. sists of live oak, cabbage palmetto, saw-palmetto, pine,
The natural vegetation on Blichton fine sand con- vines, shrubs, and a few grasses.
sists of live oaks and other hardwoods, pines, shrubs, Profile description:
a few cabbage palmettos and saw-palmettos, and 0 to 4 inches, dark-gray fine sand; contains a small to a
grasses. moderate amount of organic matter; strongly acid.
Profile description: 4 to 14 inches, light grayish-brown or light-gray, nearly
loose fine sand; strongly acid to medium acid.
0 to 8 inches, dark-gray fine sand that contains a small to 14 to 20 inches, pale-brown or grayish-brown, nearly loose
moderate amount of organic matter; a few pebbles on fine sand; medium acid.
the surface. 20 to 32 inches, grayish-brown fine sandy clay, streaked in
8 to 25 inches, grayish-brown or gray loamy fine sand; a few places with yellowish brown; sticky and plastic
contains a few pebbles and rounded stones. when wet and hard when dry; slightly acid to neutral.
25 to 42 inches +, mottled light yellowish-brown and yel- :2 to 42 inches +, light-gray marl having a texture of fine
low fine sandy clay or fine sandy clay loam that contains sandy clay or sandy clay loam.
many pebbles and rounded stones.
The surface laer in gray, In some places the surface layer is very dark gray,
T sfeayer in places is very dark gray, and in other places it is grayish brown. The surface
or grayish brown and is 6 to 9 inches thick. In some laver ranges from -1 to 9 inches in thickness. The
areas the horizon immediately below the surface layer depth to the clayey materials ranges from 18 to 30
is light gray; this horizon ranges from fine sand to inches.
fine sandy loam in texture. Fine sandy clay or fine This soil is strongly acid to neutral. Drainage is
sandy clay loam occurs at depths of 18 to 36 inches. somewhat poor. Both surface runoff and internal
In some places many pebbles and rounded stones oc- rainage are slow medium.
cur on the surface; in others, the pebbles and stones r mdu
occur only in the clayey materials. Pebbles and stones Use and management.-Practically all of this soil is
are more numerous on the slopes than on nearby level covered by natural vegetation, which provides fair
areas grazing for cattle on the range pastures. A few areas
This soil is medium acid to strongly acid. Drainage are included in fields where vegetable crops and truck
is moderately good to somewhat poor. Both surface crops are grown, and yields are fair to good if fertil-
drainage and internal drainage are slow to medium. izer is applied liberally and water is controlled.
Use and management.-The more sloping areas of Pines and other trees grow well on this soil. If
this soil are generally planted to citrus trees. The rest well managed they produce valuable timber.
is range pasture or is used to grow general crops. This soil is in capability unit IIIs-2 and in the soil
Yields are fair to good if the soil is well managed. association of Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands Over
Liberal amounts of fertilizer and lime are needed, and a Calcareous Substratum.
irrigation is required on some cultivated areas. Cover Bradenton fine sand, thin surface phase (Bg).-
crops or grasses should be grown on the stronger Clayey materials occur at depths of less than 18 inches
slopes, or the natural growth of weeds should be al- in this soil. The marl horizon generally occurs at
lowed to remain when the soil is not covered by tilled depths between 20 and 30 inches; in a few areas,
crops. Otherwise, heavy rains may cause these areas however, it is lacking. Otherwise, this soil is similar
to erode slightly. to typical Bradenton fine sand.
The natural vegetation on the range pastures pro- This soil occupies level to nearly level areas near the
vides grazing of fair quality. Pines and hardwoods coast and near streams and fresh-water swamps in
grow well. the southern and northeastern parts of the county.
This soil is in capability unit IIe-1 and in the soil Drainage is somewhat poor.
association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos- The natural vegetation consists of live oak, gum,
phatic Materials. elm, hickory, magnolia, cabbage palmetto, a rank
Bradenton fine sand (Bf).-This somewhat poorly growth of saw-palmetto, shrubs, vines, and a few
drained soil has developed from thin beds of sand grasses.
that overlie clayey materials and marl. As a rule it Use and management.-Practically all of this soil is
occupies level or nearly level areas near the coast or used as range pasture. The natural vegetation fur-
near streams, but a few acres are on slopes of 2 to 5 nishes fair to good forage for cattle throughout the
percent. Most of the soil occurs near Sun City, Rus- year. Fair to good yields of many vegetable and truck
kin, and Gibsonton. crops could be obtained if the soil were cleared and
This soil is associated with soils of the Ruskin, well managed. The cost of removing the dense ham-
Adamsville, Sunniland, Keri, Broward, Leon, Manatee, mock vegetation would be high. Fertilizer and some
Pompano, and Delray series. The clayey materials, means of water control would be needed.
typical of this Bradenton soil do not occur in the pro- Trees grow rapidly on this soil. They can be grown
file of the associated Adamsville, Keri, and Broward profitably if good forestry management is practiced.







HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 17

This soil is in capability unit IIIs-2 and in the soil clay more than 6 inches thick that underlies the sandy
association of Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands Over layers. They are also deeper. The Ruskin soil, and
a Calcareous Substratum. in many places the Sunniland soil, are underlain by
Brighton peat (Bh).-This organic soil has developed marl at depths of as much as 42 inches. The Adams-
from the remains of sedges, lilies, bonnets, water- ville soil resembles the Broward soil, but it lacks the
tolerant grasses, and other aquatic plants. The or- limestone layer. The Broward soil is shallower over
ganic layers overlie acid sands. The soil occurs in limestone than the Pompano soils, and it is better
fairly large marshes or shallow depressions in the drained. In some places the Broward soil has a brown-
flatwood sections, mainly in the east-central, north- stained layer above the limestone, but it does not have
ern, and southeastern parts of the county. Sedges, the organic pan that is characteristic of the Leon soils.
grasses, lilies, bonnets, and other water-tolerant plants The natural vegetation on Broward fine sand con-
grow on all the areas. sists of second-growth pine, cabbage palmetto, saw-
Profile description: palmetto, and runner oak; gallberry and other shrubs;
0 to 10 inches, very dark brown fibrous peat. and wiregrass.
10 to 40 inches, dark grayish-brown or brown, fibrous, felty Profile description:
peat; sands are mixed with the organic materials in
lower part of horizon. 0 to 5 inches, dark-gray or gray loose fine sand, which has
40 to 60 inches +, dark-gray or gray loose fine sand. a salt-and-pepper appearance; slightly acid to neutral.
5 to 14 inches, light-gray loose fine sand; slightly acid to
The fibrous material is 20 to 48 inches thick. The neutral.
spots where it is shallowest are small, and they occur 14 to 28 inches, very pale brown to yellowish brown loose
near the outer boundaries of the areas. The underly- fine sand; neutral to alkaline.
ing sandy material ranges from dark gray to light 28 to 36 inches +, nearly white limestone.
gray in color. The surface layer in places is gray to very dark
This soil is strongly to very strongly acid. It is gray, and it ranges from 3 to 8 inches in thickness.
very poorly drained and is under water during many The horizon immediately below ranges from nearly
months of the year. white to light yellowish brown and in places has nearly
Use and management.-When the areas of this soil white to light yellowish-brown mottles.
are not covered too deeply by water, the aquatic plants In some areas limestone is only 12 inches from the
provide good forage. During the dry seasons, some surface. There are a few areas, including one north
of the peaty materials are dug and used as filler in of the Hillsborough River bottom lands, where the
mixed fertilizer or as an organic fertilizer for lawns limestone is exposed. In a few places, a 1- to 2-inch
and shrubbery. layer of fine sandy clay, mottled light gray and yel-
Some of the areas are partly drained by canals and lowish brown, overlies the limestone. There are a
ditches. Water control would make it possible to use number of places where a brown or grayish-brown
this soil for improved pasture or to grow vegetables, stained horizon occurs just above the limestone.
This soil is in capability unit IIIs-4 and in the soil This soil is somewhat poorly drained. Surface run-
association of Very Poorly Drained Organic Soils. off is slow. Internal drainage is medium to rapid if
Brighton mucky peat (Bk).-The organic materials in not retarded by the high water table.
this soil are in a more advanced stage of decomposition Use and management.-Practically all of this soil
and are less fibrous than those in Brighton peat. The is covered by natural vegetation and is used for pas-
soil occurs in fairly large areas, mainly in the east- ture. The carrying capacity of unimproved pasture
central part of the county. is about 1 cow to each 15 to 25 acres. If the soil is
The native vegetation consists of various grasses, cleared, fertilized, and seeded to improved pasture
sedges, and aquatic plants. grasses, only 2 or 3 acres is needed to support a cow.
This soil consists of black, nonfibrous, organic ma- Second-growth pines make fair to good growth on
trials, 6 to 10 inches thick, underlain by dark-brown this soil, but few grow to saw-log size.
or grayish-brown, fibrous, felty peat. The organic ma- This soil is in capability unit IVs-2 and in the soil
trial is 15 to 40 inches thick. It overlies gray or association of Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands Over
light-gray fine sand. a Calcareous Substratum.
Use and management.-This soil is under water Charlotte fine sand (Ca).-This poorly drained soil
much of the time. When it is not covered too deeply has developed from moderately thick beds of fine sand
by water, the natural vegetation provides good graz- that overlie calcareous materials. It occupies level or
ing. The soil is in capability unit IIIs-4 and in the slightly depressed areas. It occurs principally near
soil association of Very Poorly Drained Organic Soils. the coast, northwest and southeast of Tampa, and
Broward fine sand (Bl).-This inextensive soil has near some of the larger streams. The soil is associ-
developed from a thin layer of sand that overlies ated with Leon and Pompano soils. It lacks the or-
limestone. It occupies level or nearly level areas along ganic pan that is characteristic of the Leon soils, and
the coast, mainly west and northwest of Tampa, near the Leon soils occupy slightly higher positions. It dif-
Old Tampa Bay, and north of the bottom lands along fers from the Adamsville soil in being more poorly
the Hillsborough River. drained and in having brighter colors in the lower
This soil is associated with soils of the Ruskin, horizons. The lower part of its profile differs in color
Sunniland, Adamsville, Pompano, Felda, and Leon from that of the Pompano soils.
series. The Ruskin and Sunniland soils, unlike the The natural vegetation consists of various short
Broward, have a horizon of sandy clay loam or sandy grasses, a few pines, and cabbage palmettos.







HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 17

This soil is in capability unit IIIs-2 and in the soil clay more than 6 inches thick that underlies the sandy
association of Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands Over layers. They are also deeper. The Ruskin soil, and
a Calcareous Substratum. in many places the Sunniland soil, are underlain by
Brighton peat (Bh).-This organic soil has developed marl at depths of as much as 42 inches. The Adams-
from the remains of sedges, lilies, bonnets, water- ville soil resembles the Broward soil, but it lacks the
tolerant grasses, and other aquatic plants. The or- limestone layer. The Broward soil is shallower over
ganic layers overlie acid sands. The soil occurs in limestone than the Pompano soils, and it is better
fairly large marshes or shallow depressions in the drained. In some places the Broward soil has a brown-
flatwood sections, mainly in the east-central, north- stained layer above the limestone, but it does not have
ern, and southeastern parts of the county. Sedges, the organic pan that is characteristic of the Leon soils.
grasses, lilies, bonnets, and other water-tolerant plants The natural vegetation on Broward fine sand con-
grow on all the areas. sists of second-growth pine, cabbage palmetto, saw-
Profile description: palmetto, and runner oak; gallberry and other shrubs;
0 to 10 inches, very dark brown fibrous peat. and wiregrass.
10 to 40 inches, dark grayish-brown or brown, fibrous, felty Profile description:
peat; sands are mixed with the organic materials in
lower part of horizon. 0 to 5 inches, dark-gray or gray loose fine sand, which has
40 to 60 inches +, dark-gray or gray loose fine sand. a salt-and-pepper appearance; slightly acid to neutral.
5 to 14 inches, light-gray loose fine sand; slightly acid to
The fibrous material is 20 to 48 inches thick. The neutral.
spots where it is shallowest are small, and they occur 14 to 28 inches, very pale brown to yellowish brown loose
near the outer boundaries of the areas. The underly- fine sand; neutral to alkaline.
ing sandy material ranges from dark gray to light 28 to 36 inches +, nearly white limestone.
gray in color. The surface layer in places is gray to very dark
This soil is strongly to very strongly acid. It is gray, and it ranges from 3 to 8 inches in thickness.
very poorly drained and is under water during many The horizon immediately below ranges from nearly
months of the year. white to light yellowish brown and in places has nearly
Use and management.-When the areas of this soil white to light yellowish-brown mottles.
are not covered too deeply by water, the aquatic plants In some areas limestone is only 12 inches from the
provide good forage. During the dry seasons, some surface. There are a few areas, including one north
of the peaty materials are dug and used as filler in of the Hillsborough River bottom lands, where the
mixed fertilizer or as an organic fertilizer for lawns limestone is exposed. In a few places, a 1- to 2-inch
and shrubbery. layer of fine sandy clay, mottled light gray and yel-
Some of the areas are partly drained by canals and lowish brown, overlies the limestone. There are a
ditches. Water control would make it possible to use number of places where a brown or grayish-brown
this soil for improved pasture or to grow vegetables, stained horizon occurs just above the limestone.
This soil is in capability unit IIIs-4 and in the soil This soil is somewhat poorly drained. Surface run-
association of Very Poorly Drained Organic Soils. off is slow. Internal drainage is medium to rapid if
Brighton mucky peat (Bk).-The organic materials in not retarded by the high water table.
this soil are in a more advanced stage of decomposition Use and management.-Practically all of this soil
and are less fibrous than those in Brighton peat. The is covered by natural vegetation and is used for pas-
soil occurs in fairly large areas, mainly in the east- ture. The carrying capacity of unimproved pasture
central part of the county. is about 1 cow to each 15 to 25 acres. If the soil is
The native vegetation consists of various grasses, cleared, fertilized, and seeded to improved pasture
sedges, and aquatic plants. grasses, only 2 or 3 acres is needed to support a cow.
This soil consists of black, nonfibrous, organic ma- Second-growth pines make fair to good growth on
trials, 6 to 10 inches thick, underlain by dark-brown this soil, but few grow to saw-log size.
or grayish-brown, fibrous, felty peat. The organic ma- This soil is in capability unit IVs-2 and in the soil
trial is 15 to 40 inches thick. It overlies gray or association of Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands Over
light-gray fine sand. a Calcareous Substratum.
Use and management.-This soil is under water Charlotte fine sand (Ca).-This poorly drained soil
much of the time. When it is not covered too deeply has developed from moderately thick beds of fine sand
by water, the natural vegetation provides good graz- that overlie calcareous materials. It occupies level or
ing. The soil is in capability unit IIIs-4 and in the slightly depressed areas. It occurs principally near
soil association of Very Poorly Drained Organic Soils. the coast, northwest and southeast of Tampa, and
Broward fine sand (Bl).-This inextensive soil has near some of the larger streams. The soil is associ-
developed from a thin layer of sand that overlies ated with Leon and Pompano soils. It lacks the or-
limestone. It occupies level or nearly level areas along ganic pan that is characteristic of the Leon soils, and
the coast, mainly west and northwest of Tampa, near the Leon soils occupy slightly higher positions. It dif-
Old Tampa Bay, and north of the bottom lands along fers from the Adamsville soil in being more poorly
the Hillsborough River. drained and in having brighter colors in the lower
This soil is associated with soils of the Ruskin, horizons. The lower part of its profile differs in color
Sunniland, Adamsville, Pompano, Felda, and Leon from that of the Pompano soils.
series. The Ruskin and Sunniland soils, unlike the The natural vegetation consists of various short
Broward, have a horizon of sandy clay loam or sandy grasses, a few pines, and cabbage palmettos.







HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 17

This soil is in capability unit IIIs-2 and in the soil clay more than 6 inches thick that underlies the sandy
association of Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands Over layers. They are also deeper. The Ruskin soil, and
a Calcareous Substratum. in many places the Sunniland soil, are underlain by
Brighton peat (Bh).-This organic soil has developed marl at depths of as much as 42 inches. The Adams-
from the remains of sedges, lilies, bonnets, water- ville soil resembles the Broward soil, but it lacks the
tolerant grasses, and other aquatic plants. The or- limestone layer. The Broward soil is shallower over
ganic layers overlie acid sands. The soil occurs in limestone than the Pompano soils, and it is better
fairly large marshes or shallow depressions in the drained. In some places the Broward soil has a brown-
flatwood sections, mainly in the east-central, north- stained layer above the limestone, but it does not have
ern, and southeastern parts of the county. Sedges, the organic pan that is characteristic of the Leon soils.
grasses, lilies, bonnets, and other water-tolerant plants The natural vegetation on Broward fine sand con-
grow on all the areas. sists of second-growth pine, cabbage palmetto, saw-
Profile description: palmetto, and runner oak; gallberry and other shrubs;
0 to 10 inches, very dark brown fibrous peat. and wiregrass.
10 to 40 inches, dark grayish-brown or brown, fibrous, felty Profile description:
peat; sands are mixed with the organic materials in
lower part of horizon. 0 to 5 inches, dark-gray or gray loose fine sand, which has
40 to 60 inches +, dark-gray or gray loose fine sand. a salt-and-pepper appearance; slightly acid to neutral.
5 to 14 inches, light-gray loose fine sand; slightly acid to
The fibrous material is 20 to 48 inches thick. The neutral.
spots where it is shallowest are small, and they occur 14 to 28 inches, very pale brown to yellowish brown loose
near the outer boundaries of the areas. The underly- fine sand; neutral to alkaline.
ing sandy material ranges from dark gray to light 28 to 36 inches +, nearly white limestone.
gray in color. The surface layer in places is gray to very dark
This soil is strongly to very strongly acid. It is gray, and it ranges from 3 to 8 inches in thickness.
very poorly drained and is under water during many The horizon immediately below ranges from nearly
months of the year. white to light yellowish brown and in places has nearly
Use and management.-When the areas of this soil white to light yellowish-brown mottles.
are not covered too deeply by water, the aquatic plants In some areas limestone is only 12 inches from the
provide good forage. During the dry seasons, some surface. There are a few areas, including one north
of the peaty materials are dug and used as filler in of the Hillsborough River bottom lands, where the
mixed fertilizer or as an organic fertilizer for lawns limestone is exposed. In a few places, a 1- to 2-inch
and shrubbery. layer of fine sandy clay, mottled light gray and yel-
Some of the areas are partly drained by canals and lowish brown, overlies the limestone. There are a
ditches. Water control would make it possible to use number of places where a brown or grayish-brown
this soil for improved pasture or to grow vegetables, stained horizon occurs just above the limestone.
This soil is in capability unit IIIs-4 and in the soil This soil is somewhat poorly drained. Surface run-
association of Very Poorly Drained Organic Soils. off is slow. Internal drainage is medium to rapid if
Brighton mucky peat (Bk).-The organic materials in not retarded by the high water table.
this soil are in a more advanced stage of decomposition Use and management.-Practically all of this soil
and are less fibrous than those in Brighton peat. The is covered by natural vegetation and is used for pas-
soil occurs in fairly large areas, mainly in the east- ture. The carrying capacity of unimproved pasture
central part of the county. is about 1 cow to each 15 to 25 acres. If the soil is
The native vegetation consists of various grasses, cleared, fertilized, and seeded to improved pasture
sedges, and aquatic plants. grasses, only 2 or 3 acres is needed to support a cow.
This soil consists of black, nonfibrous, organic ma- Second-growth pines make fair to good growth on
trials, 6 to 10 inches thick, underlain by dark-brown this soil, but few grow to saw-log size.
or grayish-brown, fibrous, felty peat. The organic ma- This soil is in capability unit IVs-2 and in the soil
trial is 15 to 40 inches thick. It overlies gray or association of Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands Over
light-gray fine sand. a Calcareous Substratum.
Use and management.-This soil is under water Charlotte fine sand (Ca).-This poorly drained soil
much of the time. When it is not covered too deeply has developed from moderately thick beds of fine sand
by water, the natural vegetation provides good graz- that overlie calcareous materials. It occupies level or
ing. The soil is in capability unit IIIs-4 and in the slightly depressed areas. It occurs principally near
soil association of Very Poorly Drained Organic Soils. the coast, northwest and southeast of Tampa, and
Broward fine sand (Bl).-This inextensive soil has near some of the larger streams. The soil is associ-
developed from a thin layer of sand that overlies ated with Leon and Pompano soils. It lacks the or-
limestone. It occupies level or nearly level areas along ganic pan that is characteristic of the Leon soils, and
the coast, mainly west and northwest of Tampa, near the Leon soils occupy slightly higher positions. It dif-
Old Tampa Bay, and north of the bottom lands along fers from the Adamsville soil in being more poorly
the Hillsborough River. drained and in having brighter colors in the lower
This soil is associated with soils of the Ruskin, horizons. The lower part of its profile differs in color
Sunniland, Adamsville, Pompano, Felda, and Leon from that of the Pompano soils.
series. The Ruskin and Sunniland soils, unlike the The natural vegetation consists of various short
Broward, have a horizon of sandy clay loam or sandy grasses, a few pines, and cabbage palmettos.







HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 17

This soil is in capability unit IIIs-2 and in the soil clay more than 6 inches thick that underlies the sandy
association of Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands Over layers. They are also deeper. The Ruskin soil, and
a Calcareous Substratum. in many places the Sunniland soil, are underlain by
Brighton peat (Bh).-This organic soil has developed marl at depths of as much as 42 inches. The Adams-
from the remains of sedges, lilies, bonnets, water- ville soil resembles the Broward soil, but it lacks the
tolerant grasses, and other aquatic plants. The or- limestone layer. The Broward soil is shallower over
ganic layers overlie acid sands. The soil occurs in limestone than the Pompano soils, and it is better
fairly large marshes or shallow depressions in the drained. In some places the Broward soil has a brown-
flatwood sections, mainly in the east-central, north- stained layer above the limestone, but it does not have
ern, and southeastern parts of the county. Sedges, the organic pan that is characteristic of the Leon soils.
grasses, lilies, bonnets, and other water-tolerant plants The natural vegetation on Broward fine sand con-
grow on all the areas. sists of second-growth pine, cabbage palmetto, saw-
Profile description: palmetto, and runner oak; gallberry and other shrubs;
0 to 10 inches, very dark brown fibrous peat. and wiregrass.
10 to 40 inches, dark grayish-brown or brown, fibrous, felty Profile description:
peat; sands are mixed with the organic materials in
lower part of horizon. 0 to 5 inches, dark-gray or gray loose fine sand, which has
40 to 60 inches +, dark-gray or gray loose fine sand. a salt-and-pepper appearance; slightly acid to neutral.
5 to 14 inches, light-gray loose fine sand; slightly acid to
The fibrous material is 20 to 48 inches thick. The neutral.
spots where it is shallowest are small, and they occur 14 to 28 inches, very pale brown to yellowish brown loose
near the outer boundaries of the areas. The underly- fine sand; neutral to alkaline.
ing sandy material ranges from dark gray to light 28 to 36 inches +, nearly white limestone.
gray in color. The surface layer in places is gray to very dark
This soil is strongly to very strongly acid. It is gray, and it ranges from 3 to 8 inches in thickness.
very poorly drained and is under water during many The horizon immediately below ranges from nearly
months of the year. white to light yellowish brown and in places has nearly
Use and management.-When the areas of this soil white to light yellowish-brown mottles.
are not covered too deeply by water, the aquatic plants In some areas limestone is only 12 inches from the
provide good forage. During the dry seasons, some surface. There are a few areas, including one north
of the peaty materials are dug and used as filler in of the Hillsborough River bottom lands, where the
mixed fertilizer or as an organic fertilizer for lawns limestone is exposed. In a few places, a 1- to 2-inch
and shrubbery. layer of fine sandy clay, mottled light gray and yel-
Some of the areas are partly drained by canals and lowish brown, overlies the limestone. There are a
ditches. Water control would make it possible to use number of places where a brown or grayish-brown
this soil for improved pasture or to grow vegetables, stained horizon occurs just above the limestone.
This soil is in capability unit IIIs-4 and in the soil This soil is somewhat poorly drained. Surface run-
association of Very Poorly Drained Organic Soils. off is slow. Internal drainage is medium to rapid if
Brighton mucky peat (Bk).-The organic materials in not retarded by the high water table.
this soil are in a more advanced stage of decomposition Use and management.-Practically all of this soil
and are less fibrous than those in Brighton peat. The is covered by natural vegetation and is used for pas-
soil occurs in fairly large areas, mainly in the east- ture. The carrying capacity of unimproved pasture
central part of the county. is about 1 cow to each 15 to 25 acres. If the soil is
The native vegetation consists of various grasses, cleared, fertilized, and seeded to improved pasture
sedges, and aquatic plants. grasses, only 2 or 3 acres is needed to support a cow.
This soil consists of black, nonfibrous, organic ma- Second-growth pines make fair to good growth on
trials, 6 to 10 inches thick, underlain by dark-brown this soil, but few grow to saw-log size.
or grayish-brown, fibrous, felty peat. The organic ma- This soil is in capability unit IVs-2 and in the soil
trial is 15 to 40 inches thick. It overlies gray or association of Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands Over
light-gray fine sand. a Calcareous Substratum.
Use and management.-This soil is under water Charlotte fine sand (Ca).-This poorly drained soil
much of the time. When it is not covered too deeply has developed from moderately thick beds of fine sand
by water, the natural vegetation provides good graz- that overlie calcareous materials. It occupies level or
ing. The soil is in capability unit IIIs-4 and in the slightly depressed areas. It occurs principally near
soil association of Very Poorly Drained Organic Soils. the coast, northwest and southeast of Tampa, and
Broward fine sand (Bl).-This inextensive soil has near some of the larger streams. The soil is associ-
developed from a thin layer of sand that overlies ated with Leon and Pompano soils. It lacks the or-
limestone. It occupies level or nearly level areas along ganic pan that is characteristic of the Leon soils, and
the coast, mainly west and northwest of Tampa, near the Leon soils occupy slightly higher positions. It dif-
Old Tampa Bay, and north of the bottom lands along fers from the Adamsville soil in being more poorly
the Hillsborough River. drained and in having brighter colors in the lower
This soil is associated with soils of the Ruskin, horizons. The lower part of its profile differs in color
Sunniland, Adamsville, Pompano, Felda, and Leon from that of the Pompano soils.
series. The Ruskin and Sunniland soils, unlike the The natural vegetation consists of various short
Broward, have a horizon of sandy clay loam or sandy grasses, a few pines, and cabbage palmettos.






18 SOIL SURVEY SERIES 1950, NO. 3

Profile description: Profile description:
0 to 4 inches, grayish-brown loose fine sand containing 0 to 12 inches, black fine sand; contains a large amount of
enough organic material to give it a salt-and-pepper organic matter; slightly acid to neutral.
appearance; slightly acid to neutral. 12 to 26 inches, very dark gray or dark gray nearly loose
4 to 12 inches, light brownish-gray or light yellowish- fine sand; slightly acid to neutral.
brown loose fine sand; neutral to alkaline. 26 to 42 inches, gray or light-gray nearly loose fine sand
12 to 30 inches, brownish-yellow or yellowish-brown loose streaked with pale yellow and brown; neutral to alkaline.
fine sand; neutral to alkaline.
30 to 48 inches +, pale brown to very pale brown or white The dark surface soil ranges from 7 to 20 inches in
loose fine sand with splotches of yellow; neutral to thickness. In places it grades to light-gray sand, and
alkaline. the very dark gray or dark gray horizon is absent.
The surface layer ranges from 3 to 8 inches in thick- In some places a grayish-brown horizon of fine sand
ness and in places is very dark gray or light brownish occurs at depths between 30 and 42 inches.
gray. The surface layer generally has light colors This soil is poorly drained to very poorly drained.
where the soil adjoins areas of Adamsville or Leon Surface runoff is slow. Internal drainage is rapid if
soils. In these border areas the horizon immediately not retarded by the high water table.
below the surface layer is light gray to a depth of Use and management.-A few areas of this soil
15 to 24 inches, and the third layer is bright yellow near Ruskin have been included in fields of other soils
to brownish yellow or yellowish brown. This third and are used to grow vegetables. The rest is used as
layer may have a few iron concretions in the lower range pasture. Fairly high yields of vegetable crops
part, and it overlies sandy materials that become are obtained under good management. The soil re-
lighter colored at increasing depths. quires fertilizer, however, and some means of water
Near the Pinellas County line in the northwestern control. The natural vegetation provides fair to good
part of the county, there are several areas where mot- grazing. A few areas that have been fertilized and
tied gray, yellowish-brown, and brownish-yellow fine seeded to improved pasture grasses provide good
sandy clay loam or fine sandy clay begins at depths of forage.
30 to 42 inches. These areas are under water several Ditches and canals have been dug to drain some of
months of the year, and the mottling indicates their the areas. Many of these, however, should have dams
poor drainage. or locks to control the rate of runoff. If the water is
Use and management.-Practically all of this soil is allowed to drain into the ditches without any control,
covered by native grasses, a few cabbage palmettos, the water table in the adjacent higher lying soils may
and pines and shrubs. This natural vegetation pro- be lowered so much that plant growth on the higher
vides fair grazing for cattle. The carrying capacity is soils will be retarded. Many of the depressions serve
1 cow to each 10 to 20 acres. Improved pastures will as natural reservoirs for water.
support a cow on 2 or 3 acres. This soil is in capability unit IIIs-3 and in the soil
Little of this soil is used for crops, but it would association of Poorly Drained Neutral to Alkaline
give good yields of vegetables if well managed. Fer- Sands and Sandy Clays.
tilization and water control are needed for crops or Delray fine sand, shallow phase (Db).-This inexten-
for improved pasture. sive soil generally occupies level or slightly depressed
This soil is in capability unit IVs-3 and in the soil areas near Ruskin and Sun City in the southwestern
association of Poorly Drained Neutral to Alkaline part of the county. Except that clayey materials oc-
Sands and Sandy Clays. cur at depths of 30 to 42 inches, it is similar to typi-
Delray fine sand (Da).-This dark-colored soil has cal Delray fine sand. The clayey materials consist of
formed from moderately thick beds of sand that over- gray or light-gray fine sandy clay loam or fine sandy
lie calcareous materials. It occupies level or slightly clay, mottled with pale yellow and grayish brown.
depressed areas, mainly near the coast between Sun This soil resembles the Manatee soils, but the clayey
City and the Pinellas County line, and near Sixmile materials in the Manatee soils are nearer the surface.
Creek. Some areas occur in the southern and north- Use and management.-A few areas of this soil are
eastern parts of the county. included in fields of other soils that are used to grow
The soil is associated with soils of the Ruskin, vegetables and truck crops. Fair to good yields are
Adamsville, Keri, Bradenton, Leon, Immokalee, Pom- obtained -under good management. Most areas are
pano, Charlotte, and Manatee series. It has a darker used as range pasture. Where the soil is not flooded
surface layer than the Ruskin and Bradenton soils too often, the natural vegetation provides good forage.
and lacks the clayey materials that occur in the pro- Water control and liberal fertilization are necessary.
files of those soils. It occupies wetter areas and has a This soil is in capability unit IIIs-3 and in the soil
darker, thicker surface layer than the Adamsville soil. association of Poorly Drained Neutral to Alkaline
It does not have the organic pan that occurs in the Sands and Sandy Clays.
Leon and Immokalee soils. It has a darker colored Eustis fine sand, level phase (Ea).-This strongly acid
surface layer than Charlotte fine sand and it lacks the soil has developed from thick beds of sand. It occu-
yellowish lower layer that occurs in that soil. The pies nearly level areas, principally in the north-cen-
Manatee soils have finer textured materials within 30 tral part of the county. Fairly large areas occur be-
inches of the surface. tween Thonotosassa and Seffner and near Brandon,
The natural vegetation consists of various grasses, Valrico, and Limona. The soil is associated with soils
gallberry, myrtle bushes, a few cabbage palmettos, of the Lakeland, Blanton, and Gainesville series. It
and pines and hardwoods. differs from the Lakeland and Blanton soils in color






18 SOIL SURVEY SERIES 1950, NO. 3

Profile description: Profile description:
0 to 4 inches, grayish-brown loose fine sand containing 0 to 12 inches, black fine sand; contains a large amount of
enough organic material to give it a salt-and-pepper organic matter; slightly acid to neutral.
appearance; slightly acid to neutral. 12 to 26 inches, very dark gray or dark gray nearly loose
4 to 12 inches, light brownish-gray or light yellowish- fine sand; slightly acid to neutral.
brown loose fine sand; neutral to alkaline. 26 to 42 inches, gray or light-gray nearly loose fine sand
12 to 30 inches, brownish-yellow or yellowish-brown loose streaked with pale yellow and brown; neutral to alkaline.
fine sand; neutral to alkaline.
30 to 48 inches +, pale brown to very pale brown or white The dark surface soil ranges from 7 to 20 inches in
loose fine sand with splotches of yellow; neutral to thickness. In places it grades to light-gray sand, and
alkaline. the very dark gray or dark gray horizon is absent.
The surface layer ranges from 3 to 8 inches in thick- In some places a grayish-brown horizon of fine sand
ness and in places is very dark gray or light brownish occurs at depths between 30 and 42 inches.
gray. The surface layer generally has light colors This soil is poorly drained to very poorly drained.
where the soil adjoins areas of Adamsville or Leon Surface runoff is slow. Internal drainage is rapid if
soils. In these border areas the horizon immediately not retarded by the high water table.
below the surface layer is light gray to a depth of Use and management.-A few areas of this soil
15 to 24 inches, and the third layer is bright yellow near Ruskin have been included in fields of other soils
to brownish yellow or yellowish brown. This third and are used to grow vegetables. The rest is used as
layer may have a few iron concretions in the lower range pasture. Fairly high yields of vegetable crops
part, and it overlies sandy materials that become are obtained under good management. The soil re-
lighter colored at increasing depths. quires fertilizer, however, and some means of water
Near the Pinellas County line in the northwestern control. The natural vegetation provides fair to good
part of the county, there are several areas where mot- grazing. A few areas that have been fertilized and
tied gray, yellowish-brown, and brownish-yellow fine seeded to improved pasture grasses provide good
sandy clay loam or fine sandy clay begins at depths of forage.
30 to 42 inches. These areas are under water several Ditches and canals have been dug to drain some of
months of the year, and the mottling indicates their the areas. Many of these, however, should have dams
poor drainage. or locks to control the rate of runoff. If the water is
Use and management.-Practically all of this soil is allowed to drain into the ditches without any control,
covered by native grasses, a few cabbage palmettos, the water table in the adjacent higher lying soils may
and pines and shrubs. This natural vegetation pro- be lowered so much that plant growth on the higher
vides fair grazing for cattle. The carrying capacity is soils will be retarded. Many of the depressions serve
1 cow to each 10 to 20 acres. Improved pastures will as natural reservoirs for water.
support a cow on 2 or 3 acres. This soil is in capability unit IIIs-3 and in the soil
Little of this soil is used for crops, but it would association of Poorly Drained Neutral to Alkaline
give good yields of vegetables if well managed. Fer- Sands and Sandy Clays.
tilization and water control are needed for crops or Delray fine sand, shallow phase (Db).-This inexten-
for improved pasture. sive soil generally occupies level or slightly depressed
This soil is in capability unit IVs-3 and in the soil areas near Ruskin and Sun City in the southwestern
association of Poorly Drained Neutral to Alkaline part of the county. Except that clayey materials oc-
Sands and Sandy Clays. cur at depths of 30 to 42 inches, it is similar to typi-
Delray fine sand (Da).-This dark-colored soil has cal Delray fine sand. The clayey materials consist of
formed from moderately thick beds of sand that over- gray or light-gray fine sandy clay loam or fine sandy
lie calcareous materials. It occupies level or slightly clay, mottled with pale yellow and grayish brown.
depressed areas, mainly near the coast between Sun This soil resembles the Manatee soils, but the clayey
City and the Pinellas County line, and near Sixmile materials in the Manatee soils are nearer the surface.
Creek. Some areas occur in the southern and north- Use and management.-A few areas of this soil are
eastern parts of the county. included in fields of other soils that are used to grow
The soil is associated with soils of the Ruskin, vegetables and truck crops. Fair to good yields are
Adamsville, Keri, Bradenton, Leon, Immokalee, Pom- obtained -under good management. Most areas are
pano, Charlotte, and Manatee series. It has a darker used as range pasture. Where the soil is not flooded
surface layer than the Ruskin and Bradenton soils too often, the natural vegetation provides good forage.
and lacks the clayey materials that occur in the pro- Water control and liberal fertilization are necessary.
files of those soils. It occupies wetter areas and has a This soil is in capability unit IIIs-3 and in the soil
darker, thicker surface layer than the Adamsville soil. association of Poorly Drained Neutral to Alkaline
It does not have the organic pan that occurs in the Sands and Sandy Clays.
Leon and Immokalee soils. It has a darker colored Eustis fine sand, level phase (Ea).-This strongly acid
surface layer than Charlotte fine sand and it lacks the soil has developed from thick beds of sand. It occu-
yellowish lower layer that occurs in that soil. The pies nearly level areas, principally in the north-cen-
Manatee soils have finer textured materials within 30 tral part of the county. Fairly large areas occur be-
inches of the surface. tween Thonotosassa and Seffner and near Brandon,
The natural vegetation consists of various grasses, Valrico, and Limona. The soil is associated with soils
gallberry, myrtle bushes, a few cabbage palmettos, of the Lakeland, Blanton, and Gainesville series. It
and pines and hardwoods. differs from the Lakeland and Blanton soils in color






18 SOIL SURVEY SERIES 1950, NO. 3

Profile description: Profile description:
0 to 4 inches, grayish-brown loose fine sand containing 0 to 12 inches, black fine sand; contains a large amount of
enough organic material to give it a salt-and-pepper organic matter; slightly acid to neutral.
appearance; slightly acid to neutral. 12 to 26 inches, very dark gray or dark gray nearly loose
4 to 12 inches, light brownish-gray or light yellowish- fine sand; slightly acid to neutral.
brown loose fine sand; neutral to alkaline. 26 to 42 inches, gray or light-gray nearly loose fine sand
12 to 30 inches, brownish-yellow or yellowish-brown loose streaked with pale yellow and brown; neutral to alkaline.
fine sand; neutral to alkaline.
30 to 48 inches +, pale brown to very pale brown or white The dark surface soil ranges from 7 to 20 inches in
loose fine sand with splotches of yellow; neutral to thickness. In places it grades to light-gray sand, and
alkaline. the very dark gray or dark gray horizon is absent.
The surface layer ranges from 3 to 8 inches in thick- In some places a grayish-brown horizon of fine sand
ness and in places is very dark gray or light brownish occurs at depths between 30 and 42 inches.
gray. The surface layer generally has light colors This soil is poorly drained to very poorly drained.
where the soil adjoins areas of Adamsville or Leon Surface runoff is slow. Internal drainage is rapid if
soils. In these border areas the horizon immediately not retarded by the high water table.
below the surface layer is light gray to a depth of Use and management.-A few areas of this soil
15 to 24 inches, and the third layer is bright yellow near Ruskin have been included in fields of other soils
to brownish yellow or yellowish brown. This third and are used to grow vegetables. The rest is used as
layer may have a few iron concretions in the lower range pasture. Fairly high yields of vegetable crops
part, and it overlies sandy materials that become are obtained under good management. The soil re-
lighter colored at increasing depths. quires fertilizer, however, and some means of water
Near the Pinellas County line in the northwestern control. The natural vegetation provides fair to good
part of the county, there are several areas where mot- grazing. A few areas that have been fertilized and
tied gray, yellowish-brown, and brownish-yellow fine seeded to improved pasture grasses provide good
sandy clay loam or fine sandy clay begins at depths of forage.
30 to 42 inches. These areas are under water several Ditches and canals have been dug to drain some of
months of the year, and the mottling indicates their the areas. Many of these, however, should have dams
poor drainage. or locks to control the rate of runoff. If the water is
Use and management.-Practically all of this soil is allowed to drain into the ditches without any control,
covered by native grasses, a few cabbage palmettos, the water table in the adjacent higher lying soils may
and pines and shrubs. This natural vegetation pro- be lowered so much that plant growth on the higher
vides fair grazing for cattle. The carrying capacity is soils will be retarded. Many of the depressions serve
1 cow to each 10 to 20 acres. Improved pastures will as natural reservoirs for water.
support a cow on 2 or 3 acres. This soil is in capability unit IIIs-3 and in the soil
Little of this soil is used for crops, but it would association of Poorly Drained Neutral to Alkaline
give good yields of vegetables if well managed. Fer- Sands and Sandy Clays.
tilization and water control are needed for crops or Delray fine sand, shallow phase (Db).-This inexten-
for improved pasture. sive soil generally occupies level or slightly depressed
This soil is in capability unit IVs-3 and in the soil areas near Ruskin and Sun City in the southwestern
association of Poorly Drained Neutral to Alkaline part of the county. Except that clayey materials oc-
Sands and Sandy Clays. cur at depths of 30 to 42 inches, it is similar to typi-
Delray fine sand (Da).-This dark-colored soil has cal Delray fine sand. The clayey materials consist of
formed from moderately thick beds of sand that over- gray or light-gray fine sandy clay loam or fine sandy
lie calcareous materials. It occupies level or slightly clay, mottled with pale yellow and grayish brown.
depressed areas, mainly near the coast between Sun This soil resembles the Manatee soils, but the clayey
City and the Pinellas County line, and near Sixmile materials in the Manatee soils are nearer the surface.
Creek. Some areas occur in the southern and north- Use and management.-A few areas of this soil are
eastern parts of the county. included in fields of other soils that are used to grow
The soil is associated with soils of the Ruskin, vegetables and truck crops. Fair to good yields are
Adamsville, Keri, Bradenton, Leon, Immokalee, Pom- obtained -under good management. Most areas are
pano, Charlotte, and Manatee series. It has a darker used as range pasture. Where the soil is not flooded
surface layer than the Ruskin and Bradenton soils too often, the natural vegetation provides good forage.
and lacks the clayey materials that occur in the pro- Water control and liberal fertilization are necessary.
files of those soils. It occupies wetter areas and has a This soil is in capability unit IIIs-3 and in the soil
darker, thicker surface layer than the Adamsville soil. association of Poorly Drained Neutral to Alkaline
It does not have the organic pan that occurs in the Sands and Sandy Clays.
Leon and Immokalee soils. It has a darker colored Eustis fine sand, level phase (Ea).-This strongly acid
surface layer than Charlotte fine sand and it lacks the soil has developed from thick beds of sand. It occu-
yellowish lower layer that occurs in that soil. The pies nearly level areas, principally in the north-cen-
Manatee soils have finer textured materials within 30 tral part of the county. Fairly large areas occur be-
inches of the surface. tween Thonotosassa and Seffner and near Brandon,
The natural vegetation consists of various grasses, Valrico, and Limona. The soil is associated with soils
gallberry, myrtle bushes, a few cabbage palmettos, of the Lakeland, Blanton, and Gainesville series. It
and pines and hardwoods. differs from the Lakeland and Blanton soils in color






18 SOIL SURVEY SERIES 1950, NO. 3

Profile description: Profile description:
0 to 4 inches, grayish-brown loose fine sand containing 0 to 12 inches, black fine sand; contains a large amount of
enough organic material to give it a salt-and-pepper organic matter; slightly acid to neutral.
appearance; slightly acid to neutral. 12 to 26 inches, very dark gray or dark gray nearly loose
4 to 12 inches, light brownish-gray or light yellowish- fine sand; slightly acid to neutral.
brown loose fine sand; neutral to alkaline. 26 to 42 inches, gray or light-gray nearly loose fine sand
12 to 30 inches, brownish-yellow or yellowish-brown loose streaked with pale yellow and brown; neutral to alkaline.
fine sand; neutral to alkaline.
30 to 48 inches +, pale brown to very pale brown or white The dark surface soil ranges from 7 to 20 inches in
loose fine sand with splotches of yellow; neutral to thickness. In places it grades to light-gray sand, and
alkaline. the very dark gray or dark gray horizon is absent.
The surface layer ranges from 3 to 8 inches in thick- In some places a grayish-brown horizon of fine sand
ness and in places is very dark gray or light brownish occurs at depths between 30 and 42 inches.
gray. The surface layer generally has light colors This soil is poorly drained to very poorly drained.
where the soil adjoins areas of Adamsville or Leon Surface runoff is slow. Internal drainage is rapid if
soils. In these border areas the horizon immediately not retarded by the high water table.
below the surface layer is light gray to a depth of Use and management.-A few areas of this soil
15 to 24 inches, and the third layer is bright yellow near Ruskin have been included in fields of other soils
to brownish yellow or yellowish brown. This third and are used to grow vegetables. The rest is used as
layer may have a few iron concretions in the lower range pasture. Fairly high yields of vegetable crops
part, and it overlies sandy materials that become are obtained under good management. The soil re-
lighter colored at increasing depths. quires fertilizer, however, and some means of water
Near the Pinellas County line in the northwestern control. The natural vegetation provides fair to good
part of the county, there are several areas where mot- grazing. A few areas that have been fertilized and
tied gray, yellowish-brown, and brownish-yellow fine seeded to improved pasture grasses provide good
sandy clay loam or fine sandy clay begins at depths of forage.
30 to 42 inches. These areas are under water several Ditches and canals have been dug to drain some of
months of the year, and the mottling indicates their the areas. Many of these, however, should have dams
poor drainage. or locks to control the rate of runoff. If the water is
Use and management.-Practically all of this soil is allowed to drain into the ditches without any control,
covered by native grasses, a few cabbage palmettos, the water table in the adjacent higher lying soils may
and pines and shrubs. This natural vegetation pro- be lowered so much that plant growth on the higher
vides fair grazing for cattle. The carrying capacity is soils will be retarded. Many of the depressions serve
1 cow to each 10 to 20 acres. Improved pastures will as natural reservoirs for water.
support a cow on 2 or 3 acres. This soil is in capability unit IIIs-3 and in the soil
Little of this soil is used for crops, but it would association of Poorly Drained Neutral to Alkaline
give good yields of vegetables if well managed. Fer- Sands and Sandy Clays.
tilization and water control are needed for crops or Delray fine sand, shallow phase (Db).-This inexten-
for improved pasture. sive soil generally occupies level or slightly depressed
This soil is in capability unit IVs-3 and in the soil areas near Ruskin and Sun City in the southwestern
association of Poorly Drained Neutral to Alkaline part of the county. Except that clayey materials oc-
Sands and Sandy Clays. cur at depths of 30 to 42 inches, it is similar to typi-
Delray fine sand (Da).-This dark-colored soil has cal Delray fine sand. The clayey materials consist of
formed from moderately thick beds of sand that over- gray or light-gray fine sandy clay loam or fine sandy
lie calcareous materials. It occupies level or slightly clay, mottled with pale yellow and grayish brown.
depressed areas, mainly near the coast between Sun This soil resembles the Manatee soils, but the clayey
City and the Pinellas County line, and near Sixmile materials in the Manatee soils are nearer the surface.
Creek. Some areas occur in the southern and north- Use and management.-A few areas of this soil are
eastern parts of the county. included in fields of other soils that are used to grow
The soil is associated with soils of the Ruskin, vegetables and truck crops. Fair to good yields are
Adamsville, Keri, Bradenton, Leon, Immokalee, Pom- obtained -under good management. Most areas are
pano, Charlotte, and Manatee series. It has a darker used as range pasture. Where the soil is not flooded
surface layer than the Ruskin and Bradenton soils too often, the natural vegetation provides good forage.
and lacks the clayey materials that occur in the pro- Water control and liberal fertilization are necessary.
files of those soils. It occupies wetter areas and has a This soil is in capability unit IIIs-3 and in the soil
darker, thicker surface layer than the Adamsville soil. association of Poorly Drained Neutral to Alkaline
It does not have the organic pan that occurs in the Sands and Sandy Clays.
Leon and Immokalee soils. It has a darker colored Eustis fine sand, level phase (Ea).-This strongly acid
surface layer than Charlotte fine sand and it lacks the soil has developed from thick beds of sand. It occu-
yellowish lower layer that occurs in that soil. The pies nearly level areas, principally in the north-cen-
Manatee soils have finer textured materials within 30 tral part of the county. Fairly large areas occur be-
inches of the surface. tween Thonotosassa and Seffner and near Brandon,
The natural vegetation consists of various grasses, Valrico, and Limona. The soil is associated with soils
gallberry, myrtle bushes, a few cabbage palmettos, of the Lakeland, Blanton, and Gainesville series. It
and pines and hardwoods. differs from the Lakeland and Blanton soils in color






18 SOIL SURVEY SERIES 1950, NO. 3

Profile description: Profile description:
0 to 4 inches, grayish-brown loose fine sand containing 0 to 12 inches, black fine sand; contains a large amount of
enough organic material to give it a salt-and-pepper organic matter; slightly acid to neutral.
appearance; slightly acid to neutral. 12 to 26 inches, very dark gray or dark gray nearly loose
4 to 12 inches, light brownish-gray or light yellowish- fine sand; slightly acid to neutral.
brown loose fine sand; neutral to alkaline. 26 to 42 inches, gray or light-gray nearly loose fine sand
12 to 30 inches, brownish-yellow or yellowish-brown loose streaked with pale yellow and brown; neutral to alkaline.
fine sand; neutral to alkaline.
30 to 48 inches +, pale brown to very pale brown or white The dark surface soil ranges from 7 to 20 inches in
loose fine sand with splotches of yellow; neutral to thickness. In places it grades to light-gray sand, and
alkaline. the very dark gray or dark gray horizon is absent.
The surface layer ranges from 3 to 8 inches in thick- In some places a grayish-brown horizon of fine sand
ness and in places is very dark gray or light brownish occurs at depths between 30 and 42 inches.
gray. The surface layer generally has light colors This soil is poorly drained to very poorly drained.
where the soil adjoins areas of Adamsville or Leon Surface runoff is slow. Internal drainage is rapid if
soils. In these border areas the horizon immediately not retarded by the high water table.
below the surface layer is light gray to a depth of Use and management.-A few areas of this soil
15 to 24 inches, and the third layer is bright yellow near Ruskin have been included in fields of other soils
to brownish yellow or yellowish brown. This third and are used to grow vegetables. The rest is used as
layer may have a few iron concretions in the lower range pasture. Fairly high yields of vegetable crops
part, and it overlies sandy materials that become are obtained under good management. The soil re-
lighter colored at increasing depths. quires fertilizer, however, and some means of water
Near the Pinellas County line in the northwestern control. The natural vegetation provides fair to good
part of the county, there are several areas where mot- grazing. A few areas that have been fertilized and
tied gray, yellowish-brown, and brownish-yellow fine seeded to improved pasture grasses provide good
sandy clay loam or fine sandy clay begins at depths of forage.
30 to 42 inches. These areas are under water several Ditches and canals have been dug to drain some of
months of the year, and the mottling indicates their the areas. Many of these, however, should have dams
poor drainage. or locks to control the rate of runoff. If the water is
Use and management.-Practically all of this soil is allowed to drain into the ditches without any control,
covered by native grasses, a few cabbage palmettos, the water table in the adjacent higher lying soils may
and pines and shrubs. This natural vegetation pro- be lowered so much that plant growth on the higher
vides fair grazing for cattle. The carrying capacity is soils will be retarded. Many of the depressions serve
1 cow to each 10 to 20 acres. Improved pastures will as natural reservoirs for water.
support a cow on 2 or 3 acres. This soil is in capability unit IIIs-3 and in the soil
Little of this soil is used for crops, but it would association of Poorly Drained Neutral to Alkaline
give good yields of vegetables if well managed. Fer- Sands and Sandy Clays.
tilization and water control are needed for crops or Delray fine sand, shallow phase (Db).-This inexten-
for improved pasture. sive soil generally occupies level or slightly depressed
This soil is in capability unit IVs-3 and in the soil areas near Ruskin and Sun City in the southwestern
association of Poorly Drained Neutral to Alkaline part of the county. Except that clayey materials oc-
Sands and Sandy Clays. cur at depths of 30 to 42 inches, it is similar to typi-
Delray fine sand (Da).-This dark-colored soil has cal Delray fine sand. The clayey materials consist of
formed from moderately thick beds of sand that over- gray or light-gray fine sandy clay loam or fine sandy
lie calcareous materials. It occupies level or slightly clay, mottled with pale yellow and grayish brown.
depressed areas, mainly near the coast between Sun This soil resembles the Manatee soils, but the clayey
City and the Pinellas County line, and near Sixmile materials in the Manatee soils are nearer the surface.
Creek. Some areas occur in the southern and north- Use and management.-A few areas of this soil are
eastern parts of the county. included in fields of other soils that are used to grow
The soil is associated with soils of the Ruskin, vegetables and truck crops. Fair to good yields are
Adamsville, Keri, Bradenton, Leon, Immokalee, Pom- obtained -under good management. Most areas are
pano, Charlotte, and Manatee series. It has a darker used as range pasture. Where the soil is not flooded
surface layer than the Ruskin and Bradenton soils too often, the natural vegetation provides good forage.
and lacks the clayey materials that occur in the pro- Water control and liberal fertilization are necessary.
files of those soils. It occupies wetter areas and has a This soil is in capability unit IIIs-3 and in the soil
darker, thicker surface layer than the Adamsville soil. association of Poorly Drained Neutral to Alkaline
It does not have the organic pan that occurs in the Sands and Sandy Clays.
Leon and Immokalee soils. It has a darker colored Eustis fine sand, level phase (Ea).-This strongly acid
surface layer than Charlotte fine sand and it lacks the soil has developed from thick beds of sand. It occu-
yellowish lower layer that occurs in that soil. The pies nearly level areas, principally in the north-cen-
Manatee soils have finer textured materials within 30 tral part of the county. Fairly large areas occur be-
inches of the surface. tween Thonotosassa and Seffner and near Brandon,
The natural vegetation consists of various grasses, Valrico, and Limona. The soil is associated with soils
gallberry, myrtle bushes, a few cabbage palmettos, of the Lakeland, Blanton, and Gainesville series. It
and pines and hardwoods. differs from the Lakeland and Blanton soils in color






HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 19

and from the Gainesville soils in texture. The Gaines- areas occur within or next to areas of Bradenton soils.
ville soils, which are-finer textured, were derived from Other associated soils belong to the Pompano, Char-
loamy sands mixed with phosphatic materials. lotte, and Manatee series.
The natural vegetation consists of scrub live oaks, The natural vegetation consists of various grasses;
turkey oaks, bluejack oaks, sand pines, rosemary, a a few pines, saw-palmettos, and cabbage palmettos;
few saw-palmettos, and grasses. and gallberry bushes, myrtle bushes, and other shrubs.
Profile description: Profile description:
0 to 6 inches, dark grayish-brown or grayish-brown loose 0 to 6 inches, very dark gray or dark gray nearly loose
fine sand; contains a small amount of organic matter; fine sand; contains a large quantity of organic matter
has a salt-and-pepper appearance. and has a salt-and-pepper appearance; slightly acid.
6 to 12 inches, yellowish-brown or brownish-yellow loose 6 to 18 inches, grayish-brown to light-gray nearly loose
fine sand. fine sand; slightly acid.
12 to 48 inches +, strong-brown, reddish-yellow, or yel- 18 to 30 inches, light brownish-gray or light-gray fine sandy
lowish-red loose fine sand. clay loam in which a few yellow, yellowish-brown, or
This soil is strongly acid throughout. It is wll brownish-yellow mottles occur; slightly acid to neutral.
This soil is strongly acid throughout. It is well 30 to 48 inches +, mottled light-gray, brownish-yellow, and
drained to somewhat excessively drained. yellow fine sandy clay loam; contains a few lime and
Use and management.-A large acreage of this soil iron concretions; alkaline.
has been planted to citrus trees. A few areas are used The surface layer ranges from 3 to 9 inches in thick-
to grow watermelons and general crops. Citrus trees ness, and in some places it is gray. The sand mantle
yield well if well managed, but they need fertilizer, ranges from 6 to 30 inches in thickness.
and irrigation must be provided during extremely dry No appreciable runoff occurs, and internal drainage
periods. Many areas are still covered by native is slow. During the rainy season, water drains onto
grasses and shrubs, which provide poor to fair graz- this soil from nearby higher lying soils. The areas in
ing during part of the year. depressions are covered by water for many days at
This soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in the soil a time.
association of Well-Drained Deep Sands. Use and management.-Most of this soil is used for
Eustis fine sand, gently undulating phase (Eb).-Most range pasture. The native grasses provide fair graz-
of this soil is on slopes of 2 to 5 percent, but some ing. A few areas near Ruskin are included in fields
areas near sinkholes, lakes, ponds, or streams are on used to grow vegetables and truck crops. Good yields
short slopes of 5 to 10 percent. Except for slope the are obtained if good management practices, including
soil resembles Eustis fine sand, level phase. It occurs liberal fertilization and water control, are followed.
in the north-central part of the county. Large areas This soil is in capability unit IIIs-3 and in the soil
occur between Thonotosassa and Seffner and near association of Poorly Drained Neutral to Alkaline
Valrico, Brandon, and Limona. Sands and Sandy Clays.
This soil is strongly acid throughout. It is well Fellowship loamy fine sand (Fb).-This dark-colored
drained to somewhat excessively drained. Surface soil was derived from thin beds of loamy sand and
runoff is medium to rapid. Internal drainage is rapid. sandy clay, mixed with residuum from phosphatic
Use and management.-Much of this soil is in citrus limestone. It occupies a few of the high ridges in the
groves. A small acreage is planted to watermelons north-central part of the county. Most of the areas
and general crops. Citrus trees produce good yields occur a few miles north and northwest of Mango and
if well managed. They need liberal applications of near the Hillsborough River. Approximately one-
fertilizer and should be irrigated during extremely third of the areas are nearly level. The rest are on
dry seasons. Cover crops should be grown between slopes of 2 to 8 percent.
the rows. The soils on slopes steeper than 5 percent This soil is associated with soils of the Blichton,
are subject to erosion during hard rains if cultivated Gainesville, and Arredondo series. It has a darker
and should be managed as suggested for soils in capa- colored and finer textured surface layer than the
ability unit IVs-4. Blichton soil, and fine sandy clay occurs at shallower
This soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in the soil depths. Its texture is not so coarse as that of the
association of Well-Drained Deep Sands. Gainesville and Arredondo soils.
Felda fine sand (Fa).-This poorly drained gray soil The natural vegetation consists of live oak, pine,
has a thin mantle of fine sand over alkaline clayey shrubs, and grasses.
materials. The clayey materials, in places, contain Profile description:
calcareous concretions or shell fragments. The soil 0 to 6 inches, very dark gray loamy fine sand; contains a
generally occupies level or slightly depressed areas, few pebbles and small stones occur on
but a few areas are on slopes of 2 to 5 percent. the surface; strongly acid.
This soil is more poorly drained than the Ruskin, 6 to 12 inches, dark-gray loamy fine sand; contains many
Sunniland, and Adamsville soils. Unlike the Pompano pebb12 to 42 inches st, mottled gray, yellowronglyish-brown, anacid.d yel-
soils, which consist of fine sand throughout, this soil low fine sandy clay; sticky and plastic when wet and
has clayey materials in its profile. very hard when dry; contains many pebbles and rounded
Fairly large areas occur next to or within areas of stones; strongly acid.
Sunniland soils near the Hillsborough River in the The surface layer ranges from nearly black to dark
northern part of the county. Small areas occur next gray in color and from 4 to 8 inches in thickness. In
to areas of Ruskin and Adamsville soils along the many places the 6- to 12-inch layer is absent and the
coast from Sun City to the vicinity of Oldsmar. Some dark-colored surface soil immediately overlies the






HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 19

and from the Gainesville soils in texture. The Gaines- areas occur within or next to areas of Bradenton soils.
ville soils, which are-finer textured, were derived from Other associated soils belong to the Pompano, Char-
loamy sands mixed with phosphatic materials. lotte, and Manatee series.
The natural vegetation consists of scrub live oaks, The natural vegetation consists of various grasses;
turkey oaks, bluejack oaks, sand pines, rosemary, a a few pines, saw-palmettos, and cabbage palmettos;
few saw-palmettos, and grasses. and gallberry bushes, myrtle bushes, and other shrubs.
Profile description: Profile description:
0 to 6 inches, dark grayish-brown or grayish-brown loose 0 to 6 inches, very dark gray or dark gray nearly loose
fine sand; contains a small amount of organic matter; fine sand; contains a large quantity of organic matter
has a salt-and-pepper appearance. and has a salt-and-pepper appearance; slightly acid.
6 to 12 inches, yellowish-brown or brownish-yellow loose 6 to 18 inches, grayish-brown to light-gray nearly loose
fine sand. fine sand; slightly acid.
12 to 48 inches +, strong-brown, reddish-yellow, or yel- 18 to 30 inches, light brownish-gray or light-gray fine sandy
lowish-red loose fine sand. clay loam in which a few yellow, yellowish-brown, or
This soil is strongly acid throughout. It is wll brownish-yellow mottles occur; slightly acid to neutral.
This soil is strongly acid throughout. It is well 30 to 48 inches +, mottled light-gray, brownish-yellow, and
drained to somewhat excessively drained. yellow fine sandy clay loam; contains a few lime and
Use and management.-A large acreage of this soil iron concretions; alkaline.
has been planted to citrus trees. A few areas are used The surface layer ranges from 3 to 9 inches in thick-
to grow watermelons and general crops. Citrus trees ness, and in some places it is gray. The sand mantle
yield well if well managed, but they need fertilizer, ranges from 6 to 30 inches in thickness.
and irrigation must be provided during extremely dry No appreciable runoff occurs, and internal drainage
periods. Many areas are still covered by native is slow. During the rainy season, water drains onto
grasses and shrubs, which provide poor to fair graz- this soil from nearby higher lying soils. The areas in
ing during part of the year. depressions are covered by water for many days at
This soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in the soil a time.
association of Well-Drained Deep Sands. Use and management.-Most of this soil is used for
Eustis fine sand, gently undulating phase (Eb).-Most range pasture. The native grasses provide fair graz-
of this soil is on slopes of 2 to 5 percent, but some ing. A few areas near Ruskin are included in fields
areas near sinkholes, lakes, ponds, or streams are on used to grow vegetables and truck crops. Good yields
short slopes of 5 to 10 percent. Except for slope the are obtained if good management practices, including
soil resembles Eustis fine sand, level phase. It occurs liberal fertilization and water control, are followed.
in the north-central part of the county. Large areas This soil is in capability unit IIIs-3 and in the soil
occur between Thonotosassa and Seffner and near association of Poorly Drained Neutral to Alkaline
Valrico, Brandon, and Limona. Sands and Sandy Clays.
This soil is strongly acid throughout. It is well Fellowship loamy fine sand (Fb).-This dark-colored
drained to somewhat excessively drained. Surface soil was derived from thin beds of loamy sand and
runoff is medium to rapid. Internal drainage is rapid. sandy clay, mixed with residuum from phosphatic
Use and management.-Much of this soil is in citrus limestone. It occupies a few of the high ridges in the
groves. A small acreage is planted to watermelons north-central part of the county. Most of the areas
and general crops. Citrus trees produce good yields occur a few miles north and northwest of Mango and
if well managed. They need liberal applications of near the Hillsborough River. Approximately one-
fertilizer and should be irrigated during extremely third of the areas are nearly level. The rest are on
dry seasons. Cover crops should be grown between slopes of 2 to 8 percent.
the rows. The soils on slopes steeper than 5 percent This soil is associated with soils of the Blichton,
are subject to erosion during hard rains if cultivated Gainesville, and Arredondo series. It has a darker
and should be managed as suggested for soils in capa- colored and finer textured surface layer than the
ability unit IVs-4. Blichton soil, and fine sandy clay occurs at shallower
This soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in the soil depths. Its texture is not so coarse as that of the
association of Well-Drained Deep Sands. Gainesville and Arredondo soils.
Felda fine sand (Fa).-This poorly drained gray soil The natural vegetation consists of live oak, pine,
has a thin mantle of fine sand over alkaline clayey shrubs, and grasses.
materials. The clayey materials, in places, contain Profile description:
calcareous concretions or shell fragments. The soil 0 to 6 inches, very dark gray loamy fine sand; contains a
generally occupies level or slightly depressed areas, few pebbles and small stones occur on
but a few areas are on slopes of 2 to 5 percent. the surface; strongly acid.
This soil is more poorly drained than the Ruskin, 6 to 12 inches, dark-gray loamy fine sand; contains many
Sunniland, and Adamsville soils. Unlike the Pompano pebb12 to 42 inches st, mottled gray, yellowronglyish-brown, anacid.d yel-
soils, which consist of fine sand throughout, this soil low fine sandy clay; sticky and plastic when wet and
has clayey materials in its profile. very hard when dry; contains many pebbles and rounded
Fairly large areas occur next to or within areas of stones; strongly acid.
Sunniland soils near the Hillsborough River in the The surface layer ranges from nearly black to dark
northern part of the county. Small areas occur next gray in color and from 4 to 8 inches in thickness. In
to areas of Ruskin and Adamsville soils along the many places the 6- to 12-inch layer is absent and the
coast from Sun City to the vicinity of Oldsmar. Some dark-colored surface soil immediately overlies the






20 SOIL SURVEY SERIES 1950, NO. 3

horizon of mottled gray or grayish-brown, yellowish- association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos-
brown, and yellow fine sandy clay. phatic Materials.
Drainage is somewhat poor. Surface runoff is me- Fort Meade loamy fine sand, undulating phase (Fd).-
dium, and internal drainage is slow. Except for slope this soil resembles Fort Meade loamy
Use and management.-Most of this soil is covered fine sand, level phase. Slopes generally range from
by the native vegetation, which provides fair to good 2 to 5 percent, but a few areas, near sinkholes and
grazing. A few areas are included in fields with other depressions, are on slopes of 5 to 8 percent. A small
soils that are used to grow general crops. Yields are area of about 25 acres, in the western part of sec. 1,
fair to good under good management. Liberal appli- T. 30 S., R. 20 E., is on slopes as steep as 15 percent.
cations of fertilizer are needed, however, and in places Many pebbles and small rounded stones occur on the
irrigation is required. Sloping areas should be planted surface and throughout the profile. The soil occurs
to cover crops or kept under grass, when not used for near Brandon, Valrico, Seffner, Cork, and Limona, and
tilled crops, to protect them from sheet erosion during north of Dover, Plant City, and Knights.
heavy rains. Use and management.-This soil is used to grow
This soil is in capability unit IIe-1 and in the soil citrus fruits, vegetables, and general crops, or for pas-
association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos- ture. Several areas are covered by the natural vege-
phatic Materials. station of pines and hardwood trees, shrubs, and
Fort Meade loamy fine sand, level phase (Fc).-This grasses. Good yields of tilled crops are obtained if
dark-colored soil has developed from moderately thick management is good and weather is favorable. Fer-
beds of loamy sand mixed to some extent with mate- tilizers are needed, and cover crops should be grown.
rials from beds of phosphatic pebbles. It occupies Some vegetable crops need irrigation during dry sea-
fairly large level or nearly level areas in the east- sons. The areas planted to improved pasture grasses
central part of the county, mainly near Brandon, Val- provide good grazing if fertilized adequately.
rico, and Seffner, east of Bloomingdale, and north of Some sloping areas have been damaged slightly by
Dover and Plant City. erosion during heavy rains. To prevent serious dam-
This soil is associated with the Gainesville, Arre- age from runoff, cover crops or natural plant growth
dondo, Lakeland, and Scranton soils. The surface should cover the slopes in citrus groves and culti-
layer is darker colored and thicker than that of the vated fields. Sloping areas that are not tilled should
Gainesville, Arredondo, and Lakeland soils. The Lake- remain under a good vegetative cover. Slopes steeper
land soils were not derived from phosphatic materials. than 5 percent are subject to erosion if not protected
The Fort Meade soil is higher in phosphorus than the during heavy rains and should be managed as sug-
Scranton soil and is better drained. gested for soils of capability unit IIs-2.
The natural vegetation consists of live, bluejack, and This soil is in capability unit IIs-2 and in the soil
turkey oaks, hickory, and other hardwoods; pine; and association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos-
phatic Materials.
grasses. Fresh water swamp (unclassified soils) (Fe).-This
Profile description: mapping unit occurs mostly in sloughlike depressions.
0 to 12 inches, black loamy fine sand; contains a large It consists of swamps, cypress strands, and shallow
amount of organic matter and a few phosphatic pebbles; ponds. Some of the areas serve as natural drainage-
a few pebbles are on the surface.
12 to 20 inches, dark grayish-brown loamy fine sand; con- ways in the flatwoods. Fairly large areas occur in
tains a few phosphatic pebbles. the southern, northern, northeastern, and northwest-
20 to 42 inches +, grayish-brown or brown loamy fine sand; ern parts of the county.
contains many phosphatic pebbles and small rounded Included in the mapping unit are areas of Rutlege,
stones. Portsmouth, Plummer, Delray, Manatee, Pompano,
The surface layer ranges from 10 to 20 inches in and Istokpoga soils. It is impractical to try to map
thickness, and in places it is dark grayish brown. In these soils separately because the soils are so inter-
some places the lower part of the profile is pale brown, mingled, the vegetation so dense, and the land so wet.
yellowish brown, or reddish brown. Many areas support a growth of water oak, laurel
This soil is medium acid throughout. It is well oak, gum, ash, maple, bay, waxmyrtle, willow, cypress,
drained. Surface runoff is slow to medium; internal and various shrubs. A few airplants grow on some
drainage is medium to rapid. of the trees. A mixture of trees grows in the swamps,
Use and management.-A large acreage of this soil and cypress grows in the strands and ponds. Cypress
is used to grow citrus trees, vegetables, and general and a few shrubs and grasses grow in the small
crops. Yields are high under good management if the rounded or oval areas.
weather is favorable. Many kinds of vegetables could Within short distances the soils vary in the color,
be grown on this soil if the crops were irrigated dur- texture, composition, and thickness of the various lay-
ing dry seasons. The soil is fairly high in phosphorus, ers. In places the topmost 2- or 3-inch layer is black
but it needs fertilizer, including the minor elements, ohis mapping unit has practically no agricultural
and some areas need lime. Some areas have been fer- value and was not given a capability classification.
tilized and seeded to Bahiagrass, Pangolagrass, and Much of it is under water most of the time, but the
other improved pasture grasses. Pines and hardwood water level varies from year to year and from season
trees grow on a few areas. to season. Sometimes the surface is dry. Reclama-
This soil is in capability unit IIs-2 and in the soil tion would be impractical because artificial drainage






20 SOIL SURVEY SERIES 1950, NO. 3

horizon of mottled gray or grayish-brown, yellowish- association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos-
brown, and yellow fine sandy clay. phatic Materials.
Drainage is somewhat poor. Surface runoff is me- Fort Meade loamy fine sand, undulating phase (Fd).-
dium, and internal drainage is slow. Except for slope this soil resembles Fort Meade loamy
Use and management.-Most of this soil is covered fine sand, level phase. Slopes generally range from
by the native vegetation, which provides fair to good 2 to 5 percent, but a few areas, near sinkholes and
grazing. A few areas are included in fields with other depressions, are on slopes of 5 to 8 percent. A small
soils that are used to grow general crops. Yields are area of about 25 acres, in the western part of sec. 1,
fair to good under good management. Liberal appli- T. 30 S., R. 20 E., is on slopes as steep as 15 percent.
cations of fertilizer are needed, however, and in places Many pebbles and small rounded stones occur on the
irrigation is required. Sloping areas should be planted surface and throughout the profile. The soil occurs
to cover crops or kept under grass, when not used for near Brandon, Valrico, Seffner, Cork, and Limona, and
tilled crops, to protect them from sheet erosion during north of Dover, Plant City, and Knights.
heavy rains. Use and management.-This soil is used to grow
This soil is in capability unit IIe-1 and in the soil citrus fruits, vegetables, and general crops, or for pas-
association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos- ture. Several areas are covered by the natural vege-
phatic Materials. station of pines and hardwood trees, shrubs, and
Fort Meade loamy fine sand, level phase (Fc).-This grasses. Good yields of tilled crops are obtained if
dark-colored soil has developed from moderately thick management is good and weather is favorable. Fer-
beds of loamy sand mixed to some extent with mate- tilizers are needed, and cover crops should be grown.
rials from beds of phosphatic pebbles. It occupies Some vegetable crops need irrigation during dry sea-
fairly large level or nearly level areas in the east- sons. The areas planted to improved pasture grasses
central part of the county, mainly near Brandon, Val- provide good grazing if fertilized adequately.
rico, and Seffner, east of Bloomingdale, and north of Some sloping areas have been damaged slightly by
Dover and Plant City. erosion during heavy rains. To prevent serious dam-
This soil is associated with the Gainesville, Arre- age from runoff, cover crops or natural plant growth
dondo, Lakeland, and Scranton soils. The surface should cover the slopes in citrus groves and culti-
layer is darker colored and thicker than that of the vated fields. Sloping areas that are not tilled should
Gainesville, Arredondo, and Lakeland soils. The Lake- remain under a good vegetative cover. Slopes steeper
land soils were not derived from phosphatic materials. than 5 percent are subject to erosion if not protected
The Fort Meade soil is higher in phosphorus than the during heavy rains and should be managed as sug-
Scranton soil and is better drained. gested for soils of capability unit IIs-2.
The natural vegetation consists of live, bluejack, and This soil is in capability unit IIs-2 and in the soil
turkey oaks, hickory, and other hardwoods; pine; and association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos-
phatic Materials.
grasses. Fresh water swamp (unclassified soils) (Fe).-This
Profile description: mapping unit occurs mostly in sloughlike depressions.
0 to 12 inches, black loamy fine sand; contains a large It consists of swamps, cypress strands, and shallow
amount of organic matter and a few phosphatic pebbles; ponds. Some of the areas serve as natural drainage-
a few pebbles are on the surface.
12 to 20 inches, dark grayish-brown loamy fine sand; con- ways in the flatwoods. Fairly large areas occur in
tains a few phosphatic pebbles. the southern, northern, northeastern, and northwest-
20 to 42 inches +, grayish-brown or brown loamy fine sand; ern parts of the county.
contains many phosphatic pebbles and small rounded Included in the mapping unit are areas of Rutlege,
stones. Portsmouth, Plummer, Delray, Manatee, Pompano,
The surface layer ranges from 10 to 20 inches in and Istokpoga soils. It is impractical to try to map
thickness, and in places it is dark grayish brown. In these soils separately because the soils are so inter-
some places the lower part of the profile is pale brown, mingled, the vegetation so dense, and the land so wet.
yellowish brown, or reddish brown. Many areas support a growth of water oak, laurel
This soil is medium acid throughout. It is well oak, gum, ash, maple, bay, waxmyrtle, willow, cypress,
drained. Surface runoff is slow to medium; internal and various shrubs. A few airplants grow on some
drainage is medium to rapid. of the trees. A mixture of trees grows in the swamps,
Use and management.-A large acreage of this soil and cypress grows in the strands and ponds. Cypress
is used to grow citrus trees, vegetables, and general and a few shrubs and grasses grow in the small
crops. Yields are high under good management if the rounded or oval areas.
weather is favorable. Many kinds of vegetables could Within short distances the soils vary in the color,
be grown on this soil if the crops were irrigated dur- texture, composition, and thickness of the various lay-
ing dry seasons. The soil is fairly high in phosphorus, ers. In places the topmost 2- or 3-inch layer is black
but it needs fertilizer, including the minor elements, ohis mapping unit has practically no agricultural
and some areas need lime. Some areas have been fer- value and was not given a capability classification.
tilized and seeded to Bahiagrass, Pangolagrass, and Much of it is under water most of the time, but the
other improved pasture grasses. Pines and hardwood water level varies from year to year and from season
trees grow on a few areas. to season. Sometimes the surface is dry. Reclama-
This soil is in capability unit IIs-2 and in the soil tion would be impractical because artificial drainage






20 SOIL SURVEY SERIES 1950, NO. 3

horizon of mottled gray or grayish-brown, yellowish- association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos-
brown, and yellow fine sandy clay. phatic Materials.
Drainage is somewhat poor. Surface runoff is me- Fort Meade loamy fine sand, undulating phase (Fd).-
dium, and internal drainage is slow. Except for slope this soil resembles Fort Meade loamy
Use and management.-Most of this soil is covered fine sand, level phase. Slopes generally range from
by the native vegetation, which provides fair to good 2 to 5 percent, but a few areas, near sinkholes and
grazing. A few areas are included in fields with other depressions, are on slopes of 5 to 8 percent. A small
soils that are used to grow general crops. Yields are area of about 25 acres, in the western part of sec. 1,
fair to good under good management. Liberal appli- T. 30 S., R. 20 E., is on slopes as steep as 15 percent.
cations of fertilizer are needed, however, and in places Many pebbles and small rounded stones occur on the
irrigation is required. Sloping areas should be planted surface and throughout the profile. The soil occurs
to cover crops or kept under grass, when not used for near Brandon, Valrico, Seffner, Cork, and Limona, and
tilled crops, to protect them from sheet erosion during north of Dover, Plant City, and Knights.
heavy rains. Use and management.-This soil is used to grow
This soil is in capability unit IIe-1 and in the soil citrus fruits, vegetables, and general crops, or for pas-
association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos- ture. Several areas are covered by the natural vege-
phatic Materials. station of pines and hardwood trees, shrubs, and
Fort Meade loamy fine sand, level phase (Fc).-This grasses. Good yields of tilled crops are obtained if
dark-colored soil has developed from moderately thick management is good and weather is favorable. Fer-
beds of loamy sand mixed to some extent with mate- tilizers are needed, and cover crops should be grown.
rials from beds of phosphatic pebbles. It occupies Some vegetable crops need irrigation during dry sea-
fairly large level or nearly level areas in the east- sons. The areas planted to improved pasture grasses
central part of the county, mainly near Brandon, Val- provide good grazing if fertilized adequately.
rico, and Seffner, east of Bloomingdale, and north of Some sloping areas have been damaged slightly by
Dover and Plant City. erosion during heavy rains. To prevent serious dam-
This soil is associated with the Gainesville, Arre- age from runoff, cover crops or natural plant growth
dondo, Lakeland, and Scranton soils. The surface should cover the slopes in citrus groves and culti-
layer is darker colored and thicker than that of the vated fields. Sloping areas that are not tilled should
Gainesville, Arredondo, and Lakeland soils. The Lake- remain under a good vegetative cover. Slopes steeper
land soils were not derived from phosphatic materials. than 5 percent are subject to erosion if not protected
The Fort Meade soil is higher in phosphorus than the during heavy rains and should be managed as sug-
Scranton soil and is better drained. gested for soils of capability unit IIs-2.
The natural vegetation consists of live, bluejack, and This soil is in capability unit IIs-2 and in the soil
turkey oaks, hickory, and other hardwoods; pine; and association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos-
phatic Materials.
grasses. Fresh water swamp (unclassified soils) (Fe).-This
Profile description: mapping unit occurs mostly in sloughlike depressions.
0 to 12 inches, black loamy fine sand; contains a large It consists of swamps, cypress strands, and shallow
amount of organic matter and a few phosphatic pebbles; ponds. Some of the areas serve as natural drainage-
a few pebbles are on the surface.
12 to 20 inches, dark grayish-brown loamy fine sand; con- ways in the flatwoods. Fairly large areas occur in
tains a few phosphatic pebbles. the southern, northern, northeastern, and northwest-
20 to 42 inches +, grayish-brown or brown loamy fine sand; ern parts of the county.
contains many phosphatic pebbles and small rounded Included in the mapping unit are areas of Rutlege,
stones. Portsmouth, Plummer, Delray, Manatee, Pompano,
The surface layer ranges from 10 to 20 inches in and Istokpoga soils. It is impractical to try to map
thickness, and in places it is dark grayish brown. In these soils separately because the soils are so inter-
some places the lower part of the profile is pale brown, mingled, the vegetation so dense, and the land so wet.
yellowish brown, or reddish brown. Many areas support a growth of water oak, laurel
This soil is medium acid throughout. It is well oak, gum, ash, maple, bay, waxmyrtle, willow, cypress,
drained. Surface runoff is slow to medium; internal and various shrubs. A few airplants grow on some
drainage is medium to rapid. of the trees. A mixture of trees grows in the swamps,
Use and management.-A large acreage of this soil and cypress grows in the strands and ponds. Cypress
is used to grow citrus trees, vegetables, and general and a few shrubs and grasses grow in the small
crops. Yields are high under good management if the rounded or oval areas.
weather is favorable. Many kinds of vegetables could Within short distances the soils vary in the color,
be grown on this soil if the crops were irrigated dur- texture, composition, and thickness of the various lay-
ing dry seasons. The soil is fairly high in phosphorus, ers. In places the topmost 2- or 3-inch layer is black
but it needs fertilizer, including the minor elements, ohis mapping unit has practically no agricultural
and some areas need lime. Some areas have been fer- value and was not given a capability classification.
tilized and seeded to Bahiagrass, Pangolagrass, and Much of it is under water most of the time, but the
other improved pasture grasses. Pines and hardwood water level varies from year to year and from season
trees grow on a few areas. to season. Sometimes the surface is dry. Reclama-
This soil is in capability unit IIs-2 and in the soil tion would be impractical because artificial drainage






20 SOIL SURVEY SERIES 1950, NO. 3

horizon of mottled gray or grayish-brown, yellowish- association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos-
brown, and yellow fine sandy clay. phatic Materials.
Drainage is somewhat poor. Surface runoff is me- Fort Meade loamy fine sand, undulating phase (Fd).-
dium, and internal drainage is slow. Except for slope this soil resembles Fort Meade loamy
Use and management.-Most of this soil is covered fine sand, level phase. Slopes generally range from
by the native vegetation, which provides fair to good 2 to 5 percent, but a few areas, near sinkholes and
grazing. A few areas are included in fields with other depressions, are on slopes of 5 to 8 percent. A small
soils that are used to grow general crops. Yields are area of about 25 acres, in the western part of sec. 1,
fair to good under good management. Liberal appli- T. 30 S., R. 20 E., is on slopes as steep as 15 percent.
cations of fertilizer are needed, however, and in places Many pebbles and small rounded stones occur on the
irrigation is required. Sloping areas should be planted surface and throughout the profile. The soil occurs
to cover crops or kept under grass, when not used for near Brandon, Valrico, Seffner, Cork, and Limona, and
tilled crops, to protect them from sheet erosion during north of Dover, Plant City, and Knights.
heavy rains. Use and management.-This soil is used to grow
This soil is in capability unit IIe-1 and in the soil citrus fruits, vegetables, and general crops, or for pas-
association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos- ture. Several areas are covered by the natural vege-
phatic Materials. station of pines and hardwood trees, shrubs, and
Fort Meade loamy fine sand, level phase (Fc).-This grasses. Good yields of tilled crops are obtained if
dark-colored soil has developed from moderately thick management is good and weather is favorable. Fer-
beds of loamy sand mixed to some extent with mate- tilizers are needed, and cover crops should be grown.
rials from beds of phosphatic pebbles. It occupies Some vegetable crops need irrigation during dry sea-
fairly large level or nearly level areas in the east- sons. The areas planted to improved pasture grasses
central part of the county, mainly near Brandon, Val- provide good grazing if fertilized adequately.
rico, and Seffner, east of Bloomingdale, and north of Some sloping areas have been damaged slightly by
Dover and Plant City. erosion during heavy rains. To prevent serious dam-
This soil is associated with the Gainesville, Arre- age from runoff, cover crops or natural plant growth
dondo, Lakeland, and Scranton soils. The surface should cover the slopes in citrus groves and culti-
layer is darker colored and thicker than that of the vated fields. Sloping areas that are not tilled should
Gainesville, Arredondo, and Lakeland soils. The Lake- remain under a good vegetative cover. Slopes steeper
land soils were not derived from phosphatic materials. than 5 percent are subject to erosion if not protected
The Fort Meade soil is higher in phosphorus than the during heavy rains and should be managed as sug-
Scranton soil and is better drained. gested for soils of capability unit IIs-2.
The natural vegetation consists of live, bluejack, and This soil is in capability unit IIs-2 and in the soil
turkey oaks, hickory, and other hardwoods; pine; and association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos-
phatic Materials.
grasses. Fresh water swamp (unclassified soils) (Fe).-This
Profile description: mapping unit occurs mostly in sloughlike depressions.
0 to 12 inches, black loamy fine sand; contains a large It consists of swamps, cypress strands, and shallow
amount of organic matter and a few phosphatic pebbles; ponds. Some of the areas serve as natural drainage-
a few pebbles are on the surface.
12 to 20 inches, dark grayish-brown loamy fine sand; con- ways in the flatwoods. Fairly large areas occur in
tains a few phosphatic pebbles. the southern, northern, northeastern, and northwest-
20 to 42 inches +, grayish-brown or brown loamy fine sand; ern parts of the county.
contains many phosphatic pebbles and small rounded Included in the mapping unit are areas of Rutlege,
stones. Portsmouth, Plummer, Delray, Manatee, Pompano,
The surface layer ranges from 10 to 20 inches in and Istokpoga soils. It is impractical to try to map
thickness, and in places it is dark grayish brown. In these soils separately because the soils are so inter-
some places the lower part of the profile is pale brown, mingled, the vegetation so dense, and the land so wet.
yellowish brown, or reddish brown. Many areas support a growth of water oak, laurel
This soil is medium acid throughout. It is well oak, gum, ash, maple, bay, waxmyrtle, willow, cypress,
drained. Surface runoff is slow to medium; internal and various shrubs. A few airplants grow on some
drainage is medium to rapid. of the trees. A mixture of trees grows in the swamps,
Use and management.-A large acreage of this soil and cypress grows in the strands and ponds. Cypress
is used to grow citrus trees, vegetables, and general and a few shrubs and grasses grow in the small
crops. Yields are high under good management if the rounded or oval areas.
weather is favorable. Many kinds of vegetables could Within short distances the soils vary in the color,
be grown on this soil if the crops were irrigated dur- texture, composition, and thickness of the various lay-
ing dry seasons. The soil is fairly high in phosphorus, ers. In places the topmost 2- or 3-inch layer is black
but it needs fertilizer, including the minor elements, ohis mapping unit has practically no agricultural
and some areas need lime. Some areas have been fer- value and was not given a capability classification.
tilized and seeded to Bahiagrass, Pangolagrass, and Much of it is under water most of the time, but the
other improved pasture grasses. Pines and hardwood water level varies from year to year and from season
trees grow on a few areas. to season. Sometimes the surface is dry. Reclama-
This soil is in capability unit IIs-2 and in the soil tion would be impractical because artificial drainage






HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 21

would be likely to lower the water table of the higher association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos-
land surrounding the swamps. In their present con- phatic Materials.
edition, the swamps provide cover for wildlife and pro- Gainesville loamy fine sand, gently undulating phase
duce some forest products. Some of the merchantable (Gb).-This soil occurs principally near Brandon, Val-
cypress and hardwood timber is being harvested. rico, and Seffner, and north of Dover and Plant City.
Gainesville loamy fine sand, level phase '(Ga).-This It resembles Gainesville loamy fine sand, level phase,
brown, well-drained soil has developed from moder- except that most of it is on slopes of 2 to 5 percent.
ately thick beds of loamy sand, which has been mixed A few short slopes range up to 8 percent. More
to some extent with residuum from the underlying phosphatic pebbles occur on the surface and through-
phosphatic limestone. It occupies level or nearly level out the profile than in the level phase.
areas, mainly in the east-central part of the county In a few small areas, a layer of brown or strong-
near Brandon and Valrico and north of Seffner. brown fine sandy clay loam occurs at depths between
This soil is associated with soils of the Arredondo, 30 and 42 inches. This layer contains many pebbles
Fort Meade, Alachua, Eustis, and Lakeland series, and small stones. The total extent of these areas is a
Its surface layer resembles that of the Arredondo soils, little less than 100 acres.
but the lower horizons differ in color. Its surface layer Use and management.-This soil is used to grow
is not so dark colored nor so thick as that of the Fort citrus trees, general crops (fig. 5), and a few vege-
Meade soils. Its position differs from that of the tables. Some areas are pastured. Yields are good if
Alachua soil, which occurs in depressions within areas the soil is well managed and the weather is favorable.
of Gainesville soil. The Gainesville soil is not so sandy This soil is somewhat drought. If it is irrigated
as the Eustis soils. It is fairly high in phosphorus, during dry seasons, many kinds of vegetables can be
compared to the Eustis soils. grown with good results. Cover crops such as hairy
The natural vegetation consists of live oak, red oak, indigo, crotalaria, velvetbeans, and cowpeas, or beg-
hickory, magnolia, pine, shrubs, and grasses. garweeds or other natural vegetation, should be used
Profile description: to protect the soil when it is not in tilled crops. Cover
crops should also be planted between the rows in citrus
0 to 8 inches, very dark grayish-brown loamy fine sand; groves. The plant cover not only protects the soil
contains a moderate amount of organic matter and a few from erosion but also replenishes and increases the
small phosphatic pebbles; a few small pebbles occur on from erosion but also replenishes and increases the
the surface. content of organic matter.
8 to 18 inches, dark-brown loamy fine sand; contains a few Pastures on this soil are generally seeded to Pensa-
phosphatic pebbles. cola Bahiagrass, common Bahiagrass, Pangolagrass,
18 to 30 inches, brown loamy fine sand; contains a few or other improved grasses, and they are fertilized each
phosphatic pebbles.
30 to 42 inches +, strong-brown loamy fine sand; contains year. These pastures provide good forage. Forage is
a few phosphatic pebbles and small stones, further improved by planting hairy indigo and alyce-
clover with the grasses.
The surface layer ranges from nearly black to gray-
ish brown in color and from 6 to 9 inches in thick-
ness. At depths below about 18 inches, the soil is
brown in some places, and in others it is strong brown, ' -
reddish yellow, or reddish brown. Many pebbles and ..
small stones occur in places in the lower part of the ,
profile. Included in the mapping unit are a few areas
where brown or strong-brown fine sandy clay loam
begins at depths between 30 and 42 inches. These
areas are generally less than 5 acres in size, and their
total extent is only about 60 acres.
This soil is medium acid throughout. It is well
drained. Surface runoff is slow to medium, and in-
ternal drainage is medium to rapid.
Use and management.-Some areas of this soil are
planted to citrus trees. Others are used for general
crops. If the soil is well managed and the weather is
favorable, citrus yields are good, and yields of cow-
peas, corn, sweetpotatoes, and other crops are fair to
good.
The soil needs applications of mixed fertilizer. Be-
cause it is somewhat drought, it may be necessary to
irrigate crops during dry seasons. If properly irri-
gated, many kinds of vegetables can be grown.
Most pastures are fertilized and seeded to improved
pasture grasses. Lime is applied where needed. The
pastures provide a large quantity of good forage.
Trees grow well in the forested areas. Figure 5.-Cowpeas on Gainesville loamy fine sand, gently un-
This soil is in capability unit IIs-2 and in the soil dulating phase, near Valrico.






HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 21

would be likely to lower the water table of the higher association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos-
land surrounding the swamps. In their present con- phatic Materials.
edition, the swamps provide cover for wildlife and pro- Gainesville loamy fine sand, gently undulating phase
duce some forest products. Some of the merchantable (Gb).-This soil occurs principally near Brandon, Val-
cypress and hardwood timber is being harvested. rico, and Seffner, and north of Dover and Plant City.
Gainesville loamy fine sand, level phase '(Ga).-This It resembles Gainesville loamy fine sand, level phase,
brown, well-drained soil has developed from moder- except that most of it is on slopes of 2 to 5 percent.
ately thick beds of loamy sand, which has been mixed A few short slopes range up to 8 percent. More
to some extent with residuum from the underlying phosphatic pebbles occur on the surface and through-
phosphatic limestone. It occupies level or nearly level out the profile than in the level phase.
areas, mainly in the east-central part of the county In a few small areas, a layer of brown or strong-
near Brandon and Valrico and north of Seffner. brown fine sandy clay loam occurs at depths between
This soil is associated with soils of the Arredondo, 30 and 42 inches. This layer contains many pebbles
Fort Meade, Alachua, Eustis, and Lakeland series, and small stones. The total extent of these areas is a
Its surface layer resembles that of the Arredondo soils, little less than 100 acres.
but the lower horizons differ in color. Its surface layer Use and management.-This soil is used to grow
is not so dark colored nor so thick as that of the Fort citrus trees, general crops (fig. 5), and a few vege-
Meade soils. Its position differs from that of the tables. Some areas are pastured. Yields are good if
Alachua soil, which occurs in depressions within areas the soil is well managed and the weather is favorable.
of Gainesville soil. The Gainesville soil is not so sandy This soil is somewhat drought. If it is irrigated
as the Eustis soils. It is fairly high in phosphorus, during dry seasons, many kinds of vegetables can be
compared to the Eustis soils. grown with good results. Cover crops such as hairy
The natural vegetation consists of live oak, red oak, indigo, crotalaria, velvetbeans, and cowpeas, or beg-
hickory, magnolia, pine, shrubs, and grasses. garweeds or other natural vegetation, should be used
Profile description: to protect the soil when it is not in tilled crops. Cover
crops should also be planted between the rows in citrus
0 to 8 inches, very dark grayish-brown loamy fine sand; groves. The plant cover not only protects the soil
contains a moderate amount of organic matter and a few from erosion but also replenishes and increases the
small phosphatic pebbles; a few small pebbles occur on from erosion but also replenishes and increases the
the surface. content of organic matter.
8 to 18 inches, dark-brown loamy fine sand; contains a few Pastures on this soil are generally seeded to Pensa-
phosphatic pebbles. cola Bahiagrass, common Bahiagrass, Pangolagrass,
18 to 30 inches, brown loamy fine sand; contains a few or other improved grasses, and they are fertilized each
phosphatic pebbles.
30 to 42 inches +, strong-brown loamy fine sand; contains year. These pastures provide good forage. Forage is
a few phosphatic pebbles and small stones, further improved by planting hairy indigo and alyce-
clover with the grasses.
The surface layer ranges from nearly black to gray-
ish brown in color and from 6 to 9 inches in thick-
ness. At depths below about 18 inches, the soil is
brown in some places, and in others it is strong brown, ' -
reddish yellow, or reddish brown. Many pebbles and ..
small stones occur in places in the lower part of the ,
profile. Included in the mapping unit are a few areas
where brown or strong-brown fine sandy clay loam
begins at depths between 30 and 42 inches. These
areas are generally less than 5 acres in size, and their
total extent is only about 60 acres.
This soil is medium acid throughout. It is well
drained. Surface runoff is slow to medium, and in-
ternal drainage is medium to rapid.
Use and management.-Some areas of this soil are
planted to citrus trees. Others are used for general
crops. If the soil is well managed and the weather is
favorable, citrus yields are good, and yields of cow-
peas, corn, sweetpotatoes, and other crops are fair to
good.
The soil needs applications of mixed fertilizer. Be-
cause it is somewhat drought, it may be necessary to
irrigate crops during dry seasons. If properly irri-
gated, many kinds of vegetables can be grown.
Most pastures are fertilized and seeded to improved
pasture grasses. Lime is applied where needed. The
pastures provide a large quantity of good forage.
Trees grow well in the forested areas. Figure 5.-Cowpeas on Gainesville loamy fine sand, gently un-
This soil is in capability unit IIs-2 and in the soil dulating phase, near Valrico.






HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 21

would be likely to lower the water table of the higher association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos-
land surrounding the swamps. In their present con- phatic Materials.
edition, the swamps provide cover for wildlife and pro- Gainesville loamy fine sand, gently undulating phase
duce some forest products. Some of the merchantable (Gb).-This soil occurs principally near Brandon, Val-
cypress and hardwood timber is being harvested. rico, and Seffner, and north of Dover and Plant City.
Gainesville loamy fine sand, level phase '(Ga).-This It resembles Gainesville loamy fine sand, level phase,
brown, well-drained soil has developed from moder- except that most of it is on slopes of 2 to 5 percent.
ately thick beds of loamy sand, which has been mixed A few short slopes range up to 8 percent. More
to some extent with residuum from the underlying phosphatic pebbles occur on the surface and through-
phosphatic limestone. It occupies level or nearly level out the profile than in the level phase.
areas, mainly in the east-central part of the county In a few small areas, a layer of brown or strong-
near Brandon and Valrico and north of Seffner. brown fine sandy clay loam occurs at depths between
This soil is associated with soils of the Arredondo, 30 and 42 inches. This layer contains many pebbles
Fort Meade, Alachua, Eustis, and Lakeland series, and small stones. The total extent of these areas is a
Its surface layer resembles that of the Arredondo soils, little less than 100 acres.
but the lower horizons differ in color. Its surface layer Use and management.-This soil is used to grow
is not so dark colored nor so thick as that of the Fort citrus trees, general crops (fig. 5), and a few vege-
Meade soils. Its position differs from that of the tables. Some areas are pastured. Yields are good if
Alachua soil, which occurs in depressions within areas the soil is well managed and the weather is favorable.
of Gainesville soil. The Gainesville soil is not so sandy This soil is somewhat drought. If it is irrigated
as the Eustis soils. It is fairly high in phosphorus, during dry seasons, many kinds of vegetables can be
compared to the Eustis soils. grown with good results. Cover crops such as hairy
The natural vegetation consists of live oak, red oak, indigo, crotalaria, velvetbeans, and cowpeas, or beg-
hickory, magnolia, pine, shrubs, and grasses. garweeds or other natural vegetation, should be used
Profile description: to protect the soil when it is not in tilled crops. Cover
crops should also be planted between the rows in citrus
0 to 8 inches, very dark grayish-brown loamy fine sand; groves. The plant cover not only protects the soil
contains a moderate amount of organic matter and a few from erosion but also replenishes and increases the
small phosphatic pebbles; a few small pebbles occur on from erosion but also replenishes and increases the
the surface. content of organic matter.
8 to 18 inches, dark-brown loamy fine sand; contains a few Pastures on this soil are generally seeded to Pensa-
phosphatic pebbles. cola Bahiagrass, common Bahiagrass, Pangolagrass,
18 to 30 inches, brown loamy fine sand; contains a few or other improved grasses, and they are fertilized each
phosphatic pebbles.
30 to 42 inches +, strong-brown loamy fine sand; contains year. These pastures provide good forage. Forage is
a few phosphatic pebbles and small stones, further improved by planting hairy indigo and alyce-
clover with the grasses.
The surface layer ranges from nearly black to gray-
ish brown in color and from 6 to 9 inches in thick-
ness. At depths below about 18 inches, the soil is
brown in some places, and in others it is strong brown, ' -
reddish yellow, or reddish brown. Many pebbles and ..
small stones occur in places in the lower part of the ,
profile. Included in the mapping unit are a few areas
where brown or strong-brown fine sandy clay loam
begins at depths between 30 and 42 inches. These
areas are generally less than 5 acres in size, and their
total extent is only about 60 acres.
This soil is medium acid throughout. It is well
drained. Surface runoff is slow to medium, and in-
ternal drainage is medium to rapid.
Use and management.-Some areas of this soil are
planted to citrus trees. Others are used for general
crops. If the soil is well managed and the weather is
favorable, citrus yields are good, and yields of cow-
peas, corn, sweetpotatoes, and other crops are fair to
good.
The soil needs applications of mixed fertilizer. Be-
cause it is somewhat drought, it may be necessary to
irrigate crops during dry seasons. If properly irri-
gated, many kinds of vegetables can be grown.
Most pastures are fertilized and seeded to improved
pasture grasses. Lime is applied where needed. The
pastures provide a large quantity of good forage.
Trees grow well in the forested areas. Figure 5.-Cowpeas on Gainesville loamy fine sand, gently un-
This soil is in capability unit IIs-2 and in the soil dulating phase, near Valrico.






92 SOIL SURVEY SERIES 1o95, NO. :

Hardwoods and pines, which grow rapidly on this profile is neutral or alkaline below the pan layer. It
soil, are on a few areas. occurs mainly near the Gulf Coast and near the Little
This soil is in capability unit lls-2 and in the soil Manatee River in the southwestern part of the county.
association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos- Some areas are narrow strips between Ltuskin and
phatic Materials. Leon soils or between Adamsville and Leon soils.
Immokalee fine sand .a.-This somewhat poorly The natural vegetation consists of pines and a rank
drained soil occurs in fairly large areas in the flat- growth of saw-palmettos, shrubs, and grasses.
woods of the southern, northeastern, and northwestern U.s an(!d a aniqcn('l t.-Most of this soil is used for
parts of the county. Most of it is level or nearly range pasture. The natural vegetation provides a fair
level, but the slope gradient ranges up to 5 percent amirnut of forage. By good management fair to good
in some areas. The parent material was thick beds grass pastures can be established on cleared areas.
of unconsolidated sand, deposited when the sea level Pine trees make fair to good growth and would be
was higher than at present. A black or dark-brown profitable under good forest management.
weakly cemented organic pan occurs at depths of 30 This soil is in capability unit IVs-2 and in the soil
to 42 inches- association of Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands with
This soil is associated with the Leon, Ona, Pamello, Organic Pan.
Plummer, and Rutlege soils. The pan layer in the Istokpoga peat (Ic).-This organic soil has developed
Leon soil is denser than in this soil and is nearer the over acid sand from the remains of woody plants. It
surface. The brown, organic-stained layer in ti e occupies low, level or slightly depressed areas, mainly
Ona soils occurs within 14 inches of the surface. The in the southern, central, and northeastern parts of
Pomello soil has a lighter colored surface layer and the county.
lacks the pan that is typical of the Immokalee soil. The natural vegetation consists of redbays; cy-
The Plummer and Rutlege soils occupy wetter areas. presses; some maple trees and other hardwoods; and
The natural vegetation consists of second-growth myrtle bushes, briers, vines, ferns, and a few grasses.
pine, saw-palmetto, runner oak, gallberry bushes, and Profile description.
wiregrass and other grasses.
Profile description: 0 to 8 inches, black or very dark brown woody peat; con-
tains small pieces of hard wood.
0 to 6 inches, dark-gray loose fine sand, which has a salt- 8 to 40 inches, dark reddish-brown or dark-brown woody
and-pepper appearance. peat.
6 to 12 inches, gray loose fine sand. 40 to 60 inches -, gray or light-gray fine sand.
12 to 32 inches, light-gray loose fine sand; has a few light
browrish-gray splotches around old root channels. The woody organic material ranges from 30 to 60
32 to 38 inches, very dark brown fine sand, a slightly inches in thickness. The lower part of the organic
cemented organic pan.
38 to 42 inches +, dark grayish-brown loose fine sand; material contains some fine sand from the underlying
grades to lighter colors with increasing depth, sandy layer.
The surface layer ranges from very dark gray to This soil is strongly to very strongly acid through-
gray in color and from 3 to 8 inches in thickness. In out. It is very poorly drained and is covered by
places the pan extends to depths of more than 48 water during much of the year.
inches before the sandy material grades to lighter Use and nmanagcment.-This soil is used as range
colors, pasture. The natural vegetation provides some for-
This soil is strongly to very strongly acid through- age. Some of the cypresses and hardwoods are of
out. It is somewhat poorly drained. Surface runoff merchantable size.
is slow. Internal drainage is medium to rapid if not This soil is in capability unit IVs-4 and in the soil
retarded by the high water table. association of Very Poorly Drained Organic Soils.
Use and management.-Nearly all of this soil is Istokpoga mucky peat (Id).-The organic materials
used for range pasture. The natural vegetation pro- in this soil have reached a more advanced stage of de-
vides only poor to fair forage, and 15 to 25 acres is composition than those in Istokpoga peat. This soil
needed to graze 1 cow. Some areas have been cleared, is not extensive. It occurs in the central and north-
fertilized, and planted to improved pasture grasses. eastern parts of the county.
About 80 acres of improved pasture, within 400 acres The natural vegetation consists of bays, maples.
of range pasture, will support 70 head of cattle. Near cypresses, a few hardwoods, myrtle bushes, vines, and
Ruskin and Sun City, several acres of this soil are grasses.
included in fields used to grow vegetables. Fair to The 6- to 10-inch surface layer of black mucky peat
good yields are obtained if good management is prac- contains a few pieces of partly decayed woody mate-
ticed. The soil needs liberal applications of a good rial. Immediately below the surface layer is dark
fertilizer mixture and control of water. grayish-brown or reddish-brown woody peat. The
Pine trees grow moderately well on this soil. The organic material is from 20 to 40 inches thick and is
forested areas make profitable returns if well man- underlain by gray or light-gray fine sand.
aged. This soil is strongly to very strongly acid through-
This soil is in capability unit IVs-2 and in the soil out. It is very poorly drained and is covered by wa-
association of Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands with ter during much of the year.
Organic Pan. Use and management.-Most of this soil is included
Immokalee fine sand. alkaline variant (Ib).-This soil in range pastures. When not covered too deeply by
is like typical Immokalee fine sand except that the water, the natural vegetation provides some grazing.






92 SOIL SURVEY SERIES 1o95, NO. :

Hardwoods and pines, which grow rapidly on this profile is neutral or alkaline below the pan layer. It
soil, are on a few areas. occurs mainly near the Gulf Coast and near the Little
This soil is in capability unit lls-2 and in the soil Manatee River in the southwestern part of the county.
association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos- Some areas are narrow strips between Ltuskin and
phatic Materials. Leon soils or between Adamsville and Leon soils.
Immokalee fine sand .a.-This somewhat poorly The natural vegetation consists of pines and a rank
drained soil occurs in fairly large areas in the flat- growth of saw-palmettos, shrubs, and grasses.
woods of the southern, northeastern, and northwestern U.s an(!d a aniqcn('l t.-Most of this soil is used for
parts of the county. Most of it is level or nearly range pasture. The natural vegetation provides a fair
level, but the slope gradient ranges up to 5 percent amirnut of forage. By good management fair to good
in some areas. The parent material was thick beds grass pastures can be established on cleared areas.
of unconsolidated sand, deposited when the sea level Pine trees make fair to good growth and would be
was higher than at present. A black or dark-brown profitable under good forest management.
weakly cemented organic pan occurs at depths of 30 This soil is in capability unit IVs-2 and in the soil
to 42 inches- association of Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands with
This soil is associated with the Leon, Ona, Pamello, Organic Pan.
Plummer, and Rutlege soils. The pan layer in the Istokpoga peat (Ic).-This organic soil has developed
Leon soil is denser than in this soil and is nearer the over acid sand from the remains of woody plants. It
surface. The brown, organic-stained layer in ti e occupies low, level or slightly depressed areas, mainly
Ona soils occurs within 14 inches of the surface. The in the southern, central, and northeastern parts of
Pomello soil has a lighter colored surface layer and the county.
lacks the pan that is typical of the Immokalee soil. The natural vegetation consists of redbays; cy-
The Plummer and Rutlege soils occupy wetter areas. presses; some maple trees and other hardwoods; and
The natural vegetation consists of second-growth myrtle bushes, briers, vines, ferns, and a few grasses.
pine, saw-palmetto, runner oak, gallberry bushes, and Profile description.
wiregrass and other grasses.
Profile description: 0 to 8 inches, black or very dark brown woody peat; con-
tains small pieces of hard wood.
0 to 6 inches, dark-gray loose fine sand, which has a salt- 8 to 40 inches, dark reddish-brown or dark-brown woody
and-pepper appearance. peat.
6 to 12 inches, gray loose fine sand. 40 to 60 inches -, gray or light-gray fine sand.
12 to 32 inches, light-gray loose fine sand; has a few light
browrish-gray splotches around old root channels. The woody organic material ranges from 30 to 60
32 to 38 inches, very dark brown fine sand, a slightly inches in thickness. The lower part of the organic
cemented organic pan.
38 to 42 inches +, dark grayish-brown loose fine sand; material contains some fine sand from the underlying
grades to lighter colors with increasing depth, sandy layer.
The surface layer ranges from very dark gray to This soil is strongly to very strongly acid through-
gray in color and from 3 to 8 inches in thickness. In out. It is very poorly drained and is covered by
places the pan extends to depths of more than 48 water during much of the year.
inches before the sandy material grades to lighter Use and nmanagcment.-This soil is used as range
colors, pasture. The natural vegetation provides some for-
This soil is strongly to very strongly acid through- age. Some of the cypresses and hardwoods are of
out. It is somewhat poorly drained. Surface runoff merchantable size.
is slow. Internal drainage is medium to rapid if not This soil is in capability unit IVs-4 and in the soil
retarded by the high water table. association of Very Poorly Drained Organic Soils.
Use and management.-Nearly all of this soil is Istokpoga mucky peat (Id).-The organic materials
used for range pasture. The natural vegetation pro- in this soil have reached a more advanced stage of de-
vides only poor to fair forage, and 15 to 25 acres is composition than those in Istokpoga peat. This soil
needed to graze 1 cow. Some areas have been cleared, is not extensive. It occurs in the central and north-
fertilized, and planted to improved pasture grasses. eastern parts of the county.
About 80 acres of improved pasture, within 400 acres The natural vegetation consists of bays, maples.
of range pasture, will support 70 head of cattle. Near cypresses, a few hardwoods, myrtle bushes, vines, and
Ruskin and Sun City, several acres of this soil are grasses.
included in fields used to grow vegetables. Fair to The 6- to 10-inch surface layer of black mucky peat
good yields are obtained if good management is prac- contains a few pieces of partly decayed woody mate-
ticed. The soil needs liberal applications of a good rial. Immediately below the surface layer is dark
fertilizer mixture and control of water. grayish-brown or reddish-brown woody peat. The
Pine trees grow moderately well on this soil. The organic material is from 20 to 40 inches thick and is
forested areas make profitable returns if well man- underlain by gray or light-gray fine sand.
aged. This soil is strongly to very strongly acid through-
This soil is in capability unit IVs-2 and in the soil out. It is very poorly drained and is covered by wa-
association of Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands with ter during much of the year.
Organic Pan. Use and management.-Most of this soil is included
Immokalee fine sand. alkaline variant (Ib).-This soil in range pastures. When not covered too deeply by
is like typical Immokalee fine sand except that the water, the natural vegetation provides some grazing.






92 SOIL SURVEY SERIES 1o95, NO. :

Hardwoods and pines, which grow rapidly on this profile is neutral or alkaline below the pan layer. It
soil, are on a few areas. occurs mainly near the Gulf Coast and near the Little
This soil is in capability unit lls-2 and in the soil Manatee River in the southwestern part of the county.
association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos- Some areas are narrow strips between Ltuskin and
phatic Materials. Leon soils or between Adamsville and Leon soils.
Immokalee fine sand .a.-This somewhat poorly The natural vegetation consists of pines and a rank
drained soil occurs in fairly large areas in the flat- growth of saw-palmettos, shrubs, and grasses.
woods of the southern, northeastern, and northwestern U.s an(!d a aniqcn('l t.-Most of this soil is used for
parts of the county. Most of it is level or nearly range pasture. The natural vegetation provides a fair
level, but the slope gradient ranges up to 5 percent amirnut of forage. By good management fair to good
in some areas. The parent material was thick beds grass pastures can be established on cleared areas.
of unconsolidated sand, deposited when the sea level Pine trees make fair to good growth and would be
was higher than at present. A black or dark-brown profitable under good forest management.
weakly cemented organic pan occurs at depths of 30 This soil is in capability unit IVs-2 and in the soil
to 42 inches- association of Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands with
This soil is associated with the Leon, Ona, Pamello, Organic Pan.
Plummer, and Rutlege soils. The pan layer in the Istokpoga peat (Ic).-This organic soil has developed
Leon soil is denser than in this soil and is nearer the over acid sand from the remains of woody plants. It
surface. The brown, organic-stained layer in ti e occupies low, level or slightly depressed areas, mainly
Ona soils occurs within 14 inches of the surface. The in the southern, central, and northeastern parts of
Pomello soil has a lighter colored surface layer and the county.
lacks the pan that is typical of the Immokalee soil. The natural vegetation consists of redbays; cy-
The Plummer and Rutlege soils occupy wetter areas. presses; some maple trees and other hardwoods; and
The natural vegetation consists of second-growth myrtle bushes, briers, vines, ferns, and a few grasses.
pine, saw-palmetto, runner oak, gallberry bushes, and Profile description.
wiregrass and other grasses.
Profile description: 0 to 8 inches, black or very dark brown woody peat; con-
tains small pieces of hard wood.
0 to 6 inches, dark-gray loose fine sand, which has a salt- 8 to 40 inches, dark reddish-brown or dark-brown woody
and-pepper appearance. peat.
6 to 12 inches, gray loose fine sand. 40 to 60 inches -, gray or light-gray fine sand.
12 to 32 inches, light-gray loose fine sand; has a few light
browrish-gray splotches around old root channels. The woody organic material ranges from 30 to 60
32 to 38 inches, very dark brown fine sand, a slightly inches in thickness. The lower part of the organic
cemented organic pan.
38 to 42 inches +, dark grayish-brown loose fine sand; material contains some fine sand from the underlying
grades to lighter colors with increasing depth, sandy layer.
The surface layer ranges from very dark gray to This soil is strongly to very strongly acid through-
gray in color and from 3 to 8 inches in thickness. In out. It is very poorly drained and is covered by
places the pan extends to depths of more than 48 water during much of the year.
inches before the sandy material grades to lighter Use and nmanagcment.-This soil is used as range
colors, pasture. The natural vegetation provides some for-
This soil is strongly to very strongly acid through- age. Some of the cypresses and hardwoods are of
out. It is somewhat poorly drained. Surface runoff merchantable size.
is slow. Internal drainage is medium to rapid if not This soil is in capability unit IVs-4 and in the soil
retarded by the high water table. association of Very Poorly Drained Organic Soils.
Use and management.-Nearly all of this soil is Istokpoga mucky peat (Id).-The organic materials
used for range pasture. The natural vegetation pro- in this soil have reached a more advanced stage of de-
vides only poor to fair forage, and 15 to 25 acres is composition than those in Istokpoga peat. This soil
needed to graze 1 cow. Some areas have been cleared, is not extensive. It occurs in the central and north-
fertilized, and planted to improved pasture grasses. eastern parts of the county.
About 80 acres of improved pasture, within 400 acres The natural vegetation consists of bays, maples.
of range pasture, will support 70 head of cattle. Near cypresses, a few hardwoods, myrtle bushes, vines, and
Ruskin and Sun City, several acres of this soil are grasses.
included in fields used to grow vegetables. Fair to The 6- to 10-inch surface layer of black mucky peat
good yields are obtained if good management is prac- contains a few pieces of partly decayed woody mate-
ticed. The soil needs liberal applications of a good rial. Immediately below the surface layer is dark
fertilizer mixture and control of water. grayish-brown or reddish-brown woody peat. The
Pine trees grow moderately well on this soil. The organic material is from 20 to 40 inches thick and is
forested areas make profitable returns if well man- underlain by gray or light-gray fine sand.
aged. This soil is strongly to very strongly acid through-
This soil is in capability unit IVs-2 and in the soil out. It is very poorly drained and is covered by wa-
association of Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands with ter during much of the year.
Organic Pan. Use and management.-Most of this soil is included
Immokalee fine sand. alkaline variant (Ib).-This soil in range pastures. When not covered too deeply by
is like typical Immokalee fine sand except that the water, the natural vegetation provides some grazing.






92 SOIL SURVEY SERIES 1o95, NO. :

Hardwoods and pines, which grow rapidly on this profile is neutral or alkaline below the pan layer. It
soil, are on a few areas. occurs mainly near the Gulf Coast and near the Little
This soil is in capability unit lls-2 and in the soil Manatee River in the southwestern part of the county.
association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos- Some areas are narrow strips between Ltuskin and
phatic Materials. Leon soils or between Adamsville and Leon soils.
Immokalee fine sand .a.-This somewhat poorly The natural vegetation consists of pines and a rank
drained soil occurs in fairly large areas in the flat- growth of saw-palmettos, shrubs, and grasses.
woods of the southern, northeastern, and northwestern U.s an(!d a aniqcn('l t.-Most of this soil is used for
parts of the county. Most of it is level or nearly range pasture. The natural vegetation provides a fair
level, but the slope gradient ranges up to 5 percent amirnut of forage. By good management fair to good
in some areas. The parent material was thick beds grass pastures can be established on cleared areas.
of unconsolidated sand, deposited when the sea level Pine trees make fair to good growth and would be
was higher than at present. A black or dark-brown profitable under good forest management.
weakly cemented organic pan occurs at depths of 30 This soil is in capability unit IVs-2 and in the soil
to 42 inches- association of Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands with
This soil is associated with the Leon, Ona, Pamello, Organic Pan.
Plummer, and Rutlege soils. The pan layer in the Istokpoga peat (Ic).-This organic soil has developed
Leon soil is denser than in this soil and is nearer the over acid sand from the remains of woody plants. It
surface. The brown, organic-stained layer in ti e occupies low, level or slightly depressed areas, mainly
Ona soils occurs within 14 inches of the surface. The in the southern, central, and northeastern parts of
Pomello soil has a lighter colored surface layer and the county.
lacks the pan that is typical of the Immokalee soil. The natural vegetation consists of redbays; cy-
The Plummer and Rutlege soils occupy wetter areas. presses; some maple trees and other hardwoods; and
The natural vegetation consists of second-growth myrtle bushes, briers, vines, ferns, and a few grasses.
pine, saw-palmetto, runner oak, gallberry bushes, and Profile description.
wiregrass and other grasses.
Profile description: 0 to 8 inches, black or very dark brown woody peat; con-
tains small pieces of hard wood.
0 to 6 inches, dark-gray loose fine sand, which has a salt- 8 to 40 inches, dark reddish-brown or dark-brown woody
and-pepper appearance. peat.
6 to 12 inches, gray loose fine sand. 40 to 60 inches -, gray or light-gray fine sand.
12 to 32 inches, light-gray loose fine sand; has a few light
browrish-gray splotches around old root channels. The woody organic material ranges from 30 to 60
32 to 38 inches, very dark brown fine sand, a slightly inches in thickness. The lower part of the organic
cemented organic pan.
38 to 42 inches +, dark grayish-brown loose fine sand; material contains some fine sand from the underlying
grades to lighter colors with increasing depth, sandy layer.
The surface layer ranges from very dark gray to This soil is strongly to very strongly acid through-
gray in color and from 3 to 8 inches in thickness. In out. It is very poorly drained and is covered by
places the pan extends to depths of more than 48 water during much of the year.
inches before the sandy material grades to lighter Use and nmanagcment.-This soil is used as range
colors, pasture. The natural vegetation provides some for-
This soil is strongly to very strongly acid through- age. Some of the cypresses and hardwoods are of
out. It is somewhat poorly drained. Surface runoff merchantable size.
is slow. Internal drainage is medium to rapid if not This soil is in capability unit IVs-4 and in the soil
retarded by the high water table. association of Very Poorly Drained Organic Soils.
Use and management.-Nearly all of this soil is Istokpoga mucky peat (Id).-The organic materials
used for range pasture. The natural vegetation pro- in this soil have reached a more advanced stage of de-
vides only poor to fair forage, and 15 to 25 acres is composition than those in Istokpoga peat. This soil
needed to graze 1 cow. Some areas have been cleared, is not extensive. It occurs in the central and north-
fertilized, and planted to improved pasture grasses. eastern parts of the county.
About 80 acres of improved pasture, within 400 acres The natural vegetation consists of bays, maples.
of range pasture, will support 70 head of cattle. Near cypresses, a few hardwoods, myrtle bushes, vines, and
Ruskin and Sun City, several acres of this soil are grasses.
included in fields used to grow vegetables. Fair to The 6- to 10-inch surface layer of black mucky peat
good yields are obtained if good management is prac- contains a few pieces of partly decayed woody mate-
ticed. The soil needs liberal applications of a good rial. Immediately below the surface layer is dark
fertilizer mixture and control of water. grayish-brown or reddish-brown woody peat. The
Pine trees grow moderately well on this soil. The organic material is from 20 to 40 inches thick and is
forested areas make profitable returns if well man- underlain by gray or light-gray fine sand.
aged. This soil is strongly to very strongly acid through-
This soil is in capability unit IVs-2 and in the soil out. It is very poorly drained and is covered by wa-
association of Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands with ter during much of the year.
Organic Pan. Use and management.-Most of this soil is included
Immokalee fine sand. alkaline variant (Ib).-This soil in range pastures. When not covered too deeply by
is like typical Immokalee fine sand except that the water, the natural vegetation provides some grazing.







HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 23

This soil is in capability unit IVs-4 and in the soil few cabbage palmettos, and wiregrass and other
association of Very Poorly Drained Organic Soils. grasses.
Kanapaha fine sand (Ka).-This inextensive soil has Profile description:
developed from moderately thick beds of sand, mixed 0 to 5 inches, dark-gray or gray nearly loose fine sand;
to some extent with materials from phosphatic lime- contains a small amount of organic matter, which gives
it a salt-and-pepper appearance.
stone. It occupies nearly level areas in the east- 5 to 18 inches, light-gray or light brownish-gray loose fine
central part of the county, mainly south and north- sand.
west of Plant City. It is associated with soils of the 18 to 29 inches, light-gray marl streaked in a few places
Arredondo, Gainesville, Lakeland, and Blanton series. with yellow; fine sandy clay loam texture; contains a
few shells.
In color the lower layers differ somewhat from those 29 to 42 inches +, mottled light-gray, brownish-yellow, and
of the associated Arredondo and Lakeland soils. The yellow fine sand.
phosphorus content is higher than that of the Blanton The surface layer ranges from very dark gray to
soils. grayish brown and from 3 to 8 inches in thickness.
The natural vegetation consists of gums, hickories, Depth to marl ranges from 16 to 30 inches in most
magnolias, oaks, cabbage palmettos, saw-palmettos, places. In areas near the Pinellas County line, marl
pines, shrubs, and grasses. occurs at a depth of 12 inches. In places a thin gray-
Profile description: ish-brown stained layer occurs immediately above the
0 to 4 inches, dark-gray nearly loose fine sand; contains marl horizon.
small amount of organic matter; a few leached phos- The surface layer is strongly acid. It is underlain
phatic pebbles occur on the surface.
4 to 16 inches, light-gray or light yellowish-brown loose by a layer of medium acid to slightly acid fine sand.
fine sand; contains a few phosphatic pebbles. The marl layer is strongly alkaline, and the layer im-
16 to 42 inches +, very pale brown loose fine sand with a mediately below it is neutral to mildly akaline. Drain-
few streaks of yellowish brown and brownish yellow; age is somewhat poor. Surface runoff is slow, and
contains a few phosphatic pebbles. internal drainage is medium.
This soil is strongly acid throughout. It is moder- Use and nmanagement.-This soil occurs in fairly
ately well drained to somewhat poorly drained. Sur- large areas. Most of it is included in range pastures.
face runoff and internal drainage are slow to medium. The carrying capacity is 1 cow to 10 to 20 acres of
Use and nmanagement.-Some of this soil is used to the natural vegetation. Near Ruskin, a few areas
grow vegetables and citrus fruits. The rest is in range have been cleared and planted to vegetables; fair to
pasture. Fair to good yields of vegetables and citrus good yields are obtained under good management.
fruits are obtained under good management. Man- Fertilizers must be used, and water control is needed.
agement requirements include water control and lib- The second-growth pines do well on this soil.
eral fertilization. The natural vegetation provides a This soil is in capability unit IVs-2 and in the soil
fair amount of forage. association of Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands Over
Pines and hardwood trees grow rapidly on this soil. a Calcareous Substratum.
Under good management forested areas are profitable. Lakeland fine sand, level phase (Lb).-Because of its
This soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in the soil natural cover, mainly of blackjack or turkey oak,
association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos- this extensive soil is commonly called "blackjack land"
phatic Materials. or "scrub oak land." It has developed from moder-
Keri fine sand (Kb).-This grayish soil has developed ately thick beds of unconsolidated acid sands. It oc-
from stratified beds of marine sand and marl. The cupies level or nearly level high sand ridges in the
profile is characterized by layers of fine sand imme- north-central part of the county, mainly near Bran-
diately above and below a layer of marl. The marl don, Limona, Valrico, Seffner, Bloomingdale, and
begins at depths of 18 to 30 inches and is 6 to 12 Thonotosassa and northeast of Tampa.
inches thick. This soil is associated with the Blanton, Orlando,
This soil occupies level or nearly level areas near Eustis, and Arredondo soils. The lower layers differ
the coast that extend from the southern boundary of somewhat in color from those of the Blanton and
the county to the Pinellas County line in the north- Eustis soils. The surface laver is not so dark colored
west. It is associated with soils of the Parkwood, nor so thick as that of the Orlando soil. The Arre-
Broward, Ruskin, Adamsville, Leon, Immokalee, Pom- dondo soils have a higher content of phosphorus.
pano, and Delray series. The natural vegetation consists of pine and a few
In contrast to this soil, the Parkwood soil has a shrubs and grasses, besides the blackjack oaks and
thick layer of marl extending to depths of more than bluejack oaks.
42 inches. The sandy layers of the Broward soil are Profile description:
underlain by limestone. Clayey materials occur be-
tween the thin mantle of sand and the underlying shell 0 to 5 inches, dark-gray loose fine sand; low in organic
marl in the Ruskin soil. The Adamsville, Pompano, 5 to 12 inches, grayish-brown loose fine sand.
and Delray soils do not have marl layers. The Pom- 12 to 30 inches, yellowish-brown loose fine sand.
pano and Delray soils occupy wetter positions than 30 to 48 inches +, brownish-yellow loose fine sand.
the Keri soil. The Leon and Immokalee soils have a The surface layer ranges from very dark gray to
black or very dark gray organic pan, which does not grayish brown in color and from 3 to 8 inches in thick-
occur in the profile of the Keri soil. ness. In places the horizon immediately below the sur-
The natural vegetation consists of pine, runner oak, face layer is light yellowish brown or pale brown. The
gallberry bushes, a rank growth of saw-palmettos, a rest of the profile is yellow, yellowish brown, or brown-







HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 23

This soil is in capability unit IVs-4 and in the soil few cabbage palmettos, and wiregrass and other
association of Very Poorly Drained Organic Soils. grasses.
Kanapaha fine sand (Ka).-This inextensive soil has Profile description:
developed from moderately thick beds of sand, mixed 0 to 5 inches, dark-gray or gray nearly loose fine sand;
to some extent with materials from phosphatic lime- contains a small amount of organic matter, which gives
it a salt-and-pepper appearance.
stone. It occupies nearly level areas in the east- 5 to 18 inches, light-gray or light brownish-gray loose fine
central part of the county, mainly south and north- sand.
west of Plant City. It is associated with soils of the 18 to 29 inches, light-gray marl streaked in a few places
Arredondo, Gainesville, Lakeland, and Blanton series. with yellow; fine sandy clay loam texture; contains a
few shells.
In color the lower layers differ somewhat from those 29 to 42 inches +, mottled light-gray, brownish-yellow, and
of the associated Arredondo and Lakeland soils. The yellow fine sand.
phosphorus content is higher than that of the Blanton The surface layer ranges from very dark gray to
soils. grayish brown and from 3 to 8 inches in thickness.
The natural vegetation consists of gums, hickories, Depth to marl ranges from 16 to 30 inches in most
magnolias, oaks, cabbage palmettos, saw-palmettos, places. In areas near the Pinellas County line, marl
pines, shrubs, and grasses. occurs at a depth of 12 inches. In places a thin gray-
Profile description: ish-brown stained layer occurs immediately above the
0 to 4 inches, dark-gray nearly loose fine sand; contains marl horizon.
small amount of organic matter; a few leached phos- The surface layer is strongly acid. It is underlain
phatic pebbles occur on the surface.
4 to 16 inches, light-gray or light yellowish-brown loose by a layer of medium acid to slightly acid fine sand.
fine sand; contains a few phosphatic pebbles. The marl layer is strongly alkaline, and the layer im-
16 to 42 inches +, very pale brown loose fine sand with a mediately below it is neutral to mildly akaline. Drain-
few streaks of yellowish brown and brownish yellow; age is somewhat poor. Surface runoff is slow, and
contains a few phosphatic pebbles. internal drainage is medium.
This soil is strongly acid throughout. It is moder- Use and nmanagement.-This soil occurs in fairly
ately well drained to somewhat poorly drained. Sur- large areas. Most of it is included in range pastures.
face runoff and internal drainage are slow to medium. The carrying capacity is 1 cow to 10 to 20 acres of
Use and nmanagement.-Some of this soil is used to the natural vegetation. Near Ruskin, a few areas
grow vegetables and citrus fruits. The rest is in range have been cleared and planted to vegetables; fair to
pasture. Fair to good yields of vegetables and citrus good yields are obtained under good management.
fruits are obtained under good management. Man- Fertilizers must be used, and water control is needed.
agement requirements include water control and lib- The second-growth pines do well on this soil.
eral fertilization. The natural vegetation provides a This soil is in capability unit IVs-2 and in the soil
fair amount of forage. association of Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands Over
Pines and hardwood trees grow rapidly on this soil. a Calcareous Substratum.
Under good management forested areas are profitable. Lakeland fine sand, level phase (Lb).-Because of its
This soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in the soil natural cover, mainly of blackjack or turkey oak,
association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos- this extensive soil is commonly called "blackjack land"
phatic Materials. or "scrub oak land." It has developed from moder-
Keri fine sand (Kb).-This grayish soil has developed ately thick beds of unconsolidated acid sands. It oc-
from stratified beds of marine sand and marl. The cupies level or nearly level high sand ridges in the
profile is characterized by layers of fine sand imme- north-central part of the county, mainly near Bran-
diately above and below a layer of marl. The marl don, Limona, Valrico, Seffner, Bloomingdale, and
begins at depths of 18 to 30 inches and is 6 to 12 Thonotosassa and northeast of Tampa.
inches thick. This soil is associated with the Blanton, Orlando,
This soil occupies level or nearly level areas near Eustis, and Arredondo soils. The lower layers differ
the coast that extend from the southern boundary of somewhat in color from those of the Blanton and
the county to the Pinellas County line in the north- Eustis soils. The surface laver is not so dark colored
west. It is associated with soils of the Parkwood, nor so thick as that of the Orlando soil. The Arre-
Broward, Ruskin, Adamsville, Leon, Immokalee, Pom- dondo soils have a higher content of phosphorus.
pano, and Delray series. The natural vegetation consists of pine and a few
In contrast to this soil, the Parkwood soil has a shrubs and grasses, besides the blackjack oaks and
thick layer of marl extending to depths of more than bluejack oaks.
42 inches. The sandy layers of the Broward soil are Profile description:
underlain by limestone. Clayey materials occur be-
tween the thin mantle of sand and the underlying shell 0 to 5 inches, dark-gray loose fine sand; low in organic
marl in the Ruskin soil. The Adamsville, Pompano, 5 to 12 inches, grayish-brown loose fine sand.
and Delray soils do not have marl layers. The Pom- 12 to 30 inches, yellowish-brown loose fine sand.
pano and Delray soils occupy wetter positions than 30 to 48 inches +, brownish-yellow loose fine sand.
the Keri soil. The Leon and Immokalee soils have a The surface layer ranges from very dark gray to
black or very dark gray organic pan, which does not grayish brown in color and from 3 to 8 inches in thick-
occur in the profile of the Keri soil. ness. In places the horizon immediately below the sur-
The natural vegetation consists of pine, runner oak, face layer is light yellowish brown or pale brown. The
gallberry bushes, a rank growth of saw-palmettos, a rest of the profile is yellow, yellowish brown, or brown-







HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 23

This soil is in capability unit IVs-4 and in the soil few cabbage palmettos, and wiregrass and other
association of Very Poorly Drained Organic Soils. grasses.
Kanapaha fine sand (Ka).-This inextensive soil has Profile description:
developed from moderately thick beds of sand, mixed 0 to 5 inches, dark-gray or gray nearly loose fine sand;
to some extent with materials from phosphatic lime- contains a small amount of organic matter, which gives
it a salt-and-pepper appearance.
stone. It occupies nearly level areas in the east- 5 to 18 inches, light-gray or light brownish-gray loose fine
central part of the county, mainly south and north- sand.
west of Plant City. It is associated with soils of the 18 to 29 inches, light-gray marl streaked in a few places
Arredondo, Gainesville, Lakeland, and Blanton series. with yellow; fine sandy clay loam texture; contains a
few shells.
In color the lower layers differ somewhat from those 29 to 42 inches +, mottled light-gray, brownish-yellow, and
of the associated Arredondo and Lakeland soils. The yellow fine sand.
phosphorus content is higher than that of the Blanton The surface layer ranges from very dark gray to
soils. grayish brown and from 3 to 8 inches in thickness.
The natural vegetation consists of gums, hickories, Depth to marl ranges from 16 to 30 inches in most
magnolias, oaks, cabbage palmettos, saw-palmettos, places. In areas near the Pinellas County line, marl
pines, shrubs, and grasses. occurs at a depth of 12 inches. In places a thin gray-
Profile description: ish-brown stained layer occurs immediately above the
0 to 4 inches, dark-gray nearly loose fine sand; contains marl horizon.
small amount of organic matter; a few leached phos- The surface layer is strongly acid. It is underlain
phatic pebbles occur on the surface.
4 to 16 inches, light-gray or light yellowish-brown loose by a layer of medium acid to slightly acid fine sand.
fine sand; contains a few phosphatic pebbles. The marl layer is strongly alkaline, and the layer im-
16 to 42 inches +, very pale brown loose fine sand with a mediately below it is neutral to mildly akaline. Drain-
few streaks of yellowish brown and brownish yellow; age is somewhat poor. Surface runoff is slow, and
contains a few phosphatic pebbles. internal drainage is medium.
This soil is strongly acid throughout. It is moder- Use and nmanagement.-This soil occurs in fairly
ately well drained to somewhat poorly drained. Sur- large areas. Most of it is included in range pastures.
face runoff and internal drainage are slow to medium. The carrying capacity is 1 cow to 10 to 20 acres of
Use and nmanagement.-Some of this soil is used to the natural vegetation. Near Ruskin, a few areas
grow vegetables and citrus fruits. The rest is in range have been cleared and planted to vegetables; fair to
pasture. Fair to good yields of vegetables and citrus good yields are obtained under good management.
fruits are obtained under good management. Man- Fertilizers must be used, and water control is needed.
agement requirements include water control and lib- The second-growth pines do well on this soil.
eral fertilization. The natural vegetation provides a This soil is in capability unit IVs-2 and in the soil
fair amount of forage. association of Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands Over
Pines and hardwood trees grow rapidly on this soil. a Calcareous Substratum.
Under good management forested areas are profitable. Lakeland fine sand, level phase (Lb).-Because of its
This soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in the soil natural cover, mainly of blackjack or turkey oak,
association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos- this extensive soil is commonly called "blackjack land"
phatic Materials. or "scrub oak land." It has developed from moder-
Keri fine sand (Kb).-This grayish soil has developed ately thick beds of unconsolidated acid sands. It oc-
from stratified beds of marine sand and marl. The cupies level or nearly level high sand ridges in the
profile is characterized by layers of fine sand imme- north-central part of the county, mainly near Bran-
diately above and below a layer of marl. The marl don, Limona, Valrico, Seffner, Bloomingdale, and
begins at depths of 18 to 30 inches and is 6 to 12 Thonotosassa and northeast of Tampa.
inches thick. This soil is associated with the Blanton, Orlando,
This soil occupies level or nearly level areas near Eustis, and Arredondo soils. The lower layers differ
the coast that extend from the southern boundary of somewhat in color from those of the Blanton and
the county to the Pinellas County line in the north- Eustis soils. The surface laver is not so dark colored
west. It is associated with soils of the Parkwood, nor so thick as that of the Orlando soil. The Arre-
Broward, Ruskin, Adamsville, Leon, Immokalee, Pom- dondo soils have a higher content of phosphorus.
pano, and Delray series. The natural vegetation consists of pine and a few
In contrast to this soil, the Parkwood soil has a shrubs and grasses, besides the blackjack oaks and
thick layer of marl extending to depths of more than bluejack oaks.
42 inches. The sandy layers of the Broward soil are Profile description:
underlain by limestone. Clayey materials occur be-
tween the thin mantle of sand and the underlying shell 0 to 5 inches, dark-gray loose fine sand; low in organic
marl in the Ruskin soil. The Adamsville, Pompano, 5 to 12 inches, grayish-brown loose fine sand.
and Delray soils do not have marl layers. The Pom- 12 to 30 inches, yellowish-brown loose fine sand.
pano and Delray soils occupy wetter positions than 30 to 48 inches +, brownish-yellow loose fine sand.
the Keri soil. The Leon and Immokalee soils have a The surface layer ranges from very dark gray to
black or very dark gray organic pan, which does not grayish brown in color and from 3 to 8 inches in thick-
occur in the profile of the Keri soil. ness. In places the horizon immediately below the sur-
The natural vegetation consists of pine, runner oak, face layer is light yellowish brown or pale brown. The
gallberry bushes, a rank growth of saw-palmettos, a rest of the profile is yellow, yellowish brown, or brown-







HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 23

This soil is in capability unit IVs-4 and in the soil few cabbage palmettos, and wiregrass and other
association of Very Poorly Drained Organic Soils. grasses.
Kanapaha fine sand (Ka).-This inextensive soil has Profile description:
developed from moderately thick beds of sand, mixed 0 to 5 inches, dark-gray or gray nearly loose fine sand;
to some extent with materials from phosphatic lime- contains a small amount of organic matter, which gives
it a salt-and-pepper appearance.
stone. It occupies nearly level areas in the east- 5 to 18 inches, light-gray or light brownish-gray loose fine
central part of the county, mainly south and north- sand.
west of Plant City. It is associated with soils of the 18 to 29 inches, light-gray marl streaked in a few places
Arredondo, Gainesville, Lakeland, and Blanton series. with yellow; fine sandy clay loam texture; contains a
few shells.
In color the lower layers differ somewhat from those 29 to 42 inches +, mottled light-gray, brownish-yellow, and
of the associated Arredondo and Lakeland soils. The yellow fine sand.
phosphorus content is higher than that of the Blanton The surface layer ranges from very dark gray to
soils. grayish brown and from 3 to 8 inches in thickness.
The natural vegetation consists of gums, hickories, Depth to marl ranges from 16 to 30 inches in most
magnolias, oaks, cabbage palmettos, saw-palmettos, places. In areas near the Pinellas County line, marl
pines, shrubs, and grasses. occurs at a depth of 12 inches. In places a thin gray-
Profile description: ish-brown stained layer occurs immediately above the
0 to 4 inches, dark-gray nearly loose fine sand; contains marl horizon.
small amount of organic matter; a few leached phos- The surface layer is strongly acid. It is underlain
phatic pebbles occur on the surface.
4 to 16 inches, light-gray or light yellowish-brown loose by a layer of medium acid to slightly acid fine sand.
fine sand; contains a few phosphatic pebbles. The marl layer is strongly alkaline, and the layer im-
16 to 42 inches +, very pale brown loose fine sand with a mediately below it is neutral to mildly akaline. Drain-
few streaks of yellowish brown and brownish yellow; age is somewhat poor. Surface runoff is slow, and
contains a few phosphatic pebbles. internal drainage is medium.
This soil is strongly acid throughout. It is moder- Use and nmanagement.-This soil occurs in fairly
ately well drained to somewhat poorly drained. Sur- large areas. Most of it is included in range pastures.
face runoff and internal drainage are slow to medium. The carrying capacity is 1 cow to 10 to 20 acres of
Use and nmanagement.-Some of this soil is used to the natural vegetation. Near Ruskin, a few areas
grow vegetables and citrus fruits. The rest is in range have been cleared and planted to vegetables; fair to
pasture. Fair to good yields of vegetables and citrus good yields are obtained under good management.
fruits are obtained under good management. Man- Fertilizers must be used, and water control is needed.
agement requirements include water control and lib- The second-growth pines do well on this soil.
eral fertilization. The natural vegetation provides a This soil is in capability unit IVs-2 and in the soil
fair amount of forage. association of Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands Over
Pines and hardwood trees grow rapidly on this soil. a Calcareous Substratum.
Under good management forested areas are profitable. Lakeland fine sand, level phase (Lb).-Because of its
This soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in the soil natural cover, mainly of blackjack or turkey oak,
association of Well-Drained Sands Mixed with Phos- this extensive soil is commonly called "blackjack land"
phatic Materials. or "scrub oak land." It has developed from moder-
Keri fine sand (Kb).-This grayish soil has developed ately thick beds of unconsolidated acid sands. It oc-
from stratified beds of marine sand and marl. The cupies level or nearly level high sand ridges in the
profile is characterized by layers of fine sand imme- north-central part of the county, mainly near Bran-
diately above and below a layer of marl. The marl don, Limona, Valrico, Seffner, Bloomingdale, and
begins at depths of 18 to 30 inches and is 6 to 12 Thonotosassa and northeast of Tampa.
inches thick. This soil is associated with the Blanton, Orlando,
This soil occupies level or nearly level areas near Eustis, and Arredondo soils. The lower layers differ
the coast that extend from the southern boundary of somewhat in color from those of the Blanton and
the county to the Pinellas County line in the north- Eustis soils. The surface laver is not so dark colored
west. It is associated with soils of the Parkwood, nor so thick as that of the Orlando soil. The Arre-
Broward, Ruskin, Adamsville, Leon, Immokalee, Pom- dondo soils have a higher content of phosphorus.
pano, and Delray series. The natural vegetation consists of pine and a few
In contrast to this soil, the Parkwood soil has a shrubs and grasses, besides the blackjack oaks and
thick layer of marl extending to depths of more than bluejack oaks.
42 inches. The sandy layers of the Broward soil are Profile description:
underlain by limestone. Clayey materials occur be-
tween the thin mantle of sand and the underlying shell 0 to 5 inches, dark-gray loose fine sand; low in organic
marl in the Ruskin soil. The Adamsville, Pompano, 5 to 12 inches, grayish-brown loose fine sand.
and Delray soils do not have marl layers. The Pom- 12 to 30 inches, yellowish-brown loose fine sand.
pano and Delray soils occupy wetter positions than 30 to 48 inches +, brownish-yellow loose fine sand.
the Keri soil. The Leon and Immokalee soils have a The surface layer ranges from very dark gray to
black or very dark gray organic pan, which does not grayish brown in color and from 3 to 8 inches in thick-
occur in the profile of the Keri soil. ness. In places the horizon immediately below the sur-
The natural vegetation consists of pine, runner oak, face layer is light yellowish brown or pale brown. The
gallberry bushes, a rank growth of saw-palmettos, a rest of the profile is yellow, yellowish brown, or brown-






24 SOIL SURVEY SERIES 1950, NO. 3

ish yellow. The finer textured material underlying the age of this soil, consists mainly of turkey and bluejack
fine sand generally occurs at depths of 42 to 72 inches. oaks, pines, and a few shrubs and grasses.
In places it occurs at greater depths. Drainage is good to somewhat excessive. Surface
This soil is strongly to very strongly acid through- runoff is medium to rapid, and internal drainage is
out. It is well drained to somewhat excessively rapid. The water-holding capacity is low. During
drained. Surface runoff is slow to medium. Internal dry seasons the citrus trees and other crops need irri-
drainage is rapid. The soil is low in organic matter gation. This soil has better air drainage than the
and plant nutrients, level phase. It is low in organic matter and in plant
Near the little Manatee and Alafia Rivers, small nutrients.
areas of a soil that resembles Huckabee fine sand, Use and management.-This soil needs to have the
which is mapped in counties farther to the north, are content of organic matter replenished by plowing un-
included in this mapping unit. These areas occupy der cover crops or the natural growth of weeds.
natural levees or terraces. Except that the included Mixed fertilizers should be used to supply plant nutri-
soil has stratified layers of fine sand and loamy fine ents, and the acidity should be corrected by using lime.
sand or fine sandy loam in the lower part of its pro- Several thousand acres of this soil is planted to
file, it resembles Lakeland fine sand, level phase. citrus trees (fig. 6). Some areas are used to grow
Use and management.-This soil needs to have cover watermelons (fig. 7) and a few other crops. Several
crops or weeds turned under to replenish the organic hundred acres have been seeded to improved pasture
matter. Fertilizers will supply the needed nutrients, grasses such as Pensacola Bahiagrass, common Bahia-
Suitable cover crops are hairy indigo, crotalaria, cow- grass, and Pangolagrass. Yields of crops are about
peas, and velvetbeans. Beggarweeds, turned under, the same as those obtained on Lakeland fine sand, level
are a good source of organic matter. phase, the carrying capacity of pastures is about the
Several thousand acres of this soil is in citrus fruits. same, and the soil needs about the same type of man-
Good yields of oranges and grapefruit are obtained agement.
under a high level of management. The groves need This soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in the soil
liberal applications of a fertilizer mixture containing association of Well-Drained Deep Sands.
manganese, zinc, copper, and boron. Lime is needed Lakeland fine sand, undulating phase (Le).-This soil
to correct soil acidity and to supply calcium. generally occupies slopes of 5 to 8 percent, but a few
Watermelons yield well on this soil. To prevent acres are on slopes of 8 to 12 percent. Except for
damage from diseases that remain in the soil after slope the soil resembles the level and gently undulating
the crop is harvested, the melons are planted on land phases of Lakeland fine sand. The soil occurs near
that has not been cultivated or that has not been streams or on short slopes next to sinkholes and de-
planted to watermelons for several years. The melons pressions. It occurs mainly in the north-central part
need liberal applications of a good fertilizer mixture, of the county.
part of which should be applied as a topdressing. The natural vegetation is turkey and bluejack oaks,
Several areas are planted to general crops, mainly a few pines, and shrubs and grasses. Some areas have
corn, cowpeas, and sweetpotatoes. Under good man- only a few trees and are covered by a sod consisting
agement, and with favorable weather, fair yields are of various grasses.
obtained. Drainage is good to somewhat excessive. Surface
Several hundred acres of this soil have been seeded runoff is rapid. Hard rains damage the soil if it is not
to improved pasture grasses. These include Pensa- kept under cover crops or under a cover of natural
cola Bahiagrass, common Bahiagrass, and Pangola- vegetation. The vegetation not only breaks the force of
grass. If a good fertilizer mixture and lime are ap- the falling rain, but also increases the amount of humus
plied to these areas, only 2 or 3 acres of improved in the soil, thereby increasing its ability to absorb and
pasture is needed to graze 1 cow. retain water.
The natural vegetation of turkey and bluejack oaks,
a few pines, and grasses cover a large part of the soil.
The native grasses provide poor forage for animals
on the range pastures.
The native trees grow fairly well on this soil. Some
areas have been planted to pine seedlings. The growth -
of the young trees is fairly rapid.
This soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in the soil
association of Well-Drained Deep Sands.
Lakeland fine sand, gently undulating phase (Ld).-
This extensive soil occupies slopes of 2 to 5 percent.
Except for slope it resembles Lakeland fine sand, level
phase. It occurs mainly on the high sand ridges north
and northeast of Tampa; north of Dover; and near
Brandon, Bloomingdale, Limona, Valrico, Seffner,
Lithia, and Picnic. This soil is associated with other N ..- W -
phases of Lakeland fine sand and with soils of the -
Blanton, Eustis, Orlando, and Arredondo series. Figure 6.-A citrus grove on well-drained Lakeland fine sand,
The natural vegetation, which covers a large acre- gently undulating phase, near Temple Terrace.






24 SOIL SURVEY SERIES 1950, NO. 3

ish yellow. The finer textured material underlying the age of this soil, consists mainly of turkey and bluejack
fine sand generally occurs at depths of 42 to 72 inches. oaks, pines, and a few shrubs and grasses.
In places it occurs at greater depths. Drainage is good to somewhat excessive. Surface
This soil is strongly to very strongly acid through- runoff is medium to rapid, and internal drainage is
out. It is well drained to somewhat excessively rapid. The water-holding capacity is low. During
drained. Surface runoff is slow to medium. Internal dry seasons the citrus trees and other crops need irri-
drainage is rapid. The soil is low in organic matter gation. This soil has better air drainage than the
and plant nutrients, level phase. It is low in organic matter and in plant
Near the little Manatee and Alafia Rivers, small nutrients.
areas of a soil that resembles Huckabee fine sand, Use and management.-This soil needs to have the
which is mapped in counties farther to the north, are content of organic matter replenished by plowing un-
included in this mapping unit. These areas occupy der cover crops or the natural growth of weeds.
natural levees or terraces. Except that the included Mixed fertilizers should be used to supply plant nutri-
soil has stratified layers of fine sand and loamy fine ents, and the acidity should be corrected by using lime.
sand or fine sandy loam in the lower part of its pro- Several thousand acres of this soil is planted to
file, it resembles Lakeland fine sand, level phase. citrus trees (fig. 6). Some areas are used to grow
Use and management.-This soil needs to have cover watermelons (fig. 7) and a few other crops. Several
crops or weeds turned under to replenish the organic hundred acres have been seeded to improved pasture
matter. Fertilizers will supply the needed nutrients, grasses such as Pensacola Bahiagrass, common Bahia-
Suitable cover crops are hairy indigo, crotalaria, cow- grass, and Pangolagrass. Yields of crops are about
peas, and velvetbeans. Beggarweeds, turned under, the same as those obtained on Lakeland fine sand, level
are a good source of organic matter. phase, the carrying capacity of pastures is about the
Several thousand acres of this soil is in citrus fruits. same, and the soil needs about the same type of man-
Good yields of oranges and grapefruit are obtained agement.
under a high level of management. The groves need This soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in the soil
liberal applications of a fertilizer mixture containing association of Well-Drained Deep Sands.
manganese, zinc, copper, and boron. Lime is needed Lakeland fine sand, undulating phase (Le).-This soil
to correct soil acidity and to supply calcium. generally occupies slopes of 5 to 8 percent, but a few
Watermelons yield well on this soil. To prevent acres are on slopes of 8 to 12 percent. Except for
damage from diseases that remain in the soil after slope the soil resembles the level and gently undulating
the crop is harvested, the melons are planted on land phases of Lakeland fine sand. The soil occurs near
that has not been cultivated or that has not been streams or on short slopes next to sinkholes and de-
planted to watermelons for several years. The melons pressions. It occurs mainly in the north-central part
need liberal applications of a good fertilizer mixture, of the county.
part of which should be applied as a topdressing. The natural vegetation is turkey and bluejack oaks,
Several areas are planted to general crops, mainly a few pines, and shrubs and grasses. Some areas have
corn, cowpeas, and sweetpotatoes. Under good man- only a few trees and are covered by a sod consisting
agement, and with favorable weather, fair yields are of various grasses.
obtained. Drainage is good to somewhat excessive. Surface
Several hundred acres of this soil have been seeded runoff is rapid. Hard rains damage the soil if it is not
to improved pasture grasses. These include Pensa- kept under cover crops or under a cover of natural
cola Bahiagrass, common Bahiagrass, and Pangola- vegetation. The vegetation not only breaks the force of
grass. If a good fertilizer mixture and lime are ap- the falling rain, but also increases the amount of humus
plied to these areas, only 2 or 3 acres of improved in the soil, thereby increasing its ability to absorb and
pasture is needed to graze 1 cow. retain water.
The natural vegetation of turkey and bluejack oaks,
a few pines, and grasses cover a large part of the soil.
The native grasses provide poor forage for animals
on the range pastures.
The native trees grow fairly well on this soil. Some
areas have been planted to pine seedlings. The growth -
of the young trees is fairly rapid.
This soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in the soil
association of Well-Drained Deep Sands.
Lakeland fine sand, gently undulating phase (Ld).-
This extensive soil occupies slopes of 2 to 5 percent.
Except for slope it resembles Lakeland fine sand, level
phase. It occurs mainly on the high sand ridges north
and northeast of Tampa; north of Dover; and near
Brandon, Bloomingdale, Limona, Valrico, Seffner,
Lithia, and Picnic. This soil is associated with other N ..- W -
phases of Lakeland fine sand and with soils of the -
Blanton, Eustis, Orlando, and Arredondo series. Figure 6.-A citrus grove on well-drained Lakeland fine sand,
The natural vegetation, which covers a large acre- gently undulating phase, near Temple Terrace.






HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 25

Fig .7 .. e en dium. The content of organic matter and plant nutri-
ents is low.
Use and pnmnagement.-Some of this soil is included
with other soils that are in citrus groves. Other areas
are used for general crops or pasture. Yields of citrus
fruits and other crops are fair to good if weather is
favorable and good management is practiced. The
natural vegetation provides poor to fair grazing.
This soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in the soil
association of Well-Drained Deep Sands.
Lakeland fine sand, level deep phase (Lc).-Most of
this soil occurs in the south-central and southern parts
of the county. It is associated with the other phases
of Lakeland fine sand and with Lakewood fine sand.
The surface layer is lighter colored than that of the
a mother Lakeland soils, the clayey material occurs at
greater depths, and the soil materials are less coherent.
This soil does not have the light-gray or white layer
between the surface layer and the yellow subsoil that
is typical of the Lakewood soil.
The natural vegetation consists of scrub live oaks,
This s a few turkey oaks, sand pines, rosemary and a few
other shrubs, and grasses.
The surface layer, to a depth of 4 to 8 inches, is gray
or light-gray loose fine sand. In places the lower layers
t are the same color as those of the typical Lakeland
Soil, but generally they are pale yellow or yellow. The
nr -e' finer textured material occurs at depths of more than
Figure 7.-Watermelons on Lakeland fine sand, gently undulat- 72 inches.
ing phase, near Temple Terrace. This soil is somewhat excessively drained and has a
very low moisture-holding capacity. It is low in or-
ganic matter and in mineral nutrients for plants.
Use and management.-About 120 acres of this soil Use and management.-Practically all of this soil is
is planted to citrus trees. If weather is favorable and used for range pasture, but the natural vegetation
a high level of management is practiced, the yields of provides only poor grazing.
oranges and grapefruit are fairly good. The citrus This soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in the soil
trees need liberal applications of fertilizer, and cover association of Well-Drained Deep Sands.
crops should be grown between the rows. Lime is Lakeland fine sand, undulating deep phase (Lf).-
needed on some areas. This somewhat excessively drained soil occurs in the
Several areas have been seeded to Pensacola Bahia- south-central part of the county. Except that it is on
grass, common Bahiagrass, Pangolagrass, and other slopes of from 2 to 8 percent, it resembles Lakeland
improved pasture grasses. Seeded pastures need ap- fine sand, level deep phase. It is very low in organic
plication of mixed fertilizer each year and lime every matter and mineral nutrients.
5 to 7 years. The improved pastures provide good Use and management.-Practically all of this soil
forage. is covered by scrub vegetation consisting of upland
This soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in the soil live oak, sand pine, rosemary, saw-palmetto, and a few
association of Well-Drained Deep Sands. grasses. This vegetation provides very poor forage.
Lakeland fine sand, shallow phase (La).-Except that This soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in the soil
finer textured materials occur at depths of 30 to 42 association of Well-Drained Deep Sands.
inches, this inextensive soil resembles the level and Lakewood fine sand (Lg).-Because of the natural
gently undulating phases of Lakeland fine sand. The vegetation growing on this soil, it is commonly called
finer textured material is pale yellow to brownish yel- scrubland." The vegetation consists of sand pine,
low, mottled in places with light gray and strong scrub oak, and a scattered undergrowth of saw-
brown. The texture ranges from fine sandy clay to palmetto, rosemary, runner oak, pricklypear cactus,
fine sandy clay loam. and wiregrass. A few turkey oaks and bluejack oaks
About half of this soil is nearly level, and the rest grow on some areas.
The soil has developed from thick beds of very loose
is on slopes of 2 to 8 percent. The soil occupies small sand. Most areas occupy low ridges, or knolls. Slopes
areas, generally in the north-central part of the county. are generally less than 2 percent. About 100 acres is
Most of it occurs north and northeast of Mango. It on slopes of 2 to 5 percent, and a few acres is on
is associated with the other Lakeland soils. slopes of 5 to 12 percent. The soil occurs mainly near
This soil is well drained. Because of the underlying the Little Manatee River in the southern part of the
clayey materials, it retains moisture better than most county. Some areas occur in the south-central and
of the Lakeland soils. Surface runoff is slow to me- eastern parts.






HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 25

Fig .7 .. e en dium. The content of organic matter and plant nutri-
ents is low.
Use and pnmnagement.-Some of this soil is included
with other soils that are in citrus groves. Other areas
are used for general crops or pasture. Yields of citrus
fruits and other crops are fair to good if weather is
favorable and good management is practiced. The
natural vegetation provides poor to fair grazing.
This soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in the soil
association of Well-Drained Deep Sands.
Lakeland fine sand, level deep phase (Lc).-Most of
this soil occurs in the south-central and southern parts
of the county. It is associated with the other phases
of Lakeland fine sand and with Lakewood fine sand.
The surface layer is lighter colored than that of the
a mother Lakeland soils, the clayey material occurs at
greater depths, and the soil materials are less coherent.
This soil does not have the light-gray or white layer
between the surface layer and the yellow subsoil that
is typical of the Lakewood soil.
The natural vegetation consists of scrub live oaks,
This s a few turkey oaks, sand pines, rosemary and a few
other shrubs, and grasses.
The surface layer, to a depth of 4 to 8 inches, is gray
or light-gray loose fine sand. In places the lower layers
t are the same color as those of the typical Lakeland
Soil, but generally they are pale yellow or yellow. The
nr -e' finer textured material occurs at depths of more than
Figure 7.-Watermelons on Lakeland fine sand, gently undulat- 72 inches.
ing phase, near Temple Terrace. This soil is somewhat excessively drained and has a
very low moisture-holding capacity. It is low in or-
ganic matter and in mineral nutrients for plants.
Use and management.-About 120 acres of this soil Use and management.-Practically all of this soil is
is planted to citrus trees. If weather is favorable and used for range pasture, but the natural vegetation
a high level of management is practiced, the yields of provides only poor grazing.
oranges and grapefruit are fairly good. The citrus This soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in the soil
trees need liberal applications of fertilizer, and cover association of Well-Drained Deep Sands.
crops should be grown between the rows. Lime is Lakeland fine sand, undulating deep phase (Lf).-
needed on some areas. This somewhat excessively drained soil occurs in the
Several areas have been seeded to Pensacola Bahia- south-central part of the county. Except that it is on
grass, common Bahiagrass, Pangolagrass, and other slopes of from 2 to 8 percent, it resembles Lakeland
improved pasture grasses. Seeded pastures need ap- fine sand, level deep phase. It is very low in organic
plication of mixed fertilizer each year and lime every matter and mineral nutrients.
5 to 7 years. The improved pastures provide good Use and management.-Practically all of this soil
forage. is covered by scrub vegetation consisting of upland
This soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in the soil live oak, sand pine, rosemary, saw-palmetto, and a few
association of Well-Drained Deep Sands. grasses. This vegetation provides very poor forage.
Lakeland fine sand, shallow phase (La).-Except that This soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in the soil
finer textured materials occur at depths of 30 to 42 association of Well-Drained Deep Sands.
inches, this inextensive soil resembles the level and Lakewood fine sand (Lg).-Because of the natural
gently undulating phases of Lakeland fine sand. The vegetation growing on this soil, it is commonly called
finer textured material is pale yellow to brownish yel- scrubland." The vegetation consists of sand pine,
low, mottled in places with light gray and strong scrub oak, and a scattered undergrowth of saw-
brown. The texture ranges from fine sandy clay to palmetto, rosemary, runner oak, pricklypear cactus,
fine sandy clay loam. and wiregrass. A few turkey oaks and bluejack oaks
About half of this soil is nearly level, and the rest grow on some areas.
The soil has developed from thick beds of very loose
is on slopes of 2 to 8 percent. The soil occupies small sand. Most areas occupy low ridges, or knolls. Slopes
areas, generally in the north-central part of the county. are generally less than 2 percent. About 100 acres is
Most of it occurs north and northeast of Mango. It on slopes of 2 to 5 percent, and a few acres is on
is associated with the other Lakeland soils. slopes of 5 to 12 percent. The soil occurs mainly near
This soil is well drained. Because of the underlying the Little Manatee River in the southern part of the
clayey materials, it retains moisture better than most county. Some areas occur in the south-central and
of the Lakeland soils. Surface runoff is slow to me- eastern parts.






HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 25

Fig .7 .. e en dium. The content of organic matter and plant nutri-
ents is low.
Use and pnmnagement.-Some of this soil is included
with other soils that are in citrus groves. Other areas
are used for general crops or pasture. Yields of citrus
fruits and other crops are fair to good if weather is
favorable and good management is practiced. The
natural vegetation provides poor to fair grazing.
This soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in the soil
association of Well-Drained Deep Sands.
Lakeland fine sand, level deep phase (Lc).-Most of
this soil occurs in the south-central and southern parts
of the county. It is associated with the other phases
of Lakeland fine sand and with Lakewood fine sand.
The surface layer is lighter colored than that of the
a mother Lakeland soils, the clayey material occurs at
greater depths, and the soil materials are less coherent.
This soil does not have the light-gray or white layer
between the surface layer and the yellow subsoil that
is typical of the Lakewood soil.
The natural vegetation consists of scrub live oaks,
This s a few turkey oaks, sand pines, rosemary and a few
other shrubs, and grasses.
The surface layer, to a depth of 4 to 8 inches, is gray
or light-gray loose fine sand. In places the lower layers
t are the same color as those of the typical Lakeland
Soil, but generally they are pale yellow or yellow. The
nr -e' finer textured material occurs at depths of more than
Figure 7.-Watermelons on Lakeland fine sand, gently undulat- 72 inches.
ing phase, near Temple Terrace. This soil is somewhat excessively drained and has a
very low moisture-holding capacity. It is low in or-
ganic matter and in mineral nutrients for plants.
Use and management.-About 120 acres of this soil Use and management.-Practically all of this soil is
is planted to citrus trees. If weather is favorable and used for range pasture, but the natural vegetation
a high level of management is practiced, the yields of provides only poor grazing.
oranges and grapefruit are fairly good. The citrus This soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in the soil
trees need liberal applications of fertilizer, and cover association of Well-Drained Deep Sands.
crops should be grown between the rows. Lime is Lakeland fine sand, undulating deep phase (Lf).-
needed on some areas. This somewhat excessively drained soil occurs in the
Several areas have been seeded to Pensacola Bahia- south-central part of the county. Except that it is on
grass, common Bahiagrass, Pangolagrass, and other slopes of from 2 to 8 percent, it resembles Lakeland
improved pasture grasses. Seeded pastures need ap- fine sand, level deep phase. It is very low in organic
plication of mixed fertilizer each year and lime every matter and mineral nutrients.
5 to 7 years. The improved pastures provide good Use and management.-Practically all of this soil
forage. is covered by scrub vegetation consisting of upland
This soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in the soil live oak, sand pine, rosemary, saw-palmetto, and a few
association of Well-Drained Deep Sands. grasses. This vegetation provides very poor forage.
Lakeland fine sand, shallow phase (La).-Except that This soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in the soil
finer textured materials occur at depths of 30 to 42 association of Well-Drained Deep Sands.
inches, this inextensive soil resembles the level and Lakewood fine sand (Lg).-Because of the natural
gently undulating phases of Lakeland fine sand. The vegetation growing on this soil, it is commonly called
finer textured material is pale yellow to brownish yel- scrubland." The vegetation consists of sand pine,
low, mottled in places with light gray and strong scrub oak, and a scattered undergrowth of saw-
brown. The texture ranges from fine sandy clay to palmetto, rosemary, runner oak, pricklypear cactus,
fine sandy clay loam. and wiregrass. A few turkey oaks and bluejack oaks
About half of this soil is nearly level, and the rest grow on some areas.
The soil has developed from thick beds of very loose
is on slopes of 2 to 8 percent. The soil occupies small sand. Most areas occupy low ridges, or knolls. Slopes
areas, generally in the north-central part of the county. are generally less than 2 percent. About 100 acres is
Most of it occurs north and northeast of Mango. It on slopes of 2 to 5 percent, and a few acres is on
is associated with the other Lakeland soils. slopes of 5 to 12 percent. The soil occurs mainly near
This soil is well drained. Because of the underlying the Little Manatee River in the southern part of the
clayey materials, it retains moisture better than most county. Some areas occur in the south-central and
of the Lakeland soils. Surface runoff is slow to me- eastern parts.






HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 25

Fig .7 .. e en dium. The content of organic matter and plant nutri-
ents is low.
Use and pnmnagement.-Some of this soil is included
with other soils that are in citrus groves. Other areas
are used for general crops or pasture. Yields of citrus
fruits and other crops are fair to good if weather is
favorable and good management is practiced. The
natural vegetation provides poor to fair grazing.
This soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in the soil
association of Well-Drained Deep Sands.
Lakeland fine sand, level deep phase (Lc).-Most of
this soil occurs in the south-central and southern parts
of the county. It is associated with the other phases
of Lakeland fine sand and with Lakewood fine sand.
The surface layer is lighter colored than that of the
a mother Lakeland soils, the clayey material occurs at
greater depths, and the soil materials are less coherent.
This soil does not have the light-gray or white layer
between the surface layer and the yellow subsoil that
is typical of the Lakewood soil.
The natural vegetation consists of scrub live oaks,
This s a few turkey oaks, sand pines, rosemary and a few
other shrubs, and grasses.
The surface layer, to a depth of 4 to 8 inches, is gray
or light-gray loose fine sand. In places the lower layers
t are the same color as those of the typical Lakeland
Soil, but generally they are pale yellow or yellow. The
nr -e' finer textured material occurs at depths of more than
Figure 7.-Watermelons on Lakeland fine sand, gently undulat- 72 inches.
ing phase, near Temple Terrace. This soil is somewhat excessively drained and has a
very low moisture-holding capacity. It is low in or-
ganic matter and in mineral nutrients for plants.
Use and management.-About 120 acres of this soil Use and management.-Practically all of this soil is
is planted to citrus trees. If weather is favorable and used for range pasture, but the natural vegetation
a high level of management is practiced, the yields of provides only poor grazing.
oranges and grapefruit are fairly good. The citrus This soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in the soil
trees need liberal applications of fertilizer, and cover association of Well-Drained Deep Sands.
crops should be grown between the rows. Lime is Lakeland fine sand, undulating deep phase (Lf).-
needed on some areas. This somewhat excessively drained soil occurs in the
Several areas have been seeded to Pensacola Bahia- south-central part of the county. Except that it is on
grass, common Bahiagrass, Pangolagrass, and other slopes of from 2 to 8 percent, it resembles Lakeland
improved pasture grasses. Seeded pastures need ap- fine sand, level deep phase. It is very low in organic
plication of mixed fertilizer each year and lime every matter and mineral nutrients.
5 to 7 years. The improved pastures provide good Use and management.-Practically all of this soil
forage. is covered by scrub vegetation consisting of upland
This soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in the soil live oak, sand pine, rosemary, saw-palmetto, and a few
association of Well-Drained Deep Sands. grasses. This vegetation provides very poor forage.
Lakeland fine sand, shallow phase (La).-Except that This soil is in capability unit IIIs-1 and in the soil
finer textured materials occur at depths of 30 to 42 association of Well-Drained Deep Sands.
inches, this inextensive soil resembles the level and Lakewood fine sand (Lg).-Because of the natural
gently undulating phases of Lakeland fine sand. The vegetation growing on this soil, it is commonly called
finer textured material is pale yellow to brownish yel- scrubland." The vegetation consists of sand pine,
low, mottled in places with light gray and strong scrub oak, and a scattered undergrowth of saw-
brown. The texture ranges from fine sandy clay to palmetto, rosemary, runner oak, pricklypear cactus,
fine sandy clay loam. and wiregrass. A few turkey oaks and bluejack oaks
About half of this soil is nearly level, and the rest grow on some areas.
The soil has developed from thick beds of very loose
is on slopes of 2 to 8 percent. The soil occupies small sand. Most areas occupy low ridges, or knolls. Slopes
areas, generally in the north-central part of the county. are generally less than 2 percent. About 100 acres is
Most of it occurs north and northeast of Mango. It on slopes of 2 to 5 percent, and a few acres is on
is associated with the other Lakeland soils. slopes of 5 to 12 percent. The soil occurs mainly near
This soil is well drained. Because of the underlying the Little Manatee River in the southern part of the
clayey materials, it retains moisture better than most county. Some areas occur in the south-central and
of the Lakeland soils. Surface runoff is slow to me- eastern parts.






26 SOIL SURVEY SERIES 1950, NO. 3

This soil is associated with soils of the St. Lucie, somewhat poorly drained. Surface runoff is slow.
Pomello, Blanton, and Leon series. It has a yellow or Internal drainage is medium to rapid if not retarded
brownish-yellow layer, beginning 10 to 24 inches below by the high water table that is generally associated
the surface, which does not occur in the associated with the pan.
St. Lucie and Pomello soils. The Lakewood soil does Use and management.-Most of this soil is used as
not have the very dark brown or nearly black organic range pasture (fig. 8). The natural vegetation pro-
pan that occurs at depths of 14 to 30 inches in the vides poor to fair forage. From 15 to 25 acres is needed
Leon soils. to graze a cow. Some areas have been cleared, limed
Profile description: and fertilized, and seeded to improved pasture grasses.
0 to 3 inches, light-gray or gray, loose, noncoherent fine Such areas yield approximately four times as much
sand; contains a small amount of coarse organic matter. forage as those under the natural vegetation.
3 to 18 inches, white, loose, noncoherent fine sand. A few areas of this soil, near Ruskin and Plant City,
18 to 48 inches +, yellow or brownish-yellow, loose, non- have been included with other soils in fields used to
coherent fine sand that grades to light gray and white grow vegetables and strawberries. Such areas need
with increasing depth. Tlime, liberal applications of mixed fertilizer, and con-
This soil is strongly acid throughout. It is exces- trol of water. Many farmers irrigate by means of
sively drained and retains little moisture even during sprinkling systems or by allowing water to seep
the rainy summer season. It is extremely low in or- through the soil from furrows. Under good manage-
ganic matter and plant nutrients.
Use and management.-Most of this soil is in range
pastures, but a few areas are used as building sites.
The natural vegetation on the range pastures provides .
very poor forage.
This soil is in capability unit IVs-1 and in the soil
association of Excessively Drained or Well Drained
Deep Sands.
Leon fine sand (Lh).-This soil is the most extensive
in the county. Typically it has a black or dark-brown .
organic pan beginning at depths between 14 and 30
inches. The soil has developed from thick beds of
unconsolidated sand, laid down by high seas that once
covered the area. It occurs in the flatwoods. Large
areas are in the southern, northeastern, and north-
western parts of the county. The soil is mainly level
to nearly level, but some areas near streams are on
slopes of 2 to 5 percent.
Associated with this soil are soils of the Immokalee,
Ona, Pomello, Blanton, Scranton, Adamsville, Plum-
mer, and Rutlege series. The organic pan in this soil
is more strongly cemented and nearer the surface than
that in the Immokalee soils. Instead of an organic
pan, the Ona soils have, within 14 inches of the sur-
face, a layer that is stained brown by organic matter.
The Pomello and Blanton soils do not have a pan, and
they are better drained and lighter colored than the
Leon soil.
Profile description:
0 to 5 inches, dark-gray nearly loose fine sand; contains a
small amount of organic matter, which gives it a salt-
and-pepper appearance.
5 to 20 inches, light-gray loose fine sand.
20 to 24 inches, very dark grayish-brown or black fine
sand cemented with organic matter; firm and friable
when moist; hard when dry.
24 to 30 inches, dark-brown fine sand; weakly cemented.
30 to 42 inches +, yellowish-brown loose fine sand in up-
per part; grades to lighter colors with increasing depth.
The surface layer ranges from very dark gray to
gray in color and from 3 to 8 inches in thickness. The
organic pan ranges from nearly black to dark brown
and from 2 to 6 inches in thickness. As a rule the
upper part of the pan is dense and hard. In places
the dark-colored material extends to depths of more
thearicore Figure 8.-Natural cover of wiregrass, saw-palmetto, and pine
than 42 inches. on Leon fine sand. This soil is used as range pasture, but its
This soil is very strongly acid throughout. It is carrying capacity is low.






HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 27

ment fairly high yields of the vegetables and berries Leon fine sand, but in most places it is not so dense,
are obtained. Yields are not so high as those obtained and in many places it includes scrub live oaks.
on the Scranton, Ona, Ruskin, and Adamsville soils The surface layer of this soil is light-gray or gray
under similar management. fine sand, 1 to 3 inches thick. The pan layer occurs at
In the northwestern and eastern parts of the county, depths of 24 to 42 inches.
small areas are included with other soils used to grow This soil is somewhat poorly drained. Surface run-
citrus fruits. Because of the fluctuating high water off is slow to medium, and internal drainage is medium
table, the citrus trees on this soil are generally stunted to rapid when not retarded by the high water table.
and do not live long. Citrus trees can be grown if 'Use and management.-Much of this soil is used for
given special management, but the soil is not suitable range pasture, but the natural vegetation provides only
for commercial citrus groves, poor to fair grazing. A few areas are included in
Pine trees grow fairly well on this soil. Under a fields used to grow citrus fruits or other crops. Citrus
good system of forestry management, they are fairly fruits and other crops do not do well on this soil.
profitable. This soil is in capability unit Vs-1 and in the soil
This soil is in capability unit IVs-2 and in the soil association of Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands with
association of Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands with Organic Pan.
Organic Pan. Made land (Ma).-In the western part of the county,
Leon fine sand, heavy substratum phase (LI).-Except this land type consists largely of areas built up by
that the organic pan is underlain by clayey materials, dredgings taken from the bottom of Tampa Bay, Old
this soil resembles Leon fine sand. It occupies level Tampa Bay, and Hillsboro Bay, and materials taken
or nearly level areas, mainly in the southern, north- from the bottoms of lakes and ponds. A few areas of
western, northern, and northeastern parts of the Coastal beach, not mapped separately in this county,
county. It occurs next to areas of other Leon soils are included. The materials consist of sand and shells,
or Immokalee soils, or separates areas of Leon and which were pumped into low-lying areas when nearby
Immokalee soils from areas of Sunniland and Ruskin channels were widened and made deeper for boats or
soils. when lakes or ponds were deepened. Much of this
The natural vegetation consists of pine trees, runner material has been used as a foundation for highways
oaks, gallberry bushes, a few myrtle bushes and other and for roads across the bays. Some is used for build-
shrubs, and grasses. ing sites.
The organic pan in this soil begins at depths of 24 In the central and eastern parts of the county, this
to 32 inches. The clayey material begins at depths of land consists largely of residues that have resulted from
30 to 42 inches, and in most places it is mottled light- mining pebble phosphate. These areas have been lev-
gray, yellow, and yellowish-brown fine sandy clay or eled somewhat, and some of the more nearly level ones
fine sandy clay loam. have been seeded to improved pasture grasses or
The upper part of the clayey material is strongly planted to a few crops. Grasses and crops on these
acid; the lower part, at depths of nearly 42 inches, is reclaimed areas yield fair to good returns under good
strongly acid but in places is neutral or alkaline. The management. Fertilizer must be used, however, and
areas that have neutral or alkaline clayey material the crops must be irrigated during dry seasons.
generally occur near the coast or near areas of Ruskin, Pine trees grow rapidly on some of this land. This
Sunniland, or Adamsville soils. mapping unit has practically no agricultural value and
Use and management.-Practically all of this soil was not given a capability classification.
is in range pastures. Forage on these pastures is pro- Manatee fine sandy loam (Mc).-This poorly drained
vided by the natural vegetation and is only fair. A soil has a thin layer of loamy sand over alkaline clay
few acres have been cleared, fertilized, and seeded to materials and marl. It occupies level areas or slight
improved pasture grasses. Only 2 to 3 acres of im- depressions. A large area occurs east of Harney in
proved pasture is needed to graze a cow. an area known as Harney Flats. Smaller areas occur
Pine trees grow well on this soil. They are profit- near the coast in the southwestern and northwestern
able if good forestry management is practiced. parts of the county, and some occur in the northeastern
This soil is in capability unit IVs-2 and in the soil part. Some areas occur near the major streams.
association of Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands with This soil is associated with the Bradenton, Ruskin,
Organic Pan. Sunniland, Delray, Felda, and Pompano soils. The
Leon fine sand, light-colored surface phase (Lk).- surface layer is darker colored than the surface layers
This soil resembles typical Leon fine sand except that of the associated soils, except the Delray, and thicker
it has a lighter colored surface layer, is slightly deeper than the surface layers of the Bradenton, Ruskin, and
over the organic pan, and occupies slightly higher, Sunniland soils. This soil occurs on wetter areas than
better drained positions. The relief is nearly level, the Bradenton, Ruskin, and Sunniland soils. The fine-
though in places there is a slight slope toward lower textured materials in its profile occur at depths of less
lying soils. Individual areas are fairly large and are than 30 inches, but those in the Delray soils occur
scattered throughout the county. They occur within at depths below 30 inches.
larger areas of other Leon soils or between areas of The natural vegetation in most places consists of
other Leon soils and areas of Pomello, Blanton, and various grasses, sedges, lilies, and other aquatic plants.
Lakeland soils. This soil differs from the Pomello soil few grasses.
in having an organic pan. In some areas it. consists of hardwoods and cypress
The natural vegetation is similar to that on typical trees, a few cabbage palmettos, vines, shrubs, and a






HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 27

ment fairly high yields of the vegetables and berries Leon fine sand, but in most places it is not so dense,
are obtained. Yields are not so high as those obtained and in many places it includes scrub live oaks.
on the Scranton, Ona, Ruskin, and Adamsville soils The surface layer of this soil is light-gray or gray
under similar management. fine sand, 1 to 3 inches thick. The pan layer occurs at
In the northwestern and eastern parts of the county, depths of 24 to 42 inches.
small areas are included with other soils used to grow This soil is somewhat poorly drained. Surface run-
citrus fruits. Because of the fluctuating high water off is slow to medium, and internal drainage is medium
table, the citrus trees on this soil are generally stunted to rapid when not retarded by the high water table.
and do not live long. Citrus trees can be grown if 'Use and management.-Much of this soil is used for
given special management, but the soil is not suitable range pasture, but the natural vegetation provides only
for commercial citrus groves, poor to fair grazing. A few areas are included in
Pine trees grow fairly well on this soil. Under a fields used to grow citrus fruits or other crops. Citrus
good system of forestry management, they are fairly fruits and other crops do not do well on this soil.
profitable. This soil is in capability unit Vs-1 and in the soil
This soil is in capability unit IVs-2 and in the soil association of Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands with
association of Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands with Organic Pan.
Organic Pan. Made land (Ma).-In the western part of the county,
Leon fine sand, heavy substratum phase (LI).-Except this land type consists largely of areas built up by
that the organic pan is underlain by clayey materials, dredgings taken from the bottom of Tampa Bay, Old
this soil resembles Leon fine sand. It occupies level Tampa Bay, and Hillsboro Bay, and materials taken
or nearly level areas, mainly in the southern, north- from the bottoms of lakes and ponds. A few areas of
western, northern, and northeastern parts of the Coastal beach, not mapped separately in this county,
county. It occurs next to areas of other Leon soils are included. The materials consist of sand and shells,
or Immokalee soils, or separates areas of Leon and which were pumped into low-lying areas when nearby
Immokalee soils from areas of Sunniland and Ruskin channels were widened and made deeper for boats or
soils. when lakes or ponds were deepened. Much of this
The natural vegetation consists of pine trees, runner material has been used as a foundation for highways
oaks, gallberry bushes, a few myrtle bushes and other and for roads across the bays. Some is used for build-
shrubs, and grasses. ing sites.
The organic pan in this soil begins at depths of 24 In the central and eastern parts of the county, this
to 32 inches. The clayey material begins at depths of land consists largely of residues that have resulted from
30 to 42 inches, and in most places it is mottled light- mining pebble phosphate. These areas have been lev-
gray, yellow, and yellowish-brown fine sandy clay or eled somewhat, and some of the more nearly level ones
fine sandy clay loam. have been seeded to improved pasture grasses or
The upper part of the clayey material is strongly planted to a few crops. Grasses and crops on these
acid; the lower part, at depths of nearly 42 inches, is reclaimed areas yield fair to good returns under good
strongly acid but in places is neutral or alkaline. The management. Fertilizer must be used, however, and
areas that have neutral or alkaline clayey material the crops must be irrigated during dry seasons.
generally occur near the coast or near areas of Ruskin, Pine trees grow rapidly on some of this land. This
Sunniland, or Adamsville soils. mapping unit has practically no agricultural value and
Use and management.-Practically all of this soil was not given a capability classification.
is in range pastures. Forage on these pastures is pro- Manatee fine sandy loam (Mc).-This poorly drained
vided by the natural vegetation and is only fair. A soil has a thin layer of loamy sand over alkaline clay
few acres have been cleared, fertilized, and seeded to materials and marl. It occupies level areas or slight
improved pasture grasses. Only 2 to 3 acres of im- depressions. A large area occurs east of Harney in
proved pasture is needed to graze a cow. an area known as Harney Flats. Smaller areas occur
Pine trees grow well on this soil. They are profit- near the coast in the southwestern and northwestern
able if good forestry management is practiced. parts of the county, and some occur in the northeastern
This soil is in capability unit IVs-2 and in the soil part. Some areas occur near the major streams.
association of Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands with This soil is associated with the Bradenton, Ruskin,
Organic Pan. Sunniland, Delray, Felda, and Pompano soils. The
Leon fine sand, light-colored surface phase (Lk).- surface layer is darker colored than the surface layers
This soil resembles typical Leon fine sand except that of the associated soils, except the Delray, and thicker
it has a lighter colored surface layer, is slightly deeper than the surface layers of the Bradenton, Ruskin, and
over the organic pan, and occupies slightly higher, Sunniland soils. This soil occurs on wetter areas than
better drained positions. The relief is nearly level, the Bradenton, Ruskin, and Sunniland soils. The fine-
though in places there is a slight slope toward lower textured materials in its profile occur at depths of less
lying soils. Individual areas are fairly large and are than 30 inches, but those in the Delray soils occur
scattered throughout the county. They occur within at depths below 30 inches.
larger areas of other Leon soils or between areas of The natural vegetation in most places consists of
other Leon soils and areas of Pomello, Blanton, and various grasses, sedges, lilies, and other aquatic plants.
Lakeland soils. This soil differs from the Pomello soil few grasses.
in having an organic pan. In some areas it. consists of hardwoods and cypress
The natural vegetation is similar to that on typical trees, a few cabbage palmettos, vines, shrubs, and a






HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 27

ment fairly high yields of the vegetables and berries Leon fine sand, but in most places it is not so dense,
are obtained. Yields are not so high as those obtained and in many places it includes scrub live oaks.
on the Scranton, Ona, Ruskin, and Adamsville soils The surface layer of this soil is light-gray or gray
under similar management. fine sand, 1 to 3 inches thick. The pan layer occurs at
In the northwestern and eastern parts of the county, depths of 24 to 42 inches.
small areas are included with other soils used to grow This soil is somewhat poorly drained. Surface run-
citrus fruits. Because of the fluctuating high water off is slow to medium, and internal drainage is medium
table, the citrus trees on this soil are generally stunted to rapid when not retarded by the high water table.
and do not live long. Citrus trees can be grown if 'Use and management.-Much of this soil is used for
given special management, but the soil is not suitable range pasture, but the natural vegetation provides only
for commercial citrus groves, poor to fair grazing. A few areas are included in
Pine trees grow fairly well on this soil. Under a fields used to grow citrus fruits or other crops. Citrus
good system of forestry management, they are fairly fruits and other crops do not do well on this soil.
profitable. This soil is in capability unit Vs-1 and in the soil
This soil is in capability unit IVs-2 and in the soil association of Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands with
association of Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands with Organic Pan.
Organic Pan. Made land (Ma).-In the western part of the county,
Leon fine sand, heavy substratum phase (LI).-Except this land type consists largely of areas built up by
that the organic pan is underlain by clayey materials, dredgings taken from the bottom of Tampa Bay, Old
this soil resembles Leon fine sand. It occupies level Tampa Bay, and Hillsboro Bay, and materials taken
or nearly level areas, mainly in the southern, north- from the bottoms of lakes and ponds. A few areas of
western, northern, and northeastern parts of the Coastal beach, not mapped separately in this county,
county. It occurs next to areas of other Leon soils are included. The materials consist of sand and shells,
or Immokalee soils, or separates areas of Leon and which were pumped into low-lying areas when nearby
Immokalee soils from areas of Sunniland and Ruskin channels were widened and made deeper for boats or
soils. when lakes or ponds were deepened. Much of this
The natural vegetation consists of pine trees, runner material has been used as a foundation for highways
oaks, gallberry bushes, a few myrtle bushes and other and for roads across the bays. Some is used for build-
shrubs, and grasses. ing sites.
The organic pan in this soil begins at depths of 24 In the central and eastern parts of the county, this
to 32 inches. The clayey material begins at depths of land consists largely of residues that have resulted from
30 to 42 inches, and in most places it is mottled light- mining pebble phosphate. These areas have been lev-
gray, yellow, and yellowish-brown fine sandy clay or eled somewhat, and some of the more nearly level ones
fine sandy clay loam. have been seeded to improved pasture grasses or
The upper part of the clayey material is strongly planted to a few crops. Grasses and crops on these
acid; the lower part, at depths of nearly 42 inches, is reclaimed areas yield fair to good returns under good
strongly acid but in places is neutral or alkaline. The management. Fertilizer must be used, however, and
areas that have neutral or alkaline clayey material the crops must be irrigated during dry seasons.
generally occur near the coast or near areas of Ruskin, Pine trees grow rapidly on some of this land. This
Sunniland, or Adamsville soils. mapping unit has practically no agricultural value and
Use and management.-Practically all of this soil was not given a capability classification.
is in range pastures. Forage on these pastures is pro- Manatee fine sandy loam (Mc).-This poorly drained
vided by the natural vegetation and is only fair. A soil has a thin layer of loamy sand over alkaline clay
few acres have been cleared, fertilized, and seeded to materials and marl. It occupies level areas or slight
improved pasture grasses. Only 2 to 3 acres of im- depressions. A large area occurs east of Harney in
proved pasture is needed to graze a cow. an area known as Harney Flats. Smaller areas occur
Pine trees grow well on this soil. They are profit- near the coast in the southwestern and northwestern
able if good forestry management is practiced. parts of the county, and some occur in the northeastern
This soil is in capability unit IVs-2 and in the soil part. Some areas occur near the major streams.
association of Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands with This soil is associated with the Bradenton, Ruskin,
Organic Pan. Sunniland, Delray, Felda, and Pompano soils. The
Leon fine sand, light-colored surface phase (Lk).- surface layer is darker colored than the surface layers
This soil resembles typical Leon fine sand except that of the associated soils, except the Delray, and thicker
it has a lighter colored surface layer, is slightly deeper than the surface layers of the Bradenton, Ruskin, and
over the organic pan, and occupies slightly higher, Sunniland soils. This soil occurs on wetter areas than
better drained positions. The relief is nearly level, the Bradenton, Ruskin, and Sunniland soils. The fine-
though in places there is a slight slope toward lower textured materials in its profile occur at depths of less
lying soils. Individual areas are fairly large and are than 30 inches, but those in the Delray soils occur
scattered throughout the county. They occur within at depths below 30 inches.
larger areas of other Leon soils or between areas of The natural vegetation in most places consists of
other Leon soils and areas of Pomello, Blanton, and various grasses, sedges, lilies, and other aquatic plants.
Lakeland soils. This soil differs from the Pomello soil few grasses.
in having an organic pan. In some areas it. consists of hardwoods and cypress
The natural vegetation is similar to that on typical trees, a few cabbage palmettos, vines, shrubs, and a






HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA 27

ment fairly high yields of the vegetables and berries Leon fine sand, but in most places it is not so dense,
are obtained. Yields are not so high as those obtained and in many places it includes scrub live oaks.
on the Scranton, Ona, Ruskin, and Adamsville soils The surface layer of this soil is light-gray or gray
under similar management. fine sand, 1 to 3 inches thick. The pan layer occurs at
In the northwestern and eastern parts of the county, depths of 24 to 42 inches.
small areas are included with other soils used to grow This soil is somewhat poorly drained. Surface run-
citrus fruits. Because of the fluctuating high water off is slow to medium, and internal drainage is medium
table, the citrus trees on this soil are generally stunted to rapid when not retarded by the high water table.
and do not live long. Citrus trees can be grown if 'Use and management.-Much of this soil is used for
given special management, but the soil is not suitable range pasture, but the natural vegetation provides only
for commercial citrus groves, poor to fair grazing. A few areas are included in
Pine trees grow fairly well on this soil. Under a fields used to grow citrus fruits or other crops. Citrus
good system of forestry management, they are fairly fruits and other crops do not do well on this soil.
profitable. This soil is in capability unit Vs-1 and in the soil
This soil is in capability unit IVs-2 and in the soil association of Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands with
association of Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands with Organic Pan.
Organic Pan. Made land (Ma).-In the western part of the county,
Leon fine sand, heavy substratum phase (LI).-Except this land type consists largely of areas built up by
that the organic pan is underlain by clayey materials, dredgings taken from the bottom of Tampa Bay, Old
this soil resembles Leon fine sand. It occupies level Tampa Bay, and Hillsboro Bay, and materials taken
or nearly level areas, mainly in the southern, north- from the bottoms of lakes and ponds. A few areas of
western, northern, and northeastern parts of the Coastal beach, not mapped separately in this county,
county. It occurs next to areas of other Leon soils are included. The materials consist of sand and shells,
or Immokalee soils, or separates areas of Leon and which were pumped into low-lying areas when nearby
Immokalee soils from areas of Sunniland and Ruskin channels were widened and made deeper for boats or
soils. when lakes or ponds were deepened. Much of this
The natural vegetation consists of pine trees, runner material has been used as a foundation for highways
oaks, gallberry bushes, a few myrtle bushes and other and for roads across the bays. Some is used for build-
shrubs, and grasses. ing sites.
The organic pan in this soil begins at depths of 24 In the central and eastern parts of the county, this
to 32 inches. The clayey material begins at depths of land consists largely of residues that have resulted from
30 to 42 inches, and in most places it is mottled light- mining pebble phosphate. These areas have been lev-
gray, yellow, and yellowish-brown fine sandy clay or eled somewhat, and some of the more nearly level ones
fine sandy clay loam. have been seeded to improved pasture grasses or
The upper part of the clayey material is strongly planted to a few crops. Grasses and crops on these
acid; the lower part, at depths of nearly 42 inches, is reclaimed areas yield fair to good returns under good
strongly acid but in places is neutral or alkaline. The management. Fertilizer must be used, however, and
areas that have neutral or alkaline clayey material the crops must be irrigated during dry seasons.
generally occur near the coast or near areas of Ruskin, Pine trees grow rapidly on some of this land. This
Sunniland, or Adamsville soils. mapping unit has practically no agricultural value and
Use and management.-Practically all of this soil was not given a capability classification.
is in range pastures. Forage on these pastures is pro- Manatee fine sandy loam (Mc).-This poorly drained
vided by the natural vegetation and is only fair. A soil has a thin layer of loamy sand over alkaline clay
few acres have been cleared, fertilized, and seeded to materials and marl. It occupies level areas or slight
improved pasture grasses. Only 2 to 3 acres of im- depressions. A large area occurs east of Harney in
proved pasture is needed to graze a cow. an area known as Harney Flats. Smaller areas occur
Pine trees grow well on this soil. They are profit- near the coast in the southwestern and northwestern
able if good forestry management is practiced. parts of the county, and some occur in the northeastern
This soil is in capability unit IVs-2 and in the soil part. Some areas occur near the major streams.
association of Somewhat Poorly Drained Sands with This soil is associated with the Bradenton, Ruskin,
Organic Pan. Sunniland, Delray, Felda, and Pompano soils. The
Leon fine sand, light-colored surface phase (Lk).- surface layer is darker colored than the surface layers
This soil resembles typical Leon fine sand except that of the associated soils, except the Delray, and thicker
it has a lighter colored surface layer, is slightly deeper than the surface layers of the Bradenton, Ruskin, and
over the organic pan, and occupies slightly higher, Sunniland soils. This soil occurs on wetter areas than
better drained positions. The relief is nearly level, the Bradenton, Ruskin, and Sunniland soils. The fine-
though in places there is a slight slope toward lower textured materials in its profile occur at depths of less
lying soils. Individual areas are fairly large and are than 30 inches, but those in the Delray soils occur
scattered throughout the county. They occur within at depths below 30 inches.
larger areas of other Leon soils or between areas of The natural vegetation in most places consists of
other Leon soils and areas of Pomello, Blanton, and various grasses, sedges, lilies, and other aquatic plants.
Lakeland soils. This soil differs from the Pomello soil few grasses.
in having an organic pan. In some areas it. consists of hardwoods and cypress
The natural vegetation is similar to that on typical trees, a few cabbage palmettos, vines, shrubs, and a




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