Hours of sunshine

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Material Information

Title:
Hours of sunshine
Physical Description:
96, 16 p., 6 leaves of plates : col. ill. ; 18 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Barr, Matthias, b. 1831
Pletsch, Oscar, 1830-1888 ( Illustrator )
Evans, Edmund, 1826-1905 ( Printer )
Cassell, Petter, Galpin & Co ( Publisher )
Publisher:
Cassell, Petter, and Galpin
Place of Publication:
London ;
New York
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Mothers -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Temper tantrums -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1871   ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1871   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1871
Genre:
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by Matthias Barr ; with illustrations by Oscar Pletsch ; printed in colours by Edmund Evans.
General Note:
Approximate date established from Brown, P. London publishers and printers c1800-1870 and from inscription dated 1872 in UCLA copy.
General Note:
Publisher's catalogue follows text.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002221927
notis - ALG2157
oclc - 30333583
System ID:
UF00026057:00001

Full Text
This page contains no text.


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HOURS OF SU-NSHINE., 6:*'i*.


HOURS OF SUNSHINE.BYMATTHIAS BARR,AUTHOR OF "LITTLE WILLIE," "THE CHILD'S GARLAND," ETC.WITH ILLUSTRATIONS BY OSCAR PLETSCH,LONDON:CASSELL, PETTER, AND GALPIN;AND 596, BROADWAY, NEW YORK.


CONTENTS.PAGELITTLE THINGS ... ... ... ... ... ... .. 9BUSY BEE ... ... ... ... ... .. .. ... ... 10THE KING OF THE KITCHEN ... ... ... .. ... ... 12HAPPY FRED ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 13GREEDY TOM ... ... ... ... .. ... ... ... 15"GRANNY'S GONE TO SLEEP ... ... ..... ... ... 16A LITrLE PRAYER ... ... ... ... .. ... ... 17WHO MADE ALL THINGS? ... .... ... ... ... I8MIND YOUR LESSONS ... ... ... ... .. ... ... 21THOUGHTS ... ... ... ... .. ... ... ... ... 22THE GAME ... ... ...... ... ... ..... ... 24THE OAK ... ... ... .. ... ... 25PRYING TOM ... ... ... ... .. ... ... ... 28THE LIGHT ... ... ... ... ... .. ...... 29THE ROSE AND THE DAISY ... ... ... '... ... ... 30MOTHER, GUIDE HIS LITTLE STEPS ... .. ... ... ... 32- LAUGH AND SHOUT ... .. .. .. ... ... ... 33SPIN ARIGHT ... ... ...... ..... .. ... 34PRAISE GOD ... ..... ... ... ... ... 35HELP MAMMA ... ... .. .. .. ... ... 36W HAT'S A PIN? ... ... ... .. ... ... ... ... 37PAPA'S BIRTHDAY ... .... .. ... .... .. ... 40THE THIEVING FLY ... ... ... ... ... ... 41KIss HER ... .. ... .. ... .. ... ... ... 45LITTLE FEET ... ... ... .. ... ... ..... 46


vi Contents.PAGELIZZIE ... ... ... ... ... .. ... ... ... 47LITTLE BLACK CROW ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 48GRANNY'S PICTURE ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 49MOTHER'S BIRDIE... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 50ROBIN REDBREAST ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 51POLLY ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 52A SOLDIER ... ... ... ... ... .. ... ... 53THE CHIMNEY-SWEEP ... ... ... ... ... ... 55THE SWALLOWS ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 56BABY ... .. ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 57PINCHER AND THE BUTCHER ... ... ... ... ... ... 58THE OLD FIDDLER ... ... .. ... ... ... 63SHOUT AND BAWL ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 64M OMENTS ... ... ... ... ... .. ... ... ... 65CHRISTMAS EVE ... ... ... ... ... .. ... ... 67No No N o ... ... ... ... ... .. ... ... 68CRUEL TOMMY ... ... ... ... ... .. ... ... 69YOUTH AND AGE ... ... ... ... ... .. ... ... 72GOD IS LOVE ... ... ... ... ... .. ... ... 73JOHNNY WITH HIS KITE ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 74PERSEVERE ... ... ... ... ... .. ... ... ... 75GOOD MORNING ... ... ... ...... ... ... *** 76FANCIES ... ... ...... ... ... ... 77THE LITTLE NIGHTINGALE ... ...... ... ... ... 80WELCOME, SWEET FORGET-ME-NOTS ... ... ... ... ... 81THE OLD SOLDIER ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 82SO, SIR, YOU WOULD BE A MAN ... ... ... ... ... 88WHAT THE WORLD SAID ... ... ... ... ... ... 89M OTHER'S LOVE ... ... ... ... ... ... ... '... 91THE BELLS ... ... ... .. ... ... ... ... 92.FHE SPARROW AND THE SWALLOW ... ... ... ... ... 93STAY IN YOUR SEAT ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 96


PREFACE.DEAR LITTLE CHILDREN,-I have written many books.for your amusement and, let me hope, at the sametime, your edification; but I have not written youa Preface before, nor would I now were it not tothank you for the indulgent ear you have given tomy writings, and to assure you that your approbationis very dear to me.Should the present volume meet with the heartyresponse accorded to its. predecessors, you shall haveanother soon. In the meantime, believe me, yourwell-wisher,THE AUTHOR.


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HOURS O1F SUNSHINE.LITTLE THINGS.LITTLE moments make an hour;Little thoughts a book;Little seeds a tree or flower;Water-drops a brook.Little deeds of faith and loveMake a home for you above.


o1 Hours of Sunshine.BUSY BEE." HU, hum, busy bee!How I like your tune,Ever through the drowsy noon,That you sing to me.Tell me, has it got a name?For it always seems the same."" Stay a moment, cease your fun,Listen to me, pray;For the song I sing each dayIs a serious one-I am sending up on highHymns of joy where'er I fly.


Busy Bee. ii" Hymns of thankfulness to GodFor the pretty flowers-For the bright and sunny hours,And the dewy sod;And for such my life should beA day of gladsome jubilee." I, an insect, sing His praise:How much more should youFor His name and glory do,Throughout all your days!Not an hour in which you live,But some blessing you receive."


12 Hours of Sunshine.THE KING OF THE KITCHEN.GOOD morning, great king of the kitchen!Good morning, my lord of the spoon!I hope, sire, your reign may be happy,And-dinner be ordered up soon.Your subjects, I know, are quite ready,And long for a right royal treat;And, sire, would you keep them contented,Please give them sufficient to eat.


Hatapy Fred. 13HAPPY FRED." TELL me, little Freddy, pray,What has pleased your heart to-day,That you skip and leap and sing,Pleased with every little thing?"" Mother, you remember Dick;He that's lame and has a stick;Cripple Dick, with naked feet,Crossing-sweeper in our street?Well, I passed the other day,And he looked as if to say,'Little sir, a penny give.I am poor, and I must live;Please to give a lad a " brown !"So I popp'd a half-a-crown


14 Hours of Sunshine.In his hat, and passed along,Mingling with the busy throng.But to-day, would you believe,As I crossed he touched my sleeve;And he said, when he could speak,For the tears rolled down his cheek,' Mother sends her blessing, sir;Thanks for what you've done for her.When you passed me in the street,That day we had nought to eat.Oh, the joy we both did feel,When that night we had a meal!Blessings on you for the same,Luck and honour to your name !'That's what's filled my heart with joy,That's what's pleased your little boy."


Greedy Tom. 15GREEDY TOM.TOMMY was a greedy boy!Once he had a tart,Yet he never thought to giveSister Lizz a part.In his box he shut it up;"Oh," said he, " how nice!"But he quite forgot there wereLittle things called mice.In his little selfish heartHe was quite content;So when hewvas all alone,To his box he went."I shall eat it all myself;None shall have a share."Then he opened wide the lid,And found-nothing there


16 Hours of Sunshine.GRANNY'S GONE TO SLEEP.GRANNY'S gone to sleep:Softly, little boys;Read your pretty books,Don't make a noise.Pussy's on the stool,Quiet as a mouse;Not a whisper runsThrough the whole house.Hush! silence keep; Granny's gone to sleep.


!&;"*-""": GRANNY'S GONE TOU SLEEP.11|:-~" " :.6;' ~ ~ ?-::''L*:


A Little Prayer. 17A LITTLE PRAYER.FATHER, when I kneel to Thee,Hear the simple words I say;Make a happy child of me,Watch me, lest I go astray.Make me true and kind and good,Loved as little children should.-^-


18 Hours of SunshiZle.WHO MADE ALL THINGS?.HAVE you heard the thrushPipe long and loud?Have you seen the larkHigh up in a cloud ?Have you seen the flowersIn golden June,And the twinkling stars,And the sun and moon?Have you seen the snow,So soft and white?


Who Made All Things? 19Have you heard the windWhen it howls at night?If you've seen the sun,And tiny flowers;And have heard the thrushIn the woodland bowers;If you've seen the moon,And soft white snow,And have heard the windWhen it loud did blow:Have you thought whose handMade one and all-Made the stars to shine,And the snow to fall ?B 2


20 Hours of Sunshine.They were made by God,Who rules above;Whom all should obey,And dear children love.Wherever you roam,Whate'er your lot,Keep God in your heart,And forget Him not.


Mind your Lessons. 21MIND YOUR LESSONS.FLOG is a verb,And so is whack;Cane is a noun,And so is back;And lazy boys who go to sleep,And through their lessons crawl and creepAnd stut and stammer,Must see the noun and feel the verb,To help them with their grammar.


22 Hours of Sunskline.THOUGHTS.LET your thoughts, whate'er they be,Be but thoughts of kindness;Bitter thoughts in you or meShow our human blindness.If an evil thought ariseEver in your bosom,Crush it out, if you are wise,Nip it in the blossom.Never let it grow to flowerWith its thorns around it;Crush it while you have the power,Leave it where you found it.


Tkoughts. 23Grains of sand are tiny things,But they make the mountains;Feathers make the eagle's wings,Water-drops the fountains.Evil thoughts, that have their way,Make a life of sorrow,Bring us grief and care to-day,Shame and want to-morrow.


24 Hours of Sunshine.THE GAME.UNDER the table,Behind the chair;Up in the corner,Out on the stair;Behind the cupboard,All at their play,Five little childrenHappy and gay.Life is a game; when you play it, my dears,May it prove as delightful as this one appears.


The Oak. 25THE OAK.A BEAUTIFUL Oak was the people's pride,And it stood on the village green;And the fame of its beauty spread far and wide,For a fairer tree never was seen.And all the gossips were heard to sayThat the tree would flourish for many a day.From far and near the little birds came,And a home on its boughs they made;And the children theyshouted, and sang its name,As they sported beneath its shade;For a favourite thing with the young and oldWas the Oak, with its crown of green and gold.


26 Hours of Szushine.At length it grew meagre, and thin, and bare,And the good people, one and all,Looked up at their favourite tree in despair,For its branches began to fall.And they all agreed there was something amissWith the poor old Oak, when it drooped like this.They looked to the roots, and thought them firm,Then viewed it in every part;Till at last they discovered a single wormHad eaten the great Oak's heart:-A single worm had gone to the core,And the Oak would flourish no more-no more.No more would it flourish its head on high,Or the leaves on its branches grow;


The Oak. 27No more would the birds to its shelter fly,Or the little ones sport below;For ere the summer had come and passed,The Oak lay dead on the grass at last.Remember the Oak, oh, you children dear,And guard yourselves well from sin.Ask strength from above, and you need not fearThat the worm shall enter in.But beware of evil, for sure, though slow,It will poison the heart, and lay you low.


28 Hours of Sunshine.PRYING TOM.PRYING little TomPeeping in the pot;Tell me, Tommy, come,What have you got,Standing on your toes,Reaching over so ?" I have burnt my nose;Oh! oh! oh!"Better had you gone to bedAfter lessons, as Ma said.


The Light. 29THE LIGHT.MOTHER! Mother! see that lightShining through the darksome night:It is sent from heaven, I know,Sent to guide us through the snow;It is one of the angel-bandWho come from a far and distant landOn Christmas eves to visit the earth,And fill the hearts of the poor with mitth.To-morrow may be a brighter day,So weep not, Mother, but come away.


30 Hours of Sunshine.THE ROSE AND THE DAISY." SEE what a beautiful face I have got !"Said a blushing Rose in a garden plotTo a humble Daisy that hung its head,And kissed the ground with its lips so red." People will gaze on my face for hours,But they turn away from the meaner flowers;And as for you, why, who hears them say,'How lovely that daisy is looking to-day'?"Said the Daisy: "Ah, friend, though I grow atyour feet,In the eyes of men I am not less sweet.The poet will pass you, and stand by my side,When his heart is galled by folly and pride,


The Rose and the Daisy. 31And I see the tears start up in his eyes,For I fill him with human sympathies;I fill him with love for his fellow-kind,I cherish his heart and I soothe his mind,And stir in his bosom such thoughts of bliss;And can you, Rose, do aught to equal this ?"Ere the Rose could answer a single word,A step on the gravel-path was heard,And the Daisy smiled, tho' it held its tongue,While a tear to its beautiful eyelids sprung.The poet paused by the Rose's side,And said, " Oh, emblem of human pride!"Then turned to the daisy with beaming eye,And said, " Oh, flower where the virtues lie!"The Rose he placed in his button-hole,But the Daisy he cherished deep down in his soul.


32 Hours of Sunshine.MOTHER, GUIDE HIS LITTLE STEPS.MOTHER, guide his little stepsSafely, while you can;Guide them up the hill of life,Till he grow a man.Baby, when you grow a man,Strong, and wise, and brave,Guide your Mother down the hillGently, to the grave.


Laugh and Shout. 33LAUGH AND SHOUT.THE lark is up in the sky,The meadows are bright with dew;The lambs are playing, and why,Dear children, should not you ?Out into the meadows, and leap and run,And laugh and shout to the morning sun.c


34 Hours of Sunshine.SPIN ARIGHT.SPIN your threads, my little dear,Spin in hope and not in fear;Tiny threads make up the web,Little acts make up life's span.Would you be a happy girl?Spin them rightly, while you can;When the thread is broken quite,Too late then to spin aright.


Praise God. 35PRAISE GOD.BIRDS at early dawn beginEach to sing its Maker's praise;In the woods and in the fields,You should hear the hymns they raise.While the birds are praising God,Singing sweetly all the day,Children, shall your lips be dumb,Have you nothing too to say?If you would be good and wise,And would ever do aright,You must love your Maker too,Sing His praises day and night.C 2


36 Hours of iznshine.HELP MAMMA.PLEASE do let me help you, Mamma;I know you are busy to-night.I won't break a thing, I am sure,But try to do everything right.The cups and the saucers, and spoons,I'll make them look tidy and clean;And Papa will be pleased when he hearsWhat a good little girl I have been.


INDUSTRIOUS MARY.


WIzha's a Pin? 37WHAT'S A PIN?" WHAT'S a pin?Mamma has plenty;If I askShe'll give me twenty.There, Nurse, hold your horrid din-All this fuss about a pin."Saucy NedMamma had petted;More he hadThe more he fretted;And when spoken to by Nurse,Sulked, and made the matter worse.


38 Hours of Sunshine..Nurse had said,A crumb untastedFlung awayWas surely wasted;And a single pin, when lostEvery hour, would money cost.Little thoughtNed on the morrowThat same pinWould cause him sorrow,Or he ne'er had in his hasteThrown away that pin in waste.Next day Ned,Down in a corner,Went to playAt Jacky Horner,


Whal's a Pin ? 39When he gave a sudden cry,And to Nurse's lap did fly." Nurse, oh I Nurse,"He cried demented,While with painHe nearly fainted;"Take it out, oh do, I beg;See, it's sticking in my leg !"In his legThe pin was sticking,And he hadA painful pricking;But he never any moreThrew a pin upon the floor.


40 Hours of Sunshine.PAPA'S BIRTHDAY.MY dear Papa, we wish you joy-Your little girl, and little boy.I've bought this pretty book for you,And Mary she has something, too-A pretty rose, all wet with dew.Oh many birthdays may you see,Dear, dear Papa, and happy be.May God be kind, when you grow old;Your children's love be never cold,But dearer to your heart than gold.


The Thieving Fly. 41THE THIEVING FLY." HALLO there, my friend !" cried a FlyTo another one day,Whom he met in his way,"There's mischief, I see, in your eye;Come tell me, I pray, what you're after?"The other, nigh choking with laughter,Said, " Oh such a treat, I declare;Be prudent and quiet,Lest the other flies spy it,And you shall come in for a share.You must know, then, that Bessie the cookA pitcher of cream on the tableHas left; so I'm going to look,And take a sly drop if I'm able.


42 Hours of Sunshine.No one will be any wiser,And to tell you the truth, I am dry, sir;So if you are thirsty, be quick, if you please,And come, for I hear the cook shaking her keys."The first fly was young,Yet thieving, he knew, wasn't right;But the other fly, with his smooth tongue,Put the theft in a rose-coloured light;And the thing to make surer,Cried, " Who will be poorer?Why, no one; but we'll be the richer;A drop's but a drop;If you like you can stop,But I'll have a peep in the pitcher."The little fly thought of his mother,And the things she had taught him-


The Thieving Fly. 43The sweets she had bought him;And a feeling he couldn't well smotherArose in his breast as he said,"What we're doing is wrong, I'm afraid."" Pooh, pooh !" cried the other; " pooh, pooh ICome on ;" and away they both flew,Nor once did they stopTill they got on the topOf the pitcher, and had a good viewOf the rich cream below,Like a round lake of snow;And they laughed in their hearts, did the two." Now I'll show you, my friend, how to glideDown the smooth pitcher's side,"Said the old fly, the while his eyes glistened,And the younger fly listened;


44 Hours of Sunshine.But as he attempted to do it,A sharp puff of windFrom the window behindSent him down with a screamOn the top of the cream,-And then did he bitterly rue it;For struggling for breath,He cried in his grief," Be warned by my death,And never turn thief."


Kiss Her. 45KISS HER.Kiss her, my pet,Another one yet;Love her, oh! love her all else above;Nothing you haveThis side of the graveCan equal the strength of a Mother's love.


46 Hours of Sunshine.LITTLE FEET.LITTLE Feet, that never trodAny but the narrow road;Hands in anger never raised;Lips that only Jesus praised;Eyes that only saw the light-Never shadow, never night:Though we mourn you here to-day,Angels love you, far away.


Lizzie. 47LIZZIE.LITTLE LizzieIs always busy:She's never a moment still ;And kind is she,For she makes the teaWhen poor dear Father is ill.And she sits at night,By the candle-light,In a chair beside his bed,And tries to cheerHis heart, the dear!With some story she has read.


48 Hours of Sunshine.LITTLE BLACK CROW.LITTLE black Crow, little black Crow,Would you peck at your master's toe?Think, if you've got a thought in your head,Who brings you your breakfast of butter andbread;Who gives you your supper, and pets you so,And keeps you snug when the tempests blow.Don't be sulky, but come to playOut in the garden, this sunny day.


THE LITTLE BLACK CROW.


Granny's Picture. 49GRANNY'S PICTURE,LOOK at Granny's picture,Hanging on the wall;Oh, so kind and gentleShe was to us all!Something very oftenIn my heart will stir,When I see her pictureAnd I think of .her.Did I use you kindly,Darling, dear old Gran ?Oft I said I'd love youWhen I grew a man.Now you've gone and left me-Gone away to Heaven;If a wrong I've done you,Say I am forgiven.D


50 Hours of Sunshine.MOTHER'S BIRDIE.PRETTY Birdie Mother loves best,Sleeping so snugly in your nest,Wake and show her your bright blue eyes,Charm her heart with your crows and cries;Work your fingers and stretch your toes,Open your lips like a parted rose.Brightest of treasures asleep, awake,Life is dearer for your sweet sake.


Robin Redbreast. 51ROBIN REDBREAST.OH, Robin, Robin Redbreast,I love your face to see;Of all the pretty diekie-birds,You dearest are to me;For when the snow is on the ground,And all the woods are still,You come and sing your little songUpon my window-sill.Oh, Robin, Robin Redbreast,Don't stay out in the cold;I would not harm you, little thing,For twice your weight in gold.You're welcome to whate'er you get,So come whene'er you will;I like to hear you sing your songUpon my window-sill.D 2


52 Hours of Sunshine.POLLY.LOOK at Polly, she has little-Scarce, at times, enough to eat;No fine shoes, or pretty stockings,Ever grace her naked feet.Poor and humble! yet for othersSomething she will always spare.Not a bite has little Polly,But poor Toby has his share.


PO(OR POLLY.


A Soldier. 53A SOLDIER."WELL, I think I'll be a soldier;Mother, don't you think I'm right ?It must be so fine, I fancy,With a gun and sword to fight-" Fine to see the flags all flying,And to hear the cannon roar-Fine to get a silver medalWhen the fighting all is o'er." Shan't I like to be a soldier,Charging with my gallant men!I'll come home with hat and feathers,You won't know your Willie then."


54 Hours of Sunshine." Like to be a soldier, Willie?Ah, you know not what you say;But for war and all its horrors,We were not so lone to-day." But for wicked men, my darling,Your papa were smiling here;Want and woe we ne'er had tasted,Ne'er had shed the bitter tear."Ah, my son, if you must battle,Be a soldier of the Lord;Let your foe be sin and evil,And the Bible be your sword." Your reward will be the brighter,More, my son, than earthly gain:Life with Jesus everlasting,All of pleasure, nought of pain."


The Chimney-Sweep. 55THE CHIMNEY-SWEEP.ON the housetop, the Chimney-sweepInto the crow's-nest takes a peep,And he laughs aloud at the hungry brood,Calling so lustily for their food.And he thinks of his own hungry girls and boysAt home, who are making a similar noise;So he fancies himself just an old black crow,Out early to pick up a crumb or so.


56 Hours of Sunshine.THE SWALLOWS.LOOK at the Swallows, my pretty dears ;They have no sorrows, or cares, or fears.Toiling in pleasure, they build their nestSnug in some corner they love the best.Toiling in pleasure, they rear their young,Warmly sheltered the leaves among.Spending each moment in useful employ,Nothing is trouble, but all is joy.Thus they are teaching to one and allA mighty lesson, though they be sanall.


Baby. 57BABY.OH, Mother, I want to knowWho took dear Baby away?Where, where has she been since I looked onher last ?And when will she come out to play?Wherever I turn my eyes,Nothing looks beautiful now;Oh, Mother, it seems such a time since you laidMy hand upon dear Baby's brow.Whenever I ask Papa,He takes me upon his knee,And says, if I'm good, I shall go up to her,Though she cannot come down to me.I want to be good, you know,So give your own boy a kiss,For who would be bad when so simple a thingWill take me where dear Baby is?


58 Hours of Sunshine.PINCHER AND THE BUTCHER.PINCHER was a rascal:He would steal, and steal;Didn't care if what he tookMutton was, or veal.Once he went with masterTo a Butcher's shop,When he quietly walked awayWith a mutton chop." Ho! ho!" said the Butcher," I'll be quits with you.Time that thieving dogs were taughtJust a thing or two."


Pincher and the Butcher. 59So he took a fox-trap,Placed it on the floor,Just as Pincher showed his face,Next day, at the door.Pincher eyed the Butcher;Butcher laughed and talked.Pincher had another look,Then inside he walked.There he saw the fox-trap,Covered o'er with meat."Ah!" he chuckled to himself,"What a jolly treat!" Shame it is of Butcher,Wasting precious food!Leaving things upon the floorCannot do them good.


60 Hours of Sunshine." Fine for poor old Pincher,Such a piece as that;-Funny, too, I always wasVery fond of fat!" And it looks so tempting,Juicy, fat, and fine;Wonder if he'd miss it, now,If I made it mine?"Louder laughed the Butcher;Closer Pincher crept;" No one's looking-what a chance!"On the trap he stept.Alas! for poor old Pincher,He may howl and beg;But he'll limp for evermoreOn a broken leg.


Pincher and the Butcher. 61" Ho! ho!" roared the Butcher;" Safe you are, and fast.Thieving men and dogs, I find,Come to grief at last." Come here, little children !"Said the Butcher man;And into the Butcher's shopFive small children ran," Look at sneaking Pincher,There, in his disgrace;See, he cannot raise his head,Or look in your face." Children, take a warningBy old Pincher's fate;Never do a thing that youMay repent too late."


62 Hours of Sunshine.Then he took poor PincherSafely from the trap;Carried him into the street;Gave him such a slap.Down the street poor PincherLimped as best he could;And he never stole again,But became quite good.


Thze Old Fiddler. 63THE OLD FIDDLER.SEE that man, so poor and old,Standing in the winter's cold-Weary, hungry, pale, and thin-Playing on his violin:He has children ill in bed,He must play to win their bread ;He must fill your hearts with gladness,Though his own be full of sadness.Help him, children, all you can;Help him, help him, poor old man!


64 Hours of Sunshine.SHOUT AND BAWL.SHOUT and bawl,And run and fall,And up and at it again.If you must run,And have the fun,You must also have the pain.It's only by knowing the sweet from the sourThat you'll gather wisdom, and strength, andpower.**


Moments. 65MOMENTS.IN life's glassThe moments fall;Soon they passBeyond recall.Use them wellBefore they go,They foretellYour joy or woe.They shall speakYour hate or love,When they seekTheir home above.E


66 Hours of Sunshine.Oh, how sadIf one should say," He was badI left to-day;" Used meTo no wise end;Could not seeI was his friend."Prize them, dears,Each priceless gem;All your yearsAre made of them.If each bearA righteous seed,None need careHow soon they speed.


Christmas Eve. 67CHRISTMAS EVE.ON Christmas Eve, when the stars are bright,And the earth is wrapt in a robe of white,The angels come from their homes aboveDown on a mission of peace and love.Softly they steal through the open doors;Lightly they tread on the chamber floors;And, oh! but they love in their hearts to peepIn the homes where the children lie asleep.They play on their harps with the golden strings,And sing too, and whisper of beautiful things;And only at morning they vanish away,To keep with their Father their Christmas Day.E 2


68 Hours of Sunshine.NO! NO! NO!No no! no!I can't take it so.Put it in some sugar, or in something sweet.Oh, Ma, I've had enoughOf nasty doctor's stuff ;-I want a bun or apple, or a tart, to eat.Oh! oh oh!I can't take it so.I want a penny, Mother, and a nice new toy.I'll swallow every drop,But, oh I want a top,And a row of little soldiers, with a drummer-boy.


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Cruel Tommy. 69CRUEL TOMMY.ToM sat at the parlour window,Watching the people go by;But what was he really after?Why, plucking the legs from a fly.Ay, there he sat in the sunshine,Tormenting the tiny things;First plucking their legs from their sockets,Then afterwards clipping their wings.Ile didn't know then that his fatherWas standing behind his back,Inclined very much to be givingHis mischievous fingers a crack.


70 Hours of Sunshine.But he waited till after dinner,When Tommy was having his game,Then he thought he would give him a lesson,And treat him a little the same.So catching his son of a sudden,And giving his elbow a twist,He pulled at his ear till he holloed,Then doubled him up with his fist.And didn't he twist on the carpet,And didn't he bellow with pain!But whenever he cried " Oh, you hurt me!"His father would punch him again."Why, Tom, how amazingly funny !You don't seem to like it, my boy,And yet, when you try it on others,You always are singing for joy.-


Cruel Tommy 71" It's certainly strange," said his father;And this time his nose had a pull;But Tommy could stand it no longer,He bellowed and roared like a bull." Hush! hush, while I pull both your legs off,And clip off the half of each arm;What you practise yourself, sure, in othersYou can't think a sin and a harm." Now, Tommy, my boy," said his father," You'll leave these poor creatures alone ?If not, I'll go on with my lesson."" I will," cried poor Tom, with a groan.


72 Hours of Sunshine.YOUTH AND AGE.WHEN hearts are young and lightsome,The road is straight and clear,And round about on every sideHow bright all things appear!The dullest music charms us then,We laugh, and know not why;The very flowers upon our path,They look too bright to die.When hearts are old and weary,The road is twisted sore,And there is little to be seenBeyond our cottage door;The flowers we thought would never fadeLie dead upon the sod;And then we sigh for peace and restWithin the arms of God.


God is Love. 73GOD IS LOVE.ON the flowery sod beneath you,On the blazing sky above,On the face of mighty oceanIt is written, " God is love."Every little bird is singing"God is love" from tree to tree;Every little flower is breathing"God is love " to you and me.Sun, and moon, and stars are chanting"God is love," with solemn voice;Join, oh! join the happy chorus,All ye children, and rejoice!


74 Hours of Sunshine.JOHNNY WITH HIS KITE.JOHNNY with his kite,And his sword to fight;Pussy at his side,And his horse to ride,Laughs till the echoes answer far and wide.Laugh away, my boy,Fill thy heart with joy;Shout, and leap, and sing,Pleased with everything;Youth's like a butterfly, and soon on the wing.


Persevere. 75PERSEVERE.DRIVE the nail aright, boys,Hit it on the head;Strike with all your might, boys,While the iron's red.When you've work to do, boys,Do it with a will ;They who reach the top, boys,First must climb the hill.Standing at the foot, boys,Gazing at the sky,How can you get up, boys,If you never try?Though you stumble oft, boys,Never be down-cast;Try, and try again, boys,You'll succeed at last.


76 Hours of Sunshine.GOOD MORNING." GOOD morning, sweet maid !"A tiny bird said,As it perched on the maid's looking-glass." Your face is so fair,And your beautiful hairShines so lovely, whenever I pass,I thought I would ask, ere I flew to my nest,If you take as much care of the heart in yourbreast ?"


WHAT TH


Fancies. 77FANCIES.IN yon shady arbqur,By the river-side,"Where the blue-bells curtseyAnd the daisies hide,Let us lie togetherFor an hour or so,Weaving tender fanciesAs they come and go.First of all the shadows,Stealing o'er the grass,Seem like human sorrowsAs they come and pass.


78 Hours of Sunshine.Though they dim the sunshine,Lying on the heart,'Tis but for a moment-Soon they break and part.And the tender flow'rets,Where the waters run,Seem like little childrenPlaying in the sun;And the shining watersThat they bend above,Oft and oft they kiss themWith a baby-love.And the sparkling waters,Running to the sea,Seem, my little darling,So like you and me :


Fancies. 79Running, running, running,Through this life of ours-Now beneath the shadows,Now among the flowers.Everything around us,All that meets our sight,Has a meaning, darling,If we read aright.Earth and sky and ocean,Bird and flower and tree-All are rife with wisdom,Little one, to thee.


8o Hours of Sunshine.THE LITTLE NIGHTINGALE.DARLING little Nightingale,Sing that song again;You can charm the heart untilIt forgets its pain.Sing, sing, sing, sing,Pretty little bird;Sing again, for sweeter soundsEar has never heard.


THE- LITTl.E NIGHTINGALE.


Welcome, Sweet Forget-me-nots. 81WELCOME, SWEET FORGET ME -NOTS.WELCOME, sweet Forget-me-nots,To the grassy fields;Daisy meek, and Violet,--All that Nature yields.For whene'er your smiles are seen,Gladness girds the earth;And the hills and woods and streamsSing their songs of mirth.Sitting by the water-side,With the pretty flowers,What a pleasant task it isThrough the sunny hours!Listening to the little birds,And the humming-bee;Learning lessons from them all,Good for you and me.F


82 Hours of Sunshine.THE OLD SOLDIER.IT was a dreary afternoon,The snow was falling fast,As o'er a dark and lonely heathA weary wanderer passed.A stick was in his aged hand,A burden on his back;And oft he paused, for oft he strayedFrom off the beaten track.And many hours he journeyed on,And miles he wandered o'er,Until, all worn and faint, he pausedBeside a cottage door.


The Old Soldier. 83With trembling hand he raised his stick,And knocked, and then he sighed,As to a kindly voice withinHe tremblingly replied-" I crave your shelter, honest dame,For I am old and poor;And long and sore has been the wayAcross yon dreary moor." Your shelter from the blinding storm,Good folks, is all I crave;And God will bless the hand that savesAn old man from the grave."" Come in, come in, and welcome," saidThe cheery voice, once more;" No honest man, on such a night,Shall die beside our door."F 2


84 Hours of Sunshine.They took him in, the poor old man,They set him by the hearth;The children stayed their boisterous gamesAnd hushed their songs of mirth.They gathered where the old man sat,Around his knee they crept;They looked up in his wrinkled face,And wondered why he wept." Now say, old man, from whence thou art,And whither lies thy way;Do wife and children wait for thee,And wonder at thy stay ?""Alas! alas! no wife, I fear,Is waiting now for me;Or little child, with curly locks,To sit upon my knee.


The Old Soldier. 85"Good people, it is long ago-Ay, twenty years, and more-Since I was sent to face the foe,Upon a foreign shore."With Wellington, in Spain, I foughtAgainst the might of France;And there I got this wound you see,-'Twas from a Frenchman's lance."At Waterloo, my little ones,A bullet pierced this leg;But though I've served my country well,It leaves me now to beg."In youth I lived in Meadow Vale,A village here, hard by;And I am on my way once moreTo see it ere I die.


86 Hours of Sunshine." If you have lived these parts about,Perchance you've heard the taleOf Mary of the Hawthorn Glen,And William of the Vale?" How he, in dreadful times of war,Was forced, with aching heart,From wife and child, and happy home,And loving friends, to part ? "What ails the dame ? Her face is white,The tear is on her cheek;She falls upon the old man's neck,And sobs, but cannot speak.The children look with startled eyes,And round their mother creep;They wonder why she sobs so loud,And what has made her weep.


The Old Soldier. 87"Oh, blessed be God !" at length she cries;"Oh, Father, Father dear!I've prayed for this, both night and day,For many a weary year!" Oh, children, come and take his hand,And kiss him o'er and o'er;For he's your Grandad, come at last,To leave us now no more." No more he'll leave his native land,In foreign parts to roam;No more he'll wander, weak and worn,For this shall be his home.'Though Granny he no more shall see,We'll soothe his every pain,And try to bring the sunshine backTo his old heart again."


88 Hours of Sunshine.SO, SIR, YOU WOULD BE A MAN.So, sir, you would be a man,Take his troubles on your back,And with smiling face set offOn life's rough and busy track.Sir, when you grow up a man,You would gladly and with joyFling that burden far away,And become again a boy.


8-11 51s--INTNTW ND -PEN


What the World Said. 89WHAT THE WORLD SAID." ROUND and round the sun I spin,With my freight of sorrow, and woe, and sin;And the nearer I get to the golden sun,The sooner my morning is begun.But the further and further I travel away,The longer my night, the shorter my day."Thus the big World sang to a little lad,Who was thinking of many things wrong andbad." Why, you're just like me," said the World,again:" Full of many things bad and vain ;


90 Hours of Sunshine.For the little world that you call your breastIs brimful of evils that never rest;And God is the centre round which you run,Just as I do round the golden sun.And the night will be brighter, the day less dim,The nearer and nearer you get to Him;But darkness will swallow the light of day,The further and further you travel away."'>^x^-a\( ^fW^st}


Motler's Love. 91MOTHER'S LOVE.MOTHER, clasping your babes to your breast,Tell me, oh tell me, which you love the best:Which of your darlings has most of your love ?Which love you, Mother, all others above?And you say, pointing above to the sky,"Ask of the angels, the angels on high;"And to my asking this answer is given-"Not known on earth, nor yet up in heaven."


Full Text

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The Baldwin Libray S' UniW Of11 m



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Mind your Lessons. 21 MIND YOUR LESSONS. FLOG is a verb, And so is whack; Cane is a noun, And so is back; And lazy boys who go to sleep, And through their lessons crawl and creep And stut and stammer, Must see the noun and feel the verb, To help them with their grammar.



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66 Hours of Sunshine. Oh, how sad If one should say, He was bad I left to-day; Used me To no wise end; Could not see I was his friend." Prize them, dears, Each priceless gem; All your years Are made of them. If each bear A righteous seed, None need care How soon they speed.



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22 Hours of Sunskline. THOUGHTS. LET your thoughts, whate'er they be, Be but thoughts of kindness; Bitter thoughts in you or me Show our human blindness. If an evil thought arise Ever in your bosom, Crush it out, if you are wise, Nip it in the blossom. Never let it grow to flower With its thorns around it; Crush it while you have the power, Leave it where you found it.



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62 Hours of Sunshine. Then he took poor Pincher Safely from the trap; Carried him into the street; Gave him such a slap. Down the street poor Pincher Limped as best he could; And he never stole again, But became quite good.



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Who Made All Things? 19 Have you heard the wind When it howls at night? If you've seen the sun, And tiny flowers; And have heard the thrush In the woodland bowers; If you've seen the moon, And soft white snow, And have heard the wind When it loud did blow: Have you thought whose hand Made one and allMade the stars to shine, And the snow to fall ? B 2



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24 Hours of Sunshine. THE GAME. UNDER the table, Behind the chair; Up in the corner, Out on the stair; Behind the cupboard, All at their play, Five little children Happy and gay. Life is a game; when you play it, my dears, May it prove as delightful as this one appears.



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Robin Redbreast. 51 ROBIN REDBREAST. OH, Robin, Robin Redbreast, I love your face to see; Of all the pretty diekie-birds, You dearest are to me; For when the snow is on the ground, And all the woods are still, You come and sing your little song Upon my window-sill. Oh, Robin, Robin Redbreast, Don't stay out in the cold; I would not harm you, little thing, For twice your weight in gold. You're welcome to whate'er you get, So come whene'er you will; I like to hear you sing your song Upon my window-sill. D 2



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Hatapy Fred. 13 HAPPY FRED. TELL me, little Freddy, pray, What has pleased your heart to-day, That you skip and leap and sing, Pleased with every little thing?" Mother, you remember Dick; He that's lame and has a stick; Cripple Dick, with naked feet, Crossing-sweeper in our street? Well, I passed the other day, And he looked as if to say, 'Little sir, a penny give. I am poor, and I must live; Please to give a lad a brown !" So I popp'd a half-a-crown



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HOURS O1F SUNSHINE. LITTLE THINGS. LITTLE moments make an hour; Little thoughts a book; Little seeds a tree or flower; Water-drops a brook. Little deeds of faith and love Make a home for you above.



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18 Hours of SunshiZle. WHO MADE ALL THINGS?. HAVE you heard the thrush Pipe long and loud? Have you seen the lark High up in a cloud ? Have you seen the flowers In golden June, And the twinkling stars, And the sun and moon? Have you seen the snow, So soft and white?



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Laugh and Shout. 33 LAUGH AND SHOUT. THE lark is up in the sky, The meadows are bright with dew; The lambs are playing, and why, Dear children, should not you ? Out into the meadows, and leap and run, And laugh and shout to the morning sun. c



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The Oak. 25 THE OAK. A BEAUTIFUL Oak was the people's pride, And it stood on the village green; And the fame of its beauty spread far and wide, For a fairer tree never was seen. And all the gossips were heard to say That the tree would flourish for many a day. From far and near the little birds came, And a home on its boughs they made; And the children theyshouted, and sang its name, As they sported beneath its shade; For a favourite thing with the young and old Was the Oak, with its crown of green and gold.



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Lizzie. 47 LIZZIE. LITTLE Lizzie Is always busy: She's never a moment still ; And kind is she, For she makes the tea When poor dear Father is ill. And she sits at night, By the candle-light, In a chair beside his bed, And tries to cheer His heart, the dear! With some story she has read.



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72 Hours of Sunshine. YOUTH AND AGE. WHEN hearts are young and lightsome, The road is straight and clear, And round about on every side How bright all things appear! The dullest music charms us then, We laugh, and know not why; The very flowers upon our path, They look too bright to die. When hearts are old and weary, The road is twisted sore, And there is little to be seen Beyond our cottage door; The flowers we thought would never fade Lie dead upon the sod; And then we sigh for peace and rest Within the arms of God.



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Greedy Tom. 15 GREEDY TOM. TOMMY was a greedy boy! Once he had a tart, Yet he never thought to give Sister Lizz a part. In his box he shut it up; "Oh," said he, how nice!" But he quite forgot there were Little things called mice. In his little selfish heart He was quite content; So when hewvas all alone, To his box he went. "I shall eat it all myself; None shall have a share." Then he opened wide the lid, And found-nothing there



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PREFACE. DEAR LITTLE CHILDREN,-I have written many books .for your amusement and, let me hope, at the same time, your edification; but I have not written you a Preface before, nor would I now were it not to thank you for the indulgent ear you have given to my writings, and to assure you that your approbation is very dear to me. Should the present volume meet with the hearty response accorded to its. predecessors, you shall have another soon. In the meantime, believe me, your well-wisher, THE AUTHOR.



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12 CASSELL, PETTER, AND GALPIN, PRIMARY SERIES. Elementary Arithmetic: dealing with the Primary Rules in a new and original manner, and supplying more than I,1o3 Examples. Cloth, lettered .4d. Elementary British History : A condensed recital of the Principal Events of British History, specially prepared for popular use in Junior Classes. Cloth, lettered ......6d. Elementary Geography: written in a simple, terse style, and furnishing throughout the Etymology of terms supplied. Illustrated. Cloth, lettered ........4d. England at Home: An Elementary Text-Book of Geography, Manufacture, Trade, and Commerce. Cloth, lettered .Is. Our Bodies: An Elementary Text-Book of Human Physiology ; with ioo Questions for Examination, and numerous Illustrations on Wood. Cloth, lettered ...Is. Our Plants: What they are and Why they are. With Illustrations ..........Is. Right Lines in their Right Places; or, Geometry without Instruments : An entirely novel treatment, which explains to the youngest pupil the First Principles of Geometry. With Drawings on Wood by the Author. Cloth, lettered ....Is. The Boy's First Reader, in Words of One Syllable, with Spelling Lessons. Adapted to Standard I. Illustrated. Cloth, lettered ...........4d. The Boy's Second Reader. Adapted to Standard II. Cloth, lettered .........4d. The Girl's First Reader, in Words of One Syllable, with Spelling Lessons. Adapted to Standard I. Illustrated. Cloth, lettered ...........4d. The Girl's Second Reader. Adapted to Standard II. Cloth, lettered ..........4d. Zoology; or, the Animal Kingdom Explained in a familiar but strictly scientific manner. With abundant Illustrations. Double vol., cloth, lettered ....2s. LUDGATE HILL, LONDON; AND 596, BROADWAY, NEW YORK.



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36 Hours of iznshine. HELP MAMMA. PLEASE do let me help you, Mamma; I know you are busy to-night. I won't break a thing, I am sure, But try to do everything right. The cups and the saucers, and spoons, I'll make them look tidy and clean; And Papa will be pleased when he hears What a good little girl I have been.



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o1 Hours of Sunshine. BUSY BEE. HU, hum, busy bee! How I like your tune, Ever through the drowsy noon, That you sing to me. Tell me, has it got a name? For it always seems the same." Stay a moment, cease your fun, Listen to me, pray; For the song I sing each day Is a serious oneI am sending up on high Hymns of joy where'er I fly.



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Busy Bee. ii Hymns of thankfulness to God For the pretty flowersFor the bright and sunny hours, And the dewy sod; And for such my life should be A day of gladsome jubilee. I, an insect, sing His praise: How much more should you For His name and glory do, Throughout all your days! Not an hour in which you live, But some blessing you receive."



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INDUSTRIOUS MARY.



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Moments. 65 MOMENTS. IN life's glass The moments fall; Soon they pass Beyond recall. Use them well Before they go, They foretell Your joy or woe. They shall speak Your hate or love, When they seek Their home above. E



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44 Hours of Sunshine. But as he attempted to do it, A sharp puff of wind From the window behind Sent him down with a scream On the top of the cream, -And then did he bitterly rue it; For struggling for breath, He cried in his grief, Be warned by my death, And never turn thief."



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96 Hours of Sunshine. STAY IN YOUR SEAT. HAVE you forgotten the road to your mouth, Whether it lies in the north or the south ? Feeding your eyes and your nose with your dinner Won't make you fatter, but very much thinner. Besides, who would kiss such a queer-looking boy? Mamma won't behold you with feelings of joy. Next time you are given your dinner to eat, Please do it more cleanly, and stay in your seat. CASSELL, PETTER, AND GALPIN, BELLE SAUVAGE WORKS, LONDON, E.C.



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Persevere. 75 PERSEVERE. DRIVE the nail aright, boys, Hit it on the head; Strike with all your might, boys, While the iron's red. When you've work to do, boys, Do it with a will ; They who reach the top, boys, First must climb the hill. Standing at the foot, boys, Gazing at the sky, How can you get up, boys, If you never try? Though you stumble oft, boys, Never be down-cast; Try, and try again, boys, You'll succeed at last.



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88 Hours of Sunshine. SO, SIR, YOU WOULD BE A MAN. So, sir, you would be a man, Take his troubles on your back, And with smiling face set off On life's rough and busy track. Sir, when you grow up a man, You would gladly and with joy Fling that burden far away, And become again a boy.



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8 CASSELL, PETTER, AND GALPIN, ILLUSTRATED GIFT BOOKS. The Child's Bible. Large print; large pictures. Being a selection from the Holy Bible in the Words of the Authorised Version, with large Full-page Illustrations especially designed for Children by the best Artists of the Day. Cloth elegant, gilt edges ..£ is. Flexible leather binding, hand tooled, gilt edges r .Ios. Best morocco elegant or antique ..Z2 2s. Esop's Fables. A New and carefully revised Version of these Fables. By J. B. RUN DELL. Profusely Illustrated with Original Designs by ERNEST GRISET. Cloth gilt, gilt edges. .21s. Fairy Realm. A Collection of the Favourite Old Tales. Illustrated by GUSTAVE DORE, and Told in Verse by TOM HOOD. Imperial 4to, cloth gilt, gilt edges .. is. The Adventures of Baron Munchausen. Illustrated by GUSTAVE DORE, 4to, cloth (New Edition) ....los. 6d. Robinson Crusoe (Library Edition), beautifully Illustrated throughout. Plain cloth .7s. 6d. Full gilt cloth, gilt edges .los. 6d. Morocco antique .........21S. Robinson Crusoe (New Royal 8vo Edition), Illustrated. Cloth, plain 5s. Full gilt cloth, gilt edges 6s. Gulliver's Travels. Beautifully printed on Toned Paper, and Illustrated throughout by MORTEN. With an Introduction, Annotations, and a LIFE OF SWIFT, by J. F. WALLER, LL.D., M.R.I.A. Plain cloth .7s. 6d. Full gilt cloth, gilt edges. .os. 6d. Full morocco antique .21s. The Vicar of Wakefield, and Poems. Beautifully printed on Toned Paper, and Illustrated throughout. In One handsome Volume, bound in plain cloth. 7s. 6d. Full gilt cloth, gilt edges ..Ios. 6d. Full morocco antique .......21s. LUDGATE HILL, LONDON; AND 596, BROADWAY, NEW YORK.



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8-11 51 s--IN TNTW ND -PEN



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90 Hours of Sunshine. For the little world that you call your breast Is brimful of evils that never rest; And God is the centre round which you run, Just as I do round the golden sun. And the night will be brighter, the day less dim, The nearer and nearer you get to Him; But darkness will swallow the light of day, The further and further you travel away." '>^x^-a \( ^fW^st}



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Welcome, Sweet Forget-me-nots. 81 WELCOME, SWEET FORGET -ME NOTS. WELCOME, sweet Forget-me-nots, To the grassy fields; Daisy meek, and Violet,-All that Nature yields. For whene'er your smiles are seen, Gladness girds the earth; And the hills and woods and streams Sing their songs of mirth. Sitting by the water-side, With the pretty flowers, What a pleasant task it is Through the sunny hours! Listening to the little birds, And the humming-bee; Learning lessons from them all, Good for you and me. F



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46 Hours of Sunshine. LITTLE FEET. LITTLE Feet, that never trod Any but the narrow road; Hands in anger never raised; Lips that only Jesus praised; Eyes that only saw the lightNever shadow, never night: Though we mourn you here to-day, Angels love you, far away.



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26 Hours of Szushine. At length it grew meagre, and thin, and bare, And the good people, one and all, Looked up at their favourite tree in despair, For its branches began to fall. And they all agreed there was something amiss With the poor old Oak, when it drooped like this. They looked to the roots, and thought them firm, Then viewed it in every part; Till at last they discovered a single worm Had eaten the great Oak's heart:A single worm had gone to the core, And the Oak would flourish no more-no more. No more would it flourish its head on high, Or the leaves on its branches grow;



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The Chimney-Sweep. 55 THE CHIMNEY-SWEEP. ON the housetop, the Chimney-sweep Into the crow's-nest takes a peep, And he laughs aloud at the hungry brood, Calling so lustily for their food. And he thinks of his own hungry girls and boys At home, who are making a similar noise; So he fancies himself just an old black crow, Out early to pick up a crumb or so.





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94 Hours of Sunshine. There you never get a blinkNot a single spark. How a bird of sense can mope Up there in the dark! Dont you knock your silly head Oft against your door ? How you feed your little ones Puzzles me full sore." While she spoke a little hand Caught her by the tail,Seized her in its ruthless grasp; Oh, but she turned pale! Then it took her from her nest, And her young so frail. In a close and narrow cage She was put to live;



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Pincher and the Butcher. 59 So he took a fox-trap, Placed it on the floor, Just as Pincher showed his face, Next day, at the door. Pincher eyed the Butcher; Butcher laughed and talked. Pincher had another look, Then inside he walked. There he saw the fox-trap, Covered o'er with meat. "Ah!" he chuckled to himself, "What a jolly treat! Shame it is of Butcher, Wasting precious food! Leaving things upon the floor Cannot do them good.



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42 Hours of Sunshine. No one will be any wiser, And to tell you the truth, I am dry, sir; So if you are thirsty, be quick, if you please, And come, for I hear the cook shaking her keys." The first fly was young, Yet thieving, he knew, wasn't right; But the other fly, with his smooth tongue, Put the theft in a rose-coloured light; And the thing to make surer, Cried, Who will be poorer? Why, no one; but we'll be the richer; A drop's but a drop; If you like you can stop, But I'll have a peep in the pitcher." The little fly thought of his mother, And the things she had taught him-



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50 Hours of Sunshine. MOTHER'S BIRDIE. PRETTY Birdie Mother loves best, Sleeping so snugly in your nest, Wake and show her your bright blue eyes, Charm her heart with your crows and cries; Work your fingers and stretch your toes, Open your lips like a parted rose. Brightest of treasures asleep, awake, Life is dearer for your sweet sake.



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48 Hours of Sunshine. LITTLE BLACK CROW. LITTLE black Crow, little black Crow, Would you peck at your master's toe? Think, if you've got a thought in your head, Who brings you your breakfast of butter and bread; Who gives you your supper, and pets you so, And keeps you snug when the tempests blow. Don't be sulky, but come to play Out in the garden, this sunny day.



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16 CASSELL, PETTER, AND GALPIN. Superfine Wa/er Colours, FOR LANDSCAPES, FIGURES, AND FLOWERS. In Mahogany, with Sliding Top. No. s. d. I. Improved Colours, 12 Cakes, Brushes, &c. .....4 5. Superfine Colours, 36 Cakes, Brushes, &c. ...2 6 6. The Sixpenny Box of Colours, 12 Cakes, Brushes, &c.. ..o 6 7. The Scholar's Colour Box, 14 Cakes, Brushes, &c. ..o 8. The Universal Colour Box, 18 Cakes, Brushes, &c. .9 9. The "Educator" Colour Box, 27 Cakes, Brushes, &c. .3 0 COLOTJRS FREE FROM POISON. In Mahogany, with Sliding Top, Polished Boxes. 120. Containing 9 large Cakes, Brushes, Coloured Crayons ..0 "I55. Containing 15 small Cakes, Brushes, Coloured Crayons .1 4 "117. Containing 15 large Cakes, Brushes, Coloured Crayons .2 3 119. Containing 9 large Cakes, Compass, Stumps, Coloured Crayons, &c. 2 6 In Highly Polished Boxes. 43. Containing r8 large Cakes, Brushes, Crayons, &c. .4 0 53. Containing 15 large Cakes, Brushes, Crayons, &c. ..5 55. Containing 15 middle Cakes, Brushes, Crayons, &c., lock and key 5 6 54. Containing 18 large Cakes, Brushes, Crayons, &c., lock and key .7 6 57. Containing 15 middle Cakes, in a handsome Case, inlaid with brass, Brushes, Crayons, Stumps, Glue, Gold and Silver Shells, Saucers, &c., lock and key .....9 6 LUDGATE HILL, LONDON; AND 596, BROADWAY, NEW YORK.



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4 CASSELL, PETTER, AND GALPIN, On a Coral Reef: A Sea Story fcr Boys. By ARTHTR LOCKER, Author of Sweet Seventeen," &c. With Eight Illustrations. Cloth gilt .3. 6d. King Gab's Story Bag; and the Wondrous Tales it contained. By HERACLITUS GRFY. With Illustratiors after ALBERT DURER by WALTER CRANE. Cloth gilt ..3s. 6d. Hours of Sunshine: A Series of Poems for Children. By MATTHIAS BARR, Author of "Little Willie," &c. With 16 Coloured Plates from Designs by OSCAR PLETSCH .3s. 6d. #** Other Volumes of this unique Series in active preparation. ONE SYLLABLE LIBRARY. The Rare Romance of Reynard the Fox, and the Shifts of his Son Reynardine, in Words of One Syllable. By S. PHILLIPS DAY. With Illustrations in Colours from Designs by ERNEST GRISET. Handsomely bound in cloth gilt .3s. 6d. The Pilgrim's Progress, in Words of One Syllable. By S. PHILLIPS DAY. With Coloured Illustrations by KRONHEIM. Handsomely bound in cloth gilt .3s. 6d. Evenings at Home, in Words of One Syllable. By UNCLE JOHN, Author of "The Children's Album." With Coloured Illustrations. Handsomely bound in cloth gilt .3s. 6d. Swiss Family Robinson, in Words of One Syllable. By the Author of Girl's First Reader," Queer Characters," &c. With Coloured Illustrations. Handsomely bound in cloth gilt ..s. 6d. .Esop's Fables, in Words of One Syllable. With Illustrations printed in Colours by KRONHEIM. Handsomely bound in cloth gilt ........ .3s. 6d. Sandford and Merton, in Words of One Syllable. With Illustrations printed in Colours by KRONHEIM. Handsomely bound in cloth gilt ...3s. 6d. *** Other Volumes ofthis unique Series in active preparation. LUDGATE HILL, LONDON; -AND 596, BROADWAY, NEW YORK.



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Tkoughts. 23 Grains of sand are tiny things, But they make the mountains; Feathers make the eagle's wings, Water-drops the fountains. Evil thoughts, that have their way, Make a life of sorrow, Bring us grief and care to-day, Shame and want to-morrow.



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30 Hours of Sunshine. THE ROSE AND THE DAISY. SEE what a beautiful face I have got !" Said a blushing Rose in a garden plot To a humble Daisy that hung its head, And kissed the ground with its lips so red. People will gaze on my face for hours, But they turn away from the meaner flowers; And as for you, why, who hears them say, 'How lovely that daisy is looking to-day'?" Said the Daisy: "Ah, friend, though I grow at your feet, In the eyes of men I am not less sweet. The poet will pass you, and stand by my side, When his heart is galled by folly and pride,





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Whal's a Pin ? 39 When he gave a sudden cry, And to Nurse's lap did fly. Nurse, oh I Nurse," He cried demented, While with pain He nearly fainted; "Take it out, oh do, I beg; See, it's sticking in my leg !" In his leg The pin was sticking, And he had A painful pricking; But he never any more Threw a pin upon the floor.



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WHAT TH



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38 Hours of Sunshine.. Nurse had said, A crumb untasted Flung away Was surely wasted; And a single pin, when lost Every hour, would money cost. Little thought Ned on the morrow That same pin Would cause him sorrow, Or he ne'er had in his haste Thrown away that pin in waste. Next day Ned, Down in a corner, Went to play At Jacky Horner,



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20 Hours of Sunshine. They were made by God, Who rules above; Whom all should obey, And dear children love. Wherever you roam, Whate'er your lot, Keep God in your heart, And forget Him not.



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Cruel Tommy 71 It's certainly strange," said his father; And this time his nose had a pull; But Tommy could stand it no longer, He bellowed and roared like a bull. Hush! hush, while I pull both your legs off, And clip off the half of each arm; What you practise yourself, sure, in others You can't think a sin and a harm. Now, Tommy, my boy," said his father, You'll leave these poor creatures alone ? If not, I'll go on with my lesson." I will," cried poor Tom, with a groan.



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Cruel Tommy. 69 CRUEL TOMMY. ToM sat at the parlour window, Watching the people go by; But what was he really after? Why, plucking the legs from a fly. Ay, there he sat in the sunshine, Tormenting the tiny things; First plucking their legs from their sockets, Then afterwards clipping their wings. Ile didn't know then that his father Was standing behind his back, Inclined very much to be giving His mischievous fingers a crack.



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14 CASSELL, PETTER, AND GALPIN, No. s. d. go. Rosewood Case, with lock and key, three Compasses, Spring Divider, Ivory Ruling Pen, Bar, Protractor, Rule, Parallels, Scale, &c. .so o 91. Rosewood Case, with lock and key, three Compasses, a pair of small Dividers, Ivory Ruling Pen, Bar, Protractor, Rule, Curves, Parallels, Scale, &c. ........12 6 92. Mahogany Case, with lock and key, containing superior Instruments in German Silver, two Compasses, Ivory Ruling Pen, Spring Divider, Protractor, Parallels, Scal, &c. ....15 o 93. Mahogany Box, with lock and key, containing superior German Silver Instruments, three Compasses, small Dividers, Ivory Pen, Bar, Rule, Parallels, Scale, &c. ......18 o 94. Handsome Rosewood Case, with lock and key, containing three Compasses, Spring Dividers, Proportion Compass, Ivory Pen, Rule, Bar, Curves, Parallels, Scales, &c. .....21 o 95. Mahogany Case, with lock and key, containing a superior set of German Silver Instruments, two Compasses, two Ivory Ruling Pens, two Spring Dividers, Bar, Rule, Protractor, Parallels, Scale, &c. .........25 o 96. Handsome Mahogany Inlaid Box, with lock and key, containing three Compasses, small Dividers, Proportion Compass, two Ivory Ruling Pens, Bars, two Rhles, Curves, Protractor, Parallels, Scale, &c. ..........25 6 97. Handsome Case, inlaid with brass and boxwood, lock and key, containing superbly-finished Instruments, three Compasses, Proportion ditto, Spring Compasses, two Ruling Pens (ivory handles), Bar, Rules, Protractor, Parallel, Scale, &c. ..35 o 48. Handsome Case, also in!aid w:th brass and boxwood, lock and key, and containing Instruments same as above, but in German silver instead of brass, Parallels, and Scale .....50 99. Richly-inlaid Mahogany Case, with lock and key, and highly-finished Instruments, three Compasses, Proportion ditto, three Ivory Ruling Pens, Spring Compass, Bars, Protractor, Rules, Curves, Parallels, Scale, &c. .. .....60 o LUDGATE HILL, LONDON; AND 596, BROADWAY, NEW YORK.



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70 Hours of Sunshine. But he waited till after dinner, When Tommy was having his game, Then he thought he would give him a lesson, And treat him a little the same. So catching his son of a sudden, And giving his elbow a twist, He pulled at his ear till he holloed, Then doubled him up with his fist. And didn't he twist on the carpet, And didn't he bellow with pain! But whenever he cried Oh, you hurt me!" His father would punch him again. "Why, Tom, how amazingly funny You don't seem to like it, my boy, And yet, when you try it on others, You always are singing for joy.-



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SELECTIONS FROM CASSELL, PETTER, & GALPIN'S (rat a log uc, COMPRISING Illustrated Gift Books, Books for Children, Primary and Technical Series, Mathematical Instruments and Colours. LUDGATE HILL, LONDON; AND 596, BROADWAY, NEW YORK.



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Granny's Picture. 49 GRANNY'S PICTURE, LOOK at Granny's picture, Hanging on the wall; Oh, so kind and gentle She was to us all! Something very often In my heart will stir, When I see her picture And I think of .her. Did I use you kindly, Darling, dear old Gran ? Oft I said I'd love you When I grew a man. Now you've gone and left meGone away to Heaven; If a wrong I've done you, Say I am forgiven. D



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40 Hours of Sunshine. PAPA'S BIRTHDAY. MY dear Papa, we wish you joyYour little girl, and little boy. I've bought this pretty book for you, And Mary she has something, tooA pretty rose, all wet with dew. Oh many birthdays may you see, Dear, dear Papa, and happy be. May God be kind, when you grow old; Your children's love be never cold, But dearer to your heart than gold.



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SQ3W 01



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32 Hours of Sunshine. MOTHER, GUIDE HIS LITTLE STEPS. MOTHER, guide his little steps Safely, while you can; Guide them up the hill of life, Till he grow a man. Baby, when you grow a man, Strong, and wise, and brave, Guide your Mother down the hill Gently, to the grave.



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vi Contents. PAGE LIZZIE ... ... ... ... ... .. ... ... ... 47 LITTLE BLACK CROW ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 48 GRANNY'S PICTURE ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 49 MOTHER'S BIRDIE... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 50 ROBIN REDBREAST ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 51 POLLY ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 52 A SOLDIER ... ... ... ... ... .. ... ... 53 THE CHIMNEY-SWEEP ... ... ... ... ... ... 55 THE SWALLOWS ... ... ... .... ... ... ... ... 56 BABY ... .. ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 57 PINCHER AND THE BUTCHER ... ... ... ... ... ... 58 THE OLD FIDDLER ... ... ... ... ... ... 63 SHOUT AND BAWL ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 64 M OMENTS ... ... ... ... ... .. ... ... ... 65 CHRISTMAS EVE ... ... ... ... ... .. ... ... 67 No No N o ... ... ... ... ... .. ... ... 68 CRUEL TOMMY ... ... ... ... ... .. ... ... 69 YOUTH AND AGE ... ... ... ... ... .. ... ... 72 GOD IS LOVE ... ... ... ... ... .. ... ... 73 JOHNNY WITH HIS KITE ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 74 PERSEVERE ... ... ... ... ... .. ... ... ... 75 GOOD MORNING ... ... ... ...... ... ... *** 76 FANCIES ... ... ....... ... ... ... 77 THE LITTLE NIGHTINGALE ... ...... ... ... ... 80 WELCOME, SWEET FORGET-ME-NOTS ... ... ... ... ... 81 THE OLD SOLDIER ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 82 SO, SIR, YOU WOULD BE A MAN ... ... ... ... ... 88 WHAT THE WORLD SAID ... ... ... ... ... ... 89 M OTHER'S LOVE ... ... ... ... ... ... ... '... 91 THE BELLS ... ... ... .. ... ... ... ... 92 .FHE SPARROW AND THE SWALLOW ... ... ... ... ... 93 STAY IN YOUR SEAT ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 96



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A Soldier. 53 A SOLDIER. "WELL, I think I'll be a soldier; Mother, don't you think I'm right ? It must be so fine, I fancy, With a gun and sword to fight" Fine to see the flags all flying, And to hear the cannon roarFine to get a silver medal When the fighting all is o'er. Shan't I like to be a soldier, Charging with my gallant men! I'll come home with hat and feathers, You won't know your Willie then."



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60 Hours of Sunshine. Fine for poor old Pincher, Such a piece as that;Funny, too, I always was Very fond of fat! And it looks so tempting, Juicy, fat, and fine; Wonder if he'd miss it, now, If I made it mine?" Louder laughed the Butcher; Closer Pincher crept; No one's looking-what a chance!" On the trap he stept. Alas! for poor old Pincher, He may howl and beg; But he'll limp for evermore On a broken leg.



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76 Hours of Sunshine. GOOD MORNING. GOOD morning, sweet maid !" A tiny bird said, As it perched on the maid's looking-glass. Your face is so fair, And your beautiful hair Shines so lovely, whenever I pass, I thought I would ask, ere I flew to my nest, If you take as much care of the heart in your breast ?"



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HOURS OF SUNSHINE. BY MATTHIAS BARR, AUTHOR OF "LITTLE WILLIE," "THE CHILD'S GARLAND," ETC. WITH ILLUSTRATIONS BY OSCAR PLETSCH, LONDON: CASSELL, PETTER, AND GALPIN; AND 596, BROADWAY, NEW YORK.



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The Rose and the Daisy. 31 And I see the tears start up in his eyes, For I fill him with human sympathies; I fill him with love for his fellow-kind, I cherish his heart and I soothe his mind, And stir in his bosom such thoughts of bliss; And can you, Rose, do aught to equal this ?" Ere the Rose could answer a single word, A step on the gravel-path was heard, And the Daisy smiled, tho' it held its tongue, While a tear to its beautiful eyelids sprung. The poet paused by the Rose's side, And said, Oh, emblem of human pride!" Then turned to the daisy with beaming eye, And said, Oh, flower where the virtues lie!" The Rose he placed in his button-hole, But the Daisy he cherished deep down in his soul.



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78 Hours of Sunshine. Though they dim the sunshine, Lying on the heart, 'Tis but for a momentSoon they break and part. And the tender flow'rets, Where the waters run, Seem like little children Playing in the sun; And the shining waters That they bend above, Oft and oft they kiss them With a baby-love. And the sparkling waters, Running to the sea, Seem, my little darling, So like you and me :



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16 Hours of Sunshine. GRANNY'S GONE TO SLEEP. GRANNY'S gone to sleep: Softly, little boys; Read your pretty books, Don't make a noise. Pussy's on the stool, Quiet as a mouse; Not a whisper runs Through the whole house. Hush! silence keep; Granny's gone to sleep.



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92 Hours of Sunshine. THE BELLS. THE bells are ringing far away, And through the open window floats The murmur of their brazen tongues, The music of their magic notes. And little hearts, like steeple-bells, Are ringing music of their own, That through God's open window goes, And murmurs round the Eternal Throne.



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The Sparrow and the Swallow. 93 THE SPARROW AND THE SWALLOW. UNDERNEATH the cottage eaves, Fast against the wall, There you build your prison-house, Into which you crawl. There you rear your little ones, All up out of sight; Why, how dismal you must be, Morning, noon, and night! Look at me, my glossy friend, I know what is best; See, within this leafy hedge I have built my nest. Here I catch the morning sun, Sleeping on my breast.



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PO(OR POLLY.



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WIzha's a Pin? 37 WHAT'S A PIN? WHAT'S a pin? Mamma has plenty; If I ask She'll give me twenty. There, Nurse, hold your horrid dinAll this fuss about a pin." Saucy Ned Mamma had petted; More he had The more he fretted; And when spoken to by Nurse, Sulked, and made the matter worse.



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!&;"*-""": GRANNY'S GONE TOU SLEEP. 11|:-~" :. 6;' ~ ~ ?-::''L*:



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Praise God. 35 PRAISE GOD. BIRDS at early dawn begin Each to sing its Maker's praise; In the woods and in the fields, You should hear the hymns they raise. While the birds are praising God, Singing sweetly all the day, Children, shall your lips be dumb, Have you nothing too to say? If you would be good and wise, And would ever do aright, You must love your Maker too, Sing His praises day and night. C 2



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Motler's Love. 91 MOTHER'S LOVE. MOTHER, clasping your babes to your breast, Tell me, oh tell me, which you love the best: Which of your darlings has most of your love ? Which love you, Mother, all others above? And you say, pointing above to the sky, "Ask of the angels, the angels on high;" And to my asking this answer is given"Not known on earth, nor yet up in heaven."



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86 Hours of Sunshine. If you have lived these parts about, Perchance you've heard the tale Of Mary of the Hawthorn Glen, And William of the Vale? How he, in dreadful times of war, Was forced, with aching heart, From wife and child, and happy home, And loving friends, to part ? What ails the dame ? Her face is white, The tear is on her cheek; She falls upon the old man's neck, And sobs, but cannot speak. The children look with startled eyes, And round their mother creep; They wonder why she sobs so loud, And what has made her weep.





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CASSELL, PETTER, AND GALPIN, TECHNICAL SERIES. Consisting of a Series of Two Shilling Volumes, which contain all the essentials of a Technical Education, the principles of Science and Art being laid down with all possible clearness, and their practical application to the various branches of skilled workmanship being demonstrated and illustrated so as to enable any one of ordinary intelligence to avail himself of the advantages which a technical education is calculated to confer uppn the well-instructed artisan. SVols. I., II., and III. of the TECHNICAL SERIES are now ready, as under:Linear Drawing. By ELLIS A. DAVIDSON, Lecturer on Engineering and Architectural Drawing in the City of London MiddleClss Schools, contains the principles of Linear Drawing as adapted to Trade, Manufactures, Engineering, Architecture, and Design, with about 150 Illustrations, and six whole-page diagrams of working drawings. Orthographic and Isometrical Projection. By the same Author, treats of the Projection of Plans, Elevations and Sections of Solids, and the Development of Surfaces, for Masons, Carpenters, Builders, Architects, Metal-Plate Workers, Plumbers, and Artisans generally. Illustrated with about 40 whole-page diagrams, drawn on Wood by the Author. Linear Drawing and Projection. The Two Volumes in One. Cloth, lettered ....3s. Cd. Building Construction, the Elements of, and Architectural Drawing, with 130 Illustrations drawn on Wood by the Author. By ELLIS A. DAVIDSON, Author of "Linear Drawing," "Projection," "Right Lines," &c. Cloth, limp .......2s. Systematic Drawing and Shading. (In the Press.) Drawing for 7oiners and Carpenters. (In the Press.) *** The Series is prepared with a view to the Volumes being used by Teachers in Public and Private Schools-for Home Study-by Students in Training Colleges and Scientific Classes-as School Books in National and other Schools-and for Persons preparing for the Whitwortfi Scholarships," or the Government Department of Science and Art, the Society of Arts, the Middle-Class, and other Examinations. LUDGATE HILL, LONDON; AND 596, BROADWAY, NEW YORK.



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58 Hours of Sunshine. PINCHER AND THE BUTCHER. PINCHER was a rascal: He would steal, and steal; Didn't care if what he took Mutton was, or veal. Once he went with master To a Butcher's shop, When he quietly walked away With a mutton chop. Ho! ho!" said the Butcher, I'll be quits with you. Time that thieving dogs were taught Just a thing or two."



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The Thieving Fly. 41 THE THIEVING FLY. HALLO there, my friend !" cried a Fly To another one day, Whom he met in his way, "There's mischief, I see, in your eye; Come tell me, I pray, what you're after?" The other, nigh choking with laughter, Said, Oh such a treat, I declare; Be prudent and quiet, Lest the other flies spy it, And you shall come in for a share. You must know, then, that Bessie the cook A pitcher of cream on the table Has left; so I'm going to look, And take a sly drop if I'm able.



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CASSELL, PETTER, AND GALPIN, 5 THE BELLE SAUVAGE LIBRARY. A Series of Volumes for Family and Home Reading. Handsomely bound in bevelled boards, red edges, 3s. 6d. per volume. I. Pulpit Table Talk. Containing Remarks and Anecdotes on Preachers and Preaching. By EDWIN B. RAMSAY, M.A., LL.D., F.R.S.E., Dean of Edinburgh. 2. The Search for the Gral. By JULIA GODDARD, Author of "Joyce Dormer's Story," "Ad1iana," &c. &c. 3. Sermons for Boys. By the Rev. ALFRED BARRY, D.D., Principal of King's College, London, late Head Master of Cheltenham Grammar School. 4. The Life of Bernard Palissy, of Saintes. By HENRY MORLEY, Professor of English Literature in University College, London. 5. The Young Man in the Battle of Life. By the Rev. DR. LANDELS, Author of Woman: her Sphere," &c. "*** Other Volumes in Preparation. PRIZE BOOK SERIES. Handsomely bound in extra cloth gilt, gilt edges, Illustrated. UNIFORM IN SIZE AND PRICE. Will Adams: The Adventures of the first Englishman in Japan. By WILLIAM DALTON. ...3s. 6d. Working Women of this Century : the Lesson of their Lives. By CLARA LUCAS BALFOUR ...3s. 6d. Famous Regiments of the British Army. With Coloured Plate of Uniforms. By WILLIAM H. DAVENPORT ADAMS .3s. 6d. The Angel of the Iceberg, and other Stories. By JOHN TODD, D.D. (New Edition.) ..3s. 6d. The Book of Drawing-Room Plays and Eveniig Amusements. A Comprehensive Manual of In-door Recreation, including all kinds of Acting Charades, &c. Illustrated by Du MAURIER and CORBOULD 3s. 6d. LUDGATE HILL, LONDON; AND 596, BROADWAY, NEW YORK.



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Baby. 57 BABY. OH, Mother, I want to know Who took dear Baby away? Where, where has she been since I looked on her last ? And when will she come out to play? Wherever I turn my eyes, Nothing looks beautiful now; Oh, Mother, it seems such a time since you laid My hand upon dear Baby's brow. Whenever I ask Papa, He takes me upon his knee, And says, if I'm good, I shall go up to her, Though she cannot come down to me. I want to be good, you know, So give your own boy a kiss, For who would be bad when so simple a thing Will take me where dear Baby is?



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The Thieving Fly. 43 The sweets she had bought him; And a feeling he couldn't well smother Arose in his breast as he said, "What we're doing is wrong, I'm afraid." Pooh, pooh !" cried the other; pooh, pooh I Come on ;" and away they both flew, Nor once did they stop Till they got on the top Of the pitcher, and had a good view Of the rich cream below, Like a round lake of snow; And they laughed in their hearts, did the two. Now I'll show you, my friend, how to glide Down the smooth pitcher's side," Said the old fly, the while his eyes glistened, And the younger fly listened;



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Fancies. 79 Running, running, running, Through this life of oursNow beneath the shadows, Now among the flowers. Everything around us, All that meets our sight, Has a meaning, darling, If we read aright. Earth and sky and ocean, Bird and flower and treeAll are rife with wisdom, Little one, to thee.



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0o CASSELL, PETTER, AND GALPIN, Beauties of Poetry and Gems of Art. Illustrated in the highest style of art. Cloth gilt, gilt edges ....7s. 6d. Favourite Poems by Gifted Bards. Illustrated in the highest style of art. Cloth gilt, gilt edges ....7s. 6d. Jewels Gathered from Painter and Poet. Illustrated in the highest style of art. Cloth gilt, gilt edges ..7s. 6d. Poems and Pictures. Comprising the three preceding volumes. Very handsomely bound in extra gilt cloth .21s. Old Friends and New Faces. Demy 4to, cloth, elegantly gilt, with Twenty-four Full-page Illustrations beautifully printed by KRONHEIM ....5s. The Natural History of the Three Kingdoms. With Coloured Plates, and Text in English, French, and German 3s. 6d. Popular Drawing Copies. In Four Sets of Books, adapted to the use of Elementary, Middle, and Upper-Class Schools; for Schools of Art, and Private Study; and designed to prepare Students for the Art Examinations in connection with the Department of Science and Art at South Kensington, and the Society of Arts. Series A. Floral and Vegetable Forms. Cloth, lettered 7 s. 6d. ,, B. Model Drawing. Cloth, lettered --s. 6d. ,, C. Landscape Drawing. Cloth, lettered 7s. 6d. ,, D. Figure Drawing. Cloth, lettered -7s. 6d. Each Set consists of Twelve Parts, price Sixpence each, which may be had separately. Cassell's Descriptive Catalogue, comprising a complete List of all Works printed and published by Messrs. CASSELL, PETTER, and GALPIN, including a compendious List of their numerous Educational Works. This Catalogue is supplied gratis by all Booksellers, and will be forwarded post free on request addressed to the Publishers. LUDGATE HILL, LONDON; AND 596, BROADWAY, NEW YORK.



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What the World Said. 89 WHAT THE WORLD SAID. ROUND and round the sun I spin, With my freight of sorrow, and woe, and sin; And the nearer I get to the golden sun, The sooner my morning is begun. But the further and further I travel away, The longer my night, the shorter my day." Thus the big World sang to a little lad, Who was thinking of many things wrong and bad. Why, you're just like me," said the World, again: Full of many things bad and vain ;



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8o Hours of Sunshine. THE LITTLE NIGHTINGALE. DARLING little Nightingale, Sing that song again; You can charm the heart until It forgets its pain. Sing, sing, sing, sing, Pretty little bird; Sing again, for sweeter sounds Ear has never heard.



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84 Hours of Sunshine. They took him in, the poor old man, They set him by the hearth; The children stayed their boisterous games And hushed their songs of mirth. They gathered where the old man sat, Around his knee they crept; They looked up in his wrinkled face, And wondered why he wept. Now say, old man, from whence thou art, And whither lies thy way; Do wife and children wait for thee, And wonder at thy stay ?" "Alas! alas! no wife, I fear, Is waiting now for me; Or little child, with curly locks, To sit upon my knee.



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~~-at4 a ~ TH ELS



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The Sparrow and the Swallow. 95 And for daily food she had Just what folks would give. From the window of the cot Where her cage was hung, She could see the Swallow pass, Flying to her young. And full oft the Swallow said, Not in spite or rage, But with sad and mournful voice"Ah, my learned sage, Don't you think my prison-house Better than your cage ?"



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74 Hours of Sunshine. JOHNNY WITH HIS KITE. JOHNNY with his kite, And his sword to fight; Pussy at his side, And his horse to ride, Laughs till the echoes answer far and wide. Laugh away, my boy, Fill thy heart with joy; Shout, and leap, and sing, Pleased with everything; Youth's like a butterfly, and soon on the wing.



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Christmas Eve. 67 CHRISTMAS EVE. ON Christmas Eve, when the stars are bright, And the earth is wrapt in a robe of white, The angels come from their homes above Down on a mission of peace and love. Softly they steal through the open doors; Lightly they tread on the chamber floors; And, oh! but they love in their hearts to peep In the homes where the children lie asleep. They play on their harps with the golden strings, And sing too, and whisper of beautiful things; And only at morning they vanish away, To keep with their Father their Christmas Day. E 2





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Kiss Her. 45 KISS HER. Kiss her, my pet, Another one yet; Love her, oh! love her all else above; Nothing you have This side of the grave Can equal the strength of a Mother's love.



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CASSELL, PETTER, AND GALPIN, 3 CASSELL'S CHILDREN'S LIBRARY. NEW AND ORIGINAL WORKS. UNIFORM IN SIZE AND PRICE. The Children's Album. Containing nearly Two Hundred beautiful Engravings, with Short Stories by UNCLE JOHN. Third Edition, revised and improved. Square crown 8vo, 368 pages, cloth lettered ........3s. 6d. Peggy, and other Tales; including the History of a 7hreepenny Bit, and the Story of a Sovereign. With Eight Illustrations. Handsomely bound in cloth gilt 3s. 6d. Old Burchell's Pocket: A Book for the Young Folks. By ELIHU BURRITT. Illustrated with Eight Engravings. Bound in cloth gilt ...........3s. 6d. Mince-Pie Island: A Christmas Story for Young Readers. By R. ST. JOHN CORBET. Handsomely Illustrated. Cloth gilt .. 3s. 6d. Cloudland and Shadowland; or, Rambles into Fairy Land with Uncle White Cloud. By J. THACKRAY BUNCE. Beautifully Illustrated, and bound in cloth gilt .....3s. 6d. The Queen of the Tournament, and Butterfly Ball at Maperley Hall. By the Author of "Mince-Pie Island." With Eight Illustrations by F. LAWSON. Cloth gilt .....3s. 6d. Lily and Nannie at School: A Story for Girls By the Author of "The Little Warringtons." With Eight Illustrations by DALZIEL BROTHERS. Cloth gilt ...3s. 6d. The Life and Times of Crocker the Clown: A Storyfor Boys. By the Editor of "Kind Words." With Eight Illustrations by WIEGAND. Cloth gilt ...3s. 6d. The Magic of Kindness; or, The Wondrous Story of the Good Huan. By the BROTHERS MAYHEW. With Eight Engravings after ALBERT DURER by WALTER CRANE. Cloth gilt ..3s. 6d. LUDGATE HILL, LONDON; AND 595, BROADWAY, NEW YORK.'



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64 Hours of Sunshine. SHOUT AND BAWL. SHOUT and bawl, And run and fall, And up and at it again. If you must run, And have the fun, You must also have the pain. It's only by knowing the sweet from the sour That you'll gather wisdom, and strength, and power. **



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6 CASSELL, PETTER, AND GALPIN, TWO SHILLING SERIES OF NEW AND ORIGINAL WORKS. Bound in best cloth, gilt edges, with Coloured Illustrations by KRONHEIM. New Stories and Old Legends. By Mrs. T. K. HERVEY. .25. Owen Carstone : A Story of School Life ... The Story of the Hamil/ons ......2s. Beatrice Langton ; or, The Spirit of Obedience .2s. TheStoryof ArthurlHun/er and hisFirst Shilling. 2s. The Boy who Wondered. By the Author of Ups and Downs in an Old Maid's Life." ......2s. The Little Orphan. With Illustrations printed in Colours. Cloth, gilt edges .......2s. The Hillside Farm. With Illustrations printed in Colours. Cloth, gilt edges ........2s. EIGHTEENPENNY SERIES OF NEW AND ORIGINAL WORKS. Bound in best cloth, gilt edges, with Four Coloured Plates by KRONHEIM in each Book. Grandmamma's Spectacles. By the Author of A Trap to Catch a Sunbeam." .....s. 6d. Hid in a Cave : A Story for the Young s. s.d. Flora Selwyn: A Story for Girls ...is. 6d. The Holidays at Llandudno .....Is.6d. The Hop Garden; or, Town and Country Life is. 6d. Algy's Lesson .........Is.6d. Ashfeld Fairm: A Holiday Story ..s. 6d. Little Fables for Little Folks. .s. 6d. #** Other Volumes in active preparation. LUDGATE HILL, LONDON; AND 596, BROADWAY, NEW YORK.



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THELITTl.E NIGHTINGALE.



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CASSELL, PETTER, AND GALPIN, 15 BEST ENGLISH MADE INSTRUMENTS. Specially manufactured for Messrs. CASSELL,' PETTER, and GALPIN. No. s. d. Ioo. Mahogany Box, polished, containing Compass, with Pen and Pencil Legs, Ruling Pen, and Scale .....7 0 ioI. Same, with addition of Ebony Parallel, Rule, and Dotted Line Leg 9 o 102. Mahogany locked Box, with Tray, containing Compass, with Pen and Pencil Legs, Ruling Pen and Pencil, small Circle Pen, Compass, Ebony Parallel, Box Scale, and Brass Protractor ..13 6 o13. Same as last, with larger Instruments, with small Circle, Pencil, Compass, Boxwood Scale, and Protractor and Sector, Ebony Parallel ...........17 6 105. Highly-polished Mahogany locked Box, with Tray, Compass, with Pen and Pencil Legs and Lengthening Bar, Dividers, small Circle, Pen and Pencil Compasses, and two Ruling Pens, with joints for cleaning, in German silver, Ebony Parallel, and Box Protractor ...30 0 lo6. Box and Instruments as last, with addition of set of three Spring Dividers, Ivory Protractor and Scale, and Ebony Parallel. In brass ... .37 6 In German silver .........42 o 107. Box and Instruments same in number as Io6, but larger and better finished, Ivory Parallel, and Protractor. In brass ...63 o In German silver .........0 o og8. Ditto ditto, with Proportional Compass. In German silver 84 o& o09. Full Set of Instruments, as No. Io8, with addition of Ivory Joint Rule, of the same quality as 105 (a really useful set) ..65 o 120. Set of 3 Small Dividers, with Pencil and Pen Points, German silver, in Morocco case ........12 o 121. Set of 3 Spring Dividers, with Pencil and Pen Points, German silver, in Morocco case ....13 6 LUDGATE HILL, LONDON; AND 596, BROADWAY, NEW YORK.



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Pincher and the Butcher. 61 Ho! ho!" roared the Butcher; Safe you are, and fast. Thieving men and dogs, I find, Come to grief at last. Come here, little children !" Said the Butcher man; And into the Butcher's shop Five small children ran, Look at sneaking Pincher, There, in his disgrace; See, he cannot raise his head, Or look in your face. Children, take a warning By old Pincher's fate; Never do a thing that you May repent too late."



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68 Hours of Sunshine. NO! NO! NO! No no! no! I can't take it so. Put it in some sugar, or in something sweet. Oh, Ma, I've had enough Of nasty doctor's stuff ;I want a bun or apple, or a tart, to eat. Oh! oh oh! I can't take it so. I want a penny, Mother, and a nice new toy. I'll swallow every drop, But, oh I want a top, And a row of little soldiers, with a drummerboy.



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The Light. 29 THE LIGHT. MOTHER! Mother! see that light Shining through the darksome night: It is sent from heaven, I know, Sent to guide us through the snow; It is one of the angel-band Who come from a far and distant land On Christmas eves to visit the earth, And fill the hearts of the poor with mitth. To-morrow may be a brighter day, So weep not, Mother, but come away.



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12 Hours of Sunshine. THE KING OF THE KITCHEN. GOOD morning, great king of the kitchen! Good morning, my lord of the spoon! I hope, sire, your reign may be happy, And-dinner be ordered up soon. Your subjects, I know, are quite ready, And long for a right royal treat; And, sire, would you keep them contented, Please give them sufficient to eat.



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The Old Soldier. 83 With trembling hand he raised his stick, And knocked, and then he sighed, As to a kindly voice within He tremblingly replied" I crave your shelter, honest dame, For I am old and poor; And long and sore has been the way Across yon dreary moor. Your shelter from the blinding storm, Good folks, is all I crave; And God will bless the hand that saves An old man from the grave." Come in, come in, and welcome," said The cheery voice, once more; No honest man, on such a night, Shall die beside our door." F 2



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A Little Prayer. 17 A LITTLE PRAYER. FATHER, when I kneel to Thee, Hear the simple words I say; Make a happy child of me, Watch me, lest I go astray. Make me true and kind and good, Loved as little children should. -^-



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The Old Soldier. 85 "Good people, it is long agoAy, twenty years, and moreSince I was sent to face the foe, Upon a foreign shore. "With Wellington, in Spain, I fought Against the might of France; And there I got this wound you see,'Twas from a Frenchman's lance. "At Waterloo, my little ones, A bullet pierced this leg; But though I've served my country well, It leaves me now to beg. "In youth I lived in Meadow Vale, A village here, hard by; And I am on my way once more To see it ere I die.



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Thze Old Fiddler. 63 THE OLD FIDDLER. SEE that man, so poor and old, Standing in the winter's coldWeary, hungry, pale, and thinPlaying on his violin: He has children ill in bed, He must play to win their bread ; He must fill your hearts with gladness, Though his own be full of sadness. Help him, children, all you can; Help him, help him, poor old man!



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God is Love. 73 GOD IS LOVE. ON the flowery sod beneath you, On the blazing sky above, On the face of mighty ocean It is written, God is love." Every little bird is singing "God is love" from tree to tree; Every little flower is breathing "God is love to you and me. Sun, and moon, and stars are chanting "God is love," with solemn voice; Join, oh! join the happy chorus, All ye children, and rejoice!



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28 Hours of Sunshine. PRYING TOM. PRYING little Tom Peeping in the pot; Tell me, Tommy, come, What have you got, Standing on your toes, Reaching over so ? I have burnt my nose; Oh! oh! oh!" Better had you gone to bed After lessons, as Ma said.





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Fancies. 77 FANCIES. IN yon shady arbqur, By the river-side, "Where the blue-bells curtsey And the daisies hide, Let us lie together For an hour or so, Weaving tender fancies As they come and go. First of all the shadows, Stealing o'er the grass, Seem like human sorrows As they come and pass.



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CASSELL, PETTER, AND GALPIN, 9 The Pilgrim's Progress. Illustrated throughout. Plain cloth .7s. 6d. Full gilt cloth, gilt edges .lOs. 6d. Full morocco antique. .......21s. The Holy War. Uniform with above, and same price. The Book of Sacred Poems. Illustrated by the first Artists of the day. Edited by the Rev. R. H. BAYNES, M.A., Editor of "Lyra Anglicana," "English Lyrics," &c. &c. Plain cloth .7s. 6d. Full gilt cloth, gilt edges ...jos. 6d. Full morocco antique. .......21s. The World of Wonders. Illustrated. A Record of Things Wonderful in Nature, Science, and Art. Plain cloth .7s. 6d. Full gilt cloth, gilt edges .Ios. 6d. Illustrated Readings. Edited by TOM HOOD. First and Second Series, each complete in itself. Plain cloth .7s. 6d. Full gilt cloth, gilt edges .Ios. 6d. The two vols. in one, cloth .12s. 6d. Half-bound I.15s. Foxe's Book of Martyrs. Edited by the Rev. W. BRAMLEY-MOORE, M.A. Illustrated with Full-page Designs by the best Artists. Imperial 8vo, plain cloth ......2s. Full gilt cloth, gilt edges 15s. Little Songs for Me to Sing. Illustrated by J. E. MILLAIS, R.A.; with Music composed expressly for the Work by HENRY LESLIE. Square Crown 8vo (Dedicated, by expresspermission, to Her Royal highness the PRINCESS OF WALES) ....6s. The Child's Garland of Little Poems: Rhymes for Little People. With Exquisite Illustrative Borders by GIACOMELLI. Square 8vo, cloth gilt ......7s. 6d. Bright Thoughts for the Little Ones. Twentyseven Original Drawings by PROCTER. With Prose and Verse by GRANDMAMMA. Square 8vo, cloth gilt ..7s. 6d. LUDGATE HILL, LONDON; AND 596, BROADWAY, NEW YORK.



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CASSELL, PETTER, AND GALPIN, 7 SHILLING STORY BOOKS. Bound in cloth, gilt lettering, with Four Illustrations in each Book. The Elchester College Boys. By Mrs. HENRY WOOD. And other Tales .......Is. The Delft Yug. By SILVERPEN. And other Tales .Is. My First Cruise. By W. H. KINGSTON. And other Tales ...........Is. Little Lizzie. By MARY GILLIES. And other Tales .Is. Luke Barnicott. By WILLIAM HOWITT. And other Tales ..s. The Secret Society. By Mrs. DE MORGAN. And other Tales ..Is. The Boat Club. By OLIVER OPTIC. And other Tales. is. The Little Peacemaker. By MARY HOWITT. And other Tales ............Is. SHILLING TOY-BOOKS. In Demy 4to, stiff covers. With Full-page Illustrations printed in Colours by KRONHEIM. I. HOW COCK SPARROW SPENT HIS CHRISTMAS. 2. THE ADVENTURES OF ROBINSON CRUSOE. 3. QUEER CREATURES, DRAWN BY ONE OF THEMSELVES. 4. AESOP'S FABLES. (21 Plates.) PICTURE TEACHING SERIES. Picture Teaching Jfr Old and Young: A Series of Object Lessons, progressively arranged, so as to Teach the Meaning of every Term employed. With more than 200 Illustrations. 4to, cloth, lettered ...........5s, Picture Natural History: A Series of Plates, numbering upwards of 700, in which the Animal, Vegetable, and Mineral Kingdoms are classified in families and drawn to scale. With descriptive letterpress. Edited by the Rev. C. BOUTELL, M. A. 4to, cloth, lettered 5s. LUDGATE HILL, LONDON; AND 596, BROADWAY, NEW YORK.



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CONTENTS. PAGE LITTLE THINGS ... ... ... ... ... ... .. 9 BUSY BEE ... ... ... ... ... .. .. ... ... 10 THE KING OF THE KITCHEN ... ... ... .. ... ... 12 HAPPY FRED ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 13 GREEDY TOM ... ... ... ... .. ... ... ... 15 "GRANNY'S GONE TO SLEEP ... ... ..... ... ... 16 A LITrLE PRAYER ... ... ... ... .. ... ... 17 WHO MADE ALL THINGS? ... .... ... ... ... I8 MIND YOUR LESSONS ... ... ... ... .. ... ... 21 THOUGHTS ... ... ... ... .. ... ... ... ... 22 THE GAME ... ... ...... ... ... ..... ... 24 THE OAK ... ... ... .. ... ... 25 PRYING TOM ... ... ... ... .. ... ... ... 28 THE LIGHT ... ... ... ... ... .. ...... 29 THE ROSE AND THE DAISY ... ... ... '... ... ... 30 MOTHER, GUIDE HIS LITTLE STEPS ... .. ... ... ... 32 -LAUGH AND SHOUT ... .. .. .. ... ... ... 33 SPIN ARIGHT ... ... ...... ..... .. ... 34 PRAISE GOD ... ..... ... ... ... ... 35 HELP MAMMA ... ... ... .. .. ... ... 36 W HAT'S A PIN? ... ... ... .. ... ... ... ... 37 PAPA'S BIRTHDAY ... .... .. ... .... .. ... 40 THE THIEVING FLY ... ... .... ... ... ... 41 KIss HER ... .. ... .. ... .. ... ... ... 45 LITTLE FEET ... ... ... .. ... ... ..... 46



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The Old Soldier. 87 "Oh, blessed be God !" at length she cries; "Oh, Father, Father dear! I've prayed for this, both night and day, For many a weary year! Oh, children, come and take his hand, And kiss him o'er and o'er; For he's your Grandad, come at last, To leave us now no more. No more he'll leave his native land, In foreign parts to roam; No more he'll wander, weak and worn, For this shall be his home. 'Though Granny he no more shall see, We'll soothe his every pain, And try to bring the sunshine back To his old heart again."



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14 Hours of Sunshine. In his hat, and passed along, Mingling with the busy throng. But to-day, would you believe, As I crossed he touched my sleeve; And he said, when he could speak, For the tears rolled down his cheek, Mother sends her blessing, sir; Thanks for what you've done for her. When you passed me in the street, That day we had nought to eat. Oh, the joy we both did feel, When that night we had a meal! Blessings on you for the same, Luck and honour to your name !' That's what's filled my heart with joy, That's what's pleased your little boy."



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56 Hours of Sunshine. THE SWALLOWS. LOOK at the Swallows, my pretty dears ; They have no sorrows, or cares, or fears. Toiling in pleasure, they build their nest Snug in some corner they love the best. Toiling in pleasure, they rear their young, Warmly sheltered the leaves among. Spending each moment in useful employ, Nothing is trouble, but all is joy. Thus they are teaching to one and all A mighty lesson, though they be sanall.



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THE LITTLE BLACK CROW.



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HOURS OF SU-NSHINE. 6:*'i*.



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CASSELL, PETTER, AND GALPIN, '3 DRAWING MATERIALS SPECIALLY PREPARED BY CASSELL, FETTEIX, AND GALPINlT, LONDON AND NEW YORK. It is only necessary, upon ordering either Mathematical Instruments, Drawing Books, or Colour Boxes, to indicate the number preceding each description. Mathematical Instruments. No. s. d. 80. A Deal Wood Box, varnished, containing Compass, Pen and Pencil, and Rule ..........I 6 81. Same ditto, with addition of Ruling Pen, Rule, &c. ..2 0 82. Deal Wood Box, painted; two Compasses, Pen and Pencil, Ruling Pen, Lengthening Bar, Protractor, and Rule ..3 0 83. Rosewood Case, containing Two Compasses, Pen and Pencil, Lengthening Bar, Ivory Ruling Pen, Protractor, and Rule .3 6 84. Deal Wood Case, containing Two Compasses, Pen and Pencil, Lengthening Bar, Ruling Pen, Protractor (6-in. instruments), Rule 3 6 85. Mahogany Case, with two Compasses, Pen and Pencil, Lengthening Bar, Ivory Ruling Pen, Protractor, and Rule ....4 6 86. Mahogany Case, same as above, with addition of small Dividers, Pen and Pencil, and Rule ....6 o 87. Rosewood Case, two Compasses, Pen, Pencil, Lengthening Bar, Ivory Ruling Pen, Rule, and Spring Divider ....7 0 88. Rosewood Case, with lock and key (superior instruments), two Compasses, small Dividers, with Pen and Pencil, Bar, Ivory Ruling Pen, Curves, Protractor, Parallels, Scale, &c. ..9 0 89. Rosewood Case, with lock and key, three Compasses, a pair of small Dividers, Ivory Ruling Pen, Bar, Protractor, Rule, Parallels, Scale, &c. ........ o LUDGATE HILL, LONDONM--ND 596, BROADWAY, NEW YORK.



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The Oak. 27 No more would the birds to its shelter fly, Or the little ones sport below; For ere the summer had come and passed, The Oak lay dead on the grass at last. Remember the Oak, oh, you children dear, And guard yourselves well from sin. Ask strength from above, and you need not fear That the worm shall enter in. But beware of evil, for sure, though slow, It will poison the heart, and lay you low.



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34 Hours of Sunshine. SPIN ARIGHT. SPIN your threads, my little dear, Spin in hope and not in fear; Tiny threads make up the web, Little acts make up life's span. Would you be a happy girl? Spin them rightly, while you can; When the thread is broken quite, Too late then to spin aright.



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52 Hours of Sunshine. POLLY. LOOK at Polly, she has littleScarce, at times, enough to eat; No fine shoes, or pretty stockings, Ever grace her naked feet. Poor and humble! yet for others Something she will always spare. Not a bite has little Polly, But poor Toby has his share.



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54 Hours of Sunshine. Like to be a soldier, Willie? Ah, you know not what you say; But for war and all its horrors, We were not so lone to-day. But for wicked men, my darling, Your papa were smiling here; Want and woe we ne'er had tasted, Ne'er had shed the bitter tear. "Ah, my son, if you must battle, Be a soldier of the Lord; Let your foe be sin and evil, And the Bible be your sword. Your reward will be the brighter, More, my son, than earthly gain: Life with Jesus everlasting, All of pleasure, nought of pain."



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82 Hours of Sunshine. THE OLD SOLDIER. IT was a dreary afternoon, The snow was falling fast, As o'er a dark and lonely heath A weary wanderer passed. A stick was in his aged hand, A burden on his back; And oft he paused, for oft he strayed From off the beaten track. And many hours he journeyed on, And miles he wandered o'er, Until, all worn and faint, he paused Beside a cottage door.