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 Front Cover
 The Discontented Frogs
 Back Cover






Title: The discontented frogs
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00026032/00001
 Material Information
Title: The discontented frogs
Physical Description: 20 p. : col. ill. ; 23 x 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Publisher: McLoughlin Bros.
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: [between 1880 and 1889]
 Subjects
Subject: Frogs -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Discontent -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1885   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1885
Genre: Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Summary: Against the advice of their elders, several young frogs leave their lowly but secure pond for the big city. They meet with disaster and death before reaching their goal.
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: Pages printed on one side only.
General Note: Publisher's advertisement on back paper cover.
General Note: Story in verse.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00026032
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002245644
oclc - 52949957
notis - ALJ6654

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    The Discontented Frogs
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Back Cover
        Page 14
Full Text
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THE DISCONTENTED FROGS.ONE fine Summer night, by the side of a pond, "The proud, stately horses, that prance in the streets,Croaked a party of grave-looking Frogs; The gaily dressed children so fair;Some sat in the reeds, on the lily-pads-some, The houses-the churches that reach to the clouds,And some on the water-soaked logs. The music that swells in the air."Their dapple-green coats, glist'ned under the Moon, "Let us go to the City, and taste of its joys,As they croaked of some weighty .affair; We will send our dear children to school;While a hoary old owl, hooted dismally near, And there in the midst of its varied delightsLike a ghost, floating high in the air. You'll forget this detestable pool!"At length in a voice, like the rasp of a saw, "The bright Moon is shining, to show us the way,Spoke a Frog, yellow, spotted and green; While the heavy dew moistens the road;"Now listen dear neighbors, and friends, as once more We'll be half-way to town, by the breaking of day,I tell of the marvels I've seen." And ''tis good to be early abroad.'""To the City I've traveled, as all of you know:- He paused for a moment, all swelling with pride,Of its wonders, again, and again; To hear what the others would say;Have truthfully told you, yet day after day, When old Uncle Spotty-coat, prudent and wise,In this dull, stupid pool you remain." Spoke up without further delay."How lovely the fountains, that spring in the Parks, "'Tis all very well Master Croaker," said he,The velvet sod, brilliant and gay; "These wonderful stories to tell;-The trees, the sweet flow'rs that glow in the Sun,- We're much better off, in our own native pool,The lights, that turn night into day!" Where we've always been happy and well."The Baldwin Library'WZ


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THE DISCONTENTED FROGS."We have plenty to eat, and but little to do, Then good Aunty-Speckleback, hobbled along,The insects are tasty and fat; Croaking much of her aches and her pains;No cattle or dogs, ever trouble us here; While the rest of the party, came hopping behind,Now what can you say unto that ?" Looking out for the shady green lanes.Then young Master Croaker replied with disdain, So leaping and skipping, with croaks of delight," You Old Fogies' are always behind; They were now fairly started for town;Take a vote now, of whether to go, or to stay, Their green, native marshes, soon vanished from sight,And yourself in the lurch you will find." And the way became stony and brown.The conceited young Frogs, who wanted a change, They found little pools, by the side of the road,Voted yes to young Croaker's demand; Where they rested, and paddled awhile;" Hurrah!" they all cried, " we'll get out of this hole, And when red and angry, the Summer sun rose,And be off to the City so grand." They had scarcely gone over a mile.Then bold Master Croaker, came down from his log, More burning and closer, the heavy air grew,All objections to argue away; Like a flame was the sun in the sky;Till even old Spotty-coat yielded at last, It drank up the dew, till the terrible dust,And joined in the noisy array. Flew in blinding clouds, choking and dry.Young Croaker the Pilot, at once took the lead, As grimy and dirty, they straggled along.Uncle Spotty-coat followed the guide; How soiled were their shiny green coats!A good oaken cudgel, he held in his hand, They stumbled, and fell, in the difficult road;And his bottle-green son at his side. All gasping-so dry were their throats!


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THE DISCONTENTED FROGS.And thus they kept going, from bad unto worse, They rested awhile, till the fierce burning sun,Until blinded and tired and lame; Hung low in the heavens again;Poor Spotty-coat groaning, sat down in the road, Then halting, and slowly, hopped sadly along,And his bottle-green son did the same. Croaking faintly with hunger and pain,Then one of the younger ones spoke up at last, Just then came behind them a sleepy old Cow." Master Croaker, I really must say; Her feet in the dust, made no sound.The dust, and the heat, are too much for us Frogs, She caught Uncle Spotty-coat under her hoof,And we'd better far, rest for the day? And crushed him out flat on the ground!Then, said the bold Pilot, all swelling with rage, In ev'ry direction, the terrified Frogs,Although he felt hungry and sore; Leaped wildly, with fear and dismay;"Did you think to escape without trouble or pain? While the plodding old Cow-unconscious of harm.Let me hear of such folly no more." Went slowly along on her way."I'd have you to know, as your leader and guide, Then old Aunty Speckleback, cried in despair,I'm responsible too, for your lives; "Let me stay with my husband so dear!"And know very well, when to stop or go on, And clasping her sad little son to her breast,For the good of your children and wives." She sobbed, "we will die with him here."But now they all murmured,-no further would go; And turning to Croaker, she said thro' her tears,But stopped in a pretty green field;- "Our punishment now has begun;And there, a few insects, they managed to find, My dear, precious husband lies dead in the road,While the grass, a slight moisture did yield. I Just see what your folly has done!"


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THE DISCONTENTED FROGS.Young Croaker was bold, but in such a sad case, I "Come, get up you sluggards, the morning is fair,All his eloquence faded away; Shake off the dull cobwebs of sleep;So choked with emotion, and sorrow te seemed, The town is in sight, and we soon shall be there,That he'd notions of comfort to say. Let's be off with a hop, and a leap."They gathered about the poor widow so lone, But old Aunty Speckleback, couldn't go on,To soothe, and console her they tried; And sighing, said "leave me to die;"Then buried poor Spotty-coat deep in the ditch, Which made Master Croaker despondent again,That bordered the dusty road-side. Till he saw a pond shining hard-by.And now it grew dark, and the Moon was obscured. Then to the poor widow, he coaxingly said,Aunty Speckleback, weak and forlorn; "Come Aunty, we'll give you a bath;Was unable to move, so they made up their minds, A swim in the mill-pond, will freshen you up,To stay in the ditch till the morn. Then we'll all go again on the path."The ditch was a dry one, no water was there, So they made her a litter, of rushes and grass,Not a cricket or worm could be found; Gently carried her off to the pond;So hungry, and thirsty, and weary, they sat, Then in they all tumbled with croaks of delight,All night, huddled up on the ground. Nor dreamed of the danger beyond!But Croaker was restless. He rose with the dawn, Till a fierce spotted Pickerel, under the reeds,Climbed up to the top of a hill; (Like a tiger, that springs on his prey;)Saw far in the distance, the roofs of the town, With wide open jaws, Aunty Speckleback seized,Then shouted aloud with a will. And bore her all shrieking away!S- !;.


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THE DISCONTENTED FROGS.With croakings of horror, the other ones swam, They looked at each other, in silent dismay.To the shore, where, all quaking with fear; Too late, the sad lesson they learn ;-They gazed, as tho' fearing, again they might see, As they sink in the dust, faint, weary and worn,The fierce scaly robber appear. That they've not even strength to return!But ah! who shall tell of the terrible grief, And now, a cool shadow is cast on the ground.That filled the poor little Frog's heart; Three Cranes sail around in the sky;Who of father and mother bereft-must alas! Then down in the midst of the terrified Frogs,Now bear a poor Orphan's sad part. Like cruel white Phantoms they fly.As weak, and exhausted, he lay on the grass, The Frogs, in their terror, leap wildly about,-No soothing could soften his woe, Until wounded by bramble and thorn;Even bold Master Croaker. was torn with remorse, Entangled and bruised,-to their pitiful fate,When he cried, "it is time we should go." They yield, sadly bleeding and torn.So wretched and hopeless, they set out once more. With bills, long and pointed, the Cranes set to workBut they hopped, as tho' bearing a load; They pierced the poor Frogs thro' and thro';And in sorrow, and silence, went sadly along, And bold Master Croaker, was gobbled up first,Till they once again came to the road. A spectacle, frightful to view!But thicker than ever, the burning dust rose. And save only one, all the rest were devoured,Their tender skins parched in the sun;- The hungry Cranes swallowed them down;Till Croaker himself, almost dropped with fatigue, And so these misguided and foolish young Frogs,And wished the long journey were done. Never got to the wonderful town!


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THE DISCONTENTED FROGS.But old Uncle Spotty-coat's bottle-green son, He told them his story, from first unto last.Being little, crept under a stone; Good Mother Duck dropped a sad tear;And there safely hidden, he lay till the Cranes, The Ducklings so downy, in sympathy wept,Stopped searching, and left him alone. When he spoke of his parents so dear.Then trembling with terror, he peeped from the hole, They cheered up his spirits, and gave him some food.Not a Frog, young or old, met his view; Of the Ducklings he grew very fond;His friends and relations, no longer were there, And when he felt stronger, they showed him the way,And well their sad ending he knew! To a nice, quiet, smooth little pond."With croaks of despair, he crawled back to the pond, The Ducks, and the Ducklings, lived near to the place.Where he sat on a stone by its side; It was close to a cosy old farm;.And there he lamented, with sobbing and tears, No Cranes or fierce Pickerel ever came there,By the place where his mother had died. To cause him distress or alarm.Just then Father Drake, and his wife Mrs. Duck, And there, honest Bottle-green lived at his ease,Were taking their family out; His life was both happy and long;To give them an airing, a swim and a run, And so ends the tale, of the poor foolish Frogs,In the pond, and the country about. Whose story I've told you in song.But hearing the cries of the lonely young Frog, With this I will finish, my dear little friends,For a moment they halted in fright; And this precept, I hope you will keep;Then waddled along, till they saw with amaze, Be content, if you can, with the blessings you have,Little Bottle-green's pitiful plight. But always look well, ere you leap.


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