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Title: Aladdin, or, The wonderful lamp.
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Title: Aladdin, or, The wonderful lamp.
Series Title: Aladdin, or, The wonderful lamp.
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Bibliographic ID: UF00026016
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
Full Text







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ALADDIN,

AND THE


WONDERFUL LAMP.



IN Pekin's fair city, the pride of Cathay,
There lived an old woman, the widow Twankay;
She was poor, and her dwelling was not very nice,
And she had only chopsticks for dinner with rice.
A sore list of troubles her life did annoy,
But worst of them all was Aladdin, her boy.
As idle an urchin as ever was nursed,
He wore out his jackets, his trousers he burst;
To his elders was saucy, and cared for no rule,
Cracked nuts on the sly, and ate taffy in school.
In short, his poor mother was driven quite wild,
In her search for a rod, that would better her child!
As he played in the gutters one sunshiny day,
A mighty Magician stepped over the way,


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A/?1 ,i' and the Wonderful Lamp.

And tapping him gently, said Finish your fun
And then I will give you a nice currant bun-
If you'll do me a service, a small one you see,
And it pleases me,-then I may double your fee."
The boy to the bargain agreed, and the two,
Set off in a hurry the business to do.
Far out in the country they walked, till they found,
In a dark lonesome valley, a hole in the ground;
Then said the Magician Down here you must go,
Till you reach a great cavern that stretches below;
And there, by the aid of this magical ring,
A lamp you will find, which to me you must bring."
So down the lad went. In a moment he came
To the wonderful lamp, and he saw by the flame,
That the cavern was brilliant with riches untold,
Of diamonds, and rubies, and mountains of gold!
He paused for a moment, then gathered a store
Of the gems, till his pockets could carry no more,
And amazed at the wonders that circled him round,
Forgot the Magician who watched above ground.
"Where are you?" he cried, down the hole, then again-
"Are you coming?" he asked, but he asked it in vain,
Then he shouted so loud, and kicked up such a breeze,
' Shut up," said Aladdin, I'll come when I please."







Aladdin and the Wonderful Lamp.

"Say you so?" the Magician then cried in his rage,
"You saucy young scamp, you shall die in this cage!"
Then crash! closed the rocks with terrible sound,
And Aladdin was caught hard and tast under ground!
He was all in the dark, for the lamp had gone out,
While encompassed with horrible roarings about,
He lay on his face, with his tears flowing fast;
Sorely punished for all his misdoings at last.
His hot scalding tears little comfort did bring,
But in rubbing his red eyes, he rubbed on the ring;
Then a Genie appeared, and said Sir, if you please,
I'm the slave of the ring, and can help you with ease."
" Is that so ?" said Aladdin, then this be your care,
Take me home at your quickest, and leave me safe there."
So home to his mother returned the young scamp,
Bringing back in his pocket the dirty old lamp;
" I will scrub it," she said, "when I get it to shine,
I'll sell it for money to breakfast and dine !"
With a will she set to, when the sound of a gong,
Made her feel as ifsomething, had somehow, gone wrong,
And drest all in red, with a gold plate before,
A Genie popped up through the stones in the floor!
"To give you, dear madam, whatever you ask,"
Smiled the Genie, I'm happy to say is my task."








Aladdin and the Wonderful Lamp.

Then the widow replied, Honored sir, I suppose
You can fit us at once, with some ready-made clothes.'
In a moment, in jewels and satins they stood,
And the widow, amazed, found the quality good!
Then again smiled the Genie, "Dear madam, what now?"
"Bring in dinner," she said, "Very good," with a bow
The red Genie replied, I will summon my imps."
" Bring wine," cried Aladdin, I like it with shrimps,"
In a moment, was spread a most bountiful meal,
The widow drank twice, and seemed partial to veal;
But they both ate away, without raising a question,
As to what might, or might not, be good for digestion.
The meal cleared away, said Aladdin, So long
We have lived upon nothing, my wishes are strong
For all the fine things, ready money can bring,
So I'll marry a Princess, and live a great King!
Now listen, red Genie, if you are my slave,
Go bring me the riches that grow in the cave !"
In a moment 'tis done, for of negroes a score
All laden with jewels troop in through the door.
" I art off to the palace, dear mother come too,"
Said Aladdin, the lovely young princess to woo;
With her grumpy old father I mean to begin,
And with diamonds and rubies his favor to win.







Aladdzn and the Wonderful Lamp.

Then to the sweet Princess, my court I will pay,
And get her to name for the wedding-the day!"
Great Emperor Chang sat in state on his throne,
And his eye on Aladdin fell cold as a stone;
"What, slave! wed my child, never dream such a thing.
Why not?" said Aladdin, "just see what I bring,
Here are bushels of jewels, and none of them paste."
Said the Emperor then, "You must pardon my haste."
And his greedy eyes opened like saucers in size,
As he cried "By your riches, 'tis plain you are wise,
And I know by your presents, your love must be true;
See, daughter, the husband I've chosen for you !"
Then Aladdin relieved from the Emperor's talk,
The blushing young Princess took out for a walk."
SSo they married, and lived on as happy as doves,
But the wicked Magician looked black at their loves.
Aladdin had built him a palace so fair,
That none with its splendor or size could compare;
And there, like a monarch, he lived at his ease,
With nothing to do, but his Princess to please.
One day, on some business, Aladdin went out,
When the wily Magician came prowling about;
" Crying "bring out your lamps, what I tell you is true,
And for each battered old one, I'll give you one new.







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Aladdin and the Wonderful Lamp.


The Princess heard this, and she said to herself,
There's a horrid old lamp on our dressing-room shelf;
Here's a chance now to get a nice new one instead,
It will do for the children to light them to bed.
Aladdin, you see, his dear wife had not told
Of this lamp, far more precious than jewels or gold;
So gaining the prize by this cunning device,
The Magician, the palace bore off in a trice!
And when poor Aladdin came home-in the sky,
His wife and his palace he saw "on the fly !"
But he still had a treasure-the magical ring,
So he summoned the Genie, who came on the wing;
By magic, the runaway building brought down,
And the wicked Magician transformed to a Clown!
As one best acquainted with Pantomime tricks,
Who all its allusions, and changes could fix.
The Princess now changes to fair Columbine,
Who loves in bright colors, and jewels to shine;
While Aladdin, in Harlequin's spangles so gay,
With his bat, slaps the others who come in his way.
Old Chang, the great Emperor, turns out to be,
Pantaloon, with his night-cap and specs as you see;
While the Lamp, blazing up with electrical light,
Shows the jolly red Genie turned into a Sprite!


___ II_ I_ I ___ 1 I_~_ __
~~_ _~___~








- _________________ - 1


ALADDIN, AND THE WONDERFUL LAMP.



ALADDIN was the son of a poor tailor in a town of Tartary, who died
when the boy was fifteen years old. He spent much of his time in
the streets, liked play better than work, and left his poor mother to toil
night and day for his support. A great Magician, having learnt by the
power of his art, that near the same town there was concealed under
ground a lamp which would bestow upon its possessor the greatest power
and riches in the world, fixed upon Aladdin to go into the cavern and get
the lamp for him. So, one day, as he was playing with some boys, the
Magician asked him if his father's name was not Mustapha? Oh, yes,"
Aladdin replied; but alas, sir, my poor father is dead !" The Magician now
said he was his uncle from abroad, pretended to be much pleased, caressed
Aladdin very affectionately, and gave him a ring, which he told him would
always preserve him from harm.
The Magician and Aladdin walked on and talked for some time, until they
came to a valley between two mountains, where the Magician collected a few
dry sticks and made a fire. He then threw some perfume into it, turned
round several times, and pronounced a few magical words; when, all at
once, the earth trembled and opened up close to his feet, discovering a large
flagstone with a ring in it. The Magician told Aladdin to lift the stone, for
that under it was a treasure destined to be his. Aladdin did so, and saw
underneath the stone, steps leading to a cavern. The Magician now directed
him to the bottom of the steps, where he would find a door open, which
led into a large place, divided into three great halls, and with a garden full
of the most beautiful flowers and delicious fruits. Across that garden,"
said he, you will find a terrace, and on it a lamp, which you must take and
bring to me."
Aladdin had never even dreamt of such magnificence as now met his eyes
at every turn. He, however passed on rapidly into the garden, where he
lingered to gather some flowers which sparkled all over with real diamonds
and precious stones. Having found the lamp, he took it up, and carried it to
the mouth of the cave. Give me the lamp instantly, or you shall repent









Aladdin, and the Wonderful Lamp.


it," said the Magician. I cannot," answered Aladdin, until I am out of the
cave." The Magician was so enraged with him that he was g,-in-g to strike
him, when some powder accidentally dropped out of his hand into the fire; a
thick smoke arose and the stone moved back into its place; so poor Aladdin
was buried alive. He was for a time dreadfully frightened, but on touching
the ring the Magician had given him, a Genie of awful stature appeared, and
by his desire placed him on the very spot between the mountains where he
had left the Magician.
He ran home as quickly as possible, and showed the lamp and ring to his
mother, saying, Look, mother! I will go out, sell this lamp, and buy
food for both of us; only it would be better to clean it first." He had no
sooner began to rub it than a second Genie appeared with twelve silver dishes
filled with the most savory meats, which lasted Aladdin and his mother
several days. Then Aladdin sold the silver dishes for a good sum of money,
upon which they contrived, with care, to live for a long time.'
One day, who should pass Aladdin but the Princess Balroulboudour, who
was going, with her attendants, to the baths. Aladdin was much struck with
her beauty, and determined, if possible, to marry her. So, on his return
home, he begged his mother to go to the Sultan, and ask of him the hand
of the Princess in marriage for her son. After trying for a long time to
dissuade him from such a purpose, Aladdin's mother went, and took for a
present a vase filled with the flowers gathered in the enchanted garden. The
Sultan received her graciously, accepted her present, the wondrous beauty
of which surprised him exceedingly, and answered that, if at the end of three
months Aladdin could procure him eighty more vases filled like this one with
jewels, and borne by eighty black slaves; his consent should be given, and
Aladdin become his son-in-law. And this he was able to do, by the assist-
ance of the Genie of the lamp.
With great rejoicings the Princess and Aladdin were married, and the
fame of his great riches spreading to all parts of the world, soon reached the
ears of the Magician, who knowing how Aladdin had obtained his wealth,
resolved to try to possess himself of the Wonderful Lamp; for which purpose
he went to the front of the palace and cried out New lamps for old ones!"
Aladdin was out buntini : and the Princess, hearing the cry, told the servant
to fetch the old lamp, which she soon exchanged with the Magican for a new
one.


r --II~----------------









Aladdin, and the Wonderful Lamp.

As soon as night came, the Magician summoned the Genie of the Lamp,
and commanded him immediately to transport the palace, with the Princess
and all else that it contained, to the remotest part of Africa. The palace, at
once began to rise slowly, and steadily through the air, but with so easy
a motion, that neither the Princess, nor any of the other inmates were
awakened from their sleep.
Their astonishment may be imagined, when on looking from the windows
in the morning, a strange landscape met their eyes, and everything around
them showed that they had been transported to a foreign country during the
night. The poor Princess Badroulboudour, as you may.suppose, was in a
terrible state of weeping and fright, and called unceasingly upon her dear
husband Aladdin, who had never left her alone before for a single night since
they had been married.
Suddenly, while she was still lamenting in her distress, the wicked Magician
appeared to her. He was in a magnificent dress of velvet and gold, and
approaching her in a respectful manner, kneeled upon one knee, and tried to
kiss her lily hand ; in which, however, he did not succeed. Fairest Princess,"
said he, with what he intended for a look of tenderness, Deign to cast your
lovely eyes upon the lowest of your slaves; the false Aladdin, who is only
the son of a tailor, is unworthy even to look upon such a pearl of beauty as
yourself. Banish him then from your thoughts, and smile upon one who has
long loved you, and who would fain replace that false wretch in your affec-
tions."
She listened to all this with a profound disgust which she could scarcely
conceal; but thinking that her dear Aladdin would soon discover her where-
abouts, and come to her assistance, she determined to pretend a consent,
which of course she did not feel.
"Ah! my lord," she said, modestly casting down her eyes," give me a little
time to answer the proposal with which you have honored me, and I hope in
a few days to give you a favorable answer." At this reply, the Magician's
eyes sparkled with satisfaction, and rising from his knee, he saluted her with
an air of the profoundest respect, and immediately withdrew from the room.
We must now leave the Princess, and see what had become of'Aladdin.
On returning from the hunting expedition, upon which he had been absent
that day, what was his horror and amazement to discover that his splendid
palace had disappeared as completely as though it had never existed, leaving









Aladdin, and the Wonderful Lamp-


not a trace behind to show where it had once been! But this was as nothing
to the loss of his wife whom he so dearly loved.
Clasping his hands in despair, his eyes fell upon the magic ring, and
hope arose once more in his breast. He at once summoned the Genie of the
Ring and commanded him to bring back the palace. That," said the Genie,
" I cannot do, for it is in the power of the Genie of the Lamp, who is more
powerful than I." "Then take me where it is," said Aladdin, and in an
instant he found himself in his palace once more, and his heart bounded in
his bosom, as he heard the voice of his dear Princess, calling upon the name
of her beloved Aladdin.
After embracing each other tenderly, they decided upon a plan by which
the Magician should be punished for his wickedness and presumption.
Aladdin then gavy the Princess a powder to put in the wine of the Magician,
when next he should visit her, and concealing himself in a closet near by,
waited anxiously for the result.
He had not long to wait. The Magician soon came in to take supper with
the Princess, who smilingly presented him with a goblet of wine, which he
drank off at a single draught, at the same time leering tenderly at the dis-
gusted wife. In a few moments a change came over his ugly face, and stag-
gering wildly from his seat, he fell senseless upon the floor. Aladdin at once
rushed out, and after stabbing the wretch to the heart, took from his bosom
the precious Lamp, and summoning the Genie to his assistance, caused the
Palace to be transported back to its proper place. Great was the joy of
the Emperor at seeing his daughter and Aladdin once more; and you
may be sure that the Wonderful Lamp was more carefully preserved in the
future.
















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