Paul and Margaret

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Material Information

Title:
Paul and Margaret the inebriate's children
Physical Description:
178, 8, 6 p., 3 leaves of plates : ill. ; 18 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Potwin, H. K.
Dodd, Moses Woodruff, 1813-1899 ( Publisher )
Jenkins, Edward O ( Printer , Stereotyper )
Publisher:
M.W. Dodd
Place of Publication:
New York
Manufacturer:
Edward O. Jenkins, Printer & Stereotyper
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1868

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children of alcoholics -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Poverty -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Avarice -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Soldiers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
History -- Juvenile fiction -- United States -- Civil War, 1861-1865   ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1869   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1869
Genre:
Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by H.K.P.
General Note:
Added engraved title page printed in color.
General Note:
Publisher's catalogue follows text.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002235263
notis - ALH5706
oclc - 57624086
System ID:
UF00026006:00001

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Full Text















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The Baldwin Library
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THE MEETING IN THE HOSPITAL.
Page 126.
fc i:









PAUL AND MARGARET,

THE


INEBRIATE'S CHILDREN.




- I


















NEW YORK:
M. W. DODD, No. 506 BROADWAY.











PAUL AND MARGARET


THE




qh1riafi ( hildrtn.






BY H. K. P.
A.1HOR OF "LOBERT THE CABIN BOY," "THE KEMPTON8,"
ETC., ETC.










NEW YORK:
M. W. DODD, No. 506 BROADWAY.
1869.



































Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1868, by

M. W. DODD,

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States for the
Southern District of New York.






















EDwRno O. J-N''s,
PR ITER AND STEREOTYPER,
No. 20 North William St.





















CONTENTS.




CHAP. PAGE.
I.-ASPIRATION, .. 5

II.-PAUL's DUTY, 24

II.-ENLISTED, 42

IV.-MARGARET AT SCHOOL, 61

V.-PAL WVOUSDED, .. 77

VI.-CHILDLIKE TRUST, 94

VII.-THE MEETING, 113

VIII.-NEw ASSocIATIONs, 131

IX.-THE LETTER, 148

X.-THE INEBRIATE'S DEATH, 168

















PAUL AND MARGARET.



CHAPTER I.
Aspirations.
T is midsummer. The whole earth is
green; the grass thick and tall, where
it has not been mown; the leaves all
full grown; the berries ripe and falling
off; the air heavy with the breath of
flowers, and heated with the sun's hot
rays; and the birds are seeking the coolest
shades, and folding their wings wearily un-
til the day goes by and. the twilight comes.
The village is quiet, for it is the noon
1* 5









6 Paul and Margaret.

hour; all are resting; no sounds of labor
anywhere. Ah! we had well-nigh for-
gotten one spot where labor never ceases;
where rest never comes -in the brown
cottage yonder, that stands with strong
outline against the hill and sky. In the
cold of winter 6r the heat of summer, it
is the same; toil from dawn till dark;
constant, unending, hopeless toil was
hers-the mother there. No folding of
the hands for her, they are hard and
misshapen with their ceaseless work. No
light or refreshment for the heart, it is
weighed down with life's burdens, well-
nigh crushed, but that the Father is still
merciful, and smiles upon it when it has
strength and courage to look up for a
moment. She has no hope but when she








Aspirations. 7

looks forward to the grave-a long way
forward it seems, for she is not old. She
has no spirit of repining, although she
knows that the bright hopes of her youth
shall never rest upon her in their full
fruition. They were simple hopes, not
aspiring, as the world thinks;-only to
be loved, to love, to be happy in her
daily duties, that was all-but she has
laid them away with a sigh, perhaps,
then, but now out of sight forever.
One would think she could find a joy
in her two children, but no-she some-
times feels they were better dead. She
has no time to smile upon them, no time
to love them; she thinks they had best
learn to live without love while young,
it will save disappointment in the future;








8. Paul and Margaret.

so her face has learned severity and hard-
ness, her eye to look calm and impassion-
ed always; they would not know her if
she smiled upon them. Then, too, they
must work. Perhaps life was made for
that, her life at least; for nothing else
theirs, also, it might be; therefore the
three worked together all day and every
day.
Paul, he was the oldest. The name
had a pleasant sound to her ears even
now, although she gave it to him fifteen
years ago, before this blight came upon
her. He worked with a heart tender
for his mother, but his soul was not in it;
he had not learned as she had to stifle his
aspirations, to crush every bright young
hope; he knew there was something








Aspirations. 9

beautiftil in the world, although he had
not found it yet; his soul would not al-
ways be enchained within the brown cot-
tage. Sometimes it wandered off in
search of something tq satisfy its strange
desires; still his hands labored on, and
his work was well done, but the mother
carried a sterner face at such times, for
she saw that Paul's spirit was not there.
She saw his blue eyes brighten with a
look they did not always wear; she
noticed he came with a firmer, manlier
tread, his lips parted with something ap-
proaching a smile; it struck her that. he
had a noble look about him. But no,
she would not think or dream even for
him, for Paul her first born; his destiny
was to be a hewer of wood, and drawer









So Paul and Margaret.

of water, as was hers. How could it be
otherwise? She must do her duty, stern
though it might be, and bring him back
to life's realities; therefore she had said,
" It is useless, Paul; better think only of
your work."
He had answered with a cheerful tone,
"I am patient, mother."
"It will end in disappointment, Paul."
"It may not; if it does, I will still be
patient."
She said no more; perhaps the hope
he had infused itself somewhat into her
heart also, for she looked up oftener and
longer that day, and found her Father's
smile waiting for her acceptance.
I said she had two children. The other
was a girl of ten years, and was called








Aspirations. I

Margaret. The world had no beauty in
it for the mother when this babe came to
her. Five years had done a sad work
upon her heart. This child had never
seen the smile that had sunned Paul's in-
fancy, and that even he had almost for-
gotten, so long had it been since it came
to him last. She had grown up in the
shade, as it were, and was not unlike her
mother in face and manner. She moved
quickly about the cottage, because she
must. She had learned to do many things
that girls twice her age rarely do, and
that, too, was because she must. She
did not talk with her mother as Paul
sometimes did, but quietly and quickly
performed day after day all that was re-
quired of her. She never smiled in her









12 Paul and Margaret.

Iother's face as she had been seen to do
sometimes in Paul's; perhaps it was be-
cause he drew it forth and the mother
could not. Occasionally Paul hummed a
tune in a low tone, working steadily all
the time, but Margaret never did that;
she was a very silent child, her mother
thought, but then it was not strange, for
she had no one to talk with. Had the
mother seen her when on the Sabbath
Paul led her away from the cottage up
the foot-path that wound over the hill to
the woods beyond, she would not have
known her child; the fetters were thrown
off there, and all unconsciously. She did
not sing and shout as some children
would have done, but the look of apathy,
almost dullness, that she carried at home,








Aspirations. 13

changed to a bright, joyous one. She
answered back the sunshine with a smile
well nigh as bright as that; her tones
were quick and gleeful, like the birds
that sang in the branches over head, but
not loud and fearless like theirs, and
when her brother drew one or two old
books from his pocket to teach her or
read to her, as he didrweekly, there was
an eagerness to learn that told it was a
pleasure, a living joy. Paul read for her
as she lay beside him on the grass, and
alth'ough her eyes seemed to feast upon
the blue heavens, the growing trees or
the swift-winged birds, yet he knew she
heard every word, and that it would be
carried back to her life of drudgery and
toil a hoarded treasure.
2









14 Paul and Margaret.

The child had few secrets, but never
one from Paul. She had countless
thoughts and she told them all to him,
and in turn took his. Sunday was a
rare day to both of them although they
never spent it in church. The mother
never went, therefore they did not, but
she had taught them to pray when they
were very young had told them they
must never forget it, and they never did;
it was a pleasant change after the same-
ness and weariness of the day, if noth-
ing more; but of late prayer had .had
for Paul more significance than ever be-
fore, for he was looking toward the
future, and he felt stronger faith and
higher hopes when praying. Margaret
did not dream of the future as her









Aspirations. 15

brother did; she did not feel her need of
faith and hope yet; she prayed because
she loved to, and knew not what else to
do to show her love for the One who
made the earth so beautiful and the Sab-
.bath to come so regularly; perhaps by
and by she will need more hope and
faith and patience, then she will pray
differently.
She had never been to school as the
children in the village had, and she some-
times wondered what it was like, but
when Paul asked her if she wanted to go
she answered, "No."
Why not "
For the same reason her mother did
not go to church-she had no clothes
decent to wear and no way of getting









16 Paul and Margaret.

them; besides, she had rather he would
teach her, and Paul went winter even-
ings always. He knew a great deal-his
sister thought she could never learn so
much; but Paul praised her, and said
that she remembered better than he
did, and all that she learned she would
never forget.
These things that Paul read to her
and told her of on Sundays came to
her through the week, and the quiet,
sober face was no index of the thoughts
that filled her heart so full that she for-
got how much she worked and how tired
her little frame was when night came.
Did the mother never desire her child
to learn as others did? as she herself
had when young ?








Aspirations. 17

She had once told Paul that she
"wished Margaret could go to school long
enough to read and write. She said it
with a sigh, as though it were simply
an impossibility; and he, knowing
something of his mother's heart, pitied
her, and told her that his sister could
already do that, for he had taught
her.
The mother was satisfied and silent
afterward.
But what is it, you will ask, that
has sifted their years of all the bright-
ness that others revel in ? Why are they
not happy if they are good, if they
work and pray? Ah, there is a cloud
above them all the time, black and
tempestuous. It is not poverty, stern
2*









18 Paul and Margaret.

reality though it be, it is not that they
are without the pale of civilized society,
or that of friends they have none; it
is not that their. days are made up of
drudgery and want; none of these. The
mother with her inherent self-reliance
and strength of character could bear
all these, if but he who had years before
vowed to cherish and protect were true.
Paul would have been satisfied, .and
Margaret would have had a youth of
childlike joy, had the father not been
what he was-a miserable sot, drunken,
brutish and vile, steeped in rum from
morn till night, satisfying his morbid
cravings with the pittance taken from his
hopeless wife and children; compelling
them to labor while he sat daily in the









Aspirations. 19

bar-room, listening to low jokes, swal-
lowing huge portions of poison, and sacri-
ficing the life blood of those who should
have been dear to him, but were not.
Nothing was dear to him but the mug
which he held in his nerveless hand
and carried hourly to his bloated lips.
A strange love, one would say, surely
"a most unaccountable love for a man-
"a being made to walk upright, to lift
his forehead to the eternal heavens; to
bear about with him all the gifts of the
creator-conscience, reason, love and hope
-to bear them until he chose to trample
them under foot, and appear daily before
the world and before the still merciful
Giver with his poor, needy, starving soul,
clothed upon with rags, scarce covered









20 Paul and Margaret.

even with these, all unknowing and un-
caring that it needed to be arrayed in
other garments. From morn till dark
he left his family alone, that is why
they could be calm and patient; but
at night he terrified them, and that is
why they were joyless.
Grief has its mission, and blessed
are they that endure even unto the
end-endure as seeing Him who is in-
visible, losing sight of themselves mean-
while. One would have said while look-
ing upon the outward life of Mrs.
Bailey that she was the. very embod-
iment of patience; none but her Heav-
enly Father .knew the struggles of her
spirit, the bitterness of her thoughts, the
complaints she would not allow herself









Aspirations. 21

to utter, the disappointment, the hopeless
agony, other first years of trial, and none
but He knew how slowly she had gath-
ered up the fragments of her shattered
faith at last, and was now walking
beneath His love, suffering still, hopeless
still, as regards this life, and smitten
to the dust, but patient, quiet, silently
prayerful in feeling, undemonstrative, and
severe in manner only. None but He
knew how with a mother's depth of affec-
tion she yearned over her children. Poor
woman! it was not wilful sinning that
caused her to repress outward manifesta-
tions of love. Mistaken, certainly, she
was, but not hard and cruel, when she de-
prived her children of the little sunlight
she might have scattered about their sha-









22 Paul and Margaret.

dowy youth. Her girlhood had been
rich and rare in its joy, full of smiles and
tender heart-words from voices never to
be heard on earth again, loving tones
whose echoes would reach her even now,
dared she but listen to them; she dared
not. Even memory was sternly laid
aside, for she would be strong for life's
work and life's suffering until the day
when she should not, as now, see through
a glass darkly, but face to face.
It was because disappointment and
misery seemed harder to endure coming
after a life of tenderness and peace and
brightness, and because she felt that her
children were born to sorrow even more
than others, that she.pushed with a strong,
firm hand every gratification from them;









Aspirations. 23

it was because she feared the shock for
them, that once came to her, that she
allowed this iron hand to rest upon their
hearts, crushing almost from their natures
the buoyant, out-gushing song of youth
that God gave to them when He sent them
to her keeping for a time. It was the
mistake of her life although she knew it
not, and the sin lay not at her door but
with him who had smitten her so cruelly,
with him who had suffered himself to
sink to the lowest level.


*~~~ l















CHAPTER II.
Paul's Duty.
SHE summer had well nigh passed,
the days were getting shorter and
farther into the rich fruitful beauty of
autumn. The villagers were realizing the
fulfilment of their early spring hopes,
gathering in abundantly of earth's bounty,
filling their barns with riches and
their souls with satisfaction--all but Mrs.
Bailey. No riches or satisfaction came to
her; the great beauty of the year brought
only fear to her heart, dread of the
future, of the bitter cold-and hunger that
had been their portion for so many win-
24









Paul's Duty. 25

ters. She looked forward to nothing else.
No hopes brightened the dark prospect,
no desires, for were they not useless ? and
upon this fresh Autumn morning, as she
stood by the tub, washing, alone-for
Margaret was gathering a basket of fuel
in the woods and Paul had taken home
the clothes ironed yesterday-a dread of
the coming winter settled upon her
spirits more sensibly than ever before.
For two years civil war raged in the
country; taxes had been increased, and
light as the burden to some, the poor
found it was more than they could well
bear, for with taxation, prices of the
most common articles were rising weekly,
and thus the very poor were more nearly
affected by it.
3









26 Paul and Margaret.

It had- cost all the time and strength
of the poor woman before the war broke
out to provide food sufficient, and now
it was impossible; she saw nothing but
starvation before them. To be sure they
had corn and potatoes plenty, of Paul's
raising from the half-acre lot adjoining
the house, but if she had no money to
provide her husband with liquor, would
he not sell whatever the cellar afforded
to gratify his vitiated appetite? he had
often done so before, and she had no
reason to hope for better things from
him. Work was still plenty, but even the
rent had been increased and now took
nearly all she received; and some clothes
they must have though of the'poorest sort,
It looked very dark, but she said not a
word even to Paul.









"Paul's Duty. 27

And what did the boy think upon as
he rapidly walked from house to house
with the various bundles of smoothly-
ironed clothes, and gathered the scanty
pay that seemed so little when there was
so much to be bought for the absolute
necessities of life?
War tidings were familiar to the se-
cluded family even though a daily paper
never found its way within the walls of
the brown cottage. Paul understood that
the rebellionj was the cause -of this added
suffering among the poor, and thought
of it many times, but with no feeling of
murmuring against the government; far
from it, he was glad to share the burden
as far as he was concerned, but for his
mother's and Maggie's sake he dreaded
'

0.'









28 Paul and Margaret.

the ever-increasing. rise in the price of
provisions. On this morning, however,
his thoughts took a different channel.
The men stood in groups talking loud
and earnestly of the latest news, and as
Paul passed by he heard the sounds,
"More men to be raised have to draft !
town bounty!" and the like, until he
caught the spirit of the day and
longed to share in a nation's glory. Why
could not he, as well as others ? He was
not a man, to be sure-onlysixteen, and
small in stature-but his heart was large,
and his limbs were supple, strong, capa-
ble of endurance; he felt sure he could do
something; yes, he would volunteer and
the bounty should make his mother and
Maggie comfortable for the winter.








Paul's Duty. 29

State and town bounty! how .large it
seemed to him, how like a fortune almost
within his grasp. Visions of good
healthy food, and thick warm clothing
danced before him, not for himself; oh, no,
but for the dear suffering ones at home.
He saw, as in a dream, little Maggie in
school, divested of patched gown, smiling
over her books, as she never smiled now
except on the Sabbath, and his patient,
toil-worn mother, taking an occasional
hour to rest from labor. He could
scarcely control the wild tumult of
his heart with all in prospect; it gave
a new light to the dark blue of his
eye, and added a buoyancy to his step
as he turned toward home. Pushing
open the door he caught his mother's
"3*


V .Q









30 Paul and Margaret.

gaze, so .sad, so full of dark forboding,
and t flashed upon him that this would
be bringing a new sorrow to her life, and
saying quickly within himself, "I will
wait, I will not .tell her yet; I will pray
before I decide;" he gave her the money
and passed out to attend to other duties,
his mind all the time full of this one
great thought-bearing a small part of
the nation's burden, and making lighter
the load that rested upon his mother.
Till night it never left him; his lowly
toil seemed nobler; he almost rejoiced.
that he was poor.
But his mother! would she give him
uip? Paul knew that he was very near
her heart, nearer than any other. It
would be a bitter trial; but then Mag.



*









Paul's Duty. 31

gie would be left, and the help to
her in the coming winter; she must see
the advantage, the absolute necessity, of
his going.
"Paul!" it was Margaret calling him to
supper, and with a quick, nervous motion
he threw down the axe and started for
the hou'se. Silently they sat at table and
ate of the plain rye bread with just a
taste of butter, thankful that they still
could afford that; then as Margaret put
the dishes away, and Mrs. Bailey proceed-
ed to fold the clothes for the morrow's
ironing, Paul unburdened his heart, say-
ing at the close, "You see, mother, that I
can do nothing for you here that Mag-
gie might not do, and then I can help
a good deal, if I live."









32 Paul and Margaret.

"If you live! Paul, Paul, you are but
a boy yet."
"Sixteen, mother, and strong and
healthy; the country needs every healthy
man; I can do nothing here, I never
shall; you know, mother, how they put
me down because-because-"
His mother raised her. eyes beseeching-
ly, and Paul stopped a moment, while
the blood mounted to his brow, and as
he threw back his head he added, I'de-
test the feeling that would crush a family
for the sins of one; I know I can be a
man somewhere; I will be a man, hon-
ored and respected, see if I don't "
The mother's gaze grew tender and lov-
ing, but she did not answer, and the ex-
cited boy continued, "and, mother, think









Pauls Duty. 33

of the bounty! you shall have every cent,
you can put it in the bank where it will
be safe; you won't discourage me, say,
mother ?"
You are excited now, Paul; don't
think any more of it to-night;. in the
morning you will feel differently; I can't
send you off to die."
"No, mother, but you can send me off
o duty!"
"If it be duty, yes, I could try," and
she smoothed -the clothes with a sad ca-
ressing as she thought of what he said,
and felt that his ardor was bearing him,
for the first time in his life, away from her.
Paul answered, I am sure it is right,
1 know it; but where's Maggie ?" and
leaving his mother standing by the table









34 Paul and Margaret.

as busy as ever with her unending toil,
he went in search of his sister.
Mrs. Bailey's face was no more sad than
it had been in the morning sunshine, but
the thorn had pierced her heart. Separa-
tion from Paul! it was the last drop in
her cup of misery, but she saw and felt
that-it was inevitable. Yes, he must go,
perhaps to death, perhaps-her heart
beat faster than its wont-to honor and
years of happiness: Ah, she was content
to suffer' if it might be thus. Such
thoughts filled her mind, standing weari-
ly by the table, till the twilight came.
No one had noticed Margaret as she
stoodin the closet listening to the strange
words of her brother. Paul going to
war! to enlist for three years! was he









Paul's Duty. 35

mad ? Bravely suppressing a cry of hor-
ror, and overcoming the sudden dizziness
in her head, she stealthily slid from the
room out into the yard, breathing quick-
ly, and with a startled look about her
eyes. She stood a moment quietly hold-
ing by the fence, then stooping, she crept
through, and ran up the hill until she
panted with fatigue. With slower steps
she pressed on, her little brown hand
holding fast against her side to still the
painful throbbings, until she reached the
spot where, every pleasant sabbath, Paul
had read and talked to her. Throwing
herself upon the cold grass, she burst in-
to a torrent of passionate weeping. It
seemed as though her heart must break;
it was as if the only light in the great









36 Paul and Margaret.

world had suddenly been extinguished.
The darkness was fast approaching, but
Margaret had not raised her eyes to note
the fact; the dew settled damp upon her
clothing, but she only felt that Paul was
going to leave them.
Oh, the dreadful war! how she had
trembled as every new item of horror
reached her ears concerning it; but even
though startled and terrified, she had
never brought it near; it had been far
off always ; she had not realized it as a
thing touching her more nearly than to
listen as Paul told her what he gathered
at the store and in the streets; told of
the many battles, of the hundreds left
dead upon the field, of the wounded and
dying in the hospitals, until she saw their








Paul's Duty. 37

ghastly faces and bleeding forms in her
dreams, and never sought her bed until
she had pleaded with Christ to pity them.
She had never thought of the reality
coming home to her as this would make
it. No, no, it could not be! Paul stand-
ing before the cannon mouth of the en-
emy her Paul shot down and trampled
upon by the hurrying army, dying be-
neath the cold stars of a far off land, with
no Maggie to listen to his words she
could not bear it, no, she would not try.
The darkness came, and the evening
wind threw down autumn leaves upon
her, but she did not move only as a new
thought of agony would go quivering
through the small frame, and bring
another flood of tears from her closed
4









38 Paul and Margaret.

eyes. She forgot her mother, her work,
everything but Pau. enlisting; and he,
after piling wood a half hour, began to
wonder why Maggie had not brought her
basket to go with him to the woods for
fagots as was her custom at night. Sud-
denly remembering that she was by when
he told his mother of his new resolution,
and feeling that she was unhappy some-
"where, he sought her in the garret, over
in the lot, and ran to the edge of the
woods, calling "Maggie! Maggie !"
Not here, she must be on the hill, I'll
find her yet; poor little Maggie, I hope
she won't mind it much, but she will,
Sundays, if on no other day."
Thus talking in a low tone to himself
he climbed the hill; coming nearer, he









Paul's Duty. 39

saw her lying on the ground and heard
the sobbing moan of her troubled heart,
and with a bound he was by her, and
stooping, wound his arms about her and
pressed his lips upon her wet face.
Why, Maggie don't, don't feel so; I
wish I hadn't told you, poor little sister;
you're all wet with the dew, and cold as
a stone; come, let's go home; it isn't so
bad as you think, we'll talk about it, and
if you feel so I won't go, indeed I won't,
only don't sob so. There, now, you feel
better, I know, he said, as Maggie
wound her arms about his neck and
kissed him many times.
"You must go home; oh, how cold
you are, you wicked little thing; come,
let's run down hill and get warmed up,"









40 Paul and Margaret.

and taking firm hold of her hand they
started upon the run never stopping until
they reached the fence. The full moon
was just above the brow of the hill as
Paul turned to his sister, saying, Now
laugh, Maggie, before we go in."
Oh, Paul, how can I, with such dread-
ful feelings ?"
"You must not feel so; we'll go up
garret and talk it over; only think, Mag-
gie, that if I go it will be for the best, it
will be right, and we said long ago that
we would help each other do right; you
don't help me now."
"It don't seem right to me, Paul,"
sobbed Maggie.
The mother looked up as they entered
the house, but full of her own thoughts,








Paul's Duty. 41

heeded not the sorrow of the child, and
they. passed along up the stairs, and found
themselves alone together.
Paul took a blanket from the bed and
wrapping it about his sister they sat by
the window talking urntil they heard their
father come. The moon shed its soft light
upon them, seeming to calm the excite-
ment of the one and quiet the grief of
the other with her gentle influence. Mag-
gie's tears were not so bitter, the world
did not seem so very dark, and Paul's
hopes made her more hopeful, his cheer-
fulness and faith in the future he was en-
abled to impart in some degree to her, and
as the evening advanced she found that
she still had a heart to pray which,when
upon the hills, she had no desire to do.
4*
















CHAPTER Ill.

Enlisted.

N the morning Paul found his desire
to enlist as strong as ever; even the
remonstrance of his mother and the pale
face of Maggie did not dampen his en-
thusiasm. He had more than one incen-
tive to go-a strong wish to share in the
struggle for the right, a desire to be no
longer a burden to his mother, or, rather,
to be of more assistance to her, and a
feeling that this was the way in which he
could burst the chain that bound him to
a drunken father. In times past he had
42

$








Enlisted. 43

desired to make some attainment in
scholarship; the little he had acquired
had given him a thirst for knowledge
that would not be satisfied with any-
thing superficial, and diligently had he
improved every moment he could call his
own until now; but doing his best his
progress had been slow, and although the
praises of his teacher were a source of in-
spiration to him, impelling him at times
to sleep less than was well for him that
he might study more, yet as he looked
back upon the little he knew, and for-
ward to the boundless fields to be ex-
plored, his heart almost sank within him.
But now there seemed a future opening
before him, not so desirable, perhaps, as
the other, but more nearly within his









44 Paul and Margaret.

reach, easier of access, and bright enough
to feed an ambition that might, perhaps
before many years, be crowned with vic-
tory's wreath.
Paul was a dreamer; and who will
blame the boy, if in his moments of
thoughtfulness he almost expected, some
day, to command armies; if at times he
saw himself, a boy no longer, mounted
upon a spirited war horse, leading his fol.
lowers to victory and glory, and sharing
with them a soldier's fame. Many
another boy has dreamed this dream,
many a son and brother have had visions
of an earthly glory never to be realized,
have looked forward with eager gaze un-
til their young eyes, amid the din and
smoke of battle, suddenly closed forever,








Enlisted. 45

until the pulses of their brave hearts
ceased to beat, and they have laid them-
selves down to sleep amid the dying and
the dead, to wake we trust to a brighter
*life, crowned with fadeless flowers in the
presence of that host who have passed
from conflict to glory.
We cannot depict the silent anguish of
the mother's heart, or the first great sor-
row of Maggie, as they still pursued the
duties devolving' upon them. The days
and weeks went by. Paul had volun-
teered and been mustered into the United
States service for three years, and now,
clothed in his new uniform, he was
spending the last night at home. It
were useless to attempt to pcrtray the
feelings of the party; scarcely a home in









46 Paul and Margaret.

our land that has not experienced the
anguish of such parting.
The mother could control her sorrow,
for she had always done so, and she
scarcely raised her eyes to the boy as he
sat near her watching her fingers as she
"knit rapidly upon the socks that were to
be finished that night, for in the long
marches she knew he would need an
extra pair, and Maggie had cut out and
was now finishing the coarse flannel
bandage to be worn in those same
marches. How her heart ached as she
thought of them, and how she prayed
that even this trifle might shield him
from sudden cold and severe illness.
It was growing late but they had not
thought of seeking rest. The flannel was








Enlisted. 47

finished, folded and put into the knap-
sack, and the stockings were all ready for
the last one to be toed off, when a step
was .heard upon the gravel walk, and
Mrs. Bailey said, It is your father,
Paul, you had better go to bed, both of
you."
I'll stay and see him, mother, I sha'n't
have another chance, perhaps."
Mrs. Bailey looked a shade more
anxious, but it was too late to object, for
immediately the door opened and the
father made his appearance. He was not
more intoxicated than usual, but enough
so to be angry or foolish, whichever feel-
ing should chance to be uppermost; for-
tunately for the family, it proved to be
the latter.









48 Paul and Margaret.

"Ha! ha! ha! soldier! aint you 'fraid
you'll be shot by the rebels, hey ?"
No, father, my fears are iot for my-
self."
Who, then ?" don't have any for me, I
hope ? fool if you do. I'll do well enough
on the bounty. Tell you what, Paul, its
the handsomest thing you ever did, leav-
ing the bounty to us. I like to see a boy
honor his father, hang'd if I don't."
But father, I sat up on purpose to talk
with you to-night, and I want you to
promise me something, will you ?"
"Anything in reason, Paul. You're a
dutiful son, you respect your father, any-
body can see it, and you're no coward,
not a bit of it; so go ahead, don't be
afraid; what do you want to say to me ?"








Enlisted. 49

"You know I have cut all the wood for
a long time, and made the fires, and
"brought the water, and done all the hard
work for mother; now, when I'm away
she can't do it, nor Maggie; who will ?"
Why, I'll do it, of course. I'm ready
to do anything for you, Paul, anything in
reason; a boy that enlists to honor his
father ought to be encouraged. Yes, I'll
do all your work while you're gone."
"And another thing, father; Maggie
must go to school, and you mustn't expect
so much from mother with no help from
us, you know."
Why, boy, your mother may be a
lady for all me, and not lift her hand;
but Maggie can't go to school, she aint
fit, and we sha'n't use your money to buy
5









50 Paul and Margaret.

clothes, of course, only for absolute ne-
cessities, you know."
"Yes, father, Maggie must go to school,
she is all ready; I have bought her two
new dresses, and they are all made, and a
pair of shoes for winter, and the same for
mother."
"You don't say! I thought you
hadn't got your bounty !"
"I hadn't the last time I saw you, but
I got it soon after; now you promise to
let Maggie go, do you ?"
Yes-yes-anything : but where's
the bounty?"
"I've got it in the bank, father, and ar-
ranged so that you can have the best
possible use of it."
"That's right Paul, that's right; honor








Enlisted. 51

your father and-and-I used to know
the whole of that but it's slipped from
me; well, no matter, but where's the
book ?-I must take care of the bank
book; your mother don't know anything
about banking business."
"I know; I shouldn't think of troub-
ling her."
Of course not," replied the man,
trembling to get hold of what seemed a
small fortune to him.
But let me tell you my plans, father,
I'm sure you will call them good-"
"Yes, yes-a boy that honors his-"
"Well," interrupted Paul-the money's
in the bank, and Mr. Barnes, the grocer,
is to be paid one dollar a week for gro.
ceries which mother will select, for she









52 Paul and Margaret.

knows best what she needs in the house,
you know.
"Yes, that's good; we shall live like
princes now: I'll see that Barnes is paid
every week; but pull out the book, boy;
you'll go off and forget it, and I'm getting
confounded sleepy."
"I hav'n't got the book, father. My
teacher has it; he will see to all the.
money; I don't want you to be troubled
with it, and he will give you all you
need. I told him to."
A terrible curse burst from the lips of
the avaricious man, and for a moment
his rage was uncontrollable; but Paul
hastened to add, "I've got some cloth
already for you, father, a pair of pants,
first-rate, warm cloth."

















































PAUL'S FATHER WANTS THE BANK-iOOK.
Page 52.












Enlisted. 53

The father's anger was somewhat molli-
fied by the latter clause, yet chagrin and
disappointment were in his face as he
answered, "You fool! to trust all that
money in the hands of a stranger, when
your own father had nothing else to do
but to look out for it.
Mr. Hobert is not a stranger, father,
and he will do all that is just and right;
besides, he has promised to teach Maggie
for half price.
"Half price !-and cheat you out of
the other half!"
"No he won't, father; I hope you will
see that I have done wisely;" for Paul
wished to conciliate his father for his
mother's sake.
No such thing, you're a fool; now, off
to bed." 5*









54 Paul and Margaret.

"Perhaps I sha'n't see you in the
morning, father; this may be the last
time we shall meet."
Git out! I tell you, I'm asleep now."
"But won't you promise me before I go
away to be kind to mother and Mag-
gie?"
"Yes, when you give me that book to
take care of, not before."
"God forgive you, father, if you don't
treat them right; I'm a fraid I couldn't."
"Stop that blarney and go to bed.
Be off, Mag, what 're you staring for ?"
"Good bye, father," said Paul, his
voice trembling with grief and anger.
The father for a moment seemed
touched; he took Paul's proffered hand
saying, Good luck to you, Paul; you
needn't worry, I aint quite a brute."








Enlisted. 55

"Thank you, father, for this little com-
fort," and the son turned away and
followed Maggie up stairs.
Did they sleep? No, there was no
closing of the eyes that night. Sitting
"by the low window, hand clasped in
hand, they communed with each other
until the first glimmering ray of light
tinged the eastern sky. Paul, with his
manly heart grown stronger in view of
this separation, and Maggie, more a wom-
an than ever, choking down the rising
sobs and praying silently for faith and
strength.
A step was heard upon the stairs and
the mother entered. Are you both up ?"
she asked, and glancing towards Maggie's
little cot in the corner she saw that it









56 Paul and Margaret.

had been undisturbed, and immediately
divined they had neither of them slept,
but with her usual taciturnity she did
not speak her thoughts.
"Is father awake? asked Paul.
"No." The mother paused, looking
upon her son with the mother's heart
shining from her eyes. At last she ven-
tured to say with a low, trembling voice
and yet with tones of earnest feeling,
"Paul, you are very dear to me, never
forget it."
"I know it, mother, I always felt it,"
answered Paul, while Maggie looked
with wonder upon the haggard face
bending over them, just discernible in
the twilight.
"I have not done my duty tb either of








Enlisted. 57

you, but I love you both; never doubt
it, Paul. Maggie, do you not believe it ?"
"We know it, mother; you have always
been kind," said Paul, taking hold of the
hard hand.
"Not kind, children, and yet not harsh,
but cold and distant when perhaps I
should have been loving. God forgive
me, but I feared to be kind and tender;
and Paul, before you go, tell me that you
understand me and trust me."
"I do, mother; I know just how you
have felt, and lately I understand you
as I did not once; but we love you,
mother; don't we, Maggie ?"
Maggie could not answer; she was sob-
bing with her head upon the window-sill
and her hand still within that of Paul.









58 Paul and Margaret.

More than ever did the mother feel her
error. At a glance she saw how the
child's heart had pined for affection, and
drawing her within her arms she pressed
the young head to her bosom, and with a
tearful voice, said, "Paul, I came up to
ask you to pray once before you go; I
have heard you when you thought you
were alone many times, but now we will
pray together."
The boy lifted up his voice, and as he
prayed new hope filled all their hearts, new
strength for the coming trials, new faith
in the power that was guiding them
through the dangers and difficulties of
life.
Paul ended, and the mother folded
them both in the first strong, loving em-









Ehlisted. 59

"brace they had known for years, and
without a word went below. Presently
Maggie followed, for the dear brother
must- have warm coffee before he left
them.
The early breakfast hour passed. The
father slept on unconcious of the agony
of that parting scene, or of the utter des-
olation of the two who watched Paul as
he walked hastily down the dewy path
and through the gate into the road. The
morning sun threw its first bright ray
over the hill, and lighted his broad white
forehead as he turned to take the last
look, and swing his cap for the last good-
bye, before the curve in the road shut
him from their sight.
No harsh words from her husband









6o Paul and Margaret.

could dispel the sense of comfort left in
Mrs. Bailey's heart by the prayer of Paul.
Those words of hope and love still linger-
ed about her; she could not forget them;
they threw a brightness over the lonely
house, which she had not noticed even
when Paul was in it. Oh, the power of
prayer! how it enhances every joy, and
lightens every burden; how it throws a
flood of sunshine over the darkest path,
and smooths the roughest way.
"Oh, for a voice of sweeter sound,
For every wind to bear,
To teach the list'ning world around
The blessedness of prayer."
















CHAPTER IV.
Margaret at School. -
T HE winter passed slowly and te-
diously to the two at home; frequent
letters from Paul were the only joys that
came to them. Maggie donned each day
the new calico, and, with book in hand,
trudged through the snow to school.
She learned rapidly, and, as the months
went by, her excessive timidity wore
away; still she had trials, both at home
and at school, that caused her to live
within herself as much as ever. She had
early learned to bear abuse without a
6 61








62 Paul and Margaret.

murmur; patient and uncomplaining she
endured the taunts of her schoolmates as
they carelessly, and, it is to be hoped,
thoughtlessly, called her drunken
Bailey's daughter." Even the little brown
hood she wore, though neat and clean,
was held up to ridicule, and Maggie, in
spite of her desire to learn, would gladly
have stayed away from school, were it
not that she knew it was Paul's wish that
she should go.
I would not convey the idea that all
her schoolmates were unkind and cruel,
but there were those who, by their over-
bearing manner, gay disposition, and the
freedom with which they scattered sweet-
meats among their friends, seemed to rule
the larger part of the school. A few









Margaret at School. 63

"brave ones were independent of their
sneers, and openly took the part of
Maggie when she suffered most from un-
kind persecutions; still there was the
shrinking from her side when she uncon-
sciously stood by them, the scornful glance
towards her large shoes and dark stock-
ings, and the smile that went round when
her sensitive heart sent the blood to her
temples. Maggie did not desire kindness
from them, she only asked that they would
let her alone; indeed she felt that entire
neglect would be kindness compared with
the unwelcome notice she received from
them now.
It was after a night of unusually brutal
treatment from her father, when Maggie
and her mother had spent a large part of








64 Paul and Margaret.

the night in the woods until the storm
was past, and he had sunk into the
lethargic sleep that characterizes the ineb-
riate, before they could seek their beds
to rest, that Maggie was slowly ploughing
her way through the field of snow that
lay between her home and the school-
house. As she drew near the wall that sep-
arated her from the yard, she heard the
sound of voices, and then the loud laugh
of several of her schoolmates. Not think-
ing that she was the object of their merri-
ment, she hastened on, and, climbing the
wall, drew near the group just within the
school-house door. She did not see them,
but the next sentence arrested her steps,
and she stood, not daring to go in, and
with not strength to find her way back








Margaret at School. 65

through the drifts. Pale and sad, with
her hand pressed against her side, as her
custom was when agitated, she heard
every cruel word and felt each tone pierce
her heart. It seemed as though an hour's
agony was concentrated into the few min-
utes she stood there.
"If it wasn't the most amusing sight
I've seen this many a day ; mother and I
just stood and laughed. You should have
seen the tears run down mother's cheeks
with laughter, and Henry fairly shouted.
I never saw old Bailey cut such a figure
before; he'd try to get up, and get half
way, and down he'd go again; and then
he'd sprawl out his arms and legs like a
great frog, Henry said, and when his jug
rolled into the gutter-you ought to have
6*








66 Paul and Margaret.

seen; it was enough to kill me with
laughter; then he'd scream, 'Mag Mag !
why don't you come here, you brat "
A shout of laughter followed, and
another voice said, "We shan't see her
ladyship to school to-day, I dare say; he
went home and had a general smash-up;
father says such men do, sometimes."
"Not much to smash in that hut, I
should say," answered another.
The strength was leaving the little form
that stood in the snow without, her tremb-
ling limbs could scarcely support her, and
tottering nearer, she leaned her head
against the building.
At that moment she felt a hand upon
her shoulder, and starting up, her tearful
eyes looked into the sad ones of Mr. Hobert.









Margaret at School. 67

They were sad, indeed, in their gaze as
they rested upon her, but there was a
sternness in the lines of the mouth she
had never seen before. Tenderly he
stooped and, putting his arm about her,
drew her near to him, and left a silent kiss
on her pale face. It was all the sympathy
he could offer then, and it was enough;
her thin lips quivered and she clung to the
hand that held her with so firm and kind
a grasp as though she could never let him
go.
One more bitter remark fell upon her
ear, as she walked by her kind teacher to
the door, it was this, "I don't think Mr.
Hobert has any right to bring a low
pauper into the school. I'll make her
repent coming, for one; you may de-
pend on that."








68 Paul and Margaret.

"Young ladies, take your seats."
With sudden terror they shrunk from
before the stern gaze of their teacher, and
looked with dismay into each others' faces,
as they saw him lead by the hand the lit-
tle pauper to a seat nearest his desk. The
despised hood and cloak he himself hung
upon the hook, and then, for a moment,
rested his large hand upon her head as it
sunk upon the form before her.
Maggie felt that sympathy and love
were expressed in that simple act, but she
dared not even whisper her thanks, nor
was it needed. The good teacher felt that
her spirit was crushed, and that it would
take more than one kind deed to cause
Maggie to forget the cruel words she had
heard.









Margaret at School. 69

With a low impressive tone he read a
few of Christ's words. Not one there but
heard every sound, and felt the full force
of the teacher's meaning. It was a part
of the eighteenth chapter of Matthew.
He read five verses without looking up,
and then raising his eyes and fixing them
upon those who had stood in the entry, he
said, in a slow tone, "But whoso shall
offend one of these little ones which
believe in me, it were better for him that
a millstone were hanged about his neck,
and that he were drowned in the depth
of the sea;" then turning to his book he
resumed the reading. Presently he lifted
his sad eyes to their faces again, and said,
more slowly even than before, "Take
heed that ye despise not one of these little









70 Paul and Margaret.

ones, for I say unto you, that in heaven
their angels do always behold the face of
my father which is in heaven," and closing
the book he prayed so tenderly and so
earnestly that nearly all were melted to
tears. He brought before them in his
prayer the peculiar trials of the little girl
in such a way that they were ready to
look upon her martyr spirit with rever-
ence, and their own cruelty with abhor.
rence. Was she not one of Christ's little
ones ? had they not pierced anew the
heart of the Saviour who loved her, by
their scorn and contempt ? Their sin was
held before them in its worst form, and
they felt themselves degraded in their
own eyes as well as in the eyes of their
teacher. All but one; she who had stood









Margaret at School. 71

"by her mother's side and laughed at the
misfortune of a fallen human being, and
instead of being rebuked, had been en-
couraged to continue in doing so. She
could not see that she had committed sin
in torturing the sensitive spirit of Maggie.
She was mortified that Mr. Hobert had
been a witness of the scene, but Maggie
she hated more now than ever, and in her
heart was determined to show her what
she considered her true position, and com-
pel her to keep it.
However, as the days and weeks passed
this girl felt that Mr. Hobert understood
her; his searching eye detected every
glance of contempt, and his watchful
tenderness shielded Maggie from many a
premeditated insult that she, with her








72 Paul and Margaret.

trusting nature, would not dream was
coming until she felt the pain and morti-
fication of it.
Maggie had not Paul's determined spirit
to rise above the world's contempt; she
did not feel like him that she could live
down the disgrace a drunken father was
heaping upon her; like her mother she
wished only to do her duty in the hum-
ble corner of the world where her Heav-
enly Father had placed her, ready to bear
trials in the spirit of meekness, but still
shrinking from them, and wishing that
she might be freed from them ; looking for-
ward to nothing higher and better; never
for a moment dreaming that joy or wealth
or honor could be hers; looking for the love
of none, but that of her Heavenly Father









Margaret at School. 73

and Paul, and lately trusting in her mother
more than ever before; hoping for no
better home in this world than the little
brown cottage, and with no useless de-
sires about dress or knowledge or station.
So effectual had been the mother's disci-
pline, that her child was but a type of
herself.
Would she never wake to higher as-
pirations? would the modest heart never
desire more than it did now ? Education
sometimes inspires ambition, and as we
go on we will see what the enthusiasm of
Paul and the wise guidance of Mr. Hobert
did for her.
A year passed away and the two who
loved him began to feel more calmly re-
signed to Paul's absence. He had been
7









74 Paul and Margaret.

in several engagements, but a Heavenly
Father's watchful care, had turned aside
the fatal ball, and shielded him from the
countless dangers of the battle-field. He
had, like a host of other brave hearts,
been faithful in duty, showing the same
courage and enthusiasm in action that so
many of our brave noble privates mani-
fested, emulating each other, and bearing
with fortitude and cheerfulness all the
discomforts of camp-life, and the weari-
ness of long forced marches. Faint and
footsore though Paul might be,. yet never
a day saw him discouraged. More than
ever he felt that God was for the right,
and no surrounding influences could de-
press his buoyant spirits. Meantime the
letters Maggie received from him were









Margaret at School. 75

moulding her character more than she
was aware. They were showing to her,
that lowly as Paul's childhood had been,
God had given him, with countless others,
a work to do, a great and glorious work.
Paul, though poor, and unknown by
the exalted of this world, God had lifted
from obscurity and poverty and placed
where he could not be bound by such fet-
ters as had been a perpetual drag upon
his youth. Might not the same be done
for her? only He knew who controlled
the destinies of all. She would patiently
wait and see, and as she waited, improving
every golden opportunity, she wrote Paul
something of what was in her heart, and
he in the camp, on the march, or commun-
ing silently with himself as he paced









76 Paul and Margaret.

back and forth on picket duty, saw Mag-
gie's character and intellect expanding
slowly but beautifully each week. He
felt sure that she too would one day
burst the cruel chain that now disgraced
them all.
3*


















CHAPTER V.

Paul Wounded.

"And surely in a world like this,
So rife with woe, so scant of bliss-
Where fondest hopes are oftenest crossed,
And fondest hopes are severed most,

"'Tis something that we kneel and pray
With loved ones near and far away;
One God, one faith, one hope, one care,
One form of words, one hour of prayer."


T was the spring of '64, during that
week of fearful warfare, when the
heart-throbs of the North seemed at times
almost to cease, -so intense were the feel-
ings with which men daily waited for the
7* 77









78 Paul and Margaret.

latest news; when each day brought
back tidings of thousands killed and
wounded; when those at home knew
that roads, fields and woods were literal-
ly swarming with those suffering heroes
who had defied danger and pain for their
country's sake, and were now suddenly
smitten to the dust.
Is my husband there? thought the
lonely wife, but dared not breathe the
thought aloud. Is son or brother or
friend there ? asked many an anxious one
at home; and waited fearfully, painfully,
for the list of names that has brought
sorrow to almost every home in the land.
The war had been waged terribly and
fierce; hand-to-hand had been the con-
flict until darkness came down upon the









Paul Wounded. 79

scene, and Paul found himself alone amid
the dead. Weak from loss of blood he
lay with his head upon the outstretched
arm of one who slept his last earthly sleep.
How long he had lain there was unknown;
there was no sound of life about him;
the clouds of smoke had partly rolled
away so that the stars faintly glimmered
through, and Paul could look up and feel
that God was over all. Strange as it
may seem, he felt no fear, had no feeling
of abhorrence, when he saw dimly the
heaps of slain about him, but more calm-
ly than ever in his life before he thought
of home. A peaceful, quiet sense of rest
in God possessed him, and looking up to
the twinkling stars above he said his
childhood's prayer, and slept again.









80 Paul and Margaret.

The morning light showed him where he
was, in a field full of dead; no living be-
ing there, no sound of life anywhere, and
crawling off from those who had been his
companions in life, he drew himself slow-
ly under the shade of a clump of trees,
and waited for the coming of friends. He
knew that noble army of slain would not
be neglected whatever the exigency of
the case might be; the wounded would
be cared for, the dead hastily but rever-
ently buried. Mid-day came; a little
water left in his canteen helped to as-
suage the burning thirst of fever, and, as
he waited, the violets growing in abund-
ance proved his friends. They told him
of the hill behind the little brown cot-
tage, they reminded him of Sundays









Paul Wounded. 81

spent there, of Maggie who had gathered
them with him, and their gentle fragrance
soothed him as he reached about and
picked cluster after cluster. With hands
full of the beautiful flowers, he sang low
and sweet the songs of home, hummed
the tunes he had loved when at his work
there, smiled down upon the sweet vio-
lets, and waited patiently still, and trust-
ing all the time. Soon after they came,
and Paul with a happy smile of a child,
looked up and welcomed them. It was a
scene to bring tears to any eyes-that boy
amid the dead, so calm and happy, gath-
ering the sweet blossoms of spring, and
finding a new joy in their fragrance and
beauty. Brave Paul! tenderly as women
might, those rough men placed the boy








8 2 Paul and Margaret.

upon a litter, and bore him away to a
place of greater safety and comfort. Soon
he wrote with his own hand:-


"DEAR MOTHER AND MAGGIE:-
I'm a trifle wounded; not much; no.
thing to cause you a moment's anxiety;
the doctor says I shall be about in a few
weeks. I saved! only think, mother,
and so many noble ones dead. It was a
fearful strife; I never dreamed men could
fight so; I never thought I should have
such feelings as I had in battle; but it
was over when night came, and I lay on
the field and looked up to the stars and
grew calm and happy again. I send you
some violets I picked there and pressed
in my bible; they made me think of









Paul Wounded. 83

home. You will write often now I am
laid up, won't you, little Maggie? I'd like
to get a letter every day, but that would
be too often. They take good care of us;
I have all I need, so you must be happy.
Good bye. PAUL."


They had waited over a week after the
battle for a letter, and now as it came in
Paul's own hand-writing Maggie grew
pale with joy as she took it from the
postmaster and hastily turned to go home.
"Guess you'll find your brother all
right, Miss."
"Yes, Sir," answered Maggie with a
smile, and pressing suddenly her hand
against her side she turned away and
soon was home.









84 Paul and Margaret.

"It's come; mother, he's alive."
God be praised," replied Mrs. Bailey,
as, taking her hands from the tub, and
wiping suds from them, she sat down to
hear Maggie read it.
"The voice of the child trembled, and
the tears started to the mother's eyes at
the first words. Maggie could scarcely
control herself to finish reading the short
but precious letter. Those violets! how
they were treasured; how carefully they
were placed in her bible and looked at
again and again.
"You must write every day, Margaret,"
said the mother, with a voice that trem-
bled with intense feeling.
Yes, indeed, mother."
We must thank God for sparing him
to us."









Paul Wounded. 85

"I do, every moment. Oh, mother, if
we could go to him !"
"We couldn't get to him; they would-
n't let us pass, they are very strict in
their regulations, I hear."
"If he should be sent to Washington,
Mother ?"
You are wild Margaret to think of it,
it would cost more than we could afford
to go there; and then the board-no, it
would be impossible."
And yet the mother had thought of it
before Maggie spoke, but saw at a glance
it would be entirely impracticable. But
the thought haunted Maggie, waking and
sleeping. She dreamed of Paul in the
hospital, and herself standing by his cot
S ministering to him. How happy they
8









86 Paul and Margaret.

"both were; how like reality it seemed;
and when the morning came she had
planned it all out. Surely she could get
to him, and if they knew that she was
Paul's sister, they would let her stay, and
take care of him. She had made up her
mind to go, but first she would ask Mr.
Hobert about it: he would know more
than either she or her mother. When
she went below that morning Maggie's
face had taken on a new expression. 'The
mother noticed the change and wondered
why Margaret looked so much like Paul.
Was it her imagination ? No, some of
Paul's enthusiasm inspired her; she was
beginning to think for herself, to trust in
her own powers; she was growing self-
reliant, was making plans, and looking









Paul Wounded. 87

about to see how she might carry them
out.
"Have you written to Paul, Margaret ?
asked the mother.
"Just a few lines to last till I get
there," replied Maggie, and then started,
looking strongly in her mother's face, for
she had not meant that her plans should
be known ; she had spoken without think-
ing.
"Till you get there! what are you
thinking of?" and Mrs. Bailey spoke
muck quicker then her habit was.
"I didn't mean to say that, but I am
thinking of it, mother; for Paul's sake,
you know; I'd never leave you only for
him, and I've been thinking if fever
should set in, and we not see him, never








88 Paul and Margaret.

again-you know mother, we couldn't
"bear it; I thought I'd ask Mr. Hobert."
But where would you go to find him
where so many are sick? no, no, child,
you are wild."
"I wrote in my letter to know if he
was coming to Washington; the papers
say that thousands of the wounded are
"brought there; he may be among them;
the next letter will tell. I'll ask Mr.
Hobert about it," she persisted, in calm,
even tones.
Mrs. Bailey looked with amazement
upon the child, changed in one night to a
woman, with a woman's feelings, energy
and determination; still she shook her
head doubtfully, and thought to herself
"How much she is like Paul; I never








Paul Wounded. 89

saw it before; I shouldn't wonder if I
consented to let her go;" then, speaking
aloud, she said, "Margaret, tell me what
Mr. Hobert says as soon as you can; per-
haps you had better not stay at noon to-day.
No, mother, I'll come right home if
he thinks I can go."
"You had better go early and see him
before school; but then it's impossible;
I couldn't let you go so far, whatever he
might say."
But Maggie had faith in larger measure
than her mother. Quickly she flew
about the room, putting things to rights,
and finishing hastily her morning work;
Ssoon with her letter in hand she started
for the post office, and with rapid step
thence to the school house.
8*









90 Paul and Margaret.

It was very quiet there. Maggie was
glad that none of the girls had yet come,
but she was sure to find Mr. Hobert, for
this was the morning he arranged the
copies for writing books.
She opened the door carefully, and sure
enough there he was, bending over the
desk. At the sound of the door closing,
he looked up and smiled in his kind
fatherly way upon her, saying, What
brought you out so early, my child ?"
"Can you spare a moment to me, Mr.
Hobert ?"
"Yes, ten, if you like. What is it that
makes you look so wise this morning ?"
Maggie told him of Paul's letter, that
he was wounded, and how she was think-
ing of going on to see him, if he approved.









Paul Wounded. 91

Mr. Hobert did not interrupt her only
to ask a question now and then. He did
not appear surprised in the least, although
he was in reality looking upon the child
with wonder, standing before him so
much like a woman in attitude, voice and
language-and scarcely fourteen. His
respect for her character increased with
every word he heard her utter, and while
she presented the case to him, he was re-
volving its possibility in his own mind,
almost wishing he could himself go with
her. She paused, still looking him stead-
ily in the face.
But Paul may not be in Washing-
ton."
"I think he is, Mr. Hobert, by this
time; the next letter will tell."









92 Paul and Margaret.

"And if he should be there, you want
to use some of his money to go on
with ?"
"Yes, sir, he would be glad to have
me; he would get well sooner if I was
there; perhaps I could work part of the
time and earn something if he was not
needing me."
"Very likely. I'll think it over, and
will wait for Paul's next letter before I
decide."
"Can I go home now, sir ?"
"For the day ?" inquired the teacher.
"Yes, sir, I want to be ready if I go."
"But you may not go, my child; how-
ever do as you please about it." Mr.
Hobert suddenly turned to his copies
again, and found that his eyes were blurr-









Paul Wounded. 93

ed; he could not see. What was the
matter with him ? was it a strange sight
to see a sister with love strong enough to
overcome all obstacles and brave un-
known dangers for the sake of the dear
one? At any rate it affected him
strangely.





Full Text
14 Paul and Margaret.
The child had few secrets, but never
one from Paul. She had countless
thoughts and she told them all to him,
and in turn took his. Sunday was a
rare day to both of them although they
never spent it in church. The mother
never went, therefore they did not, but
she had taught them to pray when they
were very young had told them they
must never forget it, and they never did;
it was a pleasant change after the same-
ness and weariness of the day, if noth-
ing more; but of late prayer had .had
for Paul more significance than ever be-
fore, for he was looking toward the
future, and he felt stronger faith and
higher hopes when praying. Margaret
did not dream of the future as her



PAGE 1

The Meeting. 123 "Yes'm, the same as this I have on. "Well, that is just right to work in, and you may let me send this down to be done over; the journey has rumpled it; you will have time to take a nice bath before dinner, and dress for the afternoon; then we will see Paul; I think I know him; you resemble him somewhat, don't you ?" Oh, yes; do you know him? Is he very sick? oh, tell me.' No dear, not very; but you must not let him see you cry so, it might bring back the fever. I'm sorry r spoke of him," she said, as Maggie dropped her head on the pillow and sobbed aloud; but soon she looked up, saying, "I'm glad you know him; I sha'n't cry



PAGE 1

r 7) ".a "OK. S TAT M The Baldwin Library Univ "m i -" V *Of |,eBa ROM *;** -*}< ". '* I:" '1? '-., .' '.'*/W Unv ra t : .:. ., ;, v ^ ^ ***i; %_H -"' ;**. .."^ ..".i


170 Paul and Margaret.
Startled, she drew near, and in hurried
words they told her that he had been
kicked by a horse at the tavern; they
had just got him home, and the doctor
was on his way; would be there soon;
nothing could be done until he came;
and one by one they left, except a few of
the nearest neighbors. They did not tell
her that being in a state of intoxication he
had staggered from place to place, until
he found himself in the stable; that
having been warned off by the groom he
had recklessly and in anger made his way
into the stall of a most vicious horse,
and there met the blows that would short-
ly cause his death.
Mrs. Bailey looked, with a troubled
conscience, upon the wreck of him she


CHAP ER X.
The Inebriate's Diath.
t RS. BAILEY parted with the ladies
who had so enthusiastically com-
mended her children,with mingled feelings
of love for the two dearest to her, and
desire for herself that she were free as
they frpm her cruel bondage. In what
particular way she had not thought, but
never had life seemed so much of a bur-
den: never before had her whole nature
shrunk so from returning to her home as
now, and to the companionship of one in
whom she took no pleasure, and to whom
168


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I. 1 ^ ^.



PAGE 1

Aspirations. 17 She had once told Paul that she "wished Margaret could go to school long enough to read and write. She said it with a sigh, as though it were simply an impossibility; and he, knowing something of his mother's heart, pitied her, and told her that his sister could already do that, for he had taught her. The mother was satisfied and silent afterward. But what is it, you will ask, that has sifted their years of all the brightness that others revel in ? Why are they not happy if they are good, if they work and pray? Ah, there is a cloud above them all the time, black and tempestuous. It is not poverty, stern 2*



PAGE 1

New Associations. 145 don't feel like the same Maggie I was at home, and to think I am going to stay with her for so long." Have you written of it to mother ?" "Oh, yes, long letters to both mother and Mr. Hobert. I promised to tell all about you and the other soldiers, and what they need; he said he would have the society work for them. "So, you've written him ; then we shall hear soon." In a day or two; and, Paul, we areI mean Mrs. Maybrook is, going to try and have you at her house as soon as you are able." "That's too much, Maggie; I don't think I can consent, and while she is doing so much for you too." 13



PAGE 1

Margaret at School. 63 "brave ones were independent of their sneers, and openly took the part of Maggie when she suffered most from unkind persecutions; still there was the shrinking from her side when she unconsciously stood by them, the scornful glance towards her large shoes and dark stockings, and the smile that went round when her sensitive heart sent the blood to her temples. Maggie did not desire kindness from them, she only asked that they would let her alone; indeed she felt that entire neglect would be kindness compared with the unwelcome notice she received from them now. It was after a night of unusually brutal treatment from her father, when Maggie and her mother had spent a large part of



PAGE 1

18 Paul and Margaret. reality though it be, it is not that they are without the pale of civilized society, or that of friends they have none; it is not that their. days are made up of drudgery and want; none of these. The mother with her inherent self-reliance and strength of character could bear all these, if but he who had years before vowed to cherish and protect were true. Paul would have been satisfied, .and Margaret would have had a youth of childlike joy, had the father not been what he was-a miserable sot, drunken, brutish and vile, steeped in rum from morn till night, satisfying his morbid cravings with the pittance taken from his hopeless wife and children; compelling them to labor while he sat daily in the


6 M. W Dodd's Catalogue.
By the Author of "The Schonberg-Cotta Family."
THE DRAYTONS AND THE DAVENANTS. A
Story of the Civil Wars. By the author of the Schan-
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Cabinet edition, i6mo, tinted paper .. ... I 75
Sunday-school edition, i8mo, illustrated I oo
This work, the opening scene of which is in New England, is asso-
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S _7ournal



PAGE 1

Ehlisted. 59 "brace they had known for years, and without a word went below. Presently Maggie followed, for the dear brother musthave warm coffee before he left them. The early breakfast hour passed. The father slept on unconcious of the agony of that parting scene, or of the utter desolation of the two who watched Paul as he walked hastily down the dewy path and through the gate into the road. The morning sun threw its first bright ray over the hill, and lighted his broad white forehead as he turned to take the last look, and swing his cap for the last goodbye, before the curve in the road shut him from their sight. No harsh words from her husband


Paul Wounded. 87
about to see how she might carry them
out.
"Have you written to Paul, Margaret ?
asked the mother.
"Just a few lines to last till I get
there," replied Maggie, and then started,
looking strongly in her mother's face, for
she had not meant that her plans should
be known ; she had spoken without think-
ing.
"Till you get there! what are you
thinking of?" and Mrs. Bailey spoke
muck quicker then her habit was.
"I didn't mean to say that, but I am
thinking of it, mother; for Paul's sake,
you know; I'd never leave you only for
him, and I've been thinking if fever
should set in, and we not see him, never


8. Paul and Margaret.
so her face has learned severity and hard-
ness, her eye to look calm and impassion-
ed always; they would not know her if
she smiled upon them. Then, too, they
must work. Perhaps life was made for
that, her life at least; for nothing else
theirs, also, it might be; therefore the
three worked together all day and every
day.
Paul, he was the oldest. The name
had a pleasant sound to her ears even
now, although she gave it to him fifteen
years ago, before this blight came upon
her. He worked with a heart tender
for his mother, but his soul was not in it;
he had not learned as she had to stifle his
aspirations, to crush every bright young
hope; he knew there was something


The Letter. 1S9
Maybrook, took him home with us last
week; he is happier there, but I spend
every afternoon in the ward as I did be-
fore. Then, the men like to have us read
to them a little every day, and we some-
times sing, when not too busy. Of the
three boys concerning whom you asked,
George Maltby is perhaps the weakest;
the doctor gives him cordial every day,
and he is getting along slowly. The
other two are much better, and will be
able to leave soon; they are sometimes
home-sick and I tell them all I can of T-
to cheer them. I think letters from home
do them more good than medicine.
James Fitch told me this morning that
he had found the Saviour upon his sick-
bed; I was glad, but could say nothing to


Paul's Duty. 35
mad ? Bravely suppressing a cry of hor-
ror, and overcoming the sudden dizziness
in her head, she stealthily slid from the
room out into the yard, breathing quick-
ly, and with a startled look about her
eyes. She stood a moment quietly hold-
ing by the fence, then stooping, she crept
through, and ran up the hill until she
panted with fatigue. With slower steps
she pressed on, her little brown hand
holding fast against her side to still the
painful throbbings, until she reached the
spot where, every pleasant sabbath, Paul
had read and talked to her. Throwing
herself upon the cold grass, she burst in-
to a torrent of passionate weeping. It
seemed as though her heart must break;
it was as if the only light in the great


158 Paul and Margaret.
that are slow in healing. Yesterday a
boy died who was wounded in the breast;
I was giving him some cordial just before,
and he smiled and called me "Sister An-
nie;" it was the saddest thing I had seen
and the first death. Sometimes in the
morning I miss a face, and they tell me
he died in the night; but I do not see it
then. We take flowers to the hospital
every day. I saw a soldier cry over a
white rose the other day; he said he had
once planted one over his mother's grave,
and the last thing he did before leaving
home was to pick a white bud and put it
in his Testament. He took it out to
show me, and now we always take him a
white rose; he is nearly able to sit up.
Paul is not here now; our friend, Mrs.


The Letter. 163
that child drops into our weary home-
sick hearts are enough to revive the weak-
est. I call her a child because she is
small, but she is a woman in every sense;
the boys almost reverence her, she goes
round so quickly, bathing our heads so
gently, and her voice is so low and sweet;
she knows just what to say to cheer us;
and, mother, she prays so earnestly and
tenderly when we ask her to, and asks for
what we need in such a way that it al-
ways comes; it was while she prayed by
me yesterday that pardon through Christ
seemed to flash into my heart, and filled
it so with a glorious light that I could
hardly contain myself. She is from our
village; come to nurse her brother Paul,
one of the best fellows here, and seeing



PAGE 1

The Meeting. 29 lead me back to my regiment. Am I right sister ?" "Yes, Paul, it is right: and I-" You will go back to mother." Maggie paused, the blood mounted to her forehead, but she said, "No, Paul, mother don't need me, I will stay here, too." You! what for ?" To nurse the sick." But you can't." "I can help; I can do something; I shall stay." Paul looked in her face a moment and answered, So you will. Well then, we both have come out of the bondage of home, -but mother ?" "I know it, Paul, but we need not all



PAGE 1

Aspirations. 15 brother did; she did not feel her need of faith and hope yet; she prayed because she loved to, and knew not what else to do to show her love for the One who made the earth so beautiful and the Sab.bath to come so regularly; perhaps by and by she will need more hope and faith and patience, then she will pray differently. She had never been to school as the children in the village had, and she sometimes wondered what it was like, but when Paul asked her if she wanted to go she answered, "No." Why not For the same reason her mother did not go to church-she had no clothes decent to wear and no way of getting


46 Paul and Margaret.
our land that has not experienced the
anguish of such parting.
The mother could control her sorrow,
for she had always done so, and she
scarcely raised her eyes to the boy as he
sat near her watching her fingers as she
"knit rapidly upon the socks that were to
be finished that night, for in the long
marches she knew he would need an
extra pair, and Maggie had cut out and
was now finishing the coarse flannel
bandage to be worn in those same
marches. How her heart ached as she
thought of them, and how she prayed
that even this trifle might shield him
from sudden cold and severe illness.
It was growing late but they had not
thought of seeking rest. The flannel was



PAGE 1

Any Books on this Catalogue will be sent free of postage on receipt of price. BOOKS PUBLISHED BY M. W. DODD, No. 505 Broadway, opposite St. Nicholas Hotel, NEW YORK. BUNYAN.-GRACE ABOUNDING TO THE CHIEF OF SINNERS. In a faithful Account of the Life and Death of JOHN BUNYAN. I8mo. Many are not aware that this is a Biography of Bunyan written by himself, referring particularly to h's remarkable conversion and religious experience. It is written in a quaint and curious style, which would of itself lend interest to the narrative. It will be eagerly sought after by all who admire the spirit and genius of this remarkable mar." COTTA.-THE SCHONBERG-COTTA BOOKS IN SETS, comprising THE SCHONBERG-COTTA FAMILY. THE EARLY DAWN. DIARY OF KITTY TREVYLYAN. WINIFRED BERTRAM. THE DRAYTONS & DAVENANTS. ON BOTH SIDES OF THE SEA. I2mo edition, beautifully bound, 6 vols., uniform .$9 75 Cabinet edition, 16mo, tinted paper, extra cloth, 6 vols., uniform .............9 75 An elegant edition, suitable for presentation. Sunday-school edition, I8mo, illustrated, plain cloth, the first 5 volumes uniform .... .....o



PAGE 1

174 Paul and Margaret. dreams, bringing purer thoughts than his waking hours had known for many years ? It seemed so, and suggested to her mind the fragments of a beautiful ship, long buried, but cast up to the surface by the storm. Oh, that he might live to repent of this wasted life, these misspent years, these God-given faculties shattered, this soul destroyed! How earnestly she prayed that a week might be granted him, a single day, or even an hour of consciousness. Would he repent if he had the time? God only could know, and with folded hands and drooping head she murmured, "Thy will, 0 God, be done; may Thy glory be my chief desire." Occasionally there dropped from his lips other words and sentences that told her


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44 Paul and Margaret.
reach, easier of access, and bright enough
to feed an ambition that might, perhaps
before many years, be crowned with vic-
tory's wreath.
Paul was a dreamer; and who will
blame the boy, if in his moments of
thoughtfulness he almost expected, some
day, to command armies; if at times he
saw himself, a boy no longer, mounted
upon a spirited war horse, leading his fol.
lowers to victory and glory, and sharing
with them a soldier's fame. Many
another boy has dreamed this dream,
many a son and brother have had visions
of an earthly glory never to be realized,
have looked forward with eager gaze un-
til their young eyes, amid the din and
smoke of battle, suddenly closed forever,


PAUL AND MARGARET
THE
qh1riafi ( hildrtn.
BY H. K. P.
A.1HOR OF "LOBERT THE CABIN BOY," "THE KEMPTON8,"
ETC., ETC.
NEW YORK:
M. W. DODD, No. 506 BROADWAY.
1869.



PAGE 1

20 Paul and Margaret. even with these, all unknowing and uncaring that it needed to be arrayed in other garments. From morn till dark he left his family alone, that is why they could be calm and patient; but at night he terrified them, and that is why they were joyless. Grief has its mission, and blessed are they that endure even unto the end-endure as seeing Him who is invisible, losing sight of themselves meanwhile. One would have said while looking upon the outward life of Mrs. Bailey that she was the. very embodiment of patience; none but her Heavenly Father .knew the struggles of her spirit, the bitterness of her thoughts, the complaints she would not allow herself


Paul Wounded. 91
Mr. Hobert did not interrupt her only
to ask a question now and then. He did
not appear surprised in the least, although
he was in reality looking upon the child
with wonder, standing before him so
much like a woman in attitude, voice and
language-and scarcely fourteen. His
respect for her character increased with
every word he heard her utter, and while
she presented the case to him, he was re-
volving its possibility in his own mind,
almost wishing he could himself go with
her. She paused, still looking him stead-
ily in the face.
" But Paul may not be in Washing-
ton."
"I think he is, Mr. Hobert, by this
time; the next letter will tell."



PAGE 1

Enlisted. 49 "You know I have cut all the wood for a long time, and made the fires, and "brought the water, and done all the hard work for mother; now, when I'm away she can't do it, nor Maggie; who will ?" Why, I'll do it, of course. I'm ready to do anything for you, Paul, anything in reason; a boy that enlists to honor his father ought to be encouraged. Yes, I'll do all your work while you're gone." "And another thing, father; Maggie must go to school, and you mustn't expect so much from mother with no help from us, you know." Why, boy, your mother may be a lady for all me, and not lift her hand; but Maggie can't go to school, she aint fit, and we sha'n't use your money to buy 5


New Associations. 143
will it last ? she asked, looking into her
face.
"I hope so, dear; certainly as long as
God thinks best; at any rate we will
enjoy it while it lasts. Come, dear," and
the two joined Mr. Maybrook in the
"breakfast-room.
That morning they worked steadily
upon the wrappers, and the afternoon
was spent as on the preceding day, only
that as they left the hospital to go to
their home, Mrs. Maybrook took Maggie
into one of the large stores and looked
over some dress goods with her, and, dis-
covering something to her taste, purchased
several dress patterns. She did not say
that they were to be made up for Maggie
until they reached home, for she knew


CONTENTS.
CHAP. PAGE.
I.-ASPIRATION, .. 5
II.-PAUL's DUTY, 24
II.-ENLISTED, 42
IV.-MARGARET AT SCHOOL, 61
V.-PAL WVOUSDED, .. 77
VI.-CHILDLIKE TRUST, 94
VII.-THE MEETING, 113
VIII.-NEw ASSocIATIONs, 131
IX.-THE LETTER, 148
X.-THE INEBRIATE'S DEATH, 168


40 Paul and Margaret.
and taking firm hold of her hand they
started upon the run never stopping until
they reached the fence. The full moon
was just above the brow of the hill as
Paul turned to his sister, saying, Now
laugh, Maggie, before we go in."
" Oh, Paul, how can I, with such dread-
ful feelings ?"
"You must not feel so; we'll go up
garret and talk it over; only think, Mag-
gie, that if I go it will be for the best, it
will be right, and we said long ago that
we would help each other do right; you
don't help me now."
"It don't seem right to me, Paul,"
sobbed Maggie.
The mother looked up as they entered
the house, but full of her own thoughts,



PAGE 1

144 Paul and Margaret. the child would be almost bewildered to find her wardrobe increasing to such an extent. They were simple patterns harmonizing with Maggie's quiet beauty, and the lady told her she needed them for. street and Sabbath wear, while the two prints that she brought with her would do for morning. Maggie was pleased with her new attire when in a few days she visited Paul to show him the fruits of her friends thoughtful kindness, and he said, "You look charming Maggie, in that pretty hat; they don't wear shakers here as they do at home, and I'm glad you needn't wear yours any longer." Oh, Paul, you can't think how kind she is; it all seems like a dream to me; I



PAGE 1

8. Paul and Margaret. so her face has learned severity and hardness, her eye to look calm and impassioned always; they would not know her if she smiled upon them. Then, too, they must work. Perhaps life was made for that, her life at least; for nothing else theirs, also, it might be; therefore the three worked together all day and every day. Paul, he was the oldest. The name had a pleasant sound to her ears even now, although she gave it to him fifteen years ago, before this blight came upon her. He worked with a heart tender for his mother, but his soul was not in it; he had not learned as she had to stifle his aspirations, to crush every bright young hope; he knew there was something





PAGE 1

124 Paul and Margaret. again; I haven't for a long time before, but I couldn't stop at first." Her lips still trembled, but she tried to smile. Tears were in the lady's eyes also, as she promised to call for her in half an hour, The half hour passed and Maggie found her travelling companion in the dining room as she entered; there was a touching look of inquiry upon her face as she returned his pleasant salutation which he answered at once, Yes, I have seen Paul; he knows you are here, and he is waiting for dinner to go by as impatiently as you are. Maggie smiled; her peace had begun to flow, she was already happy in anticipation. Dinner over, the party proceeded to the hospital. As Maggie entered the ward


78 Paul and Margaret.
latest news; when each day brought
back tidings of thousands killed and
wounded; when those at home knew
that roads, fields and woods were literal-
ly swarming with those suffering heroes
who had defied danger and pain for their
country's sake, and were now suddenly
smitten to the dust.
Is my husband there? thought the
lonely wife, but dared not breathe the
thought aloud. Is son or brother or
friend there ? asked many an anxious one
at home; and waited fearfully, painfully,
for the list of names that has brought
sorrow to almost every home in the land.
The war had been waged terribly and
fierce; hand-to-hand had been the con-
flict until darkness came down upon the



PAGE 1

Mf. W. Dodd's Catalogue. Massachusetts Sabbath School Society's Publications, for which we have been for many years New York Agents, constantly on hand, and for sale at Boston frices The Society's list embraces several hundred volumes of a superior charailer, and more than fifty Question Book4 Catalogues on Aflication. BOOKS PUBLISHED SINCE MAY, 1867. PRICB The Minister's Wife ......oo Bessie and her little Brothers ......50 Tiny's Sunday Nights ... ..... .65 Old Bright .........45 Nephew Frankie ........40 Charity Chapters ........60 When were our Gospels written ? .....60 I Don't Know How .....80 Missionary Patriots .......I 25 Margaret Claire ........75 Margaret Chester .......I 25 Prince Paul, the Freedman Soldier ....25 Grace Irving's Vacation .......I 25 Hope Douglass ........I 25 Frank Grover, the Blacksmith's Boy ..80 The Double Fault ........90 Life's Changes ........6o Highways and Hedges, or following the Master. (Prize buok) .........50 Donald Deane. (Prize book). ...I 50 Deacon Sims' Prayers. (Prize book) ..50 Broken Idols ....50 Just Right, or a Little Wrong ...I 25 Blind Graham .........90 Auntie's Secret .... 90 Mary Gray's Perplexities ......I 25 Mountains of Ararat .......I 25 RECENTLY PUBLISHED. Clark's Graduated Question Books on the Heroes of the Bible, in four parts, each ...15 Clark's Great Truths of the Bible, in three parts, each .15 These Question Books are on the Graduated Plan, and hav4 enjoyed an unusual popularity.


70 Paul and Margaret.
ones, for I say unto you, that in heaven
their angels do always behold the face of
my father which is in heaven," and closing
the book he prayed so tenderly and so
earnestly that nearly all were melted to
tears. He brought before them in his
prayer the peculiar trials of the little girl
in such a way that they were ready to
look upon her martyr spirit with rever-
ence, and their own cruelty with abhor.
rence. Was she not one of Christ's little
ones ? had they not pierced anew the
heart of the Saviour who loved her, by
their scorn and contempt ? Their sin was
held before them in its worst form, and
they felt themselves degraded in their
own eyes as well as in the eyes of their
teacher. All but one; she who had stood


52 Paul and Margaret.
knows best what she needs in the house,
you know.
"Yes, that's good; we shall live like
princes now: I'll see that Barnes is paid
every week; but pull out the book, boy;
you'll go off and forget it, and I'm getting
confounded sleepy."
"I hav'n't got the book, father. My
teacher has it; he will see to all the.
money; I don't want you to be troubled
with it, and he will give you all you
need. I told him to."
A terrible curse burst from the lips of
the avaricious man, and for a moment
his rage was uncontrollable; but Paul
hastened to add, "I've got some cloth
already for you, father, a pair of pants,
first-rate, warm cloth."


The Letter. 165
I rejoice that I can call her a pupil of
mine."
Mrs. Bailey blushed slightly, but re-
plied in a low, clear tone, Thank you,
Mr. Hobert, I am glad Margaret does her
duty."
"Her duty," said Mrs. Maltby, wiping
the tears from her eyes, "more than her
duty; she is doing a grand, and noble
work; we ought every one to feel proud
of her. George has spoken of her in his
letters, but I didn't know she was your
daughter, Mrs. Bailey; I'm sure I sympa-
thize with you in the comfort of having
such a child. And now, ladies, we have
the request before us. We are beginning
to know something of the writer's worth.
A few of us, mothers, feel with gratitude


106 Paul and Margaret.
Seizing the time when it would take him
equally long to get the boot either off or
on, she said, quickly, I can't decide,
father; I'll have to ask Mr. Hobert;"
and she darted over the threshold so
quickly that she scarcely heard the curses
he shouted after her. Before he could
get to the open door, she had bounded
over the wall and was speeding across
the fields like a wild fawn. so rapid were
her motions. She knew that her father's
rage would not last long, for his burning
thirst would take him quickly to the
tavern, and her great love for Paul over-
came the fear she felt for her mother's
safety. Would he lay violent hands up-
on her mother? she asked herself. as she
drew near Mr. Hobert's house scarcely



PAGE 1

CHAPTER IX. The Letter. L ET us return to the little village awhile before we close our simple narrative, and see what is going on there, and how they appreciate the work of Maggie. It is a bright, sunny afternoon, and the members of the Soldiers' Relief Society have met in large numbers to work courageously and earnestly; some of them in sadness, too, for many a son and brother are lying among the wounded, and some dear ones sleep amid the dead, where no friendly hand can mark the spot, no 14S



PAGE 1

14 Paul and Margaret. The child had few secrets, but never one from Paul. She had countless thoughts and she told them all to him, and in turn took his. Sunday was a rare day to both of them although they never spent it in church. The mother never went, therefore they did not, but she had taught them to pray when they were very young had told them they must never forget it, and they never did; it was a pleasant change after the sameness and weariness of the day, if nothing more; but of late prayer had .had for Paul more significance than ever before, for he was looking toward the future, and he felt stronger faith and higher hopes when praying. Margaret did not dream of the future as her


22 Paul and Margaret.
dowy youth. Her girlhood had been
rich and rare in its joy, full of smiles and
tender heart-words from voices never to
be heard on earth again, loving tones
whose echoes would reach her even now,
dared she but listen to them; she dared
not. Even memory was sternly laid
aside, for she would be strong for life's
work and life's suffering until the day
when she should not, as now, see through
a glass darkly, but face to face.
It was because disappointment and
misery seemed harder to endure coming
after a life of tenderness and peace and
brightness, and because she felt that her
children were born to sorrow even more
than others, that she.pushed with a strong,
firm hand every gratification from them;



PAGE 1

Paul's Duty. 29 State and town bounty! how .large it seemed to him, how like a fortune almost within his grasp. Visions of good healthy food, and thick warm clothing danced before him, not for himself; oh, no, but for the dear suffering ones at home. He saw, as in a dream, little Maggie in school, divested of patched gown, smiling over her books, as she never smiled now except on the Sabbath, and his patient, toil-worn mother, taking an occasional hour to rest from labor. He could scarcely control the wild tumult of his heart with all in prospect; it gave a new light to the dark blue of his eye, and added a buoyancy to his step as he turned toward home. Pushing open the door he caught his mother's "3* V .Q


Paul's Duty. 37
ghastly faces and bleeding forms in her
dreams, and never sought her bed until
she had pleaded with Christ to pity them.
She had never thought of the reality
coming home to her as this would make
it. No, no, it could not be! Paul stand-
ing before the cannon mouth of the en-
emy her Paul shot down and trampled
upon by the hurrying army, dying be-
neath the cold stars of a far off land, with
no Maggie to listen to his words she
could not bear it, no, she would not try.
The darkness came, and the evening
wind threw down autumn leaves upon
her, but she did not move only as a new
thought of agony would go quivering
through the small frame, and bring
another flood of tears from her closed
4



PAGE 1

66 Paul and Margaret. seen; it was enough to kill me with laughter; then he'd scream, 'Mag Mag why don't you come here, you brat A shout of laughter followed, and another voice said, "We shan't see her ladyship to school to-day, I dare say; he went home and had a general smash-up; father says such men do, sometimes." "Not much to smash in that hut, I should say," answered another. The strength was leaving the little form that stood in the snow without, her trembling limbs could scarcely support her, and tottering nearer, she leaned her head against the building. At that moment she felt a hand upon her shoulder, and starting up, her tearful eyes looked into the sad ones of Mr. Hobert.



PAGE 1

Aspirations. 21 to utter, the disappointment, the hopeless agony, other first years of trial, and none but He knew how slowly she had gathered up the fragments of her shattered faith at last, and was now walking beneath His love, suffering still, hopeless still, as regards this life, and smitten to the dust, but patient, quiet, silently prayerful in feeling, undemonstrative, and severe in manner only. None but He knew how with a mother's depth of affection she yearned over her children. Poor woman! it was not wilful sinning that caused her to repress outward manifestations of love. Mistaken, certainly, she was, but not hard and cruel, when she deprived her children of the little sunlight she might have scattered about their sha-


Margaret at School. 63
"brave ones were independent of their
sneers, and openly took the part of
Maggie when she suffered most from un-
kind persecutions; still there was the
shrinking from her side when she uncon-
sciously stood by them, the scornful glance
towards her large shoes and dark stock-
ings, and the smile that went round when
her sensitive heart sent the blood to her
temples. Maggie did not desire kindness
from them, she only asked that they would
let her alone; indeed she felt that entire
neglect would be kindness compared with
the unwelcome notice she received from
them now.
It was after a night of unusually brutal
treatment from her father, when Maggie
and her mother had spent a large part of



PAGE 1

44 Paul and Margaret. reach, easier of access, and bright enough to feed an ambition that might, perhaps before many years, be crowned with victory's wreath. Paul was a dreamer; and who will blame the boy, if in his moments of thoughtfulness he almost expected, some day, to command armies; if at times he saw himself, a boy no longer, mounted upon a spirited war horse, leading his fol. lowers to victory and glory, and sharing with them a soldier's fame. Many another boy has dreamed this dream, many a son and brother have had visions of an earthly glory never to be realized, have looked forward with eager gaze until their young eyes, amid the din and smoke of battle, suddenly closed forever,



PAGE 1

70 Paul and Margaret. ones, for I say unto you, that in heaven their angels do always behold the face of my father which is in heaven," and closing the book he prayed so tenderly and so earnestly that nearly all were melted to tears. He brought before them in his prayer the peculiar trials of the little girl in such a way that they were ready to look upon her martyr spirit with reverence, and their own cruelty with abhor. rence. Was she not one of Christ's little ones ? had they not pierced anew the heart of the Saviour who loved her, by their scorn and contempt ? Their sin was held before them in its worst form, and they felt themselves degraded in their own eyes as well as in the eyes of their teacher. All but one; she who had stood



PAGE 1

So Paul and Margaret. of water, as was hers. How could it be otherwise? She must do her duty, stern though it might be, and bring him back to life's realities; therefore she had said, It is useless, Paul; better think only of your work." He had answered with a cheerful tone, "I am patient, mother." "It will end in disappointment, Paul." "It may not; if it does, I will still be patient." She said no more; perhaps the hope he had infused itself somewhat into her heart also, for she looked up oftener and longer that day, and found her Father's smile waiting for her acceptance. I said she had two children. The other was a girl of ten years, and was called



PAGE 1

CONTENTS. CHAP. PAGE. I.-ASPIRATION, .. ...5 II.-PAUL's DUTY, ...24 II.-ENLISTED, ...42 IV.-MARGARET AT SCHOOL, ...61 V.-PAL WVOUSDED, .... 77 VI.-CHILDLIKE TRUST, ....94 VII.-THE MEETING, .....113 VIII.-NEw ASSocIATIONs, ...131 IX.-THE LETTER, ....148 X.-THE INEBRIATE'S DEATH, .168


The Meeting. 123
"Yes'm, the same as this I have on.
"Well, that is just right to work in,
and you may let me send this down to be
done over; the journey has rumpled it;
you will have time to take a nice bath
before dinner, and dress for the after-
noon; then we will see Paul; I think I
know him; you resemble him somewhat,
don't you ?"
" Oh, yes; do you know him? Is he
very sick? oh, tell me.'
" No dear, not very; but you must not
let him see you cry so, it might bring
back the fever. I'm sorry r spoke of him,"
she said, as Maggie dropped her head on
the pillow and sobbed aloud; but soon
she looked up, saying,
"I'm glad you know him; I sha'n't cry



PAGE 1

Childlike Trust. 109 for you until you are safely fixed with Paul; is that enough?" he asked, smilingly. "Oh, yes, sir, more than I expected; I thank you, Mr. Hobert, a great deal." Yes. Now walk home slowly, and cool off a little, your cheeks are something the color of my table cloth." Maggie was relieved to find her father had gone when she reached home, and she earnestly hoped she should not see him again before she started. "Where is the money, Margaret?" asked her mother. I left it with Mr. Hobert; he will give it to me to-morrow when I start." "You did not tell him ?" "Why, no, mother, how could I 10



PAGE 1

The Inebriate's Death. 177 could be done, but words of sympathy or kind acts cannot save the lost soul, or give hope to the hopeless. Hark! it is the village bell.; and now they bear the form of the departed to its last resting place. May God's spirit speak loudly to the living as they ponder upon that wasted life, that sudden death, and bid them make haste to prepare for the hour when they too shall be called away. I cannot tell of Paul's and Maggie's feelings when the sad tidings reached them, nor can I follow their course through life, for even now they are where we last left them. I can say, however, that friends have hopes of them; that they are expected to take a noble stand for truth and righteousness; to press on in the path



PAGE 1

32 Paul and Margaret. "If you live! Paul, Paul, you are but a boy yet." "Sixteen, mother, and strong and healthy; the country needs every healthy man; I can do nothing here, I never shall; you know, mother, how they put me down because-because-" His mother raised her. eyes beseechingly, and Paul stopped a moment, while the blood mounted to his brow, and as he threw back his head he added, I'detest the feeling that would crush a family for the sins of one; I know I can be a man somewhere; I will be a man, honored and respected, see if I don't The mother's gaze grew tender and loving, but she did not answer, and the excited boy continued, "and, mother, think


-1
120 Paul and Margaret.
have strength for it by resting now;
then arranging the pillows and darkening
the room, she gently kissed the pale,
weary face, and said, "You are among
friends; we will take good care of you;
now go to sleep and I will awaken you in
time for dinner." A moment more and
the door closed, and the tumultuous
throbbings of Maggie's heart grew more
and more quiet until she slept.
Mrs. Maybrook joined her husband
who was reading in the library. "Ste-
phen" said she to her husband, "I really
think Ihave made a discovery; this child
must be the sister of the young man
wounded in the thigh, who sings so much
for the comfort of the other soldiers."
"What makes you think so, dear ?"


6 Paul and Margaret.
hour; all are resting; no sounds of labor
anywhere. Ah! we had well-nigh for-
gotten one spot where labor never ceases;
where rest never comes -in the brown
cottage yonder, that stands with strong
outline against the hill and sky. In the
cold of winter 6r the heat of summer, it
is the same; toil from dawn till dark;
constant, unending, hopeless toil was
hers-the mother there. No folding of
the hands for her, they are hard and
misshapen with their ceaseless work. No
light or refreshment for the heart, it is
weighed down with life's burdens, well-
nigh crushed, but that the Father is still
merciful, and smiles upon it when it has
strength and courage to look up for a
moment. She has no hope but when she



PAGE 1

The Letter. 149 mourner's tears be shed above the fresh made grave. Mrs. Bailey is there, strange as it may seem; she who never had entered the village church because she-felt abashed in the presence of those who knew her circumstances, and because she had nothing fit to appear in but her sunbonnet, and she had not courage'to wear that. She is there to-day that she may add her mite to the weightier contributions of others, and because good Mr. Hobert had almost insisted upon it, and his lovely wife had called for her, and brought her there, taking care, too, that she should feel as much at ease as any. Mr. Hobert had an object in view. Paul and Margaret had been favorites with him 13*



PAGE 1

PAUL AND MARGARET. CHAPTER I. Aspirations. T is midsummer. The whole earth is green; the grass thick and tall, where it has not been mown; the leaves all full grown; the berries ripe and falling off; the air heavy with the breath of flowers, and heated with the sun's hot rays; and the birds are seeking the coolest shades, and folding their wings wearily until the day goes by and. the twilight comes. The village is quiet, for it is the noon 1* 5



PAGE 1

The Letter. 153 "Would you write to Mr. Hobert ?" "Yes, or any one of influence." "There is no one else I could write to; how soon shall I begin ?" "At once, dear; to-night." And what shall I ask for ?" "The societies know best what is needed and what they can send, we generally receive dried fruits, jellies, wines, good butter, fresh eggs and suitable clothing; but I don't think it necessary to specify if they had any experience in preparing boxes." "They have packed a number; I don't know how many." "Well, my dear, you may write at once." Maggie seated herself at the little desk and soon the letter was on its way



PAGE 1

6 Paul and Margaret. hour; all are resting; no sounds of labor anywhere. Ah! we had well-nigh forgotten one spot where labor never ceases; where rest never comes -in the brown cottage yonder, that stands with strong outline against the hill and sky. In the cold of winter 6r the heat of summer, it is the same; toil from dawn till dark; constant, unending, hopeless toil was hers-the mother there. No folding of the hands for her, they are hard and misshapen with their ceaseless work. No light or refreshment for the heart, it is weighed down with life's burdens, wellnigh crushed, but that the Father is still merciful, and smiles upon it when it has strength and courage to look up for a moment. She has no hope but when she


The Letter. 167
There is but one scene more, the sad
details of which have but lately passed
before our eyes, but we reserve them for
another chapter.



PAGE 1

The Inebriate's Death. 173 watched until dawn, when she caught the sound of a fluttering breath, as though the departed spirit had ventured back a moment; bathing freely the face and head, she still waited and prayed and longed for the morning. A sound caught her ear, and bending her head to his lips she heard him whisper, broken by long intervals, "A charge to keep I have, A God to glorify." For the first time tears started to her eyes and dropped upon his face. Was it a wave of childhood faith and love surging up from the dim memories of his heart, to remind him of the ocean of sin he had passed over? The lines learned at a mother's knee, coming back to him in 15*



PAGE 1

Pauls Duty. 33 of the bounty! you shall have every cent, you can put it in the bank where it will be safe; you won't discourage me, say, mother ?" You are excited now, Paul; don't think any more of it to-night;. in the morning you will feel differently; I can't send you off to die." "No, mother, but you can send me off o duty!" "If it be duty, yes, I could try," and she smoothed -the clothes with a sad caressing as she thought of what he said, and felt that his ardor was bearing him, for the first time in his life, away from her. Paul answered, I am sure it is right, 1 know it; but where's Maggie ?" and leaving his mother standing by the table


CHAPTER II.
Paul's Duty.
SHE summer had well nigh passed,
the days were getting shorter and
farther into the rich fruitful beauty of
autumn. The villagers were realizing the
fulfilment of their early spring hopes,
gathering in abundantly of earth's bounty,
filling their barns with riches and
their souls with satisfaction--all but Mrs.
Bailey. No riches or satisfaction came to
her; the great beauty of the year brought
only fear to her heart, dread of the
future, of the bitter cold-and hunger that
had been their portion for so many win-
24


48 Paul and Margaret.
"Ha! ha! ha! soldier! aint you 'fraid
you'll be shot by the rebels, hey ?"
" No, father, my fears are iot for my-
self."
" Who, then ?" don't have any for me, I
hope ? fool if you do. I'll do well enough
on the bounty. Tell you what, Paul, its
the handsomest thing you ever did, leav-
ing the bounty to us. I like to see a boy
honor his father, hang'd if I don't."
But father, I sat up on purpose to talk
with you to-night, and I want you to
promise me something, will you ?"
"Anything in reason, Paul. You're a
dutiful son, you respect your father, any-
body can see it, and you're no coward,
not a bit of it; so go ahead, don't be
afraid; what do you want to say to me ?"


Childlike Trust. 99
without heeding the warning glance of
her mother, she opened her hand and dis-
played the roll of bills, but with a start
of terror she hastily thrust them into her
bosom, as her father but half dressed
emerged from the bed room, where, al-
though it was nearly noon, he had but
just risen from his drunken sleep.
"Money! what have you got money
for, you hussy; where did you steal it
from ? give it to me this minute, or I'll
break every bone in your skin."
Maggie, pale and trembling, dared not
speak, but retreating towards the door,
was about to flee from the presence of one
who had never spoken a kind word to her.
"Come back!" he shouted; "open
that door and I'll knock you down.


2 M. W. Dodd's Catalogue.
C HRONICLES OF THE SCHONBERG-COTTA
FAMILY. I vol., 2mo $ 5o
Fine edition. Crown 8vo, tinted paper 2 oo
Cabinet edition, 16mo, tinted paper .. I 50
Sunday-school edition, i8mo, illustrated I oo
Those familiar with the life of Luther will reinember Dame Ursula
Cotta, in Eisenach, who, when he was a lad singing from door to
door to support him at school, took him to her house and ever after
befriended him. The author of this book, for the purpose of repro-
ducing in a more familiar form the social life, the religion, and some
of the chief historical events and personages of that momentous
period, finds in the above fact a suggestion on which to improve.
The authoress manages her ingenious plot in the most skilful manner.
One can scarcely persuade himself that these are not genuine docu-
ments fished out of some old Lutheran family chest.
"It is intensely interesting, and will be a great favorite with the public. It is
eminently one of the star books of the season."-S. S. Times.
"A book of unusual attradtion and merit, where the interest never flags, and every
page is full of gems. The work might justly be termed 'A Romance of the Refor-
mation.' The various incidents in the life of Luther are portrayed with a graphic
beauty and truthfulness rarely equalled." * *
" It is seldom a book appears which, like this, has attra6ions for all classes of
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timental, the youthful, and those more advanced, are charmed by it, and its gentle
catholic spirit will render it equally attradtive to the Protestant and Romanist."-
Albany Times.
" In this work we seem almost to meetthe great men of the Reformation face to
face, and to be actually present in the thrilling scenes in which they participated."-
Methodist.
"The family history which it contains, if read by itself, would be regarded as one
of the most successful portraitures of domestic life that has ever been drawn, each
chara6ter being delineated and preserved with striking distinctness, and some of
the charaters being such as the reader will love to linger over as he would over
some beautiful portrait drawn by a master's pencil."-New York Observer.
"The story from first to last is remarkable for its artlessness and tenderness, and
it chains the reader's attention to the close."-A m. Theo. Review.
"*The prominent scenes, from the time of Huss to the death of Luther, are
painted before us, and we read them with such interest as even D'Aubign6 can
scarcely create. The book has all the fascination of a romance."-Evangelical
^Apository.
' ,



PAGE 1

62 Paul and Margaret. murmur; patient and uncomplaining she endured the taunts of her schoolmates as they carelessly, and, it is to be hoped, thoughtlessly, called her drunken Bailey's daughter." Even the little brown hood she wore, though neat and clean, was held up to ridicule, and Maggie, in spite of her desire to learn, would gladly have stayed away from school, were it not that she knew it was Paul's wish that she should go. I would not convey the idea that all her schoolmates were unkind and cruel, but there were those who, by their overbearing manner, gay disposition, and the freedom with which they scattered sweetmeats among their friends, seemed to rule the larger part of the school. A few



PAGE 1

New Associations. 147 "boy in a chair, with his arm in a sling, she peeled the fruit and divided it, so that he could with the other hand help himself. One begged her to read a chapter in his dear little Testament, and Maggie's voice was clear and sweet as she complied; another asked if she would only write a few lines to his mother, telling her he was better, and had received her letter, and read it until he had learned it by heart. Maggie did not shrink from any duty, and when the. hour came to leave the hospital, she found a reward in their earnest invitations to come again."



PAGE 1

JUVENILE AND SUNDAY SCHOOL BOOKS PUBLISHED BY M. W. DODD, 506 BROADWAY, NEW YORK. Elsie Dinsmore. By Holidays at Roselands, Martha Farquharson, author of with some After Scenes in Elsie's "\ "Allan's Fault," etc. I6mo, ilLife. A Sequel to Elsie DinsSlustrated ... ...$1 25 more. By Martha Farquharson. I6mo, illustrated ...$1 50 A beautiful and instruAive story, in which the power of true piety in a very young child is admirably exhibited in a ses of Elsie is here brought through various trials which, though severe and unusual, trials and a severe and nearly fatal sickare not beyond the limits of probability.ness to full enjoyment of her father's affecAm. Presbyterian. tion, and the happiness of seeing him a Elsie is environed with besetments and humble follower of her Divine Master. trials, but is singularly faithful through The story is even more intensely interesthem all, and gives promise by her sweeting than in the first part, as with added ness of character to be the means of saving years Elsie's character becomes more others. The sequel of this story will be natural and mature. No reader of Elsie eagerly looked for, as it closes at a very Dinsmore should fail to follow her story to interesting point in the narrative. It is a its happy completion in this sequel. charming book, and will give increased popularity to the authoress.-Phila. Home 7ournal" The Brownings. A Tale of the Great Rebellion; and Lucy The Clifford Household. Lee, or All Things for Christ. By the author of Independence By .G. Fuller. vol. 6mo. True and False," etc. 16mo, illustrated .... ..I 25 Two stories by one author. The first is a deeply interesting story of the trials and A tale illustrating the power of the relisufferings of a Union family in the late war. gion q* Christ in strengthening a gentle The scene is laid on the banks of the St shrinking girl for the performance of diffiMary's, which separates Georgia from cult duties and the endurance of severe Florida. Impressive lessons, moral and retrials, and the power of the same religion ligious, as well as patriotic, are conv.yed in crushing and subduing a proud, imperithrough the medium of the story. "The ous nature so that it bows at last to the seccnd," says the National Baptist, "is rule of Christ. The story is well told.one of the few that we would like to have Presbyterian. in every Sunday School library. It is The story is well told, and the spirit written by one who knows the value of exand lessons of the narrative are pure and perimental religion, and to whom the serevangelical.--Am. Presbyterian. vice of God is a fountain of unceasing A lifelike picture of home scenes. No joy." fancy sketch ; no exaggeration; no perfet It is original and beautiful, and we have characters; no angels; but men, women, seldom read a better story of the kind, in and children, as we find them in everyday which we have felt a deeper interest to the life.-Sprinfeldd Union. close.-North Western Presbyt i.



PAGE 1

4 JUVENILE AND SUNDAY SCHOOL BOOKS. Alden's Stories for Young Americans. 4 vols ISmo, illustrated in sets ........... .$2 OQ Separately as follows Stories and Anecdotes Fruits of the May of the Puritans ...$o 50 Flower .. .... .$o 50 As it is a kind of reading delightful to The volume contains an accurate and the ypung, and as the anecdotes give a just somewhat full account of the origin of the and exalted view of the Puritan character, Plymouth Colony, and of its progress durwe would commend the book to parents, as ing the first three years of its existence. one of unusual value. It may be read by The charaiter and noble deeds of the Pilevery one with great profit and interest.grim Fathers are thus clearly brought to N. Y. Evangelist. view. The fats stated are drawn from original documents.-Preface. The Example of WashThe Old Stone ington. With Portrait. o 50 The Stone House A little volume of great value. The auOr, the Patriot's Fireside .o 50 thor does not pretend to give the example Under the guise of a familiar, pleasant of Washington in his entire life, but emtale of the Revolutionary era, Dr. Alden ploys the weight of his great name to arrest has here presented a condensed and most and fix the attention of the young upon excellent compend of the elementary prinsome of the essential excellencies of charciples of the science of government, and ader that were so fully illustrated in that our early political history. It strikes us as unequalled specimen of human greatness; one of the. most useful, as well as able and the prominent points in thework being the ingenious of the author's many juvenile charater of Washington as a religious man. works, and will be a good book for the The book should be in the hands of every family, and not less for the school-room.youth in the land." N. Y. Evangelist. The Fred. and Minnie Library. 4 vols. in sets ........................ .$3 oo 00 Separately as follows: Fred. Lawrence; or, Minnie Carlton. By The 'World College. By MarMary Belle Bartlett. A beautigaret E. Teller. Illustrated, ful story for girls. Illustrated, I8mo .......o 75 8Imo ....... o 80 A deeply interesting story of an AmeriThe subject of this narrative is the can youth devoting himself with a lofty eldest daughter of a household, forced by sense of duty to the support of a dependthe death of her mother to take charge of ent mother and sister, and gaining a it. The pledge given to her dying mother strength and manly independence of charto train the little ones to meet her in heavader by the discipline he undergoes, as en is conscientiously fulfilled, and the leswell as a cultivated mind. by a faithful and sons of her example, prudence, and piety, religious employment of his leisure hours. rewarded by the most cheering results, -A m. Presbyterian. bringing light and joy to the household, will scarcely be read without deep and "The Deaf Shoemaker, grateful emotion.-N. ork Evangelist. and Other Stories. By Philip The Russell Family. Barrett. Illustrated, 18mo 0 75 By Anna Hastings. Illustrated, The author of this charming little book 18mo ... ....75 understands what will interest children, and how to adapt his style and language to A very beautiful and instru6tive story their taste and wants. We cord: 'ly refrom real life, illustrating the power of a commend it to a place in every Sabbath Christian mother, and the sweet influences School and family library.-Advocate and of the domestic circle.-New York Ob ua rdiat. server.



PAGE 1

Paul's Duty. 41 heeded not the sorrow of the child, and they. passed along up the stairs, and found themselves alone together. Paul took a blanket from the bed and wrapping it about his sister they sat by the window talking urntil they heard their father come. The moon shed its soft light upon them, seeming to calm the excitement of the one and quiet the grief of the other with her gentle influence. Maggie's tears were not so bitter, the world did not seem so very dark, and Paul's hopes made her more hopeful, his cheerfulness and faith in the future he was enabled to impart in some degree to her, and as the evening advanced she found that she still had a heart to pray which,when upon the hills, she had no desire to do. 4*



PAGE 1

98 Paul and Margaret. I've got to carry, and some socks and tea for Paul." "But Paul can get some tea there; you'll not need to carry any." Mother wanted to send him something; it is only a little." "Very well; now, can.you take care of your money ?" "4 Mother said it must be sewed inside my dress." "I see you understand; well, now go, and I will be round this evening." With a sweet smile of grateful love Maggie left her teacher, and with a light step she bounded across the fields to her home; pushing open the door she exclaimed, "I'm going in the morning, mother; see, I've got money here," and


134 Paul and Margaret.
short and fleeting had been the hours,
how impatient she was for the morning to
come, that she might again share his loneli-
ness and minister to his wants.
That evening when Mr. Headley made
his appearance he found his little friend
seated upon the lounge, half reclining in
the arms of Mrs. Maybrook; tears and
smiles were struggling for the mastery
upon her expressive face; it was evident
that she had been telling her new friend
something of herself, and as the gentle-
man entered Mrs. Maybrook said to him,
"I have a proposition to make to you,
Mr. Headley, regarding this little one here."
He bowed, and said, as he put his hand
on Maggie's head, "How do you like
diminutives dear ?"


Aspirations. 23
it was because she feared the shock for
them, that once came to her, that she
allowed this iron hand to rest upon their
hearts, crushing almost from their natures
the buoyant, out-gushing song of youth
that God gave to them when He sent them
to her keeping for a time. It was the
mistake of her life although she knew it
not, and the sin lay not at her door but
with him who had smitten her so cruelly,
with him who had suffered himself to
sink to the lowest level.
*~~~ l


SChildlike Trust. I05
"Well, well, take your time; you 're a
good girl, but 'tarnal slow; you must
make up your mind before I leave the
house."
"Yes, sir." Maggie spoke in a musing
tone with her eyes still fixed upon the
floor. Both parents were deceived by her
manner. The mother went on with her
work, and the father turned into the bed-
room, still keeping an eye upon Mag-
gie, but confident that she would soon
give him the money; if not, he could and
would force it from her.
Maggie waited until she saw her father
sitting upon the side of the bed pulling
on the first boot. She knew they were
water-soaked and would take more than
one strong pull to get them fairly on.



PAGE 1

Margaret at School. 73 and Paul, and lately trusting in her mother more than ever before; hoping for no better home in this world than the little brown cottage, and with no useless desires about dress or knowledge or station. So effectual had been the mother's discipline, that her child was but a type of herself. Would she never wake to higher aspirations? would the modest heart never desire more than it did now ? Education sometimes inspires ambition, and as we go on we will see what the enthusiasm of Paul and the wise guidance of Mr. Hobert did for her. A year passed away and the two who loved him began to feel more calmly resigned to Paul's absence. He had been 7



PAGE 1

140 Paul and Margaret. to your standard. Now, let me see: there are four wrappers to be made; if you can baste, we will get them all done "before dinner-plain work you see. We'll take them round this afternoon-three of the men are to sit up to day, for the first time, and they mast have fresh wrappers." "Is Paul one of them, Mrs. Maybrook ?" asked Maggie. "No, dear; Paul's thigh will prevent his getting up at present; when he is able to sit up he will be nearly well. We will bring him here as soon as we can, won't we ?" "I should like it, but "-Maggie hesitated a moment before she finished-" I'm afraid I can't do enough to pay his board too."



PAGE 1

88 Paul and Margaret. again-you know mother, we couldn't "bear it; I thought I'd ask Mr. Hobert." But where would you go to find him where so many are sick? no, no, child, you are wild." "I wrote in my letter to know if he was coming to Washington; the papers say that thousands of the wounded are "brought there; he may be among them; the next letter will tell. I'll ask Mr. Hobert about it," she persisted, in calm, even tones. Mrs. Bailey looked with amazement upon the child, changed in one night to a woman, with a woman's feelings, energy and determination; still she shook her head doubtfully, and thought to herself "How much she is like Paul; I never



PAGE 1

SChildlike Trust. I05 "Well, well, take your time; you 're a good girl, but 'tarnal slow; you must make up your mind before I leave the house." "Yes, sir." Maggie spoke in a musing tone with her eyes still fixed upon the floor. Both parents were deceived by her manner. The mother went on with her work, and the father turned into the bedroom, still keeping an eye upon Maggie, but confident that she would soon give him the money; if not, he could and would force it from her. Maggie waited until she saw her father sitting upon the side of the bed pulling on the first boot. She knew they were water-soaked and would take more than one strong pull to get them fairly on.


4,
* i^ *'" '" *'* *." "
'9.' /'



PAGE 1

The Letter. 157 give her the assistance she asks for-this is the letter:" P-HlOSPITAL, WVASHIINGTON, June, 1864. Mry DEAR TEACHERYou will excuse me for not doing just as you desired, but I can better write to you than to strangers, and leave it with yourself whether to make known our wants to the Society or not. I told you in my last letter what we needed most, and very likely they would know what to send better than I could tell them. You asked for a picture of hospital life. It would make your heart ache to see it, as I do, day after day, although when the hands are busy we do not realize it so much. There are but few cases of fever in our ward, but some very severe wounds 14



PAGE 1

154 Paul and Margaret. to Mr: Hobert. He replied that a box was already in progress, and advised her to write a letter directly to the society enclosed in one to himself, giving some idea of hospital life, mentioning the necessities of individual cases, and speaking especially of the three boys who had gone from their village, and for whom she had cared since she had been there. He told her that the box was not designed for any particular hospital, and would very likely be sent to her in reply to her letter. It must be confessedthat Maggie shrunk from this duty. She knew there would be those there who had looked upon her with scorn and contempt; perhaps they would now accuse her of presumption, but saying to herself, "Mr. Hobert would not



PAGE 1

£4, i^ *'" '" *'* *." '9.' /'



PAGE 1

162 Paul and Margaret. least she could do to counteract careless. ness and injustice. Mr. Hobert with a smile of approval read: "MY DEAR MOTHER, 1 am better and stronger to day, and I want to tell you that your prayers for your boy are answered. I have found the way to the mercy-seat and left my load of sin and guilt there. Now the Saviour smiles a pardon upon me, my heart is full of light and joy. Oh, rejoice with me, dear mother; and Nell, are you not glad your brother is savedsaved from further sin, from eternal misery and death? and all, under God, is owing to the Christian walk of little Maggie Bailey. Mother, such words as


This page contains no text.


Margaret at School. 67
They were sad, indeed, in their gaze as
they rested upon her, but there was a
sternness in the lines of the mouth she
had never seen before. Tenderly he
stooped and, putting his arm about her,
drew her near to him, and left a silent kiss
on her pale face. It was all the sympathy
he could offer then, and it was enough;
her thin lips quivered and she clung to the
hand that held her with so firm and kind
a grasp as though she could never let him
go.
One more bitter remark fell upon her
ear, as she walked by her kind teacher to
the door, it was this, "I don't think Mr.
Hobert has any right to bring a low
pauper into the school. I'll make her
repent coming, for one; you may de-
pend on that."



PAGE 1

Paul Wounded. 89 saw it before; I shouldn't wonder if I consented to let her go;" then, speaking aloud, she said, "Margaret, tell me what Mr. Hobert says as soon as you can; perhaps you had better not stay at noon to-day. No, mother, I'll come right home if he thinks I can go." "You had better go early and see him before school; but then it's impossible; I couldn't let you go so far, whatever he might say." But Maggie had faith in larger measure than her mother. Quickly she flew about the room, putting things to rights, and finishing hastily her morning work; Ssoon with her letter in hand she started for the post office, and with rapid step thence to the school house. 8*



PAGE 1

Paul Wounded. 91 Mr. Hobert did not interrupt her only to ask a question now and then. He did not appear surprised in the least, although he was in reality looking upon the child with wonder, standing before him so much like a woman in attitude, voice and language-and scarcely fourteen. His respect for her character increased with every word he heard her utter, and while she presented the case to him, he was revolving its possibility in his own mind, almost wishing he could himself go with her. She paused, still looking him steadily in the face. But Paul may not be in Washington." "I think he is, Mr. Hobert, by this time; the next letter will tell."


90 Paul and Margaret.
It was very quiet there. Maggie was
glad that none of the girls had yet come,
but she was sure to find Mr. Hobert, for
this was the morning he arranged the
copies for writing books.
She opened the door carefully, and sure
enough there he was, bending over the
desk. At the sound of the door closing,
he looked up and smiled in his kind
fatherly way upon her, saying, What
brought you out so early, my child ?"
"Can you spare a moment to me, Mr.
Hobert ?"
"Yes, ten, if you like. What is it that
makes you look so wise this morning ?"
Maggie told him of Paul's letter, that
he was wounded, and how she was think-
ing of going on to see him, if he approved.



PAGE 1

New Associations. 143 will it last ? she asked, looking into her face. "I hope so, dear; certainly as long as God thinks best; at any rate we will enjoy it while it lasts. Come, dear," and the two joined Mr. Maybrook in the "breakfast-room. That morning they worked steadily upon the wrappers, and the afternoon was spent as on the preceding day, only that as they left the hospital to go to their home, Mrs. Maybrook took Maggie into one of the large stores and looked over some dress goods with her, and, discovering something to her taste, purchased several dress patterns. She did not say that they were to be made up for Maggie until they reached home, for she knew



PAGE 1

Paul Wounded. 81 spent there, of Maggie who had gathered them with him, and their gentle fragrance soothed him as he reached about and picked cluster after cluster. With hands full of the beautiful flowers, he sang low and sweet the songs of home, hummed the tunes he had loved when at his work there, smiled down upon the sweet violets, and waited patiently still, and trusting all the time. Soon after they came, and Paul with a happy smile of a child, looked up and welcomed them. It was a scene to bring tears to any eyes-that boy amid the dead, so calm and happy, gathering the sweet blossoms of spring, and finding a new joy in their fragrance and beauty. Brave Paul! tenderly as women might, those rough men placed the boy


PAUL AND MARGARET,
THE
INEBRIATE'S CHILDREN.
- I
NEW YORK:
M. W. DODD, No. 506 BROADWAY.



PAGE 1

The iMeeting. 121 "His name is Paul, and the resemblance struck me the moment she spoke the word; it must be so; I hope it is; she is a sweet little thing," said the lady musingly. "May be so; he's a brave, cheerful fellow, you said ?" A perfect nobleman; I should pick him out from a host as the most firm, pa. tient, and courageous; he infuses his spirit into all about him." "Will he be up soon?" Yes, in a week or ten days, if he has no more fever, and I don't think he will; I've watched him pretty closely." "I thought the girl looked sad, but I got merely a glance at her face." "She was worn out with travel, and 11


"104 Paul and Margaret.
Maggie sat down in a chair and leaned
her head upon her hand in a thoughtful
attitude. Her father watched her curi-
ously for a moment, and said, "Well,
you've thought long enough, how do you
feel now ?"
"I can't quite decide; I think if we
could get him home it would he better."
"Of course; just what I've tried to
convince you all along."
"But I don't know what Mr. Hobert
would say."
"I'll make it all right with him, Mag;
come, hand it over."
"But I am not sure yet, father, about
it, and I must think longer; you know
I am not so quick as Paul is. I'll try to
do right."


Aspirations. 9
beautiftil in the world, although he had
not found it yet; his soul would not al-
ways be enchained within the brown cot-
tage. Sometimes it wandered off in
search of something tq satisfy its strange
desires; still his hands labored on, and
his work was well done, but the mother
carried a sterner face at such times, for
she saw that Paul's spirit was not there.
She saw his blue eyes brighten with a
look they did not always wear; she
noticed he came with a firmer, manlier
tread, his lips parted with something ap-
proaching a smile; it struck her that. he
had a noble look about him. But no,
she would not think or dream even for
him, for Paul her first born; his destiny
was to be a hewer of wood, and drawer



PAGE 1

Enlisted. 43 desired to make some attainment in scholarship; the little he had acquired had given him a thirst for knowledge that would not be satisfied with anything superficial, and diligently had he improved every moment he could call his own until now; but doing his best his progress had been slow, and although the praises of his teacher were a source of inspiration to him, impelling him at times to sleep less than was well for him that he might study more, yet as he looked back upon the little he knew, and forward to the boundless fields to be explored, his heart almost sank within him. But now there seemed a future opening before him, not so desirable, perhaps, as the other, but more nearly within his


New Associations. 145
don't feel like the same Maggie I was at
home, and to think I am going to stay
with her for so long."
" Have you written of it to mother ?"
"Oh, yes, long letters to both mother
and Mr. Hobert. I promised to tell all
about you and the other soldiers, and
what they need; he said he would have
the society work for them.
"So, you've written him ; then we
shall hear soon."
" In a day or two; and, Paul, we are-
I mean Mrs. Maybrook is, going to try
and have you at her house as soon as you
are able."
"That's too much, Maggie; I don't
think I can consent, and while she is do-
ing so much for you too."
13


So Paul and Margaret.
of water, as was hers. How could it be
otherwise? She must do her duty, stern
though it might be, and bring him back
to life's realities; therefore she had said,
" It is useless, Paul; better think only of
your work."
He had answered with a cheerful tone,
"I am patient, mother."
"It will end in disappointment, Paul."
"It may not; if it does, I will still be
patient."
She said no more; perhaps the hope
he had infused itself somewhat into her
heart also, for she looked up oftener and
longer that day, and found her Father's
smile waiting for her acceptance.
I said she had two children. The other
was a girl of ten years, and was called



PAGE 1

22 Paul and Margaret. dowy youth. Her girlhood had been rich and rare in its joy, full of smiles and tender heart-words from voices never to be heard on earth again, loving tones whose echoes would reach her even now, dared she but listen to them; she dared not. Even memory was sternly laid aside, for she would be strong for life's work and life's suffering until the day when she should not, as now, see through a glass darkly, but face to face. It was because disappointment and misery seemed harder to endure coming after a life of tenderness and peace and brightness, and because she felt that her children were born to sorrow even more than others, that she.pushed with a strong, firm hand every gratification from them;


100oo Paul and Margaret.
Where did you get money ? tell me quick
or I'll -- and advancing quickly he
clenched his fist before her pale face in a
frightfully threatening manner, shouting
curses in her ears at the same time.
"Mr. Hobert gave it to me, father; it
is not my own money."
"Of course it isn't, you deceitful brat.
What are you going to do with it ? speak
quick."
"Going to Paul, father, to nurse him."
"Ha! ha! that's a good one! you go-
ing to nurse Paul! come, pass over the
money, and I won't hurt you."
" She cannot give you the money, father;
it is not hers; Mr. Hobert has given it to
her to use for Paul, and he is wounded,
perhaps dying."



PAGE 1

The Letter. 167 There is but one scene more, the sad details of which have but lately passed before our eyes, but we reserve them for another chapter.


8 2 Paul and Margaret.
upon a litter, and bore him away to a
place of greater safety and comfort. Soon
he wrote with his own hand:-
"DEAR MOTHER AND MAGGIE:-
I'm a trifle wounded; not much; no.
thing to cause you a moment's anxiety;
the doctor says I shall be about in a few
weeks. I saved! only think, mother,
and so many noble ones dead. It was a
fearful strife; I never dreamed men could
fight so; I never thought I should have
such feelings as I had in battle; but it
was over when night came, and I lay on
the field and looked up to the stars and
grew calm and happy again. I send you
some violets I picked there and pressed
in my bible; they made me think of


Childlike Trust. 97
"Well, my child, you shall go. Are
you ready to start to-morrow morning, in
the stage ?"
"Yes, sir," all ready, "answered Maggie,
eagerly, and continued, "You are will-
ing, sir? oh, you are kind; how Paul
will thank you; and I'm to start in the
morning ?"
" Yes, if Mr. Headley goes, as he some-
what expected to; I will see him before
night and let you know. You will want
thirty dollars; here are fifteen, the rest I
will give you before you go, and if you
get out of money you are to write and
let me know; have you got a trunk ?"
"Oh, no, sir, I don't need one."
" But you will need something."
"Mother's large carpet bag holds all
9


THE MEETING IN THE HOSPITAL.
Page 126.
fc i:


Margaret at School. 73
and Paul, and lately trusting in her mother
more than ever before; hoping for no
better home in this world than the little
brown cottage, and with no useless de-
sires about dress or knowledge or station.
So effectual had been the mother's disci-
pline, that her child was but a type of
herself.
Would she never wake to higher as-
pirations? would the modest heart never
desire more than it did now ? Education
sometimes inspires ambition, and as we
go on we will see what the enthusiasm of
Paul and the wise guidance of Mr. Hobert
did for her.
A year passed away and the two who
loved him began to feel more calmly re-
signed to Paul's absence. He had been
7




142 Paul and Margaret.
" Not 'till Paul went away." Maggie's
tones had sympathy in them.
"That was not death; but I can read-
ily see that you felt it might almost have
been. My dear, stay with us as long as
you can, and love us all you can; I
would ask no more, only that you would
let me do for you as I would for a child,
and accept it as a child would-with
freedom; can you ?"
"If you desire it, Mrs. Maybrook."
"I do; it will make me quite happy,
and- ah, there is the breakfast bell;
come, why, I have almost started the
tears again-no, no, you must be happy,
dear."
" It is your kindness, Mrs. Maybrook;
I am not used to it, but I am happy;



PAGE 1

M. W. Dodd's Catalogue. 5 By the Author of "The Schonberg-Cotta Family." W INIFRED BERTRAM; AND THE WORLD SHE LIVED IN. By the author of the Sch6nberg-Cotta Family. I vol. 2mo .. ....$1 75 Fine edition, crown 8vo, tinted paper ..... 2 50 Cabinet edition, 16mo, tinted paper ......I 75 Sunday-school edition, i8mo, illustrated ....I oo Unlike the author's previous works, it iS not historical, but a story of modern life, with its scene laid in the heart of London. Winifred is a bright child, who very early in a naive way begins to be blase, having nothing to do but gratify her own childish desires. The lesson of the book is that one can only live happily and profitably by sympathy with others, and in exertion to benefit others. The characters are all ordinary and natural people, and the plot is without one sensational incident, but the author's genius for irradiating the common, her simple, pure spirit, her delicate humor, her faculty of seizing upon and representing character with fidelity, and the lovely spirit of morality and religion, make the book a delightful one. The whole story is suffused with vivacity and grace. George Elliot, whom we regard as the greatest female novelist of the age, never exceeded the terseness and epigrammatic force of expression of some passages in Winifred Bertram. .... The allegory of the expanding and contrating chamber is one of the most exquisite things in modern literature."-Round Table. "A charming and quickening story, as we might anticipate from the author."Congregationalist. "Delightful and charming are not properly descriptive of it, for while it is both, it is more than both; it is of the kind of books that one cannotread without growing better."-Indianapolis Stale Yournal. "It differs from its predecessors in that it is a story of our own time, but it is like them in its felicitous portraiture of charaAer, its life-likeness in narrative and Jialogue, and its exquisite illustrations of precious gospel truth."-Christian Times. "In her previous works it might have been supposed that some part of their success was due to the happy choice of her subjects, or to the quaintness and novelty Sof the form in which they were presented. But here there is no gentle illusion of the kind, and the effet is to place her clearly foremost among the living writers of religious stories. It is altogether the best and ablest book of the accomplished author."-Sunday-School Times. A succession of pictures of conversations, scenes, and comments, which show a wonderful measure.of shrewd common sense and genuine knowledge of human na ture."-National Bap5tist.


146 Paul and Margaret.
"I told her so, Paul; but she said it
was for her country she was doing it, and
that if she did not have you, there would
be some one else; she said it was her
duty, and pleasure too."
"She is more than kind, she is noble;
we soldiers love her dearly."
"I must help her now, Paul; I'll be
back soon with an orange for you; she
has a whole box of them for the men to-
day. Now let me hear you sing while I
go round with her," and Maggie turned
with a light step to cheer other sufferers
who looked for her coming, and were glad
to take the orange from her hand even
though she spoke no word, knowing she
was Paul's sister. There was something
to be done for nearly all. For the pale


38 Paul and Margaret.
eyes. She forgot her mother, her work,
everything but Pau. enlisting; and he,
after piling wood a half hour, began to
wonder why Maggie had not brought her
basket to go with him to the woods for
fagots as was her custom at night. Sud-
denly remembering that she was by when
he told his mother of his new resolution,
and feeling that she was unhappy some-
"where, he sought her in the garret, over
in the lot, and ran to the edge of the
woods, calling "Maggie! Maggie !"
" Not here, she must be on the hill, I'll
find her yet; poor little Maggie, I hope
she won't mind it much, but she will,
Sundays, if on no other day."
Thus talking in a low tone to himself
he climbed the hill; coming nearer, he


136 Paul and Margaret.
he is able to leave the hospital, when I
shall try and have him brought here. I
have, too, a quantity of sewing on hand
for the soldiers, and the child says she can
sew, or arrange while I use the machine;
what do you say ?"
"It is a fine plan for her, and I am
quite pleased with it myself; what does
Maggie say ?"
"It makes me very happy, sir," an-
swered Maggie with a smile and blush;
he saw that she appreciated the offer, and
that Mrs. Maybrook did not wish her to
think that the benefit was all on one side.
They spent some time in talking over
plans for the future, Mr. Maybrook occa-
sionally turning from his paper to make a
suggestion, and Maggie watching the


Enlisted. 49
"You know I have cut all the wood for
a long time, and made the fires, and
"brought the water, and done all the hard
work for mother; now, when I'm away
she can't do it, nor Maggie; who will ?"
" Why, I'll do it, of course. I'm ready
to do anything for you, Paul, anything in
reason; a boy that enlists to honor his
father ought to be encouraged. Yes, I'll
do all your work while you're gone."
"And another thing, father; Maggie
must go to school, and you mustn't expect
so much from mother with no help from
us, you know."
" Why, boy, your mother may be a
lady for all me, and not lift her hand;
but Maggie can't go to school, she aint
fit, and we sha'n't use your money to buy
5


144 Paul and Margaret.
the child would be almost bewildered to
find her wardrobe increasing to such an
extent. They were simple patterns har-
monizing with Maggie's quiet beauty, and
the lady told her she needed them for.
street and Sabbath wear, while the two
prints that she brought with her would
do for morning.
Maggie was pleased with her new at-
tire when in a few days she visited Paul
to show him the fruits of her friends
thoughtful kindness, and he said, "You
look charming Maggie, in that pretty hat;
they don't wear shakers here as they do
at home, and I'm glad you needn't wear
yours any longer."
" Oh, Paul, you can't think how kind
she is; it all seems like a dream to me; I


72 Paul and Margaret.
trusting nature, would not dream was
coming until she felt the pain and morti-
fication of it.
Maggie had not Paul's determined spirit
to rise above the world's contempt; she
did not feel like him that she could live
down the disgrace a drunken father was
heaping upon her; like her mother she
wished only to do her duty in the hum-
ble corner of the world where her Heav-
enly Father had placed her, ready to bear
trials in the spirit of meekness, but still
shrinking from them, and wishing that
she might be freed from them ; looking for-
ward to nothing higher and better; never
for a moment dreaming that joy or wealth
or honor could be hers; looking for the love
of none, but that of her Heavenly Father



PAGE 1

122 Paul and MAargaret. anxiety for him, but he is always cheerful, when I am there, at least; only I noticed a day or two ago a letter came to him, and his face was radiant as he read it; afterwards he seemed thoughtful, but it didn't last long; he was thinking of home, poor fellow." "Have you ordered the basket filled yet ?" "Yes, it is already packed in the hall; and now I must leave you, and get ready too ; we will start immediately after dinner." Maggie was wakened with a kiss, something so new to her that her eyes filled with tears of pleasure. Have you a fresh dress in your bag, dear ?" asked Mrs Maybrook.


Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1868, by
M. W. DODD,
In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States for the
Southern District of New York.
EDwRno O. J-N''s,
PR ITER AND STEREOTYPER,
No. 20 North William St.


4 JUVENILE AND SUNDAY SCHOOL BOOKS.
Alden's Stories for Young Americans. 4 vols
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Separately as follows
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As it is a kind of reading delightful to The volume contains an accurate and
the ypung, and as the anecdotes give a just somewhat full account of the origin of the
and exalted view of the Puritan character, Plymouth Colony, and of its progress dur-
we would commend the book to parents, as ing the first three years of its existence.
one of unusual value. It may be read by The charaiter and noble deeds of the Pil-
every one with great profit and interest.- grim Fathers are thus clearly brought to
N. Y. Evangelist. view. The fats stated are drawn from
original documents.-Preface.
The Example of Wash- The Old Stone
ington. With Portrait. o 50 The Stone House
" A little volume of great value. The au- Or, the Patriot's Fireside o 50
thor does not pretend to give the example Under the guise of a familiar, pleasant
of Washington in his entire life, but em- tale of the Revolutionary era, Dr. Alden
ploys the weight of his great name to arrest has here presented a condensed and most
and fix the attention of the young upon excellent compend of the elementary prin-
some of the essential excellencies of char- ciples of the science of government, and
ader that were so fully illustrated in that our early political history. It strikes us as
unequalled specimen of human greatness; one of the. most useful, as well as able and
the prominent points in thework being the ingenious of the author's many juvenile
charater of Washington as a religious man. works, and will be a good book for the
The book should be in the hands of every family, and not less for the school-room.-
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The Fred. and Minnie Library. 4 vols. in
sets ........................ $3 oo 00
Separately as follows:
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The 'World College. By Mar- Mary Belle Bartlett. A beauti-
garet E. Teller. Illustrated, ful story for girls. Illustrated,
I8mo .......o 75 8Imo ...... o 80
A deeply interesting story of an Ameri- The subject of this narrative is the
can youth devoting himself with a lofty eldest daughter of a household, forced by
sense of duty to the support of a depend- the death of her mother to take charge of
ent mother and sister, and gaining a it. The pledge given to her dying mother
strength and manly independence of char- to train the little ones to meet her in heav-
ader by the discipline he undergoes, as en is conscientiously fulfilled, and the les-
well as a cultivated mind. by a faithful and sons of her example, prudence, and piety,
religious employment of his leisure hours. rewarded by the most cheering results,
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will scarcely be read without deep and
"The Deaf Shoemaker, grateful emotion.-N. ork Evangelist.
and Other Stories. By Philip The Russell Family.
Barrett. Illustrated, 18mo 0 75 By Anna Hastings. Illustrated,
The author of this charming little book 18mo .. . 75
understands what will interest children,
and how to adapt his style and language to A very beautiful and instru6tive story
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School and family library.-Advocate and of the domestic circle.-New York Ob
ua rdiat. server.



PAGE 1

New Associations. 133 was intoxicating drink in any form; if there was a human being he shrunk from -considering him upon the lowest level that a human being can reach-it was the rumseller, or whoever would, no matter what his social position, put the poisoned cup to the lips of another. Paul felt degraded by contact with such a man; and well he might, with his true manliness, his innate nobleness of character. Maggie walked home with her new friend as in a dream; she could scarcely realize she had seen Paul, had sat by him, had smoothed his hair and had clasped his feverish hands in her small, cool ones; had held the cup for him when he took the drops prepared by his nurse, and told him all the particulars of her journey. How 12


86 Paul and Margaret.
"both were; how like reality it seemed;
and when the morning came she had
planned it all out. Surely she could get
to him, and if they knew that she was
Paul's sister, they would let her stay, and
take care of him. She had made up her
mind to go, but first she would ask Mr.
Hobert about it: he would know more
than either she or her mother. When
she went below that morning Maggie's
face had taken on a new expression. 'The
mother noticed the change and wondered
why Margaret looked so much like Paul.
Was it her imagination ? No, some of
Paul's enthusiasm inspired her; she was
beginning to think for herself, to trust in
her own powers; she was growing self-
reliant, was making plans, and looking



PAGE 1

96 Paul and Margaret. "But you must travel in the night if you go straight through." "I am not afraid; God will take care of me, you know, Mr. Hobert, and indeed I must go." "What will you do when you get to the hospital ?" Go right to Paul." And if they refuse to admit you ? "I'll tell them I'm his sister." "And if they still refuse asked Mr. Hohert, to try her farther. With spirit Maggie looked into his eyes, and answered, "I'll find the President, and tell him about it." "But it may not interest him; in the midst of all his weighty cares" "I think it ought; don't you, Sir ?"



PAGE 1

56 Paul and Margaret. had been undisturbed, and immediately divined they had neither of them slept, but with her usual taciturnity she did not speak her thoughts. "Is father awake? asked Paul. "No." The mother paused, looking upon her son with the mother's heart shining from her eyes. At last she ventured to say with a low, trembling voice and yet with tones of earnest feeling, "Paul, you are very dear to me, never forget it." "I know it, mother, I always felt it," answered Paul, while Maggie looked with wonder upon the haggard face bending over them, just discernible in the twilight. "I have not done my duty tb either of



PAGE 1

160 Paul and Margaret. guide him, for he is older than I. He asked me to read a chapter to him and I did-I think his mother will be glad to hear such news from him. We hope you will be able to send us a box for the boys, they are so glad of a variety. I always read your letters to them; they all remember you. Paul, too, sends his love, and I shall always love you for your great kindness to me. AIAGIE. The mother and sister of James Fitch were both before him, as he looked up from the letter. Tears were in many eyes, but none wept so bitterly as they. They remembered long ago laughing over the misfortunes of Maggie's father; they



PAGE 1

Paul's Duty. 39 saw her lying on the ground and heard the sobbing moan of her troubled heart, and with a bound he was by her, and stooping, wound his arms about her and pressed his lips upon her wet face. Why, Maggie don't, don't feel so; I wish I hadn't told you, poor little sister; you're all wet with the dew, and cold as a stone; come, let's go home; it isn't so bad as you think, we'll talk about it, and if you feel so I won't go, indeed I won't, only don't sob so. There, now, you feel better, I know, he said, as Maggie wound her arms about his neck and kissed him many times. "You must go home; oh, how cold you are, you wicked little thing; come, let's run down hill and get warmed up,"



PAGE 1

48 Paul and Margaret. "Ha! ha! ha! soldier! aint you 'fraid you'll be shot by the rebels, hey ?" No, father, my fears are iot for myself." Who, then ?" don't have any for me, I hope ? fool if you do. I'll do well enough on the bounty. Tell you what, Paul, its the handsomest thing you ever did, leaving the bounty to us. I like to see a boy honor his father, hang'd if I don't." But father, I sat up on purpose to talk with you to-night, and I want you to promise me something, will you ?" "Anything in reason, Paul. You're a dutiful son, you respect your father, anybody can see it, and you're no coward, not a bit of it; so go ahead, don't be afraid; what do you want to say to me ?"



PAGE 1

Enlisted. 45 until the pulses of their brave hearts ceased to beat, and they have laid themselves down to sleep amid the dying and the dead, to wake we trust to a brighter *life, crowned with fadeless flowers in the presence of that host who have passed from conflict to glory. We cannot depict the silent anguish of the mother's heart, or the first great sorrow of Maggie, as they still pursued the duties devolving' upon them. The days and weeks went by. Paul had volunteered and been mustered into the United States service for three years, and now, clothed in his new uniform, he was spending the last night at home. It were useless to attempt to pcrtray the feelings of the party; scarcely a home in


This page contains no text.



PAGE 1

CHAPTER VII. The Meeting. V E E will not follow Maggie step by step as she takes her first journey, nor enter into her varied feelings as she looks with the eye of appreciation upon other scenery than that of the little village, or as she thinks of her escape for a while from the thraldom of home, and anticipates her meeting with her brother; enough that her thoughts were kept within her own breast, for Maggie had not been in the habit of conversing, and the gentleman under whose care she was gave little 10* 113


CHAPTER VII.
The Meeting.
V E E will not follow Maggie step by
step as she takes her first journey,
nor enter into her varied feelings as she
looks with the eye of appreciation upon
other scenery than that of the little village,
or as she thinks of her escape for a while
from the thraldom of home, and anticipates
her meeting with her brother; enough
that her thoughts were kept within her
own breast, for Maggie had not been in
the habit of conversing, and the gentle-
man under whose care she was gave little
10* 113



PAGE 1

Childlike Trust. I01 "Then he don't want the money," answered the unfeeling brute, "and I do. Stop your infernal clatter, both of you. Go to your work, old woman, and leave the young one to me, or I'll give you a worse clip than you've had for a year." The mother sighed; it was useless to say more; Maggie would have to yield; there was no help for it. But the brave girl thought differently; she never had defied him, because he was her father in spite of his degradation, but now the duty of a child and the love of a sister were in the balance, and love was stronger than the unjust requirements of a parent; she would die sooner than give him the money, but it was folly to brave him; he had the power to take it from her, and in 9*


166 Paul and Margaret.
and love, what she has done for our sons.
I would ask what is your pleasure in re-
gard to the box we are filling? it will be
ready to send off on Wednesday morning.
There was but one mind-the box should
be directed to Miss Margaret Bailey, in
care of Mr. Maybrook, and letters of ac-
knowledgment should go from each
mother whose son had been in her care.
Maggie should know the high esteem and
respect these ladies had for her self-sacri-
ficing spirit.
I will only add, that with the letters
from the three mothers one went signed
by Nellie Fitch, a letter so full of peni.
tence and contrition, that the tears coursed
down Maggie's cheeks as she read it, tears
of joy that she had won her enemy.



PAGE 1

Aspirations. 19 bar-room, listening to low jokes, swallowing huge portions of poison, and sacrificing the life blood of those who should have been dear to him, but were not. Nothing was dear to him but the mug which he held in his nerveless hand and carried hourly to his bloated lips. A strange love, one would say, surely "a most unaccountable love for a man"a being made to walk upright, to lift his forehead to the eternal heavens; to bear about with him all the gifts of the creator-conscience, reason, love and hope -to bear them until he chose to trample them under foot, and appear daily before the world and before the still merciful Giver with his poor, needy, starving soul, clothed upon with rags, scarce covered



PAGE 1

170 Paul and Margaret. Startled, she drew near, and in hurried words they told her that he had been kicked by a horse at the tavern; they had just got him home, and the doctor was on his way; would be there soon; nothing could be done until he came; and one by one they left, except a few of the nearest neighbors. They did not tell her that being in a state of intoxication he had staggered from place to place, until he found himself in the stable; that having been warned off by the groom he had recklessly and in anger made his way into the stall of a most vicious horse, and there met the blows that would shortly cause his death. Mrs. Bailey looked, with a troubled conscience, upon the wreck of him she


130 Paul and Margaret.
be slaves. Mother will think it best, and
sometime we'll make a home for her."
Maggie seemed to be dreaming; her
eyes were looking afar off, out of the
window near, and Paul caught the spirit
and said, "Yes, after the war; just us
three; won't it be glorious?"
" It will be peace," said Maggie, slowly.
" Yes, peace for us three, peace for the
nation, a world of peace."



PAGE 1

26 Paul and Margaret. It hadcost all the time and strength of the poor woman before the war broke out to provide food sufficient, and now it was impossible; she saw nothing but starvation before them. To be sure they had corn and potatoes plenty, of Paul's raising from the half-acre lot adjoining the house, but if she had no money to provide her husband with liquor, would he not sell whatever the cellar afforded to gratify his vitiated appetite? he had often done so before, and she had no reason to hope for better things from him. Work was still plenty, but even the rent had been increased and now took nearly all she received; and some clothes they must have though of the'poorest sort, It looked very dark, but she said not a word even to Paul.


128 Paul and Margaret.
" Not until evening; I shall be too
busy, and if you will take my charge to-
night, I will not come back here."
"Very well!" answered the lady, and
Mr. Headley shook hands with Paul, pat-
ted Maggie on the head, and went his way.
A long talk they had that afternoon, as
Maggie sat by Paul's bed, her hand in his,
and many a glance of pity did she cast
upon the cots about her.
"How long are you going to stay, Mag-
gie ?"
"Until you are able to go back, Paul."
"I shall soon be up, dear, but I am not
going back; no, indeed; back to my
work as soon as I am able; I have said it
from the first; I'm in for the war, Maggie,
and if God raises me up, my duty will


56 Paul and Margaret.
had been undisturbed, and immediately
divined they had neither of them slept,
but with her usual taciturnity she did
not speak her thoughts.
"Is father awake? asked Paul.
"No." The mother paused, looking
upon her son with the mother's heart
shining from her eyes. At last she ven-
tured to say with a low, trembling voice
and yet with tones of earnest feeling,
"Paul, you are very dear to me, never
forget it."
"I know it, mother, I always felt it,"
answered Paul, while Maggie looked
with wonder upon the haggard face
bending over them, just discernible in
the twilight.
"I have not done my duty tb either of



PAGE 1

36 Paul and Margaret. world had suddenly been extinguished. The darkness was fast approaching, but Margaret had not raised her eyes to note the fact; the dew settled damp upon her clothing, but she only felt that Paul was going to leave them. Oh, the dreadful war! how she had trembled as every new item of horror reached her ears concerning it; but even though startled and terrified, she had never brought it near; it had been far off always ; she had not realized it as a thing touching her more nearly than to listen as Paul told her what he gathered at the store and in the streets; told of the many battles, of the hundreds left dead upon the field, of the wounded and dying in the hospitals, until she saw their



PAGE 1

176 Paul and Margaret. will cast thee off forever." No, she could not fold to her stricken heart one single ray of hope-all was fearful darkness. Well nigh crushed by this terrible blow, she had not strength to call the friend who waited in the adjoining room. With head bowed low upon her bosom, she wept and moaned in agony, for this was more than the passing away of a friend; this was eternal death-a never-ending separation. 0 the depth of the riches both of the wisdom and knowledge of God! how unspeakable are his judgments and his ways past finding ou; !" Time passed unheeded; none could know the wretchedness and depth of woe of this stricken woman; friends pitied and assisted; all was done for her that


Enlisted. 45
until the pulses of their brave hearts
ceased to beat, and they have laid them-
selves down to sleep amid the dying and
the dead, to wake we trust to a brighter
*life, crowned with fadeless flowers in the
presence of that host who have passed
from conflict to glory.
We cannot depict the silent anguish of
the mother's heart, or the first great sor-
row of Maggie, as they still pursued the
duties devolving' upon them. The days
and weeks went by. Paul had volun-
teered and been mustered into the United
States service for three years, and now,
clothed in his new uniform, he was
spending the last night at home. It
were useless to attempt to pcrtray the
feelings of the party; scarcely a home in


11 6 Paul and Margaret.
patience, and taking a carriage they drove
to the place mentioned. In a few words
Mr. Headley asked his friends to care for
the child until his return, giving them
something of her history and promising
to be back before noon.
"Come back to dinner, Mr. Headley,
and we will go with you this afternoon ;
my wife spends part of every day among
the sick; work enough for all, I assure
you," said the host.
"Sad work, too; I'm glad she has a
heart for it; thank you, I will be here
before the dinner hour; good day." He
turned away, and the gentleman led Mag
gie to the parlor, saying, Sit down, and
I will speak to my wife; she will make
you welcome."



PAGE 1

2 JUVENILE AND SUNDAY SCHOOL BOOKS. The Brewer's Family. Amy Carr. By Caroline By Mrs. Ellis. A Temperance Cheesebro. 3 illustrations, i6mo. Story. I vol. I6mo .$1 25 $I 15 We find this an admirable story of EngA story of a girl who, when an infant, lish life, by an English lady whose writings was left in the cars asleep, abandoned by are well known on this side of the water. its mother, and was taken home and adoptIt describes how a Christian man, brought ed by the kind-hearted engineer. The girl up to the business of a brewer, and until becomes in the end a blessing to the house middle life never once imagining that there by bringing into it, after her own converwas in it any inconsistency with his Chrission, the benign influence of the gospel. tian profession, was awakened at length to The story is very interesting, many of the a sense of such inconsistency, and led to its scenes being new to this class of books, abandonment. In his own experience in and the teachings evangelical and good.this regard his family also intimately Sunday School Times. -shared. The story is an exceedingly interesting one, with an admirable lesson.-Robert, the Cabin Boy. Christian Times. By H. K. P., author of "Mary The Kemptons. A TemAlden," etc. Illustrated, I6mo. perance Story. By H. K. P., 15 author of "I obert, the Cabin A story of uncommon beauty and interest, about a boy who had been kidnapped Boy," and other popular juvenile when a child, and carried to sea by a sailbooks. I6mo, 3 illustrations. or. The dangers and temptations of a sea I 25 life are forcibly depided; also the great benefits of Bethel Societies and religious No better temperance book has been services for seamen, both when in port and issued from the press for many years. It when at sea.-Sunday School Times. is a well-told story of youthful struggles "and triumphs, beautifully illustrating the Jacques Bonneval ; or, blessings of temperance, and showing thel sad ravages of intemperance. Many of its The Days of the Dragonnades. passages are of thrilling interest, and its A Tale of the Huguenots. By wide circulation would be of great service the auor of y to the cause of temperance.-Temnehrance e author of ary Powell. Advocate. I vol. i6mo .... .I 00 A capital temperance story. It differs So lifelike are the scenes described, from most of the stories on this subjedt in that one unhesitatingly lends his confiderce, that t.e famu y who-se history chik;y giv's and follows the ittle compan, of martyrs point to the argument is not that of a poor through all their sufferings from Papal miserable outcast, but one of the highest cruelty in France, until they are safely respe6ability.-Sunday School Times. landed on the shores of England. The story is one of intense interest, with all the Capt. Christie's Grand-, added charm of novelty, from its quaint S language and careful correspondence with daughter. I6mo, 3 illustrations. the historical events of the time.-HudI 25 son Co. Republican. In our boyhood we loved to read books Cherry and Violet A which brought tears to our eyes. This y a story, of Captain Christie would, certainly Tale of the Great Plague. By* have held a high place in our list of favorthe author of Mary Powell." ites if tested by this effed. It is an Eng16mo, cheap edition P 1 mo lish story of a retired sea-captain, living n 6mo, heap edition ..I 15 Yerkshire with his grand-daughter and an While not exclusively a religious tale, it orphan boy whom the old man adopted into is full of the spirit of self-sacrifice and dutihis family; indeed, the interest of the ful affedtion, and expresses directly much stoiy trn's more on the boy than on the true religious feeling. girl, but both are worthy of the love beThis beautiful story of domestic affecstowed on them.-National Baptist. tion, suffering, and self-sacrificing fidelity, The book is a valuable addition to our will be read by old and young with eager Sabbath School list.-Sunday School attention and pleasure.-Christian ln Tersr. telli-encer. .' !.-', .!' d


l 2 Paul and Margaret.
has been truly likened to the very gate of
hell-may every youth shun it, every
maiden use her influence against it!



PAGE 1

Margaret at School. 75 moulding her character more than she was aware. They were showing to her, that lowly as Paul's childhood had been, God had given him, with countless others, a work to do, a great and glorious work. Paul, though poor, and unknown by the exalted of this world, God had lifted from obscurity and poverty and placed where he could not be bound by such fetters as had been a perpetual drag upon his youth. Might not the same be done for her? only He knew who controlled the destinies of all. She would patiently wait and see, and as she waited, improving every golden opportunity, she wrote Paul something of what was in her heart, and he in the camp, on the march, or communing silently with himself as he paced



PAGE 1

Paul's Duty. 35 mad ? Bravely suppressing a cry of horror, and overcoming the sudden dizziness in her head, she stealthily slid from the room out into the yard, breathing quickly, and with a startled look about her eyes. She stood a moment quietly holding by the fence, then stooping, she crept through, and ran up the hill until she panted with fatigue. With slower steps she pressed on, her little brown hand holding fast against her side to still the painful throbbings, until she reached the spot where, every pleasant sabbath, Paul had read and talked to her. Throwing herself upon the cold grass, she burst into a torrent of passionate weeping. It seemed as though her heart must break; it was as if the only light in the great


76 Paul and Margaret.
back and forth on picket duty, saw Mag-
gie's character and intellect expanding
slowly but beautifully each week. He
felt sure that she too would one day
burst the cruel chain that now disgraced
them all.
3*


26 Paul and Margaret.
It had- cost all the time and strength
of the poor woman before the war broke
out to provide food sufficient, and now
it was impossible; she saw nothing but
starvation before them. To be sure they
had corn and potatoes plenty, of Paul's
raising from the half-acre lot adjoining
the house, but if she had no money to
provide her husband with liquor, would
he not sell whatever the cellar afforded
to gratify his vitiated appetite? he had
often done so before, and she had no
reason to hope for better things from
him. Work was still plenty, but even the
rent had been increased and now took
nearly all she received; and some clothes
they must have though of the'poorest sort,
It looked very dark, but she said not a
word even to Paul.


Childlike Trust. 1 I
drunkard's wife and child experience,
might be felt by him who pours the poison
out so liberally, and entices his weak vic-
tim to partake Would that every pallid
face and shrunken form, (index of broken
hearts,) might haunt his sleeping and wak-
ing hours, filling his life with such a sense
of guilt, such an entire abhorrence of self, as
to compel him to turn from the vile traffic
and seek honorable employment! The
rumseller he who holds human lives in
the balance and weighs them down with
Spaltry gold! My very soul abhors him!
my nature shrinks from all contact with
him! I could not dwell upon the hateful
theme but that I hope to snatch from his
toils some poor, weak, confiding youth as a
brand from the burning. The bar-room


62 Paul and Margaret.
murmur; patient and uncomplaining she
endured the taunts of her schoolmates as
they carelessly, and, it is to be hoped,
thoughtlessly, called her drunken
Bailey's daughter." Even the little brown
hood she wore, though neat and clean,
was held up to ridicule, and Maggie, in
spite of her desire to learn, would gladly
have stayed away from school, were it
not that she knew it was Paul's wish that
she should go.
I would not convey the idea that all
her schoolmates were unkind and cruel,
but there were those who, by their over-
bearing manner, gay disposition, and the
freedom with which they scattered sweet-
meats among their friends, seemed to rule
the larger part of the school. A few



PAGE 1

16 Paul and Margaret. them; besides, she had rather he would teach her, and Paul went winter evenings always. He knew a great deal-his sister thought she could never learn so much; but Paul praised her, and said that she remembered better than he did, and all that she learned she would never forget. These things that Paul read to her and told her of on Sundays came to her through the week, and the quiet, sober face was no index of the thoughts that filled her heart so full that she forgot how much she worked and how tired her little frame was when night came. Did the mother never desire her child to learn as others did? as she herself had when young ?


Aspirations. 15
brother did; she did not feel her need of
faith and hope yet; she prayed because
she loved to, and knew not what else to
do to show her love for the One who
made the earth so beautiful and the Sab-
.bath to come so regularly; perhaps by
and by she will need more hope and
faith and patience, then she will pray
differently.
She had never been to school as the
children in the village had, and she some-
times wondered what it was like, but
when Paul asked her if she wanted to go
she answered, "No."
" Why not "
For the same reason her mother did
not go to church-she had no clothes
decent to wear and no way of getting


160 Paul and Margaret.
guide him, for he is older than I. He
asked me to read a chapter to him and I
did-I think his mother will be glad to
hear such news from him.
We hope you will be able to send us a
box for the boys, they are so glad of a
variety. I always read your letters to
them; they all remember you. Paul,
too, sends his love, and I shall always
love you for your great kindness to me.
AIAGIE.
The mother and sister of James Fitch
were both before him, as he looked up
from the letter. Tears were in many
eyes, but none wept so bitterly as they.
They remembered long ago laughing over
the misfortunes of Maggie's father; they



PAGE 1

Margaret at School. 69 With a low impressive tone he read a few of Christ's words. Not one there but heard every sound, and felt the full force of the teacher's meaning. It was a part of the eighteenth chapter of Matthew. He read five verses without looking up, and then raising his eyes and fixing them upon those who had stood in the entry, he said, in a slow tone, "But whoso shall offend one of these little ones which believe in me, it were better for him that a millstone were hanged about his neck, and that he were drowned in the depth of the sea;" then turning to his book he resumed the reading. Presently he lifted his sad eyes to their faces again, and said, more slowly even than before, "Take heed that ye despise not one of these little


140 Paul and Margaret.
to your standard. Now, let me see:
there are four wrappers to be made; if
you can baste, we will get them all done
"before dinner-plain work you see. We'll
take them round this afternoon-three of
the men are to sit up to day, for the first
time, and they mast have fresh wrappers."
"Is Paul one of them, Mrs. May-
brook ?" asked Maggie.
"No, dear; Paul's thigh will prevent
his getting up at present; when he is
able to sit up he will be nearly well.
We will bring him here as soon as we
can, won't we ?"
"I should like it, but "-Maggie hesi-
tated a moment before she finished-" I'm
afraid I can't do enough to pay his board
too."



PAGE 1

Margaret at School. 67 They were sad, indeed, in their gaze as they rested upon her, but there was a sternness in the lines of the mouth she had never seen before. Tenderly he stooped and, putting his arm about her, drew her near to him, and left a silent kiss on her pale face. It was all the sympathy he could offer then, and it was enough; her thin lips quivered and she clung to the hand that held her with so firm and kind a grasp as though she could never let him go. One more bitter remark fell upon her ear, as she walked by her kind teacher to the door, it was this, "I don't think Mr. Hobert has any right to bring a low pauper into the school. -I'll make her repent coming, for one; you may depend on that."



PAGE 1

Childlike Trust. 1 I drunkard's wife and child experience, might be felt by him who pours the poison out so liberally, and entices his weak victim to partake Would that every pallid face and shrunken form, (index of broken hearts,) might haunt his sleeping and waking hours, filling his life with such a sense of guilt, such an entire abhorrence of self, as to compel him to turn from the vile traffic and seek honorable employment! The rumseller he who holds human lives in the balance and weighs them down with Spaltry gold! My very soul abhors him! my nature shrinks from all contact with him! I could not dwell upon the hateful theme but that I hope to snatch from his toils some poor, weak, confiding youth as a brand from the burning. The bar-room



PAGE 1

68 Paul and Margaret. "Young ladies, take your seats." With sudden terror they shrunk from before the stern gaze of their teacher, and looked with dismay into each others' faces, as they saw him lead by the hand the little pauper to a seat nearest his desk. The despised hood and cloak he himself hung upon the hook, and then, for a moment, rested his large hand upon her head as it sunk upon the form before her. Maggie felt that sympathy and love were expressed in that simple act, but she dared not even whisper her thanks, nor was it needed. The good teacher felt that her spirit was crushed, and that it would take more than one kind deed to cause Maggie to forget the cruel words she had heard.


Paul's Duty. 25
ters. She looked forward to nothing else.
No hopes brightened the dark prospect,
no desires, for were they not useless ? and
upon this fresh Autumn morning, as she
stood by the tub, washing, alone-for
Margaret was gathering a basket of fuel
in the woods and Paul had taken home
the clothes ironed yesterday-a dread of
the coming winter settled upon her
spirits more sensibly than ever before.
For two years civil war raged in the
country; taxes had been increased, and
light as the burden to some, the poor
found it was more than they could well
bear, for with taxation, prices of the
most common articles were rising weekly,
and thus the very poor were more nearly
affected by it.
3


New Associations. 137
play of the lovely animated features of
Mrs. Maybrook, and growing more deep-
ly in love with her at each new sentence,
feeling that she could gladly labor for
one who seemed so noble and disinterest-
ed in her charities. Then, too, the
thought of soon having Paul in the
very house with her, away from the
sights and sounds of his present quarters,
where she could watch his progress every
hour, was almost too much joy.
It was plain that Maggie felt just as
Mrs. Maybrook desired she should; that
she was to be not entirely indebted to
her charity for a home, but that her ser-
vices were to be equivalent to the benefit
received; for the child had by far too
much pride to be satisfied with anything
12*


92 Paul and Margaret.
"And if he should be there, you want
to use some of his money to go on
with ?"
"Yes, sir, he would be glad to have
me; he would get well sooner if I was
there; perhaps I could work part of the
time and earn something if he was not
needing me."
"Very likely. I'll think it over, and
will wait for Paul's next letter before I
decide."
"Can I go home now, sir ?"
"For the day ?" inquired the teacher.
"Yes, sir, I want to be ready if I go."
"But you may not go, my child; how-
ever do as you please about it." Mr.
Hobert suddenly turned to his copies
again, and found that his eyes were blurr-


32 Paul and Margaret.
"If you live! Paul, Paul, you are but
a boy yet."
"Sixteen, mother, and strong and
healthy; the country needs every healthy
man; I can do nothing here, I never
shall; you know, mother, how they put
me down because-because-"
His mother raised her. eyes beseeching-
ly, and Paul stopped a moment, while
the blood mounted to his brow, and as
he threw back his head he added, I'de-
test the feeling that would crush a family
for the sins of one; I know I can be a
man somewhere; I will be a man, hon-
ored and respected, see if I don't "
The mother's gaze grew tender and lov-
ing, but she did not answer, and the ex-
cited boy continued, "and, mother, think



PAGE 1

130 Paul and Margaret. be slaves. Mother will think it best, and sometime we'll make a home for her." Maggie seemed to be dreaming; her eyes were looking afar off, out of the window near, and Paul caught the spirit and said, "Yes, after the war; just us three; won't it be glorious?" It will be peace," said Maggie, slowly. Yes, peace for us three, peace for the nation, a world of peace."



PAGE 1

Childlike Trust. 99 without heeding the warning glance of her mother, she opened her hand and displayed the roll of bills, but with a start of terror she hastily thrust them into her bosom, as her father but half dressed emerged from the bed room, where, although it was nearly noon, he had but just risen from his drunken sleep. "Money! what have you got money for, you hussy; where did you steal it from ? give it to me this minute, or I'll break every bone in your skin." Maggie, pale and trembling, dared not speak, but retreating towards the door, was about to flee from the presence of one who had never spoken a kind word to her. "Come back!" he shouted; "open that door and I'll knock you down.



PAGE 1

Enlisted. 47 finished, folded and put into the knapsack, and the stockings were all ready for the last one to be toed off, when a step was .heard upon the gravel walk, and Mrs. Bailey said, It is your father, Paul, you had better go to bed, both of you." I'll stay and see him, mother, I sha'n't have another chance, perhaps." Mrs. Bailey looked a shade more anxious, but it was too late to object, for immediately the door opened and the father made his appearance. He was not more intoxicated than usual, but enough so to be angry or foolish, whichever feeling should chance to be uppermost; fortunately for the family, it proved to be the latter.



PAGE 1

Paul's Duty. 37 ghastly faces and bleeding forms in her dreams, and never sought her bed until she had pleaded with Christ to pity them. She had never thought of the reality coming home to her as this would make it. No, no, it could not be! Paul standing before the cannon mouth of the enemy her Paul shot down and trampled upon by the hurrying army, dying beneath the cold stars of a far off land, with no Maggie to listen to his words she could not bear it, no, she would not try. The darkness came, and the evening wind threw down autumn leaves upon her, but she did not move only as a new thought of agony would go quivering through the small frame, and bring another flood of tears from her closed 4



PAGE 1

114 Paul and Margaret. heed to her after seeing her wants supplied. Mr. Headley was hastening on to Washington as an agent of the Sanitary Commission to attend and nurse the sick and wounded from the recent battles. A noble-hearted Christian man, well qualified for his work, he was just the one Mr. Hobert thought would take good care of a child like Maggie ; and good care he would certainly give her, but at this time he was all engrossed in his coming labors, and would have decidedly refused to take her in charge had he not known that sometimes such girls prove valuable assistants to the female nurses in the hospitals; he had also a high respect for his friend Hobert, who assured him that


84 Paul and Margaret.
"It's come; mother, he's alive."
" God be praised," replied Mrs. Bailey,
as, taking her hands from the tub, and
wiping suds from them, she sat down to
hear Maggie read it.
"The voice of the child trembled, and
the tears started to the mother's eyes at
the first words. Maggie could scarcely
control herself to finish reading the short
but precious letter. Those violets! how
they were treasured; how carefully they
were placed in her bible and looked at
again and again.
"You must write every day, Margaret,"
said the mother, with a voice that trem-
bled with intense feeling.
" Yes, indeed, mother."
" We must thank God for sparing him
to us."



PAGE 1

JUVENILE AND SUNDAY SCHOOL BOOKS. 3 Charlotte ElizabeIt's Works. 7 vols. 8mo, illustrated, in sets ............... .$6 oo Charlotte Elizabeth's Works have become so universally known, and are so highly and deservedly appreciated in this country, that it has become almost superfluous to praise them. She thinks deeply and accurately, is a great analyst of the human heart, and withal clothes her ideas in most appropriate and eloquent language.-Albany A rgus. Separately as follos : Judah's Lion .o s5 Judea Capta .$o 85 "Judaea Capta,' the last offering from the Individuality of charaer is faithfully pen of this gifted and popular writer, will be preserved, and every one is necessary to esteemed as one of her best works. It is a the plot. The readerwill find in this book graphic narrative of the invasion of Judea much information that he can only find by the Roman legions under Vespasian and elsewhere by very laborious research. Titus, presenting affedting views of the desCharlotte Elizabeth is a firm believer in olation of her towns and cities, by the the national restoration of the Jews to the ravages of iron-hearted, bloodthirsty solpossessionof Palestine, but believes they diers, and of the terrible catastrophe witwill previously be converted to Christiannessed in the destruction of Jerusalem. ity. We advise our friends not to take up Her occasional strictures on the history of this book until they can spare time for the the apostate Josephus, who evidently wrote perusal; because, if they commence, it to please his imperial masters, appear to will require much self-denial to lay it down have been well merited.--Christian Obuntil it is fairly read through.-LChristian server. A dvocate and 7ournal. The Deserter .o s Count Raymond of TouThe principal hero of the story is a o and t e a t young Irishman, who was led, through the louse, and the Crusade against influence of one of his comrades, to enlist the Albigenses under Pope Innoin the British army, contrary to the earnest cent III. ..... 6 85 entreaties of his mother, and who went on from one step to another in the career of It is a striking, life-like pi&ture of the crime till he was finally shot as a deserter; episode, replete with important lessons.rs ri 1ei New York Evangelise lng te tou no ill afer e a rai with Explanatory Notes and a Conformity, and FalseMemoir.. ..........$o 8S "a We doubt if the o lives of many female hn d aner d Truth ...a0 5 are blended with more incidents and richer same tie to l essons of instruation and wisdoml than the We doubt if the lives of many femaleg We read this little volume with great life of Charlotte Elizabeth. It will be and unqualified satisfaction. We wish we found as captivating as any roinance, and could induce every professor of religion in willJeave on the mind a lasting impression our large cities, and indeed all who are in for good.-A lbany Spe67ator. any way exposed to contact with the fashionable world, to read it. The author, in this little work, fully sustains h.r reputation as The Flower Garden. a very accomplished and superior writer, 0 85 and the stanch advocate of Evangelical 0 8 principles, carried out and made influenA collection of deeply interesting sketchtial upon the whole life and condu6t.es and tales, beautifully illustrated unde El1i4. Recorder. the. similitude of flowers.


The Letter. 149
mourner's tears be shed above the fresh
made grave.
Mrs. Bailey is there, strange as it may
seem; she who never had entered the
village church because she-felt abashed in
the presence of those who knew her cir-
cumstances, and because she had nothing
fit to appear in but her sunbonnet, and
she had not courage'to wear that. She is
there to-day that she may add her mite to
the weightier contributions of others,
and because good Mr. Hobert had almost
insisted upon it, and his lovely wife had
called for her, and brought her there,
taking care, too, that she should feel as
much at ease as any.
Mr. Hobert had an object in view. Paul
and Margaret had been favorites with him
13*


The. Inebriate's Death. 171
once respected and loved. Had God no-,
ted her murmurings and answered the
half formed desires of her heart so speed-
ily, so fearfully ? Would he take him from
life without a moment's warning? She
feared so; and bitterly did she regret
that even in thought she had been reluc-
tant to bear with him. Must he die in
his sins? the thought was agony; but
soon the doctor came; every word he
spoke and every change in his countenance
were noted; the neighbors had gone into
the other room and she was alone with
him as he made his examinations; the
bruises on the surface of the body were
severe but not dangerous, there must be
internal injuries to cause his long uncon-
sciousness; he might revive; until he



PAGE 1

The Meeting. 1 9 river, and joy too; have no fear; now come with me and rest." Did Maggie note the contrast between the lady and herself? No; the rich morning robe was unheeded and her own dark calico unthought of, but she did dwell somewhat upon the kind tones and gentle words of the stranger; and Mrs. Maybrook thought within herself that it was the most interesting child's face she had ever seen. She took her hat and shawl and bidding her eat. of the lunch "before her, she turned away thinking Maggie would rather be alone. Returning soon, she said, "Now, my dear, you must lie down until dinner time, and then you need wait no longer; there will be work even for you to do, and you must


96 Paul and Margaret.
"But you must travel in the night if
you go straight through."
"I am not afraid; God will take care
of me, you know, Mr. Hobert, and indeed
I must go."
"What will you do when you get to
the hospital ?"
" Go right to Paul."
And if they refuse to admit you ?
"I'll tell them I'm his sister."
"And if they still refuse asked Mr.
Hohert, to try her farther.
With spirit Maggie looked into his
eyes, and answered, "I'll find the Presi-
dent, and tell him about it."
"But it may not interest him; in the
midst of all his weighty cares- "
"I think it ought; don't you, Sir ?"



PAGE 1

i;,r;i;;p;aai;l' r nirisi . 1 111 1.


The Letter. 161
called to mind the contempt and insult
they had heaped upon her, that she had
borne in the spirit of meekness, and now
she was ministering to one dear to them,
forgetful of the treatment she had received
at their hands. Bitter, burning shame
did that sister feel as she bowed her head
to hide the tears; then she saw how far,
far above her was the one she had tried
to crush in her wicked pride. And the
mother felt that the humble, forgiving
Maggie had exhibited before her child a
far better Christian spirit than she had
ever done, and in humility she rose and
brought forward a letter, asking Mr. Ho-
bert to read it, saying, it had come from
James that morning; she desired all to
know of Maggie's nobleness; it was the
14*


20 Paul and Margaret.
even with these, all unknowing and un-
caring that it needed to be arrayed in
other garments. From morn till dark
he left his family alone, that is why
they could be calm and patient; but
at night he terrified them, and that is
why they were joyless.
Grief has its mission, and blessed
are they that endure even unto the
end-endure as seeing Him who is in-
visible, losing sight of themselves mean-
while. One would have said while look-
ing upon the outward life of Mrs.
Bailey that she was the. very embod-
iment of patience; none but her Heav-
enly Father .knew the struggles of her
spirit, the bitterness of her thoughts, the
complaints she would not allow herself



PAGE 1

28 Paul and Margaret. the ever-increasing. rise in the price of provisions. On this morning, however, his thoughts took a different channel. The men stood in groups talking loud and earnestly of the latest news, and as Paul passed by he heard the sounds, "More men to be raised have to draft town bounty!" and the like, until he caught the spirit of the day and longed to share in a nation's glory. Why could not he, as well as others ? He was not a man, to be sure-onlysixteen, and small in stature-but his heart was large, and his limbs were supple, strong, capable of endurance; he felt sure he could do something; yes, he would volunteer and the bounty should make his mother and Maggie comfortable for the winter.



PAGE 1

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1868, by M. W. DODD, In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States for the Southern District of New York. EDwRno O. J-N''s, PRITER AND STEREOTYPER, No. 20 North William St.



PAGE 1

52 Paul and Margaret. knows best what she needs in the house, you know. "Yes, that's good; we shall live like princes now: I'll see that Barnes is paid every week; but pull out the book, boy; you'll go off and forget it, and I'm getting confounded sleepy." "I hav'n't got the book, father. My teacher has it; he will see to all the. money; I don't want you to be troubled with it, and he will give you all you need. I told him to." A terrible curse burst from the lips of the avaricious man, and for a moment his rage was uncontrollable; but Paul hastened to add, "I've got some cloth already for you, father, a pair of pants, first-rate, warm cloth."



PAGE 1

Enlisted. 57 you, but I love you both; never doubt it, Paul. Maggie, do you not believe it ?" "We know it, mother; you have always been kind," said Paul, taking hold of the hard hand. "Not kind, children, and yet not harsh, but cold and distant when perhaps I should have been loving. God forgive me, but I feared to be kind and tender; and Paul, before you go, tell me that you understand me and trust me." "I do, mother; I know just how you have felt, and lately I understand you as I did not once; but we love you, mother; don't we, Maggie ?" Maggie could not answer; she was sobbing with her head upon the window-sill and her hand still within that of Paul.


16 Paul and Margaret.
them; besides, she had rather he would
teach her, and Paul went winter even-
ings always. He knew a great deal-his
sister thought she could never learn so
much; but Paul praised her, and said
that she remembered better than he
did, and all that she learned she would
never forget.
These things that Paul read to her
and told her of on Sundays came to
her through the week, and the quiet,
sober face was no index of the thoughts
that filled her heart so full that she for-
got how much she worked and how tired
her little frame was when night came.
Did the mother never desire her child
to learn as others did? as she herself
had when young ?



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6 M. W Dodd's Catalogue. By the Author of "The Schonberg-Cotta Family." THE DRAYTONS AND THE DAVENANTS. A Story of the Civil Wars. By the author of the Schanberg-Cotta Family. I vol. 12mo ...... $I 75 Cabinet edition, i6mo, tinted paper .. ... .I 75 Sunday-school edition, i8mo, illustrated ...I oo This work, the opening scene of which is in New England, is associated with a period of English history in the 17th century, involving political and religious questions in which Americans are deeply interested. In its vivid and truthful impersonations of chara6ter, its great historic interest, its inimitable pitures of domestic life, aingled throughout with an unaffected tone of religious sentiment, the author has fully equalled in this volume her Cotta Family, which has delighted so many thousands. On the whole, we are inclined to assign to this a higherf position and greater Smerit than to any of Mrs. Charles' works."-Indefendent. "If this work had preceded in its publication the Schnnberg-Cotta Family, we are not sure that it would not have rivalled it in popular favor."-New York Evangelist. "The quaint antique style of the volume gives it a strong flavor of those eventful times, while the tad and fidelity with which the prominent historical circumstances are interwoven with the fiftitious incidents of the plot impart to it an air of naturalness hardly inferior to that of a cotemporary chronicle. With a curious instinct she seizes upon the heart of different epochs, incorporating it in her descriptions with equal faithfulness to the truth of history and of human nature."-New York Tribune. The volume starts with the first agitation of Protestantism as a political element in Great Britain, and proceeds through the civil wars that followed. The two families whose names afford a title to the volume were on opposite sides of the great question of the day, and the story is well wrought out in the well-known style of the author. Since the Schinberg-Cotta Family, Mrs. Charles has written no book which compares so favorably with the former as this."-Methodist Protestant. It is a living book, full of tender sympathies, holy thoughts, and devout quickeners, yet with sharp, clear-cut delineations of chara&er. The roistering cavalier, the Christian reformer, and, more than all, the womanly women of the time, gather around us, and we know and love them."-Christian Register. "To the descendants of the Puritans and those who respect their memory, this admirable volume will have a charm which even sympathy and interest rarely give." -New Haven Palladium. All through the story there is evidence of that earnestness of feeling and refinement of thought that have given such a charm to this lady's writings, and have touched the popular heart so effectively while instruting and elevating the reader's tastes and moral and religious aspirations."-Roxbury Yournal. S _7ournal



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158 Paul and Margaret. that are slow in healing. Yesterday a boy died who was wounded in the breast; I was giving him some cordial just before, and he smiled and called me "Sister Annie;" it was the saddest thing I had seen and the first death. Sometimes in the morning I miss a face, and they tell me he died in the night; but I do not see it then. We take flowers to the hospital every day. I saw a soldier cry over a white rose the other day; he said he had once planted one over his mother's grave, and the last thing he did before leaving home was to pick a white bud and put it in his Testament. He took it out to show me, and now we always take him a white rose; he is nearly able to sit up. Paul is not here now; our friend, Mrs.



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74 Paul and Margaret. in several engagements, but a Heavenly Father's watchful care, had turned aside the fatal ball, and shielded him from the countless dangers of the battle-field. He had, like a host of other brave hearts, been faithful in duty, showing the same courage and enthusiasm in action that so many of our brave noble privates manifested, emulating each other, and bearing with fortitude and cheerfulness all the discomforts of camp-life, and the weariness of long forced marches. Faint and footsore though Paul might be,. yet never a day saw him discouraged. More than ever he felt that God was for the right, and no surrounding influences could depress his buoyant spirits. Meantime the letters Maggie received from him were



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PAUL AND MARGARET, THE INEBRIATE'S CHILDREN. - I NEW YORK: M. W. DODD, No. 506 BROADWAY.



PAGE 1

New Associations. 39 as she answered, Above an hour; I think, I would have worked if I had known where to find anything to do." "Not before breakfast, dear; we will have plenty about, soon; but what are you up so early for ? "I didn't think it was early, and I had rather be busy." "I see, you think I am late; well, we will compromise--you shall lie a half hour longer, and I will rise earlier; will that do ?" "Oh, Mrs. Maybrook, you shall do as you like, and I-I will do as you say; but I can't sleep if-I am awake," and Maggie smiled archly. No, that would be impossible, surely; but we are not very early risers according


108 Paul and Margaret.
prised by Maggie's sudden movement as
he had been.
Maggie simply said to Mr. Hobert,
when she again stood before him, that she
would rather he would keep the money
until she started, if he would.
" Certainly, but why? he asked ab-
sently.
"It will be best," was all the answer
Maggie seemed to have ready. He un-
derstood her.
"Be all ready, then, at six o'clock in
the morning, and I will be round to see
you off,
"Is that gentleman going, sir asked
Maggie.
" Yes, he has just gone from here; he
will go on to Washington and look out



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"Paul's Duty. 27 And what did the boy think upon as he rapidly walked from house to house with the various bundles of smoothlyironed clothes, and gathered the scanty pay that seemed so little when there was so much to be bought for the absolute necessities of life? War tidings were familiar to the secluded family even though a daily paper never found its way within the walls of the brown cottage. Paul understood that the rebellionj was the cause -of this added suffering among the poor, and thought of it many times, but with no feeling of murmuring against the government; far from it, he was glad to share the burden as far as he was concerned, but for his mother's and Maggie's sake he dreaded 0.'



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CHAPTER V. Paul Wounded. "And surely in a world like this, So rife with woe, so scant of blissWhere fondest hopes are oftenest crossed, And fondest hopes are severed most, "'Tis something that we kneel and pray With loved ones near and far away; One God, one faith, one hope, one care, One form of words, one hour of prayer." T was the spring of '64, during that week of fearful warfare, when the heart-throbs of the North seemed at times almost to cease, -so intense were the feelings with which men daily waited for the 7* 77



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2 M. W. Dodd's Catalogue. C HRONICLES OF THE SCHONBERG-COTTA FAMILY. I vol., 2mo ........$ 5o Fine edition. Crown 8vo, tinted paper ....2 oo Cabinet edition, 16mo, tinted paper ..... I 50 Sunday-school edition, i8mo, illustrated ...I oo Those familiar with the life of Luther will reinember Dame Ursula Cotta, in Eisenach, who, when he was a lad singing from door to door to support him at school, took him to her house and ever after befriended him. The author of this book, for the purpose of reproducing in a more familiar form the social life, the religion, and some of the chief historical events and personages of that momentous period, finds in the above fact a suggestion on which to improve. The authoress manages her ingenious plot in the most skilful manner. One can scarcely persuade himself that these are not genuine documents fished out of some old Lutheran family chest. "It is intensely interesting, and will be a great favorite with the public. It is eminently one of the star books of the season."-S. S. Times. "A book of unusual attradtion and merit, where the interest never flags, and every page is full of gems. The work might justly be termed 'A Romance of the Reformation.' The various incidents in the life of Luther are portrayed with a graphic beauty and truthfulness rarely equalled." * It is seldom a book appears which, like this, has attra6ions for all classes of readers. The lovers of fiction and the lovers of history, the pra6tical and the sentimental, the youthful, and those more advanced, are charmed by it, and its gentle catholic spirit will render it equally attradtive to the Protestant and Romanist."Albany Times. In this work we seem almost to meetthe great men of the Reformation face to face, and to be actually present in the thrilling scenes in which they participated."Methodist. "The family history which it contains, if read by itself, would be regarded as one of the most successful portraitures of domestic life that has ever been drawn, each chara6ter being delineated and preserved with striking distinctness, and some of the charaters being such as the reader will love to linger over as he would over some beautiful portrait drawn by a master's pencil."-New York Observer. "The story from first to last is remarkable for its artlessness and tenderness, and it chains the reader's attention to the close."-A m. Theo. Review. "*The prominent scenes, from the time of Huss to the death of Luther, are painted before us, and we read them with such interest as even D'Aubign6 can scarcely create. The book has all the fascination of a romance."-Evangelical ^Apository. .'


Mf. W. Dodd's Catalogue.
Massachusetts Sabbath School Society's Publi-
cations, for which we have been for many years New York
Agents, constantly on hand, and for sale at Boston frices
The Society's list embraces several hundred volumes of a
superior charailer, and more than fifty Question Book4
Catalogues on A flication.
BOOKS PUBLISHED SINCE MAY, 1867.
PRICB
The Minister's Wife oo
Bessie and her little Brothers . . 50
Tiny's Sunday Nights ... ..... 65
Old Bright 45
Nephew Frankie 40
Charity Chapters 60
When were our Gospels written ? . 60
I Don't Know How 80
Missionary Patriots I 25
Margaret Claire 75
Margaret Chester . I 25
Prince Paul, the Freedman Soldier 25
Grace Irving's Vacation . I 25
Hope Douglass I 25
Frank Grover, the Blacksmith's Boy 80
The Double Fault 90
Life's Changes 6o
Highways and Hedges, or following the Master. (Prize
buok) 50
Donald Deane. (Prize book). I 50
Deacon Sims' Prayers. (Prize book) 50
Broken Idols 50
Just Right, or a Little Wrong I 25
Blind Graham 90
Auntie's Secret .. 90
Mary Gray's Perplexities I 25
Mountains of Ararat I 25
RECENTLY PUBLISHED.
Clark's Graduated Question Books on the Heroes of the
Bible, in four parts, each . 15
Clark's Great Truths of the Bible, in three parts, each 15
These Question Books are on the Graduated Plan, and hav4
enjoyed an unusual popularity.



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146 Paul and Margaret. "I told her so, Paul; but she said it was for her country she was doing it, and that if she did not have you, there would be some one else; she said it was her duty, and pleasure too." "She is more than kind, she is noble; we soldiers love her dearly." "I must help her now, Paul; I'll be back soon with an orange for you; she has a whole box of them for the men today. Now let me hear you sing while I go round with her," and Maggie turned with a light step to cheer other sufferers who looked for her coming, and were glad to take the orange from her hand even though she spoke no word, knowing she was Paul's sister. There was something to be done for nearly all. For the pale



PAGE 1

Aspirations. I Margaret. The world had no beauty in it for the mother when this babe came to her. Five years had done a sad work upon her heart. This child had never seen the smile that had sunned Paul's infancy, and that even he had almost forgotten, so long had it been since it came to him last. She had grown up in the shade, as it were, and was not unlike her mother in face and manner. She moved quickly about the cottage, because she must. She had learned to do many things that girls twice her age rarely do, and that, too, was because she must. She did not talk with her mother as Paul sometimes did, but quietly and quickly performed day after day all that was required of her. She never smiled in her


The Inebriate's Death. 177
could be done, but words of sympathy
or kind acts cannot save the lost soul, or
give hope to the hopeless.
Hark! it is the village bell.; and now
they bear the form of the departed to its
last resting place. May God's spirit speak
loudly to the living as they ponder upon
that wasted life, that sudden death, and
bid them make haste to prepare for the
hour when they too shall be called away.
I cannot tell of Paul's and Maggie's
feelings when the sad tidings reached
them, nor can I follow their course through
life, for even now they are where we last
left them. I can say, however, that
friends have hopes of them; that they are
expected to take a noble stand for truth
and righteousness; to press on in the path



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Paul Wounded. 93 ed; he could not see. What was the matter with him ? was it a strange sight to see a sister with love strong enough to overcome all obstacles and brave unknown dangers for the sake of the dear one? At any rate it affected him strangely.


Paul Wounded. 83
home. You will write often now I am
laid up, won't you, little Maggie? I'd like
to get a letter every day, but that would
be too often. They take good care of us;
I have all I need, so you must be happy.
Good bye. PAUL."
They had waited over a week after the
battle for a letter, and now as it came in
Paul's own hand-writing Maggie grew
pale with joy as she took it from the
postmaster and hastily turned to go home.
"Guess you'll find your brother all
right, Miss."
"Yes, Sir," answered Maggie with a
smile, and pressing suddenly her hand
against her side she turned away and
soon was home.



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Childlike Trust. 95 hastened with the news to Mr. Hobert. Slowly he read it, and then looking upon Maggie with his large benevolent eyes, he said, "Let me see, child, you are fourteen, are you not ?" "Yes, sir, fourteen and a-half." Have you ever travelled any ? " No, sir, but I can. I am not afraid to go." "You are a pretty good nurse ? "I should know what to do for Paul, and I could do all they told me." But I am not sure that I can find any one to take care of you on the way, and assist you afterwards in gaining admittance to the hospital." "I can go alone, Mr. Hobert, if you will write all the directions for me."



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166 Paul and Margaret. and love, what she has done for our sons. I would ask what is your pleasure in regard to the box we are filling? it will be ready to send off on Wednesday morning. There was but one mind-the box should be directed to Miss Margaret Bailey, in care of Mr. Maybrook, and letters of acknowledgment should go from each mother whose son had been in her care. Maggie should know the high esteem and respect these ladies had for her self-sacrificing spirit. I will only add, that with the letters from the three mothers one went signed by Nellie Fitch, a letter so full of peni. tence and contrition, that the tears coursed down Maggie's cheeks as she read it, tears of joy that she had won her enemy.



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CHAP ER X. The Inebriate's Diath. t RS. BAILEY parted with the ladies who had so enthusiastically commended her children,with mingled feelings of love for the two dearest to her, and desire for herself that she were free as they frpm her cruel bondage. In what particular way she had not thought, but never had life seemed so much of a burden: never before had her whole nature shrunk so from returning to her home as now, and to the companionship of one in whom she took no pleasure, and to whom 168


Aspirations. 17
She had once told Paul that she
"wished Margaret could go to school long
enough to read and write. She said it
with a sigh, as though it were simply
an impossibility; and he, knowing
something of his mother's heart, pitied
her, and told her that his sister could
already do that, for he had taught
her.
The mother was satisfied and silent
afterward.
But what is it, you will ask, that
has sifted their years of all the bright-
ness that others revel in ? Why are they
not happy if they are good, if they
work and pray? Ah, there is a cloud
above them all the time, black and
tempestuous. It is not poverty, stern
2*


JUVENILE AND SUNDAY SCHOOL BOOKS
PUBLISHED BY
M. W. DODD,
506 BROADWAY, NEW YORK.
Elsie Dinsmore. By Holidays at Roselands,
Martha Farquharson, author of with some After Scenes in Elsie's
"\ "Allan's Fault," etc. I6mo, il- Life. A Sequel to Elsie Dins-
Slustrated .. . .$1 25 more. By Martha Farquharson.
I6mo, illustrated $1 50
A beautiful and instruAive story, in which
the power of true piety in a very young
child is admirably exhibited in a ses of Elsie is here brought through various
trials which, though severe and unusual, trials and a severe and nearly fatal sick-
are not beyond the limits of probability.- ness to full enjoyment of her father's affec-
Am. Presbyterian. tion, and the happiness of seeing him a
Elsie is environed with besetments and humble follower of her Divine Master.
trials, but is singularly faithful through The story is even more intensely interest-
hem all, and gives promise by her sweet- ing than in the first part, as with added
ness of character to be the means of saving years Elsie's character becomes more
others. The sequel of this story will be natural and mature. No reader of Elsie
eagerly looked for, as it closes at a very Dinsmore should fail to follow her story to
interesting point in the narrative. It is a its happy completion in this sequel.
charming book, and will give increased
popularity to the authoress.-Phila. Home
7ournal" The Brownings. A Tale
of the Great Rebellion; and Lucy
The Clifford Household. Lee, or All Things for Christ.
By the author of Independence By G. Fuller. vol. 6mo.
True and False," etc. 16mo,
illustrated .... I 25 Two stories by one author. The first is
a deeply interesting story of the trials and
A tale illustrating the power of the reli- sufferings of a Union family in the late war.
gion q* Christ in strengthening a gentle The scene is laid on the banks of the St
shrinking girl for the performance of diffi- Mary's, which separates Georgia from
cult duties and the endurance of severe Florida. Impressive lessons, moral and re-
trials, and the power of the same religion ligious, as well as patriotic, are conv.yed
in crushing and subduing a proud, imperi- through the medium of the story. "The
ous nature so that it bows at last to the seccnd," says the National Baptist, "is
rule of Christ. The story is well told.- one of the few that we would like to have
Presbyterian. in every Sunday School library. It is
The story is well told, and the spirit written by one who knows the value of ex-
and lessons of the narrative are pure and perimental religion, and to whom the ser-
evangelical.--Am. Presbyterian. vice of God is a fountain of unceasing
A lifelike picture of home scenes. No joy."
fancy sketch ; no exaggeration; no perfet It is original and beautiful, and we have
characters; no angels; but men, women, seldom read a better story of the kind, in
and children, as we find them in everyday which we have felt a deeper interest to the
life.-Sprinfeldd Union. close.-North Western Presbyt i. .


114 Paul and Margaret.
heed to her after seeing her wants sup-
plied.
Mr. Headley was hastening on to
Washington as an agent of the Sanitary
Commission to attend and nurse the sick
and wounded from the recent battles. A
noble-hearted Christian man, well quali-
fied for his work, he was just the one Mr.
Hobert thought would take good care of
a child like Maggie ; and good care
he would certainly give her, but at this
time he was all engrossed in his coming
labors, and would have decidedly refused
to take her in charge had he not known
that sometimes such girls prove valuable
assistants to the female nurses in the hos-
pitals; he had also a high respect for his
friend Hobert, who assured him that


102 Paul and Margaret.
this .emergency her wits were at work
even while his threatening caused her to
tremble. .
It was nearly mid-day, and Bailey knew
that some one might be passing. He did
not wish to have her screams attract the
villagers, so he changed his course and
took on a coaxing tone, saying, Come
now, Maggie, you're too little to travel;
you give me the money and I'll send on
and have him brought home, and you can
nurse him up a-heap better; now don't
be a fool and make a fuss, for I promise
you I'll have it, if I tear your dress off to
get it; I won't have my authority sneered
at in my own family, I forbid you to go
away, and I tell you to give me that
money to send for him. with; don't you



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M. W. Dodd's Catalogue. 3 By the Author of "The Schonberg-Cotta Family." THE EARLY DAWN; oR, SKETCHES OF CHRISTIAN LIFE IN ENGLAND IN THE OLDEN TIME. By the author of the Schinberg-Cotta Family. With Introdu6tion by Prof. H. B. SMITH, D.D. I2mo .... .$1 50 Fine edition. Crown 8vo, tinted paper ...2 oo Cabinet edition, 16 mo, tinted paper ..... .50 Sunday-school edition, 18 mo, illustrated .. .I oo The Christian Life of England in the Olden Time is here depited, through several centuries, from its earliest dawn, in its contrasted lights and shadows, down to the morning star of the Reformation." The Druid is first introduced in converse with the Jew and the Christian. The Two Martyrs of Verulam fall within the period of the Roman domination, full fifteen hundred years ago. The fortunes of an Anglo-Saxon Family are briefly sketched through three generations. The contests of the Saxon and the Norman, and their different traits, are vividly portrayed, in the time of the Crusades. And few tales are more interesting and instructive than that in which Cuthbert narrates his experience in the Order of St. Francis and his illumination by the Everlasting Gospel of Joachim, and Cicely relates how Dr. Wycliffe, of Oxford, ministered to her spiritual needs and insight. The undeniable charm of these sketches consists in their simple, truthful adherence to the spirit and traits of these olden times. The author has been a diligent student of the literature, and through the literature, of the very life of the epochs. This is revealed in many skilful touches of art, in incidental allusions, apt citations, "and graphic descriptions of scenes and persons. But more than this is her rare gift of tracing the workings of the human soul in its needs and aspirations, its human love, its divine longings. The permanent religious wants, which remain the same under all varieties of external fortune, are so truthfully set forth that the Past becomes a mirror for the Present."-Dr. Smitl's Introduction. "The various fads and legends of Christianity are told in this book in a style of romantic fascination. It is an unusually entertaining and readable work."-Newe York Evening Post. "The author carries us back into the midst of events and scenes, wakes up the dead actors and makes them live again, ail we see not the history, but the living men that made the history."-Evangelical Refository. "*" We do not know where to look for a book that combines such beauty of style, such charming simplicity and variety of expression, with such sweetness, of spirit. It iill of beauty, and everywhere pervaded with a loving, catholic spirit."-Hari. ford Press. '.


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PAGE 1

The Meeting. I17 Weary and anxious as the child was, she looked with pleasure upon the costly decorations of the large room, the rich paintings attracting her attention more than all else. As her eye wandered about the walls, it fell upon the engraving of Dante and Beatrice. Scarcely heeding its mild beauty at first, as she gazed she was more and more impressed, until losing the consciousness that she was'in the house of a stranger she rose and approached the picture. Long, long did it hold her, rapt in wonder and reverence, until her own face took on something of the wonderful peace that pervades that of Beatrice and her spirit grew quiet. She was resting as she stood there, unconscious that she herself was



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Enlisted. 51 your father and-and-I used to know the whole of that but it's slipped from me; well, no matter, but where's the book ?-I must take care of the bank book; your mother don't know anything about banking business." "I know; I shouldn't think of troubling her." Of course not," replied the man, trembling to get hold of what seemed a small fortune to him. But let me tell you my plans, father, I'm sure you will call them good-" "Yes, yes-a boy that honors his-" "Well," interrupted Paul-the money's in the bank, and Mr. Barnes, the grocer, is to be paid one dollar a week for gro. ceries which mother will select, for she


Paul Wounded. 89
saw it before; I shouldn't wonder if I
consented to let her go;" then, speaking
aloud, she said, "Margaret, tell me what
Mr. Hobert says as soon as you can; per-
haps you had better not stay at noon to-day.
" No, mother, I'll come right home if
he thinks I can go."
"You had better go early and see him
before school; but then it's impossible;
I couldn't let you go so far, whatever he
might say."
But Maggie had faith in larger measure
than her mother. Quickly she flew
about the room, putting things to rights,
and finishing hastily her morning work;
Ssoon with her letter in hand she started
for the post office, and with rapid step
thence to the school house.
8*



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118 Paul and Margaret. looked upon with curious eyes. Pressing her hand to her side she almost stifled the sigh that was just trembling from her lips, and murmured in a tone scarcely audible, "Peace, peace!" as though she craved a portion of that which beamed from the face before her. At this moment an arm was gently placed about her, and a tender, womanly voice asked, "Have you no peace, my child? Startled, she lifted her tearful eyes to the lady, saying in a low voice, I was thinking of Paul;" and then dropping them to the rich carpet at her feet she stood silent and embarrassed. "Well, dear, you shall soon be with Paul, and then peace shall flow like a G*



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The Inebriate's Death. 169 she was of less value than a single mug of spirits. No wonder that her heart was full of bitterness as she thought of him, or that she rejoiced at the separation of her children from him, and from the home in which the joys of childhood had never visited them ; no wonder that her footsteps lagged as she drew near the house, and she would gladly have turned another way, but strange sounds met her ear as she approached; the doors and windows are thrown open, and the confusion of many voices tell her that strangers are within. What can have happened ? She dreams no longer, but hastens on and finds the neighbors gathered about the bed where her husband is lying pale and unconscious. 15





PAGE 1

34 Paul and Margaret. as busy as ever with her unending toil, he went in search of his sister. Mrs. Bailey's face was no more sad than it had been in the morning sunshine, but the thorn had pierced her heart. Separation from Paul! it was the last drop in her cup of misery, but she saw and felt that-it was inevitable. Yes, he must go, perhaps to death, perhaps-her heart beat faster than its wont-to honor and years of happiness: Ah, she was content to suffer' if it might be thus. Such thoughts filled her mind, standing wearily by the table, till the twilight came. No one had noticed Margaret as she stoodin the closet listening to the strange words of her brother. Paul going to war! to enlist for three years! was he



PAGE 1

12 Paul and Margaret. Iother's face as she had been seen to do sometimes in Paul's; perhaps it was because he drew it forth and the mother could not. Occasionally Paul hummed a tune in a low tone, working steadily all the time, but Margaret never did that; she was a very silent child, her mother thought, but then it was not strange, for she had no one to talk with. Had the mother seen her when on the Sabbath Paul led her away from the cottage up the foot-path that wound over the hill to the woods beyond, she would not have known her child; the fetters were thrown off there, and all unconsciously. She did not sing and shout as some children would have done, but the look of apathy, almost dullness, that she carried at home,



PAGE 1

JUVENILE AND SUNDAY SCHOOL BOOKS. 7 Beautizild Books for Presentation. The Little Fox. The Story of Mc Clintock's Aratic Expedition. Written for the Young. By S. T. C. Square 16 mo, beautifully illustrated and bound ........ .00 From the journal of Sir F. L. McClintock, the author has presented in a simple form, for children, the narrative of the wonderful Artic Expedition. Children will read the narrative with delight. The beautiful large type, and illustrations, will add to their pleasure. It would be an elegant holiday present.-Evangelical Repository. A capital little volume for boys and girls, containing the substance of Sir F. L. McClintock's narrative of his exploration in the artic regions, and given in a story-form for young people, telling them, in an extremely fasti ma g and absorbing manner, all about the icebergs, the animals, and the wonderful acRntures to be met with in that frozen zone.--Wide WkVld. Honey-Blossoms for Little Bees. A Beautiful Juvenile. Illustrated. A new edition. Square 16mo ...o 85 "A beautiful book with a sweet title, and what's more, a pretty story, in large type and short words, with beautiful piCtures to help the little reader to understand." A very sweet little book, which gives a peep at a sweet home in the upper part of New York.Congregational Herald. W inter in Spitzbergen. A Book for Youth, from the German of C. Hildebrandt, by E. Goodrich Smith. Illustrated. A book of surpassing interest for young people Those who have been charmed with Robinson Crusoe will be delighted with this. It gives an account of the manner in which three lonely castawhys spent a winter in the dark, frozen, and desolate polar regions of Spitzbergen, and how they were at length providentially delivered. A capital book to beread aloud arpund a winter fireside."-Baptist Mlemorial. Poetic Readings for Schools and Families. With an IntrcduEtion, by J. L. Comstock, M.D., author of "A System of Philosophy," Chemistry," &c. Illustrated. I6mo. This volume is strongly commended to School Committees, to Teachers, and to Parents. It consists of some of the choicest selections of Poetry in our languageselections which every childcan understand, and in which every child will be interested, and which contain, too, some of the most important lessons that could be impressed on, the minds and hearts of the young. It ought to find a place as a Class and Readin-. Book in every common school and private academy of the land. This is a beautiful collection of poetry for the family. We have seen nothing of the kind so well adapted to interest the young.-Cong. ournal. We cordially recommend to all young readers this charming collecion. It is executed with soundness of judgment, delicacy of taste, and great range of research ; and no school ought to be wit out it.-Home Yournal. The poetry is of the highest moral stamp, of the very character fitted to cultivate intellect and heart. -Sfedato. A very handsome collection of choice poems from the first authors. Among them we n-tice that touching ballad, "The Children in the Wood," "John Gilpin," Casaabi, ca." and a hundred others of equal interest to the young.-Daily Mercury. L, ...* .'


CHAPTER V.
Paul Wounded.
"And surely in a world like this,
So rife with woe, so scant of bliss-
Where fondest hopes are oftenest crossed,
And fondest hopes are severed most,
"'Tis something that we kneel and pray
With loved ones near and far away;
One God, one faith, one hope, one care,
One form of words, one hour of prayer."
T was the spring of '64, during that
week of fearful warfare, when the
heart-throbs of the North seemed at times
almost to cease, -so intense were the feel-
ings with which men daily waited for the
7* 77


66 Paul and Margaret.
seen; it was enough to kill me with
laughter; then he'd scream, 'Mag Mag !
why don't you come here, you brat "
A shout of laughter followed, and
another voice said, "We shan't see her
ladyship to school to-day, I dare say; he
went home and had a general smash-up;
father says such men do, sometimes."
"Not much to smash in that hut, I
should say," answered another.
The strength was leaving the little form
that stood in the snow without, her tremb-
ling limbs could scarcely support her, and
tottering nearer, she leaned her head
against the building.
At that moment she felt a hand upon
her shoulder, and starting up, her tearful
eyes looked into the sad ones of Mr. Hobert.


54 Paul and Margaret.
"Perhaps I sha'n't see you in the
morning, father; this may be the last
time we shall meet."
" Git out! I tell you, I'm asleep now."
"But won't you promise me before I go
away to be kind to mother and Mag-
gie?"
"Yes, when you give me that book to
take care of, not before."
"God forgive you, father, if you don't
treat them right; I'm a fraid I couldn't."
"Stop that blarney and go to bed.
Be off, Mag, what 're you staring for ?"
"Good bye, father," said Paul, his
voice trembling with grief and anger.
The father for a moment seemed
touched; he took Paul's proffered hand
saying, Good luck to you, Paul; you
needn't worry, I aint quite a brute."


Childlike Trust. I01
"Then he don't want the money," an-
swered the unfeeling brute, "and I do.
Stop your infernal clatter, both of you.
Go to your work, old woman, and leave
the young one to me, or I'll give you a
worse clip than you've had for a year."
The mother sighed; it was useless to
say more; Maggie would have to yield;
there was no help for it. But the brave
girl thought differently; she never had de-
fied him, because he was her father in
spite of his degradation, but now the
duty of a child and the love of a sister
were in the balance, and love was stronger
than the unjust requirements of a parent;
she would die sooner than give him the
money, but it was folly to brave him; he
had the power to take it from her, and in
9*



PAGE 1

Paul's Duty. 31 gie would be left, and the help to her in the coming winter; she must see the advantage, the absolute necessity, of his going. "Paul!" it was Margaret calling him to supper, and with a quick, nervous motion he threw down the axe and started for the hou'se. Silently they sat at table and ate of the plain rye bread with just a taste of butter, thankful that they still could afford that; then as Margaret put the dishes away, and Mrs. Bailey proceeded to fold the clothes for the morrow's ironing, Paul unburdened his heart, saying at the close, "You see, mother, that I can do nothing for you here that Maggie might not do, and then I can help a good deal, if I live."


CHAPTER VIII.
New Associations.
T HEY smiled joyfully at parting,
Paul and Margaret, for they knew
they should meet in the morning. Paul
felt that his little sister would be well
cared for; he saw that she was among
friends, and saw, too,-altho' he did not
fully realize it until after she had gone, and
he lay awake at night upon his cot-that
Maggie had grown more womanly, more
self-reliant in the time he had been away
from her; he saw that she was competent
to make her own plans and carry them to
131


New Associations. 39
as she answered, Above an hour; I
think, I would have worked if I had
known where to find anything to do."
"Not before breakfast, dear; we will
have plenty about, soon; but what are
you up so early for ? "
"I didn't think it was early, and I had
rather be busy."
"I see, you think I am late; well, we
will compromise--you shall lie a half
hour longer, and I will rise earlier; will
that do ?"
"Oh, Mrs. Maybrook, you shall do as
you like, and I-I will do as you say;
but I can't sleep if-I am awake," and
Maggie smiled archly.
" No, that would be impossible, surely;
but we are not very early risers according



PAGE 1

164 Paul and Margaret. she could do us good she stayed. I don't remember to have seen her there, but she says she has only attended school since Paul joined us; perhaps Nell knows her; I hope she will be like her. Dear mother, and Nellie, write to me often while I am laid by, and pray for me, oh, pray daily, that I may be kept from temptation. 1 should like to write more, but I must say good bye, with the love of your penitent, pardoned boy, JAMES. Mr. Hobert turned to Maggie's mother, who sat near his wife, cutting and rolling bandages, and said, "Mrs. Bailey, you may be proud of your daughter; most beautifully has her character developed;



PAGE 1

92 Paul and Margaret. "And if he should be there, you want to use some of his money to go on with ?" "Yes, sir, he would be glad to have me; he would get well sooner if I was there; perhaps I could work part of the time and earn something if he was not needing me." "Very likely. I'll think it over, and will wait for Paul's next letter before I decide." "Can I go home now, sir ?" "For the day ?" inquired the teacher. "Yes, sir, I want to be ready if I go." "But you may not go, my child; however do as you please about it." Mr. Hobert suddenly turned to his copies again, and found that his eyes were blurr-



PAGE 1

86 Paul and Margaret. "both were; how like reality it seemed; and when the morning came she had planned it all out. Surely she could get to him, and if they knew that she was Paul's sister, they would let her stay, and take care of him. She had made up her mind to go, but first she would ask Mr. Hobert about it: he would know more than either she or her mother. When she went below that morning Maggie's face had taken on a new expression. 'The mother noticed the change and wondered why Margaret looked so much like Paul. Was it her imagination ? No, some of Paul's enthusiasm inspired her; she was beginning to think for herself, to trust in her own powers; she was growing selfreliant, was making plans, and looking



PAGE 1

.. ...



PAGE 1

108 Paul and Margaret. prised by Maggie's sudden movement as he had been. Maggie simply said to Mr. Hobert, when she again stood before him, that she would rather he would keep the money until she started, if he would. Certainly, but why? he asked absently. "It will be best," was all the answer Maggie seemed to have ready. He understood her. "Be all ready, then, at six o'clock in the morning, and I will be round to see you off, "Is that gentleman going, sir asked Maggie. Yes, he has just gone from here; he will go on to Washington and look out



PAGE 1

6 JUVENILE AND SUNDAY SCHOOL BOOKS. The Collage Library. 6 vols. I 8mo, in sets 5 25 SSeparately as follows: Henry W illard; or, The Sunday Sketches for Value of Right Principles. By Children. By a Father. IllusC. M. Trowbridge. Illustratrated ... ..$o 85 ted ......... 85 On such subjects as the Hidden ManA choice book for boys, illustrating very na and the White Stone;" "The Earth happily the untold forms in which a youth without a Sea ;" "The Place for a Candle ;" may be assailed by temptation, and the "Enoch;" The Rich Young Ruler," safety of an open, frank, manly course of etc. conduct in all circumstances. The conThese are admirable sketches, naturalcluding chapter enforces impressively the ly and strikingly drawn, and will be read great lesson, that the influence of the most by the children with pleasure and profit. trifling ad may extend onward and onward -Christian Chronicle. through time. Parents who place this volume in the hands of their children will find the cost-money well invested.-Advocate Glenarvon; or, Holidays and Guardian. at the Cottage. A beautiful Uncle Barnaby ; or, ReScotch story. Illustrated .o 85 colle&ions of his Character and This is a delightful book. Its stories, Opinion. ..... o 85 drawn from Scottish life, are interspersed with interesting anecdotes and episodes, The religion of the book is good, the illustrating historical and scientific truths. morality excellent, and the mode of exhibIt conveys the best moral and religionus iting their important lessons can hardly be lessons adapted to the youthful mind, and surpassed in anything calculated to make told in such a manner as to engage the atthem attractive to the young, or successful tention.-A m. and For. Ch. Union. in correcting anything bad in their habits ormorals. The Old Oak Chest and Shadows and Sunshine; its Treasures. By Aunt Elizaas illustrated in the History of beth. A most attractive volume Notable Characters. By Rev. of several hundred anecdotes. Erskin Neal ..... o 85 and stories .. ... o 85 A book in which various characters of A colledtion of more than two hundred distinction are made to teach, and from striking incidents and anecdotes, illustrawhose checkered experience much which tive of moral and religious truths. It is an is valuable may be derived. We heartily excellent book for the family, and especialcommend it.-Religious Herald. ly the young.-Christian Observer. Sovereigns of the Bible. Frank Forest; or, The By Eliza R. Steele, author of Life of an Orphan Boy. By "Heroines of Sacred History," David M. Stone. Illustrated, etc., With fine illustrations, I8mo .. .... .o 6o ; 12mo ....... 1 50 We have here the scattered fats in It inculcates the most impressive les-the lives of the kings of Israel and Judah sons of virtue and religion, and the intense skilfully arranged in continuous narratives, interest of the story will rivet the attention which are highly instructive. The book is of the children; thus securing a happy i important contribution to our general influence on their hearts.-.ournar l of i.lical literature.-A lbany A rus. Commerce I. .* 1^ -^.



PAGE 1

Enlisted. 55 "Thank you, father, for this little comfort," and the son turned away and followed Maggie up stairs. Did they sleep? No, there was no closing of the eyes that night. Sitting "by the low window, hand clasped in hand, they communed with each other until the first glimmering ray of light tinged the eastern sky. Paul, with his manly heart grown stronger in view of this separation, and Maggie, more a woman than ever, choking down the rising sobs and praying silently for faith and strength. A step was heard upon the stairs and the mother entered. Are you both up ?" she asked, and glancing towards Maggie's little cot in the corner she saw that it



PAGE 1

38 Paul and Margaret. eyes. She forgot her mother, her work, everything but Pau. enlisting; and he, after piling wood a half hour, began to wonder why Maggie had not brought her basket to go with him to the woods for fagots as was her custom at night. Suddenly remembering that she was by when he told his mother of his new resolution, and feeling that she was unhappy some"where, he sought her in the garret, over in the lot, and ran to the edge of the woods, calling "Maggie! Maggie !" Not here, she must be on the hill, I'll find her yet; poor little Maggie, I hope she won't mind it much, but she will, Sundays, if on no other day." Thus talking in a low tone to himself he climbed the hill; coming nearer, he


178 Paul and Margaret.
of duty with an unfaltering trust, that as
they love God supremely "all things
shall work together for good to them," in
this world, and that when the world is
overcome they shall be clothed in white
raiment, and their names shall not be
blotted out of the Lamb's book of life,
but Christ will confess them before his
father and before his angels. H. K. P.
END.



PAGE 1

102 Paul and Margaret. this .emergency her wits were at work even while his threatening caused her to tremble. It was nearly mid-day, and Bailey knew that some one might be passing. He did not wish to have her screams attract the villagers, so he changed his course and took on a coaxing tone, saying, Come now, Maggie, you're too little to travel; you give me the money and I'll send on and have him brought home, and you can nurse him up a-heap better; now don't be a fool and make a fuss, for I promise you I'll have it, if I tear your dress off to get it; I won't have my authority sneered at in my own family, I forbid you to go away, and I tell you to give me that money to send for him. with; don't you



PAGE 1

54 Paul and Margaret. "Perhaps I sha'n't see you in the morning, father; this may be the last time we shall meet." Git out! I tell you, I'm asleep now." "But won't you promise me before I go away to be kind to mother and Maggie?" "Yes, when you give me that book to take care of, not before." "God forgive you, father, if you don't treat them right; I'm a fraid I couldn't." "Stop that blarney and go to bed. Be off, Mag, what 're you staring for ?" "Good bye, father," said Paul, his voice trembling with grief and anger. The father for a moment seemed touched; he took Paul's proffered hand saying, Good luck to you, Paul; you needn't worry, I aint quite a brute."



PAGE 1

40 Paul and Margaret. and taking firm hold of her hand they started upon the run never stopping until they reached the fence. The full moon was just above the brow of the hill as Paul turned to his sister, saying, Now laugh, Maggie, before we go in." Oh, Paul, how can I, with such dreadful feelings ?" "You must not feel so; we'll go up garret and talk it over; only think, Maggie, that if I go it will be for the best, it will be right, and we said long ago that we would help each other do right; you don't help me now." "It don't seem right to me, Paul," sobbed Maggie. The mother looked up as they entered the house, but full of her own thoughts,


80 Paul and Margaret.
The morning light showed him where he
was, in a field full of dead; no living be-
ing there, no sound of life anywhere, and
crawling off from those who had been his
companions in life, he drew himself slow-
ly under the shade of a clump of trees,
and waited for the coming of friends. He
knew that noble army of slain would not
be neglected whatever the exigency of
the case might be; the wounded would
be cared for, the dead hastily but rever-
ently buried. Mid-day came; a little
water left in his canteen helped to as-
suage the burning thirst of fever, and, as
he waited, the violets growing in abund-
ance proved his friends. They told him
of the hill behind the little brown cot-
tage, they reminded him of Sundays



PAGE 1

78 Paul and Margaret. latest news; when each day brought back tidings of thousands killed and wounded; when those at home knew that roads, fields and woods were literally swarming with those suffering heroes who had defied danger and pain for their country's sake, and were now suddenly smitten to the dust. Is my husband there? thought the lonely wife, but dared not breathe the thought aloud. Is son or brother or friend there ? asked many an anxious one at home; and waited fearfully, painfully, for the list of names that has brought sorrow to almost every home in the land. The war had been waged terribly and fierce; hand-to-hand had been the conflict until darkness came down upon the


174 Paul and Margaret.
dreams, bringing purer thoughts than his
waking hours had known for many years ?
It seemed so, and suggested to her mind
the fragments of a beautiful ship, long
buried, but cast up to the surface by the
storm. Oh, that he might live to repent
of this wasted life, these misspent years,
these God-given faculties shattered, this
soul destroyed! How earnestly she
prayed that a week might be granted him,
a single day, or even an hour of con-
sciousness. Would he repent if he had
the time? God only could know, and
with folded hands and drooping head she
murmured, "Thy will, 0 God, be done;
may Thy glory be my chief desire."
Occasionally there dropped from his lips
other words and sentences that told her


Paul's Duty. 31
gie would be left, and the help to
her in the coming winter; she must see
the advantage, the absolute necessity, of
his going.
"Paul!" it was Margaret calling him to
supper, and with a quick, nervous motion
he threw down the axe and started for
the hou'se. Silently they sat at table and
ate of the plain rye bread with just a
taste of butter, thankful that they still
could afford that; then as Margaret put
the dishes away, and Mrs. Bailey proceed-
ed to fold the clothes for the morrow's
ironing, Paul unburdened his heart, say-
ing at the close, "You see, mother, that I
can do nothing for you here that Mag-
gie might not do, and then I can help
a good deal, if I live."



PAGE 1

Childlike Trust. 107 pausing to take breath. He might, but she could have done no better, and her mother could flee from him, as before. There was, however, no need ; the man stood at the door a long time, with one boot on, gazing after Maggie, his rage gradually turning to amazement, that the quiet child who had scarcely ever dared speak before him, should have defied him in this manner; when she was fairly out of sight, he turned without a word into the bed-room, and finished the dressing operation, which had been so often interfered with, and then eating hastily the late breakfast upon a side-table, turned his steps toward the tavern, still too much astonished to speak, much to the relief of his wife who had been quite as much sur.



PAGE 1

90 Paul and Margaret. It was very quiet there. Maggie was glad that none of the girls had yet come, but she was sure to find Mr. Hobert, for this was the morning he arranged the copies for writing books. She opened the door carefully, and sure enough there he was, bending over the desk. At the sound of the door closing, he looked up and smiled in his kind fatherly way upon her, saying, What brought you out so early, my child ?" "Can you spare a moment to me, Mr. Hobert ?" "Yes, ten, if you like. What is it that makes you look so wise this morning ?" Maggie told him of Paul's letter, that he was wounded, and how she was thinking of going on to see him, if he approved.



PAGE 1

The Letter. 161 called to mind the contempt and insult they had heaped upon her, that she had borne in the spirit of meekness, and now she was ministering to one dear to them, forgetful of the treatment she had received at their hands. Bitter, burning shame did that sister feel as she bowed her head to hide the tears; then she saw how far, far above her was the one she had tried to crush in her wicked pride. And the mother felt that the humble, forgiving Maggie had exhibited before her child a far better Christian spirit than she had ever done, and in humility she rose and brought forward a letter, asking Mr. Hobert to read it, saying, it had come from James that morning; she desired all to know of Maggie's nobleness; it was the 14*


Margaret at School. 71
"by her mother's side and laughed at the
misfortune of a fallen human being, and
instead of being rebuked, had been en-
couraged to continue in doing so. She
could not see that she had committed sin
in torturing the sensitive spirit of Maggie.
She was mortified that Mr. Hobert had
been a witness of the scene, but Maggie
she hated more now than ever, and in her
heart was determined to show her what
she considered her true position, and com-
pel her to keep it.
However, as the days and weeks passed
this girl felt that Mr. Hobert understood
her; his searching eye detected every
glance of contempt, and his watchful
tenderness shielded Maggie from many a
premeditated insult that she, with her


162 Paul and Margaret.
least she could do to counteract careless.
ness and injustice. Mr. Hobert with a
smile of approval read:
"MY DEAR MOTHER,
1 am better and stronger to day, and I
want to tell you that your prayers for
your boy are answered. I have found
the way to the mercy-seat and left my
load of sin and guilt there. Now the
Saviour smiles a pardon upon me, my
heart is full of light and joy. Oh, re-
joice with me, dear mother; and Nell,
are you not glad your brother is saved-
saved from further sin, from eternal
misery and death? and all, under God,
is owing to the Christian walk of little
Maggie Bailey. Mother, such words as


68 Paul and Margaret.
"Young ladies, take your seats."
" With sudden terror they shrunk from
before the stern gaze of their teacher, and
looked with dismay into each others' faces,
as they saw him lead by the hand the lit-
tle pauper to a seat nearest his desk. The
despised hood and cloak he himself hung
upon the hook, and then, for a moment,
rested his large hand upon her head as it
sunk upon the form before her.
Maggie felt that sympathy and love
were expressed in that simple act, but she
dared not even whisper her thanks, nor
was it needed. The good teacher felt that
her spirit was crushed, and that it would
take more than one kind deed to cause
Maggie to forget the cruel words she had
heard.


156 Paul and Margaret.
" Oh, no; we have taken no vote, but
it looks like it."
" Well, I have a letter to read, and you
may change your plans. If you will call
the meeting to order I will read it now,
and give you time to act upon it to-day."
Presently there was silence, and Mr.
Hobert spoke, saying, he had requested a
former pupil of his, who was now acting as
nurse to the soldiers in hospital
at Washington, to inform the society as
to the wants of the sick and wounded
there, and show them how they could best
assist in relieving them. She was too
modest, he said, to write to them as a body,
therefore had addressed her letter to him.
He further said, "I have a great regard
for this young nurse, and trust you will


28 Paul and Margaret.
the ever-increasing. rise in the price of
provisions. On this morning, however,
his thoughts took a different channel.
The men stood in groups talking loud
and earnestly of the latest news, and as
Paul passed by he heard the sounds,
"More men to be raised have to draft !
town bounty!" and the like, until he
caught the spirit of the day and
longed to share in a nation's glory. Why
could not he, as well as others ? He was
not a man, to be sure-onlysixteen, and
small in stature-but his heart was large,
and his limbs were supple, strong, capa-
ble of endurance; he felt sure he could do
something; yes, he would volunteer and
the bounty should make his mother and
Maggie comfortable for the winter.





PAGE 1

Paul Wounded. 79 scene, and Paul found himself alone amid the dead. Weak from loss of blood he lay with his head upon the outstretched arm of one who slept his last earthly sleep. How long he had lain there was unknown; there was no sound of life about him; the clouds of smoke had partly rolled away so that the stars faintly glimmered through, and Paul could look up and feel that God was over all. Strange as it may seem, he felt no fear, had no feeling of abhorrence, when he saw dimly the heaps of slain about him, but more calmly than ever in his life before he thought of home. A peaceful, quiet sense of rest in God possessed him, and looking up to the twinkling stars above he said his childhood's prayer, and slept again.



PAGE 1

84 Paul and Margaret. "It's come; mother, he's alive." God be praised," replied Mrs. Bailey, as, taking her hands from the tub, and wiping suds from them, she sat down to hear Maggie read it. "The voice of the child trembled, and the tears started to the mother's eyes at the first words. Maggie could scarcely control herself to finish reading the short but precious letter. Those violets! how they were treasured; how carefully they were placed in her bible and looked at again and again. "You must write every day, Margaret," said the mother, with a voice that trembled with intense feeling. Yes, indeed, mother." We must thank God for sparing him to us."



PAGE 1

CHAPTER VI. Childlike Trust. "Cared for, watched over, though often thou seemest Justly forsaken, nor counted a child; Loved and forgiven though rightly thou deemest Thyself all unlovely, impure and defiled. "Be trustful, be steadfast, whatever betide thee; Only one thing do thou ask of the LordGrace to go forward wherever He guide thee, Simply believing the truth of His word." T HE next letter told that Paul was one of the many who had been carried to Washington and now occupied a cot near one of the windows of a large airy room in -hospital." Maggie 94



PAGE 1

Childlike Trust. 97 "Well, my child, you shall go. Are you ready to start to-morrow morning, in the stage ?" "Yes, sir," all ready, "answered Maggie, eagerly, and continued, "You are willing, sir? oh, you are kind; how Paul will thank you; and I'm to start in the morning ?" Yes, if Mr. Headley goes, as he somewhat expected to; I will see him before night and let you know. You will want thirty dollars; here are fifteen, the rest I will give you before you go, and if you get out of money you are to write and let me know; have you got a trunk ?" "Oh, no, sir, I don't need one." But you will need something." "Mother's large carpet bag holds all 9



PAGE 1

72 Paul and Margaret. trusting nature, would not dream was coming until she felt the pain and mortification of it. Maggie had not Paul's determined spirit to rise above the world's contempt; she did not feel like him that she could live down the disgrace a drunken father was heaping upon her; like her mother she wished only to do her duty in the humble corner of the world where her Heavenly Father had placed her, ready to bear trials in the spirit of meekness, but still shrinking from them, and wishing that she might be freed from them ; looking forward to nothing higher and better; never for a moment dreaming that joy or wealth or honor could be hers; looking for the love of none, but that of her Heavenly Father


124 Paul and Margaret.
again; I haven't for a long time before,
but I couldn't stop at first." Her lips still
trembled, but she tried to smile. Tears
were in the lady's eyes also, as she prom-
ised to call for her in half an hour,
The half hour passed and Maggie found
her travelling companion in the dining
room as she entered; there was a touching
look of inquiry upon her face as she re-
turned his pleasant salutation which he
answered at once, Yes, I have seen Paul;
he knows you are here, and he is waiting
for dinner to go by as impatiently as you
are. Maggie smiled; her peace had begun
to flow, she was already happy in antici-
pation.
Dinner over, the party proceeded to the
hospital. As Maggie entered the ward



PAGE 1

152 Paul and Margaret. enlarges mind and heart, a work that strengthens every attribute of her nature, that brings to her new thoughts and feelings and exerts its wonderful influence unknown to her; for unconscious of self, she labors on, simply rejoicing to do whatever she sees is needed to be done. Mrs. Maybrook had said, "Maggie have they a benevolent society in your place?" and she answered, "Oh yes, I think there are several, and one entirely for the soldiers." "Why don't you write and ask them to send you a box for our ward ? We are coming short of delicacies and the poor boys enjoy them so much. My basket don't go half as far as I wish it could; a box would help us wonderfully."


2 JUVENILE AND SUNDAY SCHOOL BOOKS.
The Brewer's Family. Amy Carr. By Caroline
By Mrs. Ellis. A Temperance Cheesebro. 3 illustrations, i6mo.
Story. I vol. I6mo $1 25 $I 15
We find this an admirable story of Eng- A story of a girl who, when an infant,
lish life, by an English lady whose writings was left in the cars asleep, abandoned by
are well known on this side of the water. its mother, and was taken home and adopt-
It describes how a Christian man, brought ed by the kind-hearted engineer. The girl
up to the business of a brewer, and until becomes in the end a blessing to the house
middle life never once imagining that there by bringing into it, after her own conver-
was in it any inconsistency with his Chris- sion, the benign influence of the gospel.
tian profession, was awakened at length to The story is very interesting, many of the
a sense of such inconsistency, and led to its scenes being new to this class of books,
abandonment. In his own experience in and the teachings evangelical and good.-
this regard his family also intimately Sunday School Times.
-shared. The story is an exceedingly in-
teresting one, with an admirable lesson.-- Robert, the Cabin Boy.
Christian Times.
By H. K. P., author of "Mary
The Kemptons. A Tem- Alden," etc. Illustrated, I6mo.
perance Story. By H. K. P., 15
author of "I obert, the Cabin A story of uncommon beauty and inter-
est, about a boy who had been kidnapped
Boy," and other popular juvenile when a child, and carried to sea by a sail-
books. I6mo, 3 illustrations. or. The dangers and temptations of a sea
I 25 life are forcibly depided; also the great
benefits of Bethel Societies and religious
No better temperance book has been services for seamen, both when in port and
issued from the press for many years. It when at sea.-Sunday School Times.
is a well-told story of youthful struggles
"and triumphs, beautifully illustrating the Jacques Bonneval ; or,
blessings of temperance, and showing thel
sad ravages of intemperance. Many of its The Days of the Dragonnades.
passages are of thrilling interest, and its A Tale of the Huguenots. By
wide circulation would be of great service the auor of y
to the cause of temperance.-Temnehrance e author of ary Powell.
Advocate. I vol. i6mo . .. I 00
A capital temperance story. It differs So lifelike are the scenes described,
from most of the stories on this subjedt in that one unhesitatingly lends his confiderce,
that t.e famu y who-se history chik;y giv's and follows the ittle compan, of martyrs
point to the argument is not that of a poor through all their sufferings from Papal
miserable outcast, but one of the highest cruelty in France, until they are safely
respe6ability.-Sunday School Times. landed on the shores of England. The
story is one of intense interest, with all the
Capt. Christie's Grand-, added charm of novelty, from its quaint
S language and careful correspondence with
daughter. I6mo, 3 illustrations. the historical events of the time.-Hud-
I 25 son Co. Republican.
In our boyhood we loved to read books Cherry and Violet A
which brought tears to our eyes. This y a
story, of Captain Christie would, certainly Tale of the Great Plague. By*
have held a high place in our list of favor- the author of Mary Powell."
ites if tested by this effed. It is an Eng- 16mo, cheap edition P 1 mo
lish story of a retired sea-captain, living n 6mo, heap edition . I 15
Yerkshire with his grand-daughter and an While not exclusively a religious tale, it
orphan boy whom the old man adopted into is full of the spirit of self-sacrifice and duti-
his family; indeed, the interest of the ful affedtion, and expresses directly much
stoiy trn's more on the boy than on the true religious feeling.
girl, but both are worthy of the love be- This beautiful story of domestic affec-
stowed on them.-National Baptist. tion, suffering, and self-sacrificing fidelity,
The book is a valuable addition to our will be read by old and young with eager
Sabbath School list.-Sunday School attention and pleasure.-Christian ln
Tersr. telli-encer.
. ', d



PAGE 1

1 5o Paul and Margaret. always; Maggie, especially, since he had discovered the unkind treatment to which she was subjected from her schoolmates. Her letters to him had surprised him, even though he knew something of her capabilities. He had looked upon her timid, shrinking nature without marking the strong undercurrent of love and tenderness; he saw her perseverance in duty even amid trials, but did not dream of the wonderful firmness and courage she possessed. She had shown wisdom in con"ducting home and school affairs, but he never expected Maggie to launch out into a bolder plan of operations than her age would seem to warrant. He had thought her capable of obeying orders in almost any circumstances, but not that she should take


New Associations. 141
The lady smiled as she answered in a
lively tone, "Oh, yes, you can; there is
a great deal you can do for me; and, my
child, there is one thing I should prize
more than all else--I want you to love
me; can you "
" Can I? why I cannot help it, Mrs.
Maybrook. I loved you as soon as you
spoke kindly to me; indeed I shall al-
ways love you."
Maggie spoke earnestly and with a
tinge of sadness in her tone; the lady
went on: We had a little girl once,
Maggie; she died a few years ago, and
since then we have been lonely, missing
her. Had she lived, you and she would
be nearly of the same age, I should think.
Have you ever lost a friend, child ? "



PAGE 1

64 Paul and Margaret. the night in the woods until the storm was past, and he had sunk into the lethargic sleep that characterizes the inebriate, before they could seek their beds to rest, that Maggie was slowly ploughing her way through the field of snow that lay between her home and the schoolhouse. As she drew near the wall that separated her from the yard, she heard the sound of voices, and then the loud laugh of several of her schoolmates. Not thinking that she was the object of their merriment, she hastened on, and, climbing the wall, drew near the group just within the school-house door. She did not see them, but the next sentence arrested her steps, and she stood, not daring to go in, and with not strength to find her way back



PAGE 1

138 Paul and Margaret. else, and early the next morning she was up, with a neat ruffle about the neck of her dark calico, all ready to begin work, but surprised that the house should be so quiet. She had yet to learn that her new friend had habits at variance with her own simple ones, one of which was, rising with the birds, and before the sun had cast a ray upon the house-tops; but the hour was spent in examining the curiosities and enjoying the engravings which abounded in the different rooms, and in thinking over the events of the last few days. "Good morning, little one, how long have you been down ?" said a cheery voice at the door. Maggie turned, her face brightening,


98 Paul and Margaret.
I've got to carry, and some socks and tea
for Paul."
"But Paul can get some tea there;
you'll not need to carry any."
" Mother wanted to send him some-
thing; it is only a little."
"Very well; now, can.you take care of
your money ?"
"4 Mother said it must be sewed inside
my dress."
"I see you understand; well, now go,
and I will be round this evening."
With a sweet smile of grateful love
Maggie left her teacher, and with a light
step she bounded across the fields to her
home; pushing open the door she ex-
claimed, "I'm going in the morning, mo-
ther; see, I've got money here," and


New Associations. 135
"I like them, sir; they have a pleasant
sound; but I am older than I look to be."
" Else you would never have got this
idea of nurse into your head, would you ?
but excuse me, Mrs. Maybrook, and let
me listen to your proposition."
"It is this: you are busy enough
already with other work, and I desire to
take Maggie off your hands entirely;
what do you say to it ?"
"Provided she agrees, I see no objection.
What are your plans for her ?"
" You know I spend half a day with the
soldiers of different wards; I want Mag-
gie to go with me each day, and assist me
in distributing reading, or whatever else
we are called upon to do, and spend also
an hour or so each day with Paul until


The Meeting. 125
and passed along by the cots all filled
with the brave, wounded men she had so
many times prayed for, the color left her
face so rapidly that Mrs. Maybrook, fear-
ing she would faint, whispered, "courage !
he is close by." A sad, brave smile
answered her, and they followed Mr.
Headley until he reached a little cot by
an open window. The young man was
raised upon pillows and had been watch-
ing their progress towards him. As the
gentleman stepped aside disclosing to his
view the slight trembling form of Maggie,
he opened his arms, tears streamed over
his face like rain, but smiles mingled with
them, as the sun sometimes breaks
through the clouds before the storm is
past.
11*



PAGE 1

The Meeting. 15 Maggie was capable of turning her hand to anything not beyond her strength. It may be that the story of her wretched home life, and the strong love she bore her wounded brother, influenced him somewhat; at all events, as we shall see, he had no cause to regret it. STravelling day and night, they reached the city in a state of weariness that unfitted them for work; still Maggie would not have rested until she had seen Paul, had not Mr. Headley assured her that it would be folly to seek him until she had eaten and slept; meantime he would take her to a private house, the home of an acquaintance who would care for her until he should look Paul up. It was hard to bear, but she tried not to show her ira-



PAGE 1

132 Paul and Margaret. a consummation without his assistance; he was glad she would not be crushed by circumstances, but like himself had an ambition of her own. Maggie had told him of their mother's daily life; that it was the same in many respects, differing only in that she did not work quite so steadily, having the weekly allowance he had arranged for her before he left; he was glad to hear even that. Of his father Maggie had simply said, The same as ever, Paul;" and he understood it perfectly. He had no reason to love his father, or even to respect him, but he now felt pity for him that he was so entirely a slave to his appetite, and if there was one thing in the world he hated with the whole strength of his being it


Margaret at School. 75
moulding her character more than she
was aware. They were showing to her,
that lowly as Paul's childhood had been,
God had given him, with countless others,
a work to do, a great and glorious work.
Paul, though poor, and unknown by
the exalted of this world, God had lifted
from obscurity and poverty and placed
where he could not be bound by such fet-
ters as had been a perpetual drag upon
his youth. Might not the same be done
for her? only He knew who controlled
the destinies of all. She would patiently
wait and see, and as she waited, improving
every golden opportunity, she wrote Paul
something of what was in her heart, and
he in the camp, on the march, or commun-
ing silently with himself as he paced



PAGE 1

CHAPTER Ill. Enlisted. N the morning Paul found his desire to enlist as strong as ever; even the remonstrance of his mother and the pale face of Maggie did not dampen his enthusiasm. He had more than one incentive to go-a strong wish to share in the struggle for the right, a desire to be no longer a burden to his mother, or, rather, to be of more assistance to her, and a feeling that this was the way in which he could burst the chain that bound him to a drunken father. In times past he had 42 $



PAGE 1

100oo Paul and Margaret. Where did you get money ? tell me quick or I'll -" and advancing quickly he clenched his fist before her pale face in a frightfully threatening manner, shouting curses in her ears at the same time. "Mr. Hobert gave it to me, father; it is not my own money." "Of course it isn't, you deceitful brat. What are you going to do with it ? speak quick." "Going to Paul, father, to nurse him." "Ha! ha! that's a good one! you going to nurse Paul! come, pass over the money, and I won't hurt you." She cannot give you the money, father; it is not hers; Mr. Hobert has given it to her to use for Paul, and he is wounded, perhaps dying."



PAGE 1

CHAPTER IV. Margaret at School. T HE winter passed slowly and tediously to the two at home; frequent letters from Paul were the only joys that came to them. Maggie donned each day the new calico, and, with book in hand, trudged through the snow to school. She learned rapidly, and, as the months went by, her excessive timidity wore away; still she had trials, both at home and at school, that caused her to live within herself as much as ever. She had early learned to bear abuse without a 6 61


So Paul and Margaret.
They would still hide, as far as they
were able, the degradation of one who
stood in so close relation to them, even
from the kindest friends. Never had a
complaint of husband's or father's brutal-
ity escaped the lips of either of them; but
the story was not unknown to Mr.
Hobert; he saw suffering imprinted upon
their faces, and respected the pride that
would conceal it from the world; he saw
it written upon the bloated form and
sensual countenance of him who was the
cause of it, but he made no sign that
would wound their sensitiveness only by
renewed kindness to Maggie in her school
life, and by diligently and indefatigably
working against the rumseller.
Would that every pang of woe the


JUVENILE AND SUNDAY SCHOOL BOOKS. 7
Beautizild Books for Presentation.
The Little Fox. The Story of Mc Clintock's
Aratic Expedition. Written for the Young. By S. T. C. Square 16
mo, beautifully illustrated and bound ...... 00
From the journal of Sir F. L. McClintock, the author has presented in a simple
form, for children, the narrative of the wonderful Artic Expedition. Children
will read the narrative with delight. The beautiful large type, and illustrations, will
add to their pleasure. It would be an elegant holiday present.-Evangelical Re-
pository.
A capital little volume for boys and girls, containing the substance of Sir F. L.
McClintock's narrative of his exploration in the artic regions, and given in a story-form
for young people, telling them, in an extremely fasti ma g and absorbing manner, all
about the icebergs, the animals, and the wonderful acRntures to be met with in that
frozen zone.--Wide WkVld.
Honey-Blossoms for Little Bees. A Beautiful
Juvenile. Illustrated. A new edition. Square 16mo o 85
"A beautiful book with a sweet title, and what's more, a pretty story, in large type
and short words, with beautiful piCtures to help the little reader to understand."
A very sweet little book, which gives a peep at a sweet home in the upper part of
New York.- Congregational Herald.
W inter in Spitzbergen. A Book for Youth,
from the German of C. Hildebrandt, by E. Goodrich Smith. Illus-
trated.
" A book of surpassing interest for young people Those who have been charmed
with Robinson Crusoe will be delighted with this. It gives an account of the manner
in which three lonely castawhys spent a winter in the dark, frozen, and desolate polar
regions of Spitzbergen, and how they were at length providentially delivered. A capital
book to beread aloud arpund a winter fireside."-Baptist Mlemorial.
Poetic Readings for Schools and Families.
With an IntrcduEtion, by J. L. Comstock, M.D., author of "A Sys-
tem of Philosophy," Chemistry," &c. Illustrated. I6mo.
This volume is strongly commended to School Committees, to Teachers, and to
Parents. It consists of some of the choicest selections of Poetry in our language-
selections which every childcan understand, and in which every child will be interest-
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on, the minds and hearts of the young. It ought to find a place as a Class and Read-
in-. Book in every common school and private academy of the land.
This is a beautiful collection of poetry for the family. We have seen nothing of the
kind so well adapted to interest the young.-Cong. ournal.
We cordially recommend to all young readers this charming collecion. It is exe-
cuted with soundness of judgment, delicacy of taste, and great range of research ; and
no school ought to be wit out it.-Home Yournal.
The poetry is of the highest moral stamp, of the very character fitted to cultivate
intellect and heart. Sfedato.
A very handsome collection of choice poems from the first authors. Among them we
n-tice that touching ballad, "The Children in the Wood," "John Gilpin," Casaa-
bi, ca." and a hundred others of equal interest to the young.-Daily Mercury.
L- . "




176 Paul and Margaret.
will cast thee off forever." No, she could
not fold to her stricken heart one single
ray of hope-all was fearful darkness.
Well nigh crushed by this terrible blow,
she had not strength to call the friend who
waited in the adjoining room. With head
bowed low upon her bosom, she wept and
moaned in agony, for this was more than
the passing away of a friend; this was eter-
nal death-a never-ending separation. 0
the depth of the riches both of the wis-
dom and knowledge of God! how un-
speakable are his judgments and his ways
past finding ou; !"
Time passed unheeded; none could
know the wretchedness and depth of woe
of this stricken woman; friends pitied
and assisted; all was done for her that


Enlisted. 43
desired to make some attainment in
scholarship; the little he had acquired
had given him a thirst for knowledge
that would not be satisfied with any-
thing superficial, and diligently had he
improved every moment he could call his
own until now; but doing his best his
progress had been slow, and although the
praises of his teacher were a source of in-
spiration to him, impelling him at times
to sleep less than was well for him that
he might study more, yet as he looked
back upon the little he knew, and for-
ward to the boundless fields to be ex-
plored, his heart almost sank within him.
But now there seemed a future opening
before him, not so desirable, perhaps, as
the other, but more nearly within his


Childlike Trust. 103
think I want to see Paul as well as you ?
now give me the money, that's a good girl."
"Will you wait, father, that I may ask
Mr. Hobert about it ?"
"No, I'll be hanged if I will; it's none
of his business, its Paul's money; think
I'm fool enough to believe it's his ? I'll
have it now."
"Will you certainly use it to bring
Paul home ? "
"'Pon my word, I will; now you're
beginning to be sensible, Mag."
"But can't you give me a few minutes
to think if .its best to send for him ? "
" I know it's best, you little fool."
"Well, father, I want to know so too;
let me think of it a minute while you
dress."


"Paul's Duty. 27
And what did the boy think upon as
he rapidly walked from house to house
with the various bundles of smoothly-
ironed clothes, and gathered the scanty
pay that seemed so little when there was
so much to be bought for the absolute
necessities of life?
War tidings were familiar to the se-
cluded family even though a daily paper
never found its way within the walls of
the brown cottage. Paul understood that
the rebellionj was the cause -of this added
suffering among the poor, and thought
of it many times, but with no feeling of
murmuring against the government; far
from it, he was glad to share the burden
as far as he was concerned, but for his
mother's and Maggie's sake he dreaded
, '
0.'


The Meeting. 29
lead me back to my regiment. Am I
right sister ?"
"Yes, Paul, it is right: and I-"
" You will go back to mother."
Maggie paused, the blood mounted to
her forehead, but she said, "No, Paul,
mother don't need me, I will stay here,
too."
" You! what for ?"
" To nurse the sick."
" But you can't."
"I can help; I can do something; I
shall stay."
Paul looked in her face a moment and
answered, So you will. Well then, we
both have come out of the bondage of
home, -but mother ?"
"I know it, Paul, but we need not all


Margaret at School. 69
With a low impressive tone he read a
few of Christ's words. Not one there but
heard every sound, and felt the full force
of the teacher's meaning. It was a part
of the eighteenth chapter of Matthew.
He read five verses without looking up,
and then raising his eyes and fixing them
upon those who had stood in the entry, he
said, in a slow tone, "But whoso shall
offend one of these little ones which
believe in me, it were better for him that
a millstone were hanged about his neck,
and that he were drowned in the depth
of the sea;" then turning to his book he
resumed the reading. Presently he lifted
his sad eyes to their faces again, and said,
more slowly even than before, "Take
heed that ye despise not one of these little


Paul's Duty. 29
State and town bounty! how .large it
seemed to him, how like a fortune almost
within his grasp. Visions of good
healthy food, and thick warm clothing
danced before him, not for himself; oh, no,
but for the dear suffering ones at home.
He saw, as in a dream, little Maggie in
school, divested of patched gown, smiling
over her books, as she never smiled now
except on the Sabbath, and his patient,
toil-worn mother, taking an occasional
hour to rest from labor. He could
scarcely control the wild tumult of
his heart with all in prospect; it gave
a new light to the dark blue of his
eye, and added a buoyancy to his step
as he turned toward home. Pushing
open the door he caught his mother's
"3*
V .Q



PAGE 1

Childlike Trust. 103 think I want to see Paul as well as you ? now give me the money, that's a good girl." "Will you wait, father, that I may ask Mr. Hobert about it ?" "No, I'll be hanged if I will; it's none of his business, its Paul's money; think I'm fool enough to believe it's his ? I'll have it now." "Will you certainly use it to bring Paul home ? "'Pon my word, I will; now you're beginning to be sensible, Mag." "But can't you give me a few minutes to think if .its best to send for him ? " I know it's best, you little fool." "Well, father, I want to know so too; let me think of it a minute while you dress."



PAGE 1

80 Paul and Margaret. The morning light showed him where he was, in a field full of dead; no living being there, no sound of life anywhere, and crawling off from those who had been his companions in life, he drew himself slowly under the shade of a clump of trees, and waited for the coming of friends. He knew that noble army of slain would not be neglected whatever the exigency of the case might be; the wounded would be cared for, the dead hastily but reverently buried. Mid-day came; a little water left in his canteen helped to assuage the burning thirst of fever, and, as he waited, the violets growing in abundance proved his friends. They told him of the hill behind the little brown cottage, they reminded him of Sundays


sgm validated


Aspirations. I
Margaret. The world had no beauty in
it for the mother when this babe came to
her. Five years had done a sad work
upon her heart. This child had never
seen the smile that had sunned Paul's in-
fancy, and that even he had almost for-
gotten, so long had it been since it came
to him last. She had grown up in the
shade, as it were, and was not unlike her
mother in face and manner. She moved
quickly about the cottage, because she
must. She had learned to do many things
that girls twice her age rarely do, and
that, too, was because she must. She
did not talk with her mother as Paul
sometimes did, but quietly and quickly
performed day after day all that was re-
quired of her. She never smiled in her


30 Paul and Margaret.
gaze, so .sad, so full of dark forboding,
and t flashed upon him that this would
be bringing a new sorrow to her life, and
saying quickly within himself, "I will
wait, I will not .tell her yet; I will pray
before I decide;" he gave her the money
and passed out to attend to other duties,
his mind all the time full of this one
great thought-bearing a small part of
the nation's burden, and making lighter
the load that rested upon his mother.
Till night it never left him; his lowly
toil seemed nobler; he almost rejoiced.
that he was poor.
But his mother! would she give him
uip? Paul knew that he was very near
her heart, nearer than any other. It
would be a bitter trial; but then Mag.
*



PAGE 1

156 Paul and Margaret. Oh, no; we have taken no vote, but it looks like it." Well, I have a letter to read, and you may change your plans. If you will call the meeting to order I will read it now, and give you time to act upon it to-day." Presently there was silence, and Mr. Hobert spoke, saying, he had requested a former pupil of his, who was now acting as nurse to the soldiers in -hospital at Washington, to inform the society as to the wants of the sick and wounded there, and show them how they could best assist in relieving them. She was too modest, he said, to write to them as a body, therefore had addressed her letter to him. He further said, "I have a great regard for this young nurse, and trust you will


50 Paul and Margaret.
clothes, of course, only for absolute ne-
cessities, you know."
"Yes, father, Maggie must go to school,
she is all ready; I have bought her two
new dresses, and they are all made, and a
pair of shoes for winter, and the same for
mother."
"You don't say! I thought you
hadn't got your bounty !"
"I hadn't the last time I saw you, but
I got it soon after; now you promise to
let Maggie go, do you ?"
" Yes-yes-anything : but where's
the bounty?"
"I've got it in the bank, father, and ar-
ranged so that you can have the best
possible use of it."
"That's right Paul, that's right; honor


The Meeting. 127
face had become familiar to them, and
they almost felt that a day would be lost
that did not bring her with it.
This was not Mr. Headley's field of op-
eration, so he soon left them, saying he
would call for his charge towards night
and take her to the place where he had
engaged board for her, which, agreeably to
Maggie's wish, he had succeeded in find-
ing, where she could pay in household
services, and still have much time to at-
tend on and cheer Paul.
Mrs. Maybrook shook her head dis-
approvingly, but merely said she would
insist upon her accompanying them that
night at least, and they would be glad to
see him at the tea hour; would he
come ?"



PAGE 1

l 2 Paul and Margaret. has been truly likened to the very gate of hell-may every youth shun it, every maiden use her influence against it!



PAGE 1

The. Inebriate's Death. 171 once respected and loved. Had God no-, ted her murmurings and answered the half formed desires of her heart so speedily, so fearfully ? Would he take him from life without a moment's warning? She feared so; and bitterly did she regret that even in thought she had been reluctant to bear with him. Must he die in his sins? the thought was agony; but soon the doctor came; every word he spoke and every change in his countenance were noted; the neighbors had gone into the other room and she was alone with him as he made his examinations; the bruises on the surface of the body were severe but not dangerous, there must be internal injuries to cause his long unconsciousness; he might revive; until he



PAGE 1

58 Paul and Margaret. More than ever did the mother feel her error. At a glance she saw how the child's heart had pined for affection, and drawing her within her arms she pressed the young head to her bosom, and with a tearful voice, said, "Paul, I came up to ask you to pray once before you go; I have heard you when you thought you were alone many times, but now we will pray together." The boy lifted up his voice, and as he prayed new hope filled all their hearts, new strength for the coming trials, new faith in the power that was guiding them through the dangers and difficulties of life. Paul ended, and the mother folded them both in the first strong, loving em-



PAGE 1

The Meeting. 127 face had become familiar to them, and they almost felt that a day would be lost that did not bring her with it. This was not Mr. Headley's field of operation, so he soon left them, saying he would call for his charge towards night and take her to the place where he had engaged board for her, which, agreeably to Maggie's wish, he had succeeded in finding, where she could pay in household services, and still have much time to attend on and cheer Paul. Mrs. Maybrook shook her head disapprovingly, but merely said she would insist upon her accompanying them that night at least, and they would be glad to see him at the tea hour; would he come ?"


Paul's Duty. 39
saw her lying on the ground and heard
the sobbing moan of her troubled heart,
and with a bound he was by her, and
stooping, wound his arms about her and
pressed his lips upon her wet face.
" Why, Maggie don't, don't feel so; I
wish I hadn't told you, poor little sister;
you're all wet with the dew, and cold as
a stone; come, let's go home; it isn't so
bad as you think, we'll talk about it, and
if you feel so I won't go, indeed I won't,
only don't sob so. There, now, you feel
better, I know, he said, as Maggie
wound her arms about his neck and
kissed him many times.
"You must go home; oh, how cold
you are, you wicked little thing; come,
let's run down hill and get warmed up,"



PAGE 1

The Meeting. 125 and passed along by the cots all filled with the brave, wounded men she had so many times prayed for, the color left her face so rapidly that Mrs. Maybrook, fearing she would faint, whispered, "courage he is close by." A sad, brave smile answered her, and they followed Mr. Headley until he reached a little cot by an open window. The young man was raised upon pillows and had been watching their progress towards him. As the gentleman stepped aside disclosing to his view the slight trembling form of Maggie, he opened his arms, tears streamed over his face like rain, but smiles mingled with them, as the sun sometimes breaks through the clouds before the storm is past. 11*




The Inebriate's Death. 173
watched until dawn, when she caught
the sound of a fluttering breath, as
though the departed spirit had ventured
back a moment; bathing freely the face
and head, she still waited and prayed and
longed for the morning.
A sound caught her ear, and bending
her head to his lips she heard him whisper,
broken by long intervals,
"A charge to keep I have,
A God to glorify."
For the first time tears started to her
eyes and dropped upon his face. Was it a
wave of childhood faith and love surging
up from the dim memories of his heart, to
remind him of the ocean of sin he had
passed over? The lines learned at a
mother's knee, coming back to him in
15*


6o Paul and Margaret.
could dispel the sense of comfort left in
Mrs. Bailey's heart by the prayer of Paul.
Those words of hope and love still linger-
ed about her; she could not forget them;
they threw a brightness over the lonely
house, which she had not noticed even
when Paul was in it. Oh, the power of
prayer! how it enhances every joy, and
lightens every burden; how it throws a
flood of sunshine over the darkest path,
and smooths the roughest way.
"Oh, for a voice of sweeter sound,
For every wind to bear,
To teach the list'ning world around
The blessedness of prayer."



PAGE 1

New Associations. 137 play of the lovely animated features of Mrs. Maybrook, and growing more deeply in love with her at each new sentence, feeling that she could gladly labor for one who seemed so noble and disinterested in her charities. Then, too, the thought of soon having Paul in the very house with her, away from the sights and sounds of his present quarters, where she could watch his progress every hour, was almost too much joy. It was plain that Maggie felt just as Mrs. Maybrook desired she should; that she was to be not entirely indebted to her charity for a home, but that her services were to be equivalent to the benefit received; for the child had by far too much pride to be satisfied with anything 12*


The Inebriate's Death. 169
she was of less value than a single mug of
spirits. No wonder that her heart was
full of bitterness as she thought of him,
or that she rejoiced at the separation of
her children from him, and from the home
in which the joys of childhood had never
visited them ; no wonder that her footsteps
lagged as she drew near the house, and
she would gladly have turned another
way, but strange sounds met her ear as
she approached; the doors and windows
are thrown open, and the confusion of
many voices tell her that strangers are
within. What can have happened ? She
dreams no longer, but hastens on and
finds the neighbors gathered about the
bed where her husband is lying pale and
unconscious.
15



PAGE 1

The Letter. 1S9 Maybrook, took him home with us last week; he is happier there, but I spend every afternoon in the ward as I did before. Then, the men like to have us read to them a little every day, and we sometimes sing, when not too busy. Of the three boys concerning whom you asked, George Maltby is perhaps the weakest; the doctor gives him cordial every day, and he is getting along slowly. The other two are much better, and will be able to leave soon; they are sometimes home-sick and I tell them all I can of Tto cheer them. I think letters from home do them more good than medicine. James Fitch told me this morning that he had found the Saviour upon his sickbed; I was glad, but could say nothing to



PAGE 1

Margaret at School. 65 through the drifts. Pale and sad, with her hand pressed against her side, as her custom was when agitated, she heard every cruel word and felt each tone pierce her heart. It seemed as though an hour's agony was concentrated into the few minutes she stood there. "If it wasn't the most amusing sight I've seen this many a day ; mother and I just stood and laughed. You should have seen the tears run down mother's cheeks with laughter, and Henry fairly shouted. I never saw old Bailey cut such a figure before; he'd try to get up, and get half way, and down he'd go again; and then he'd sprawl out his arms and legs like a great frog, Henry said, and when his jug rolled into the gutter-you ought to have 6*


Margaret at School. 65
through the drifts. Pale and sad, with
her hand pressed against her side, as her
custom was when agitated, she heard
every cruel word and felt each tone pierce
her heart. It seemed as though an hour's
agony was concentrated into the few min-
utes she stood there.
"If it wasn't the most amusing sight
I've seen this many a day ; mother and I
just stood and laughed. You should have
seen the tears run down mother's cheeks
with laughter, and Henry fairly shouted.
I never saw old Bailey cut such a figure
before; he'd try to get up, and get half
way, and down he'd go again; and then
he'd sprawl out his arms and legs like a
great frog, Henry said, and when his jug
rolled into the gutter-you ought to have
6*



PAGE 1

142 Paul and Margaret. Not 'till Paul went away." Maggie's tones had sympathy in them. "That was not death; but I can readily see that you felt it might almost have been. My dear, stay with us as long as you can, and love us all you can; I would ask no more, only that you would let me do for you as I would for a child, and accept it as a child would-with freedom; can you ?" "If you desire it, Mrs. Maybrook." "I do; it will make me quite happy, andah, there is the breakfast bell; come, why, I have almost started the tears again-no, no, you must be happy, dear." It is your kindness, Mrs. Maybrook; I am not used to it, but I am happy;


The Meeting. 15
Maggie was capable of turning her hand
to anything not beyond her strength. It
may be that the story of her wretched
home life, and the strong love she bore
her wounded brother, influenced him
somewhat; at all events, as we shall see,
he had no cause to regret it.
STravelling day and night, they reached
the city in a state of weariness that un-
fitted them for work; still Maggie would
not have rested until she had seen Paul,
had not Mr. Headley assured her that it
would be folly to seek him until she had
eaten and slept; meantime he would take
her to a private house, the home of an
acquaintance who would care for her un-
til he should look Paul up. It was hard
to bear, but she tried not to show her ira-


12 Paul and Margaret.
Iother's face as she had been seen to do
sometimes in Paul's; perhaps it was be-
cause he drew it forth and the mother
could not. Occasionally Paul hummed a
tune in a low tone, working steadily all
the time, but Margaret never did that;
she was a very silent child, her mother
thought, but then it was not strange, for
she had no one to talk with. Had the
mother seen her when on the Sabbath
Paul led her away from the cottage up
the foot-path that wound over the hill to
the woods beyond, she would not have
known her child; the fetters were thrown
off there, and all unconsciously. She did
not sing and shout as some children
would have done, but the look of apathy,
almost dullness, that she carried at home,


The Letter. 157
give her the assistance she asks for-this
is the letter:"
P-- HlOSPITAL, WVASHIINGTON, June, 1864.
Mry DEAR TEACHER-
You will excuse me for not doing just
as you desired, but I can better write to
you than to strangers, and leave it with
yourself whether to make known our
wants to the Society or not. I told you
in my last letter what we needed most,
and very likely they would know what
to send better than I could tell them.
You asked for a picture of hospital life.
It would make your heart ache to see it,
as I do, day after day, although when the
hands are busy we do not realize it so
much. There are but few cases of fever
in our ward, but some very severe wounds
14


PAUL AND MARGARET.
CHAPTER I.
Aspirations.
T is midsummer. The whole earth is
green; the grass thick and tall, where
it has not been mown; the leaves all
full grown; the berries ripe and falling
off; the air heavy with the breath of
flowers, and heated with the sun's hot
rays; and the birds are seeking the coolest
shades, and folding their wings wearily un-
til the day goes by and. the twilight comes.
The village is quiet, for it is the noon
1* 5



PAGE 1

Paul's Duty. 25 ters. She looked forward to nothing else. No hopes brightened the dark prospect, no desires, for were they not useless ? and upon this fresh Autumn morning, as she stood by the tub, washing, alone-for Margaret was gathering a basket of fuel in the woods and Paul had taken home the clothes ironed yesterday-a dread of the coming winter settled upon her spirits more sensibly than ever before. For two years civil war raged in the country; taxes had been increased, and light as the burden to some, the poor found it was more than they could well bear, for with taxation, prices of the most common articles were rising weekly, and thus the very poor were more nearly affected by it. 3



PAGE 1

Aspirations. 7 looks forward to the grave-a long way forward it seems, for she is not old. She has no spirit of repining, although she knows that the bright hopes of her youth shall never rest upon her in their full fruition. They were simple hopes, not aspiring, as the world thinks;-only to be loved, to love, to be happy in her daily duties, that was all-but she has laid them away with a sigh, perhaps, then, but now out of sight forever. One would think she could find a joy in her two children, but no-she sometimes feels they were better dead. She has no time to smile upon them, no time to love them; she thinks they had best learn to live without love while young, it will save disappointment in the future;



PAGE 1

Paul Wounded. 83 home. You will write often now I am laid up, won't you, little Maggie? I'd like to get a letter every day, but that would be too often. They take good care of us; I have all I need, so you must be happy. Good bye. PAUL." They had waited over a week after the battle for a letter, and now as it came in Paul's own hand-writing Maggie grew pale with joy as she took it from the postmaster and hastily turned to go home. "Guess you'll find your brother all right, Miss." "Yes, Sir," answered Maggie with a smile, and pressing suddenly her hand against her side she turned away and soon was home.


152 Paul and Margaret.
enlarges mind and heart, a work that
strengthens every attribute of her nature,
that brings to her new thoughts and feel-
ings and exerts its wonderful influence
unknown to her; for unconscious of self,
she labors on, simply rejoicing to do
whatever she sees is needed to be done.
Mrs. Maybrook had said, "Maggie
have they a benevolent society in your
place?" and she answered, "Oh yes, I
think there are several, and one entirely
for the soldiers."
"Why don't you write and ask them to
send you a box for our ward ? We are
coming short of delicacies and the poor
boys enjoy them so much. My basket
don't go half as far as I wish it could; a
box would help us wonderfully."


Pauls Duty. 33
of the bounty! you shall have every cent,
you can put it in the bank where it will
be safe; you won't discourage me, say,
mother ?"
" You are excited now, Paul; don't
think any more of it to-night;. in the
morning you will feel differently; I can't
send you off to die."
"No, mother, but you can send me off
o duty!"
"If it be duty, yes, I could try," and
she smoothed -the clothes with a sad ca-
ressing as she thought of what he said,
and felt that his ardor was bearing him,
for the first time in his life, away from her.
Paul answered, I am sure it is right,
1 know it; but where's Maggie ?" and
leaving his mother standing by the table


Paul Wounded. 93
ed; he could not see. What was the
matter with him ? was it a strange sight
to see a sister with love strong enough to
overcome all obstacles and brave un-
known dangers for the sake of the dear
one? At any rate it affected him
strangely.



PAGE 1

Aspirations. 13 changed to a bright, joyous one. She answered back the sunshine with a smile well nigh as bright as that; her tones were quick and gleeful, like the birds that sang in the branches over head, but not loud and fearless like theirs, and when her brother drew one or two old books from his pocket to teach her or read to her, as he didrweekly, there was an eagerness to learn that told it was a pleasure, a living joy. Paul read for her as she lay beside him on the grass, and alth'ough her eyes seemed to feast upon the blue heavens, the growing trees or the swift-winged birds, yet he knew she heard every word, and that it would be carried back to her life of drudgery and toil a hoarded treasure. 2



PAGE 1

Paul Wounded. 85 "I do, every moment. Oh, mother, if we could go to him !" "We couldn't get to him; they wouldn't let us pass, they are very strict in their regulations, I hear." "If he should be sent to Washington, Mother ?" You are wild Margaret to think of it, it would cost more than we could afford to go there; and then the board-no, it would be impossible." And yet the mother had thought of it before Maggie spoke, but saw at a glance it would be entirely impracticable. But the thought haunted Maggie, waking and sleeping. She dreamed of Paul in the hospital, and herself standing by his cot S ministering to him. How happy they 8


The Letter. i55
desire it if it was wrong, and what matter
how they regard me if only they provide
for the soldiers; I will tell them about it,"
she wrote accordingly, and it was this
letter that Mr. Hobert was to read to
them on the afternoon we have spoken of.
Very busy were they all when he
entered, his calm, benevolent face smiling
approbation upon each.
" How comes on the box, Mrs. Maltby ?"
he asked of the president.
" Finely, Mr. Hobert; one more meeting
will finish the garments and bandages,
and I think we will then have more than
we can crowd in. It will be a good box,
the best we have ever sent, and we shall
send it through the Commission."
"Is that decided ?"



PAGE 1

6o Paul and Margaret. could dispel the sense of comfort left in Mrs. Bailey's heart by the prayer of Paul. Those words of hope and love still lingered about her; she could not forget them; they threw a brightness over the lonely house, which she had not noticed even when Paul was in it. Oh, the power of prayer! how it enhances every joy, and lightens every burden; how it throws a flood of sunshine over the darkest path, and smooths the roughest way. "Oh, for a voice of sweeter sound, For every wind to bear, To teach the list'ning world around The blessedness of prayer."



PAGE 1

CHAPTER VIII. New Associations. T HEY smiled joyfully at parting, Paul and Margaret, for they knew they should meet in the morning. Paul felt that his little sister would be well cared for; he saw that she was among friends, and saw, too,-altho' he did not fully realize it until after she had gone, and he lay awake at night upon his cot-that Maggie had grown more womanly, more self-reliant in the time he had been away from her; he saw that she was competent to make her own plans and carry them to 131


New Associations. 147
"boy in a chair, with his arm in a sling,
she peeled the fruit and divided it, so that
he could with the other hand help him-
self. One begged her to read a chapter
in his dear little Testament, and Maggie's
voice was clear and sweet as she com-
plied; another asked if she would only
write a few lines to his mother, telling
her he was better, and had received her
letter, and read it until he had learned it
by heart. Maggie did not shrink from
any duty, and when the. hour came to
leave the hospital, she found a reward in
their earnest invitations to come again."


JUVENILE AND SUNDAY SCHOOL BOOKS. 3
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illustrated, in sets .............. $6 oo
Charlotte Elizabeth's Works have become so universally known, and are so highly
and deservedly appreciated in this country, that it has become almost superfluous to
praise them. She thinks deeply and accurately, is a great analyst of the human heart,
and withal clothes her ideas in most appropriate and eloquent language.-Albany
A rgus.
Separately as follos :
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"Judaea Capta,' the last offering from the
Individuality of charaer is faithfully pen of this gifted and popular writer, will be
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It is a striking, life-like pi&ture of the crime till he was finally shot as a deserter;
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any way exposed to contact with the fashion-
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El1i4. Recorder. the. similitude of flowers.



PAGE 1

128 Paul and Margaret. Not until evening; I shall be too busy, and if you will take my charge tonight, I will not come back here." "Very well!" answered the lady, and Mr. Headley shook hands with Paul, patted Maggie on the head, and went his way. A long talk they had that afternoon, as Maggie sat by Paul's bed, her hand in his, and many a glance of pity did she cast upon the cots about her. "How long are you going to stay, Maggie ?" "Until you are able to go back, Paul." "I shall soon be up, dear, but I am not going back; no, indeed; back to my work as soon as I am able; I have said it from the first; I'm in for the war, Maggie, and if God raises me up, my duty will



PAGE 1

Margaret at School. 71 "by her mother's side and laughed at the misfortune of a fallen human being, and instead of being rebuked, had been encouraged to continue in doing so. She could not see that she had committed sin in torturing the sensitive spirit of Maggie. She was mortified that Mr. Hobert had been a witness of the scene, but Maggie she hated more now than ever, and in her heart was determined to show her what she considered her true position, and compel her to keep it. However, as the days and weeks passed this girl felt that Mr. Hobert understood her; his searching eye detected every glance of contempt, and his watchful tenderness shielded Maggie from many a premeditated insult that she, with her



PAGE 1

178 Paul and Margaret. of duty with an unfaltering trust, that as they love God supremely "all things shall work together for good to them," in this world, and that when the world is overcome they shall be clothed in white raiment, and their names shall not be blotted out of the Lamb's book of life, but Christ will confess them before his father and before his angels. H. K. P. END.



PAGE 1

CHAPTER II. Paul's Duty. SHE summer had well nigh passed, the days were getting shorter and farther into the rich fruitful beauty of autumn. The villagers were realizing the fulfilment of their early spring hopes, gathering in abundantly of earth's bounty, filling their barns with riches and their souls with satisfaction--all but Mrs. Bailey. No riches or satisfaction came to her; the great beauty of the year brought only fear to her heart, dread of the future, of the bitter cold-and hunger that had been their portion for so many win24


CHAPTER VI.
Childlike Trust.
"Cared for, watched over, though often thou seemest
Justly forsaken, nor counted a child;
Loved and forgiven though rightly thou deemest
Thyself all unlovely, impure and defiled.
"Be trustful, be steadfast, whatever betide thee;
Only one thing do thou ask of the Lord-
Grace to go forward wherever He guide thee,
Simply believing the truth of His word."
T HE next letter told that Paul was
one of the many who had been car-
ried to Washington and now occupied a
cot near one of the windows of a large
airy room in hospital." Maggie
94


Paul Wounded. 81
spent there, of Maggie who had gathered
them with him, and their gentle fragrance
soothed him as he reached about and
picked cluster after cluster. With hands
full of the beautiful flowers, he sang low
and sweet the songs of home, hummed
the tunes he had loved when at his work
there, smiled down upon the sweet vio-
lets, and waited patiently still, and trust-
ing all the time. Soon after they came,
and Paul with a happy smile of a child,
looked up and welcomed them. It was a
scene to bring tears to any eyes-that boy
amid the dead, so calm and happy, gath-
ering the sweet blossoms of spring, and
finding a new joy in their fragrance and
beauty. Brave Paul! tenderly as women
might, those rough men placed the boy



PAGE 1

11 6 Paul and Margaret. patience, and taking a carriage they drove to the place mentioned. In a few words Mr. Headley asked his friends to care for the child until his return, giving them something of her history and promising to be back before noon. "Come back to dinner, Mr. Headley, and we will go with you this afternoon ; my wife spends part of every day among the sick; work enough for all, I assure you," said the host. "Sad work, too; I'm glad she has a heart for it; thank you, I will be here before the dinner hour; good day." He turned away, and the gentleman led Mag gie to the parlor, saying, Sit down, and I will speak to my wife; she will make you welcome."


Aspirations. 7
looks forward to the grave-a long way
forward it seems, for she is not old. She
has no spirit of repining, although she
knows that the bright hopes of her youth
shall never rest upon her in their full
fruition. They were simple hopes, not
aspiring, as the world thinks;-only to
be loved, to love, to be happy in her
daily duties, that was all-but she has
laid them away with a sigh, perhaps,
then, but now out of sight forever.
One would think she could find a joy
in her two children, but no-she some-
times feels they were better dead. She
has no time to smile upon them, no time
to love them; she thinks they had best
learn to live without love while young,
it will save disappointment in the future;


i ; r;i;;p ;a a i;l '
r nirisi
. 1
111
1. .


Enlisted. 51
your father and-and-I used to know
the whole of that but it's slipped from
me; well, no matter, but where's the
book ?-I must take care of the bank
book; your mother don't know anything
about banking business."
"I know; I shouldn't think of troub-
ling her."
" Of course not," replied the man,
trembling to get hold of what seemed a
small fortune to him.
" But let me tell you my plans, father,
I'm sure you will call them good-"
"Yes, yes-a boy that honors his-"
"Well," interrupted Paul-the money's
in the bank, and Mr. Barnes, the grocer,
is to be paid one dollar a week for gro.
ceries which mother will select, for she



PAGE 1

The Letter. i55 desire it if it was wrong, and what matter how they regard me if only they provide for the soldiers; I will tell them about it," she wrote accordingly, and it was this letter that Mr. Hobert was to read to them on the afternoon we have spoken of. Very busy were they all when he entered, his calm, benevolent face smiling approbation upon each. How comes on the box, Mrs. Maltby ?" he asked of the president. Finely, Mr. Hobert; one more meeting will finish the garments and bandages, and I think we will then have more than we can crowd in. It will be a good box, the best we have ever sent, and we shall send it through the Commission." "Is that decided ?"



PAGE 1

76 Paul and Margaret. back and forth on picket duty, saw Maggie's character and intellect expanding slowly but beautifully each week. He felt sure that she too would one day burst the cruel chain that now disgraced them all. 3*



PAGE 1

106 Paul and Margaret. Seizing the time when it would take him equally long to get the boot either off or on, she said, quickly, I can't decide, father; I'll have to ask Mr. Hobert;" and she darted over the threshold so quickly that she scarcely heard the curses he shouted after her. Before he could get to the open door, she had bounded over the wall and was speeding across the fields like a wild fawn. so rapid were her motions. She knew that her father's rage would not last long, for his burning thirst would take him quickly to the tavern, and her great love for Paul overcame the fear she felt for her mother's safety. Would he lay violent hands upon her mother? she asked herself. as she drew near Mr. Hobert's house scarcely


CHAPTER IX.
The Letter.
L ET us return to the little village a-
while before we close our simple nar-
rative, and see what is going on there, and
how they appreciate the work of Maggie.
It is a bright, sunny afternoon, and the
members of the Soldiers' Relief Society
have met in large numbers to work
courageously and earnestly; some of them
in sadness, too, for many a son and brother
are lying among the wounded, and some
dear ones sleep amid the dead, where no
friendly hand can mark the spot, no
14S



PAGE 1

The Inebriate's Death. 175 all had faded from his mind but a few scenes of childhood. Her name was not mentioned ; no word of children or friend, and thus he passed away, just as the sunshine gilded the hill-tops; without a moment to turn to God, without a word of repentance upon his lips, all covered with sin, vile as he had made himself, he passed into the presence of his Maker. Could that poor wife hope for him then ? She knew that God was full of love and mercy, and she knew that he was a just God. She believed the words of his own book, "Verily I say unto you, except ye be converted and become as little children ye shall not enter into the kingdom of heaven." If thou seek Him, He will be found of thee, but if thou forsake him, he


172 Paul azd Margaret.
did, it was impossible to say what the
result would be. He gave the directions
which seemed necessary, and left, saying
he would be in again before night. Fol-
lowing closely the advice of the doctor,
she sat by the bed and watched him,
praying and hoping for a return of his
reason; if only he had a short time, if
he could but know that life hung by a
thread, he might listen while she pointed
him to the Saviour as the only hope of
life eternal.
The neighbors prepared her supper, and
silently she tasted a morsel and returned
to the bedside. The doctor came and
went; there was no change; nothing to
be done but apply the restoratives he had
before left, and with fearful anxiety she



PAGE 1

134 Paul and Margaret. short and fleeting had been the hours, how impatient she was for the morning to come, that she might again share his loneliness and minister to his wants. That evening when Mr. Headley made his appearance he found his little friend seated upon the lounge, half reclining in the arms of Mrs. Maybrook; tears and smiles were struggling for the mastery upon her expressive face; it was evident that she had been telling her new friend something of herself, and as the gentleman entered Mrs. Maybrook said to him, "I have a proposition to make to you, Mr. Headley, regarding this little one here." He bowed, and said, as he put his hand on Maggie's head, "How do you like diminutives dear ?"


The Inebriate's Death. 175
all had faded from his mind but a few
scenes of childhood. Her name was not
mentioned ; no word of children or friend,
and thus he passed away, just as the sun-
shine gilded the hill-tops; without a
moment to turn to God, without a word
of repentance upon his lips, all covered
with sin, vile as he had made himself, he
passed into the presence of his Maker.
Could that poor wife hope for him then ?
She knew that God was full of love and
mercy, and she knew that he was a just
God. She believed the words of his own
book, "Verily I say unto you, except ye
be converted and become as little children
ye shall not enter into the kingdom of
heaven." If thou seek Him, He will be
found of thee, but if thou forsake him, he


Paul Wounded. 79
scene, and Paul found himself alone amid
the dead. Weak from loss of blood he
lay with his head upon the outstretched
arm of one who slept his last earthly sleep.
How long he had lain there was unknown;
there was no sound of life about him;
the clouds of smoke had partly rolled
away so that the stars faintly glimmered
through, and Paul could look up and feel
that God was over all. Strange as it
may seem, he felt no fear, had no feeling
of abhorrence, when he saw dimly the
heaps of slain about him, but more calm-
ly than ever in his life before he thought
of home. A peaceful, quiet sense of rest
in God possessed him, and looking up to
the twinkling stars above he said his
childhood's prayer, and slept again.



PAGE 1

"104 Paul and Margaret. Maggie sat down in a chair and leaned her head upon her hand in a thoughtful attitude. Her father watched her curiously for a moment, and said, "Well, you've thought long enough, how do you feel now ?" "I can't quite decide; I think if we could get him home it would he better." "Of course; just what I've tried to convince you all along." "But I don't know what Mr. Hobert would say." "I'll make it all right with him, Mag; come, hand it over." "But I am not sure yet, father, about it, and I must think longer; you know I am not so quick as Paul is. I'll try to do right."


132 Paul and Margaret.
a consummation without his assistance; he
was glad she would not be crushed by
circumstances, but like himself had an
ambition of her own.
Maggie had told him of their mother's
daily life; that it was the same in many
respects, differing only in that she did not
work quite so steadily, having the weekly
allowance he had arranged for her before
he left; he was glad to hear even that.
Of his father Maggie had simply said,
" The same as ever, Paul;" and he under-
stood it perfectly. He had no reason to
love his father, or even to respect him,
but he now felt pity for him that he was
so entirely a slave to his appetite, and if
there was one thing in the world he hated
with the whole strength of his being it


M. W. Dodd's Catalogue. 5
By the Author of "The Schonberg-Cotta Family."
W INIFRED BERTRAM; AND THE W ORLD SHE
LIVED IN. By the author of the Sch6nberg-Cotta
Family. I vol. 2mo .. . . $1 75
Fine edition, crown 8vo, tinted paper .. 2 50
Cabinet edition, 16mo, tinted paper I 75
Sunday-school edition, i8mo, illustrated I oo
Unlike the author's previous works, it iS not historical, but a story
of modern life, with its scene laid in the heart of London. Winifred
is a bright child, who very early in a naive way begins to be blase,
having nothing to do but gratify her own childish desires. The lesson
of the book is that one can only live happily and profitably by sym-
pathy with others, and in exertion to benefit others. The characters
are all ordinary and natural people, and the plot is without one sen-
sational incident, but the author's genius for irradiating the common,
her simple, pure spirit, her delicate humor, her faculty of seizing upon
and representing character with fidelity, and the lovely spirit of mo-
rality and religion, make the book a delightful one. The whole story
is suffused with vivacity and grace.
" George Elliot, whom we regard as the greatest female novelist of the age, never
exceeded the terseness and epigrammatic force of expression of some passages in
Winifred Bertram. .... The allegory of the expanding and contrating
chamber is one of the most exquisite things in modern literature."-Round Table.
"A charming and quickening story, as we might anticipate from the author."-
Congregationalist.
"Delightful and charming are not properly descriptive of it, for while it is both, it
is more than both; it is of the kind of books that one cannotread without growing
better."-Indianapolis Stale Yournal.
"It differs from its predecessors in that it is a story of our own time, but it is like
them in its felicitous portraiture of charaAer, its life-likeness in narrative and Jia-
logue, and its exquisite illustrations of precious gospel truth."-Christian Times.
"In her previous works it might have been supposed that some part of their suc-
cess was due to the happy choice of her subjects, or to the quaintness and novelty
Sof the form in which they were presented. But here there is no gentle illusion of
the kind, and the effet is to place her clearly foremost among the living writers of
religious stories. It is altogether the best and ablest book of the accomplished
author."-Sunday-School Times.
" A succession of pictures of conversations, scenes, and comments, which show a
wonderful measure.of shrewd common sense and genuine knowledge of human na
ture."-National Bap5tist.


58 Paul and Margaret.
More than ever did the mother feel her
error. At a glance she saw how the
child's heart had pined for affection, and
drawing her within her arms she pressed
the young head to her bosom, and with a
tearful voice, said, "Paul, I came up to
ask you to pray once before you go; I
have heard you when you thought you
were alone many times, but now we will
pray together."
The boy lifted up his voice, and as he
prayed new hope filled all their hearts, new
strength for the coming trials, new faith
in the power that was guiding them
through the dangers and difficulties of
life.
Paul ended, and the mother folded
them both in the first strong, loving em-


The Meeting. I17
Weary and anxious as the child was,
she looked with pleasure upon the costly
decorations of the large room, the rich
paintings attracting her attention more
than all else. As her eye wandered
about the walls, it fell upon the engrav-
ing of Dante and Beatrice. Scarcely
heeding its mild beauty at first, as she
gazed she was more and more impressed,
until losing the consciousness that she
was'in the house of a stranger she rose
and approached the picture. Long, long
did it hold her, rapt in wonder and rever-
ence, until her own face took on some-
thing of the wonderful peace that per-
vades that of Beatrice and her spirit grew
quiet. She was resting as she stood
there, unconscious that she herself was



PAGE 1

The Letter. 163 that child drops into our weary homesick hearts are enough to revive the weakest. I call her a child because she is small, but she is a woman in every sense; the boys almost reverence her, she goes round so quickly, bathing our heads so gently, and her voice is so low and sweet; she knows just what to say to cheer us; and, mother, she prays so earnestly and tenderly when we ask her to, and asks for what we need in such a way that it always comes; it was while she prayed by me yesterday that pardon through Christ seemed to flash into my heart, and filled it so with a glorious light that I could hardly contain myself. She is from our village; come to nurse her brother Paul, one of the best fellows here, and seeing



PAGE 1

New Associations. 135 "I like them, sir; they have a pleasant sound; but I am older than I look to be." Else you would never have got this idea of nurse into your head, would you ? but excuse me, Mrs. Maybrook, and let me listen to your proposition." "It is this: you are busy enough already with other work, and I desire to take Maggie off your hands entirely; what do you say to it ?" "Provided she agrees, I see no objection. What are your plans for her ?" You know I spend half a day with the soldiers of different wards; I want Maggie to go with me each day, and assist me in distributing reading, or whatever else we are called upon to do, and spend also an hour or so each day with Paul until


64 Paul and Margaret.
the night in the woods until the storm
was past, and he had sunk into the
lethargic sleep that characterizes the ineb-
riate, before they could seek their beds
to rest, that Maggie was slowly ploughing
her way through the field of snow that
lay between her home and the school-
house. As she drew near the wall that sep-
arated her from the yard, she heard the
sound of voices, and then the loud laugh
of several of her schoolmates. Not think-
ing that she was the object of their merri-
ment, she hastened on, and, climbing the
wall, drew near the group just within the
school-house door. She did not see them,
but the next sentence arrested her steps,
and she stood, not daring to go in, and
with not strength to find her way back


Childlike Trust. 107
pausing to take breath. He might, but
she could have done no better, and her
mother could flee from him, as before.
There was, however, no need ; the man
stood at the door a long time, with one
boot on, gazing after Maggie, his rage
gradually turning to amazement, that the
quiet child who had scarcely ever dared
speak before him, should have defied him
in this manner; when she was fairly out
of sight, he turned without a word into
the bed-room, and finished the dressing
operation, which had been so often inter-
fered with, and then eating hastily the
late breakfast upon a side-table, turned
his steps toward the tavern, still too much
astonished to speak, much to the relief of
his wife who had been quite as much sur.


118 Paul and Margaret.
looked upon with curious eyes. Pressing
her hand to her side she almost stifled
the sigh that was just trembling from her
lips, and murmured in a tone scarcely
audible, "Peace, peace!" as though she
craved a portion of that which beamed
from the face before her.
At this moment an arm was gently
placed about her, and a tender, womanly
voice asked, "Have you no peace, my
child? "
Startled, she lifted her tearful eyes to
the lady, saying in a low voice, I was
thinking of Paul;" and then dropping
them to the rich carpet at her feet she
stood silent and embarrassed.
"Well, dear, you shall soon be with
Paul, and then peace shall flow like a
G*


Aspirations. 13
changed to a bright, joyous one. She
answered back the sunshine with a smile
well nigh as bright as that; her tones
were quick and gleeful, like the birds
that sang in the branches over head, but
not loud and fearless like theirs, and
when her brother drew one or two old
books from his pocket to teach her or
read to her, as he didrweekly, there was
an eagerness to learn that told it was a
pleasure, a living joy. Paul read for her
as she lay beside him on the grass, and
alth'ough her eyes seemed to feast upon
the blue heavens, the growing trees or
the swift-winged birds, yet he knew she
heard every word, and that it would be
carried back to her life of drudgery and
toil a hoarded treasure.
2


This page contains no text.


This page contains no text.


74 Paul and Margaret.
in several engagements, but a Heavenly
Father's watchful care, had turned aside
the fatal ball, and shielded him from the
countless dangers of the battle-field. He
had, like a host of other brave hearts,
been faithful in duty, showing the same
courage and enthusiasm in action that so
many of our brave noble privates mani-
fested, emulating each other, and bearing
with fortitude and cheerfulness all the
discomforts of camp-life, and the weari-
ness of long forced marches. Faint and
footsore though Paul might be,. yet never
a day saw him discouraged. More than
ever he felt that God was for the right,
and no surrounding influences could de-
press his buoyant spirits. Meantime the
letters Maggie received from him were


The Letter. 151
the lead and point out to others the path
of duty; he had always thought she
might be fitted for a different position in
society than she had occupied, but he did
not expect to see the child mature so
rapidly. She seemed suddenly to have
become a woman, with a strong will, a
fervent, tender nature, a mind and heart
well fitted to press bravely on in the con-
flict of life, ready to take up every duty,
expecting with confidence every success,
forgetting that she was a child while at
work, but, with a child's humility, shrink-
ing from observation as soon as the work
was done.
What has caused this change ? Merely
that Maggie has taken up her life work
earlier than many do, and it is a work that


Ehlisted. 59
"brace they had known for years, and
without a word went below. Presently
Maggie followed, for the dear brother
must- have warm coffee before he left
them.
The early breakfast hour passed. The
father slept on unconcious of the agony
of that parting scene, or of the utter des-
olation of the two who watched Paul as
he walked hastily down the dewy path
and through the gate into the road. The
morning sun threw its first bright ray
over the hill, and lighted his broad white
forehead as he turned to take the last
look, and swing his cap for the last good-
bye, before the curve in the road shut
him from their sight.
No harsh words from her husband


PAUL'S FATHER WANTS THE BANK-iOOK.
Page 52.


4 M. W. Dodd's Catalofgue.
By the Author of "The Schonberg-Cotta Fami y.'
DIARY OF MRS. KITTY TREVYLYAN. A STORY
OF THE TIMES OF WHITEFIELD AND THE WESLEYS,
By the author of the Sch6nberg-Cotta Family. With a
Preface by the author for our edition. i2mo $ 50
Fine edition, crown 8vo, tinted paper 2 oo
Cabinet edition, I6mo, tinted paper .. I 50
Sunday-school edition, 18mo, illustrated I 00
The diary begins in 1745 and gives us a charming picture of rural
life and simplicity in Cornwall. At the date the story opens the
"mischievous fanatics," Whitefield and Wesley, begin to disturb the
parish with their plain preaching. Kitty very soon goes up to Lon-
don to pay a visit to the family of her uncle, who is a dissenter, and
there she meets those reformers, who are turning the kingdom upside
down with their new do6trines. The main interest of the book is
religious, yet the state of the country at that time, the habits of so-
ciety, the dangers of travelling, and the faithful pitures of the dress
and manners of that age will interest all who are not attra6ted by the
graver matters of the story.
" Notwithstanding the immense popularity of the Sch6nberg Cotta Chronicle, we
should not be surprised if Mrs. Kitty Trevylyan completely rivals them in popular
favor. All the good qualities that gained so much success for the writer's previous
books are found in this, while the subject undoubtedly offers superior advantages to
those where the scene is laid in remote times or in a foreign land. The family group
in the old homestead, on the storm-vexed shores of Cornwall, becomes, from the
author's skilful painting, and fine perception of chara&er, a reality from henceforth to
her readers ; and when the heroine leaves it to gain the glimpses of the great world
that form the historical portion of the book, she carries with her the good wishes of
all."-N.A Y. Times.
"The beauty of the "Diary' is its homelike simplicity, its delicate portraits, and
powerful, because so perfe6tly natural, sketches of life and manners."-Hartford
Post.
" The book is redolent with religious feeling, fresh, pure, and sensible; it abounds
in kind but keen thrusts at the follies and mistakes of conventional piety; it pushes
aside human creeds that fetter and concal the Bible's plain, clear pages; and it is
quite remarkable for its nice detetion of the starting-points of error, the places where
divine dortrines have been spliced with human ones."- Vermont Record.
"We think this decidedly the author's best work, better even than the Cotta
Family.' It sparkles on almost every page with gems of thought, while the raiative
is one of absorbing interest."-S. S. Times.
. . ** A


34 Paul and Margaret.
as busy as ever with her unending toil,
he went in search of his sister.
Mrs. Bailey's face was no more sad than
it had been in the morning sunshine, but
the thorn had pierced her heart. Separa-
tion from Paul! it was the last drop in
her cup of misery, but she saw and felt
that-it was inevitable. Yes, he must go,
perhaps to death, perhaps-her heart
beat faster than its wont-to honor and
years of happiness: Ah, she was content
to suffer' if it might be thus. Such
thoughts filled her mind, standing weari-
ly by the table, till the twilight came.
No one had noticed Margaret as she
stoodin the closet listening to the strange
words of her brother. Paul going to
war! to enlist for three years! was he



PAGE 1

126 Paul and Margaret. "Paul!" came feebly from the quivering lips, and Maggie wound her arms gently and lovingly about his neck. She would not cry, but the working of her face told the struggle within. More than one of the noble sufferers around turned away to hide the tears they could not check, and doubtless thought with many a pang of dear ones they would like to see and fold once more within their arms. Mrs. Maybrook's tender heart was deeply touched; she had not the power to hide her emotion, but walked away and began to distribute, with streaming eyes, the delicacies she had brought them. There was something for all who were able to bear it, and a kind word of sympathy and encouragement for each. Her



PAGE 1

PAUL AND MARGARET THE qh1riafi ( hildrtn. BY H. K. P. A.1HOR OF "LOBERT THE CABIN BOY," "THE KEMPTON8," ETC., ETC. NEW YORK: M. W. DODD, No. 506 BROADWAY. 1869.


Any Books on this Catalogue will be sent free of
postage on receipt of price.
BOOKS PUBLISHED BY
M. W. DODD,
No. 505 Broadway, opposite St. Nicholas Hotel,
NEW YORK.
BUNYAN.-GRACE ABOUNDING TO THE CHIEF
OF SINNERS. In a faithful Account of the Life
and Death of JOHN BUNYAN. I8mo.
Many are not aware that this is a Biography of Bunyan written by
himself, referring particularly to h's remarkable conversion and reli-
gious experience. It is written in a quaint and curious style, which
would of itself lend interest to the narrative.
" It will be eagerly sought after by all who admire the spirit and genius of this
remarkable mar."
COTTA.-THE SCHONBERG-COTTA BOOKS IN
SETS, comprising
THE SCHONBERG-COTTA FAMILY. THE EARLY DAWN.
DIARY OF KITTY TREVYLYAN. WINIFRED BERTRAM.
THE DRAYTONS & DAVENANTS. ON BOTH SIDES OF THE SEA.
I2mo edition, beautifully bound, 6 vols., uniform $9 75
Cabinet edition, 16mo, tinted paper, extra cloth, 6
vols., uniform . . . . . . 9 75
An elegant edition, suitable for presentation.
Sunday-school edition, I8mo, illustrated, plain cloth,
the first 5 volumes uniform ... . . o



PAGE 1

Paul Wounded. 87 about to see how she might carry them out. "Have you written to Paul, Margaret ? asked the mother. "Just a few lines to last till I get there," replied Maggie, and then started, looking strongly in her mother's face, for she had not meant that her plans should be known ; she had spoken without thinking. "Till you get there! what are you thinking of?" and Mrs. Bailey spoke muck quicker then her habit was. "I didn't mean to say that, but I am thinking of it, mother; for Paul's sake, you know; I'd never leave you only for him, and I've been thinking if fever should set in, and we not see him, never



PAGE 1

Aspirations. 9 beautiftil in the world, although he had not found it yet; his soul would not always be enchained within the brown cottage. Sometimes it wandered off in search of something tq satisfy its strange desires; still his hands labored on, and his work was well done, but the mother carried a sterner face at such times, for she saw that Paul's spirit was not there. She saw his blue eyes brighten with a look they did not always wear; she noticed he came with a firmer, manlier tread, his lips parted with something approaching a smile; it struck her that. he had a noble look about him. But no, she would not think or dream even for him, for Paul her first born; his destiny was to be a hewer of wood, and drawer


Paul's Duty. 41
heeded not the sorrow of the child, and
they. passed along up the stairs, and found
themselves alone together.
Paul took a blanket from the bed and
wrapping it about his sister they sat by
the window talking urntil they heard their
father come. The moon shed its soft light
upon them, seeming to calm the excite-
ment of the one and quiet the grief of
the other with her gentle influence. Mag-
gie's tears were not so bitter, the world
did not seem so very dark, and Paul's
hopes made her more hopeful, his cheer-
fulness and faith in the future he was en-
abled to impart in some degree to her, and
as the evening advanced she found that
she still had a heart to pray which,when
upon the hills, she had no desire to do.
4*



PAGE 1

Enlisted. 53 The father's anger was somewhat mollified by the latter clause, yet chagrin and disappointment were in his face as he answered, "You fool! to trust all that money in the hands of a stranger, when your own father had nothing else to do but to look out for it. Mr. Hobert is not a stranger, father, and he will do all that is just and right; besides, he has promised to teach Maggie for half price. "Half price !-and cheat you out of the other half!" "No he won't, father; I hope you will see that I have done wisely;" for Paul wished to conciliate his father for his mother's sake. No such thing, you're a fool; now, off to bed." 5*


CHAPTER Ill.
Enlisted.
N the morning Paul found his desire
to enlist as strong as ever; even the
remonstrance of his mother and the pale
face of Maggie did not dampen his en-
thusiasm. He had more than one incen-
tive to go-a strong wish to share in the
struggle for the right, a desire to be no
longer a burden to his mother, or, rather,
to be of more assistance to her, and a
feeling that this was the way in which he
could burst the chain that bound him to
a drunken father. In times past he had
42
$


Childlike Trust. 109
for you until you are safely fixed with
Paul; is that enough?" he asked, smil-
ingly.
"Oh, yes, sir, more than I expected; I
thank you, Mr. Hobert, a great deal."
" Yes. Now walk home slowly, and
cool off a little, your cheeks are something
the color of my table cloth."
Maggie was relieved to find her father
had gone when she reached home, and she
earnestly hoped she should not see him
again before she started.
"Where is the money, Margaret?"
asked her mother.
" I left it with Mr. Hobert; he will
give it to me to-morrow when I start."
"You did not tell him ?"
"Why, no, mother, how could I "
10



PAGE 1

The Letter. 165 I rejoice that I can call her a pupil of mine." Mrs. Bailey blushed slightly, but replied in a low, clear tone, Thank you, Mr. Hobert, I am glad Margaret does her duty." "Her duty," said Mrs. Maltby, wiping the tears from her eyes, "more than her duty; she is doing a grand, and noble work; we ought every one to feel proud of her. George has spoken of her in his letters, but I didn't know she was your daughter, Mrs. Bailey; I'm sure I sympathize with you in the comfort of having such a child. And now, ladies, we have the request before us. We are beginning to know something of the writer's worth. A few of us, mothers, feel with gratitude


36 Paul and Margaret.
world had suddenly been extinguished.
The darkness was fast approaching, but
Margaret had not raised her eyes to note
the fact; the dew settled damp upon her
clothing, but she only felt that Paul was
going to leave them.
Oh, the dreadful war! how she had
trembled as every new item of horror
reached her ears concerning it; but even
though startled and terrified, she had
never brought it near; it had been far
off always ; she had not realized it as a
thing touching her more nearly than to
listen as Paul told her what he gathered
at the store and in the streets; told of
the many battles, of the hundreds left
dead upon the field, of the wounded and
dying in the hospitals, until she saw their


Childlike Trust. 95
hastened with the news to Mr. Hobert.
Slowly he read it, and then looking
upon Maggie with his large benevolent
eyes, he said, "Let me see, child, you are
fourteen, are you not ?"
"Yes, sir, fourteen and a-half."
" Have you ever travelled any ? "
" No, sir, but I can. I am not afraid to
go."
"You are a pretty good nurse ? "
"I should know what to do for Paul,
and I could do all they told me."
" But I am not sure that I can find any
one to take care of you on the way, and
assist you afterwards in gaining admit-
tance to the hospital."
"I can go alone, Mr. Hobert, if you
will write all the directions for me."


The Letter. 153
"Would you write to Mr. Hobert ?"
"Yes, or any one of influence."
"There is no one else I could write to;
how soon shall I begin ?"
"At once, dear; to-night."
" And what shall I ask for ?"
"The societies know best what is
needed and what they can send, we gene-
rally receive dried fruits, jellies, wines,
good butter, fresh eggs and suitable
clothing; but I don't think it necessary
to specify if they had any experience in
preparing boxes."
"They have packed a number; I don't
know how many."
"Well, my dear, you may write at
once." Maggie seated herself at the little
desk and soon the letter was on its way


Paul Wounded. 85
"I do, every moment. Oh, mother, if
we could go to him !"
"We couldn't get to him; they would-
n't let us pass, they are very strict in
their regulations, I hear."
"If he should be sent to Washington,
Mother ?"
" You are wild Margaret to think of it,
it would cost more than we could afford
to go there; and then the board-no, it
would be impossible."
And yet the mother had thought of it
before Maggie spoke, but saw at a glance
it would be entirely impracticable. But
the thought haunted Maggie, waking and
sleeping. She dreamed of Paul in the
hospital, and herself standing by his cot
S ministering to him. How happy they
8


Enlisted. 55
"Thank you, father, for this little com-
fort," and the son turned away and
followed Maggie up stairs.
Did they sleep? No, there was no
closing of the eyes that night. Sitting
"by the low window, hand clasped in
hand, they communed with each other
until the first glimmering ray of light
tinged the eastern sky. Paul, with his
manly heart grown stronger in view of
this separation, and Maggie, more a wom-
an than ever, choking down the rising
sobs and praying silently for faith and
strength.
A step was heard upon the stairs and
the mother entered. Are you both up ?"
she asked, and glancing towards Maggie's
little cot in the corner she saw that it



PAGE 1

46 Paul and Margaret. our land that has not experienced the anguish of such parting. The mother could control her sorrow, for she had always done so, and she scarcely raised her eyes to the boy as he sat near her watching her fingers as she "knit rapidly upon the socks that were to be finished that night, for in the long marches she knew he would need an extra pair, and Maggie had cut out and was now finishing the coarse flannel bandage to be worn in those same marches. How her heart ached as she thought of them, and how she prayed that even this trifle might shield him from sudden cold and severe illness. It was growing late but they had not thought of seeking rest. The flannel was


The iMeeting. 121
"His name is Paul, and the resem-
blance struck me the moment she spoke
the word; it must be so; I hope it is;
she is a sweet little thing," said the lady
musingly.
"May be so; he's a brave, cheerful
fellow, you said ?"
A perfect nobleman; I should pick
him out from a host as the most firm, pa.
tient, and courageous; he infuses his spirit
into all about him."
"Will he be up soon?"
" Yes, in a week or ten days, if he has
no more fever, and I don't think he will;
I've watched him pretty closely."
"I thought the girl looked sad, but I
got merely a glance at her face."
"She was worn out with travel, and
11


M. W. Dodd's Catalogue. 3
By the Author of "The Schonberg-Cotta Family."
THE EARLY DAWN; oR, SKETCHES OF CHRISTIAN
LIFE IN ENGLAND IN THE OLDEN TIME. By the
author of the Schinberg-Cotta Family. With Introdu6tion
by Prof. H. B. SMITH, D.D. I2mo .. $1 50
Fine edition. Crown 8vo, tinted paper 2 oo
Cabinet edition, 16 mo, tinted paper .. 50
Sunday-school edition, 18 mo, illustrated .. I oo
The Christian Life of England in the Olden Time is here depited,
through several centuries, from its earliest dawn, in its contrasted
lights and shadows, down to the morning star of the Reformation."
The Druid is first introduced in converse with the Jew and the Chris-
tian. The Two Martyrs of Verulam fall within the period of the
Roman domination, full fifteen hundred years ago. The fortunes of
an Anglo-Saxon Family are briefly sketched through three genera-
tions. The contests of the Saxon and the Norman, and their different
traits, are vividly portrayed, in the time of the Crusades. And few
tales are more interesting and instructive than that in which Cuthbert
narrates his experience in the Order of St. Francis and his illumina-
tion by the Everlasting Gospel of Joachim, and Cicely relates
how Dr. Wycliffe, of Oxford, ministered to her spiritual needs and
insight.
" The undeniable charm of these sketches consists in their simple, truthful adhe-
rence to the spirit and traits of these olden times. The author has been a diligent
student of the literature, and through the literature, of the very life of the epochs.
This is revealed in many skilful touches of art, in incidental allusions, apt citations,
"and graphic descriptions of scenes and persons. But more than this is her rare gift
of tracing the workings of the human soul in its needs and aspirations, its human
love, its divine longings. The permanent religious wants, which remain the same
under all varieties of external fortune, are so truthfully set forth that the Past be-
comes a mirror for the Present."-Dr. Smitl's Introduction.
"The various fads and legends of Christianity are told in this book in a style of
romantic fascination. It is an unusually entertaining and readable work."-Newe
York Evening Post.
"The author carries us back into the midst of events and scenes, wakes up the
dead actors and makes them live again, ail we see not the history, but the living
men that made the history."-Evangelical Refository.
"*" We do not know where to look for a book that combines such beauty of style,
such charming simplicity and variety of expression, with such sweetness, of spirit.
It iill of beauty, and everywhere pervaded with a loving, catholic spirit."-Hari.
ford Press.
'- .


CHAPTER IV.
Margaret at School. -
T HE winter passed slowly and te-
diously to the two at home; frequent
letters from Paul were the only joys that
came to them. Maggie donned each day
the new calico, and, with book in hand,
trudged through the snow to school.
She learned rapidly, and, as the months
went by, her excessive timidity wore
away; still she had trials, both at home
and at school, that caused her to live
within herself as much as ever. She had
early learned to bear abuse without a
6 61


Enlisted. 57
you, but I love you both; never doubt
it, Paul. Maggie, do you not believe it ?"
"We know it, mother; you have always
been kind," said Paul, taking hold of the
hard hand.
"Not kind, children, and yet not harsh,
but cold and distant when perhaps I
should have been loving. God forgive
me, but I feared to be kind and tender;
and Paul, before you go, tell me that you
understand me and trust me."
"I do, mother; I know just how you
have felt, and lately I understand you
as I did not once; but we love you,
mother; don't we, Maggie ?"
Maggie could not answer; she was sob-
bing with her head upon the window-sill
and her hand still within that of Paul.


Enlisted. 53
The father's anger was somewhat molli-
fied by the latter clause, yet chagrin and
disappointment were in his face as he
answered, "You fool! to trust all that
money in the hands of a stranger, when
your own father had nothing else to do
but to look out for it.
" Mr. Hobert is not a stranger, father,
and he will do all that is just and right;
besides, he has promised to teach Maggie
for half price.
"Half price !-and cheat you out of
the other half!"
"No he won't, father; I hope you will
see that I have done wisely;" for Paul
wished to conciliate his father for his
mother's sake.
" No such thing, you're a fool; now, off
to bed." 5*


S JUVENILE AND SUNDAY SCHOOL BOOKS. 3
The Schonberg Cotta Books. 5 vols. I 8mo, illus-
trated, in sets................... $5 0
"Young and old alike should read the entire set of Mrs. Charles' Works, if they
would be refreshed in the purest waters of Christianity."
Separately as follows:
Chronicles of the Schon- W inifred Bertram.
berg Cotta Family. ISmo $1 oo 18mo. .. .. $. oo
The times of Luther and the Reforma- Modern English Life.
to n. The Daytons and the
The Early Dawn. Davenants. I8mo I oo
8mo . ... I 00 The Civil Wars in Cromwell's times.
Christianity in England from the earliest
times to the days ofWickliffe. On Both Sides of the
Diary of Kitty Trevyl- Sea.
i8mo, .. I 0 Continuation of the Daytons and Dave-
~nyan ants, bringing the Puritans to New Eng-
The times of Whitefield and the Wesleys. land.
For afuller description of the Cotta. Books, see our General Catalogue.
The Cousin Bessie' Series. 5 vols 6mo, beauti-
fully bound in sets. . .... ... 4 25
Separately as follows:
Cousin Bessie. A Story what became of each. There is a good
in ie. A ry deal of variety in the incidents, and the
of Youthful Earnestness. 4 il- lessons inculcated are those of unselfishness
lustrations .... o0 85 and du.ty.-S. S. Times.
A story of an orphan girl who was re- Toil and Trust ; or, The
ceived into the family of her uncle, a weal-
thy merchant, where she made herself very Life Story of Patty, the Work-
useful to the worldly and ungodly family by house Girl. 3 illustrations o 85
her modest but steadfast no to every entice- he iesr rhse ir sh
ment to sin. The story is dire ed mainly The life-story of a workhouse girl, show-
onTo thos esoy his diree hm g that poor unfortunatosses of Chis kind arehood.
against the drinking usages of society, andi itat oo non s o s n
is a first-class temperance tale for people in t always destitute of good elements in
fashionable life-S. S. iempens. their-nature, but may sometidhes be mouids
as. imes ed into usefulness and propriety. 'he
volume contains also some powerful lessons
Tom Burtona ; or, The on intemperance -S. h. Tice er.
Better W 3 illustrationso 85 Alice and her Friends;
The story of two journeymen mechainics, and hey are s n hw to m t tm.
one of whom employed his leisure hours in or, The Crosses of Childhood.
reading and study, attending mechanics' 3 illustrations . 0 85
institutes, etc. The other frequented the A book intended for the young especially,
tavern. It is a good temperan e story and showing that every child has a cross of
S. S. Times. some kind to take up. Mrs. Seymour, the
wisewoman of the book, first teaches
SThe Grahams. By J. Jigher little daughter "Alice" what her
G. Fuller. Illustrated o 85 cross is. Then, as her cousins and ether
" friends visit her from time to time, the
An officer in the United States army was crosses of each are severally pointedr! out,
killed at the storming of Chapultepec, in and they are shown how to nmeet them,
the Mexican war. This little volume telis The story is arranged with much ability,
the story of his widow and his three chil- and its teachings are as wise as they are
dren; hcw the latter were educated, and impartial.-S. S. imns.



PAGE 1

THE MEETING IN THE HOSPITAL. Page 126. fc i:



PAGE 1

New Associations. 141 The lady smiled as she answered in a lively tone, "Oh, yes, you can; there is a great deal you can do for me; and, my child, there is one thing I should prize more than all else--I want you to love me; can you " Can I? why I cannot help it, Mrs. Maybrook. I loved you as soon as you spoke kindly to me; indeed I shall always love you." Maggie spoke earnestly and with a tinge of sadness in her tone; the lady went on: We had a little girl once, Maggie; she died a few years ago, and since then we have been lonely, missing her. Had she lived, you and she would be nearly of the same age, I should think. Have you ever lost a friend, child ?


138 Paul and Margaret.
else, and early the next morning she was
up, with a neat ruffle about the neck of
her dark calico, all ready to begin work,
but surprised that the house should be so
quiet. She had yet to learn that her
new friend had habits at variance with
her own simple ones, one of which was,
rising with the birds, and before the sun
had cast a ray upon the house-tops; but
the hour was spent in examining the
curiosities and enjoying the engravings
which abounded in the different rooms,
and in thinking over the events of the
last few days.
"Good morning, little one, how long
have you been down ?" said a cheery voice
at the door.
Maggie turned, her face brightening,


164 Paul and Margaret.
she could do us good she stayed. I don't
remember to have seen her there, but she
says she has only attended school since
Paul joined us; perhaps Nell knows her;
I hope she will be like her. Dear mother,
and Nellie, write to me often while I am
laid by, and pray for me, oh, pray daily,
that I may be kept from temptation. 1
should like to write more, but I must say
good bye, with the love of your penitent,
pardoned boy, JAMES.
Mr. Hobert turned to Maggie's mother,
who sat near his wife, cutting and rolling
bandages, and said, "Mrs. Bailey, you
may be proud of your daughter; most
beautifully has her character developed;


1 5o Paul and Margaret.
always; Maggie, especially, since he had
discovered the unkind treatment to which
she was subjected from her schoolmates.
Her letters to him had surprised him, even
though he knew something of her capa-
bilities. He had looked upon her timid,
shrinking nature without marking the
strong undercurrent of love and tender-
ness; he saw her perseverance in duty
even amid trials, but did not dream of the
wonderful firmness and courage she pos-
sessed. She had shown wisdom in con-
"ducting home and school affairs, but he
never expected Maggie to launch out into
a bolder plan of operations than her age
would seem to warrant. He had thought
her capable of obeying orders in almost any
circumstances, but not that she should take


154 Paul and Margaret.
to Mr: Hobert. He replied that a box
was already in progress, and advised her
to write a letter directly to the society
enclosed in one to himself, giving some
idea of hospital life, mentioning the necessi-
ties of individual cases, and speaking espe-
cially of the three boys who had gone
from their village, and for whom she had
cared since she had been there. He told
her that the box was not designed for any
particular hospital, and would very likely
be sent to her in reply to her letter.
It must be confessedthat Maggie shrunk
from this duty. She knew there would
be those there who had looked upon her
with scorn and contempt; perhaps they
would now accuse her of presumption, but
saying to herself, "Mr. Hobert would not



PAGE 1

So Paul and Margaret. They would still hide, as far as they were able, the degradation of one who stood in so close relation to them, even from the kindest friends. Never had a complaint of husband's or father's brutality escaped the lips of either of them; but the story was not unknown to Mr. Hobert; he saw suffering imprinted upon their faces, and respected the pride that would conceal it from the world; he saw it written upon the bloated form and sensual countenance of him who was the cause of it, but he made no sign that would wound their sensitiveness only by renewed kindness to Maggie in her school life, and by diligently and indefatigably working against the rumseller. Would that every pang of woe the



PAGE 1

136 Paul and Margaret. he is able to leave the hospital, when I shall try and have him brought here. I have, too, a quantity of sewing on hand for the soldiers, and the child says she can sew, or arrange while I use the machine; what do you say ?" "It is a fine plan for her, and I am quite pleased with it myself; what does Maggie say ?" "It makes me very happy, sir," answered Maggie with a smile and blush; he saw that she appreciated the offer, and that Mrs. Maybrook did not wish her to think that the benefit was all on one side. They spent some time in talking over plans for the future, Mr. Maybrook occasionally turning from his paper to make a suggestion, and Maggie watching the



PAGE 1

Aspirations. 23 it was because she feared the shock for them, that once came to her, that she allowed this iron hand to rest upon their hearts, crushing almost from their natures the buoyant, out-gushing song of youth that God gave to them when He sent them to her keeping for a time. It was the mistake of her life although she knew it not, and the sin lay not at her door but with him who had smitten her so cruelly, with him who had suffered himself to sink to the lowest level. *~~~ l



PAGE 1

4 M. W. Dodd's Catalofgue. By the Author of "The Schonberg-Cotta Fami y.' DIARY OF MRS. KITTY TREVYLYAN. A STORY OF THE TIMES OF WHITEFIELD AND THE WESLEYS, By the author of the Sch6nberg-Cotta Family. With a Preface by the author for our edition. i2mo .$ 50 Fine edition, crown 8vo, tinted paper ....2 oo Cabinet edition, I6mo, tinted paper ...... I 50 Sunday-school edition, 18mo, illustrated ....I 00 The diary begins in 1745 and gives us a charming picture of rural life and simplicity in Cornwall. At the date the story opens the "mischievous fanatics," Whitefield and Wesley, begin to disturb the parish with their plain preaching. Kitty very soon goes up to London to pay a visit to the family of her uncle, who is a dissenter, and there she meets those reformers, who are turning the kingdom upside down with their new do6trines. The main interest of the book is religious, yet the state of the country at that time, the habits of society, the dangers of travelling, and the faithful pitures of the dress and manners of that age will interest all who are not attra6ted by the graver matters of the story. Notwithstanding the immense popularity of the Sch6nberg Cotta Chronicle, we should not be surprised if Mrs. Kitty Trevylyan completely rivals them in popular favor. All the good qualities that gained so much success for the writer's previous books are found in this, while the subject undoubtedly offers superior advantages to those where the scene is laid in remote times or in a foreign land. The family group in the old homestead, on the storm-vexed shores of Cornwall, becomes, from the author's skilful painting, and fine perception of chara&er, a reality from henceforth to her readers ; and when the heroine leaves it to gain the glimpses of the great world that form the historical portion of the book, she carries with her the good wishes of all."-N.A Y. Times. "The beauty of the "Diary' is its homelike simplicity, its delicate portraits, and powerful, because so perfe6tly natural, sketches of life and manners."-Hartford Post. The book is redolent with religious feeling, fresh, pure, and sensible; it abounds in kind but keen thrusts at the follies and mistakes of conventional piety; it pushes aside human creeds that fetter and concal the Bible's plain, clear pages; and it is quite remarkable for its nice detetion of the starting-points of error, the places where divine dortrines have been spliced with human ones."Vermont Record. "We think this decidedly the author's best work, better even than the Cotta Family.' It sparkles on almost every page with gems of thought, while the raiative is one of absorbing interest."-S. S. Times. ..' ..!* ** A


DOCTYPE SGML fclaTextClass.dtd


The Meeting. 1 9
river, and joy too; have no fear; now
come with me and rest."
Did Maggie note the contrast between
the lady and herself? No; the rich
morning robe was unheeded and her own
dark calico unthought of, but she did
dwell somewhat upon the kind tones and
gentle words of the stranger; and Mrs.
Maybrook thought within herself that it
was the most interesting child's face she
had ever seen. She took her hat and
shawl and bidding her eat. of the lunch
"before her, she turned away thinking
Maggie would rather be alone. Return-
ing soon, she said, "Now, my dear, you
must lie down until dinner time, and then
you need wait no longer; there will be
work even for you to do, and you must



PAGE 1

S JUVENILE AND SUNDAY SCHOOL BOOKS. 3 The Schonberg Cotta Books. 5 vols. I 8mo, illustrated, in sets................... $5 0 "Young and old alike should read the entire set of Mrs. Charles' Works, if they would be refreshed in the purest waters of Christianity." Separately as follows: Chronicles of the SchonW inifred Bertram. berg Cotta Family. ISmo $1 oo 18mo. .. ... .$. oo The times of Luther and the ReformaModern English Life. to n. The Daytons and the The Early Dawn. Davenants. I8mo .I oo 8mo ....... I 00 The Civil Wars in Cromwell's times. Christianity in England from the earliest times to the days ofWickliffe. On Both Sides of the Diary of Kitty TrevylSea. i8mo, .. I 0 Continuation of the Daytons and Dave~nyan ants, bringing the Puritans to New EngThe times of Whitefield and the Wesleys. land. For afuller description of the Cotta. Books, see our General Catalogue. The Cousin Bessie' Series. 5 vols -6mo, beautifully bound in sets. ........... ... .4 25 Separately as follows: Cousin Bessie. A Story what became of each. There is a good in ie. A ry deal of variety in the incidents, and the of Youthful Earnestness. 4 illessons inculcated are those of unselfishness lustrations ..... o0 85 and du.ty.-S. S. Times. A story of an orphan girl who was reToil and Trust ; or, The ceived into the family of her uncle, a wealthy merchant, where she made herself very Life Story of Patty, the Workuseful to the worldly and ungodly family by house Girl. 3 illustrations o 85 her modest but steadfast no to every enticehe iesr rhse ir sh ment to sin. The story is dire ed mainly The life-story of a workhouse girl, showonTo thos esoy his diree hm g that poor unfortunatosses of Chis kind arehood. against the drinking usages of society, andi itat oo non s o s n is a first-class temperance tale for people in t always destitute of good elements in fashionable life-S. S. iempens. their-nature, but may sometidhes be mouids as. .imes .ed into usefulness and propriety. 'he volume contains also some powerful lessons Tom Burtona ; or, The on intemperance -S. h. Tice er. Better W .3 illustrationso 85 Alice and her Friends; The story of two journeymen mechainics, and hey are s n hw to m t tm. one of whom employed his leisure hours in or, The Crosses of Childhood. reading and study, attending mechanics' 3 illustrations ....0 85 institutes, etc. The other frequented the A book intended for the young especially, tavern. It is a good temperan e story -and showing that every child has a cross of S. S. Times. some kind to take up. Mrs. Seymour, the wisewoman of the book, first teaches SThe Grahams. By J. Jigher little daughter "Alice" what her G. Fuller. Illustrated o 85 cross is. Then, as her cousins and ether friends visit her from time to time, the An officer in the United States army was crosses of each are severally pointedr! out, killed at the storming of Chapultepec, in and they are shown how to nmeet them, the Mexican war. This little volume telis The story is arranged with much ability, the story of his widow and his three chiland its teachings are as wise as they are dren; hcw the latter were educated, and impartial.-S. S. imns.



PAGE 1

30 Paul and Margaret. gaze, so .sad, so full of dark forboding, and t flashed upon him that this would be bringing a new sorrow to her life, and saying quickly within himself, "I will wait, I will not .tell her yet; I will pray before I decide;" he gave her the money and passed out to attend to other duties, his mind all the time full of this one great thought-bearing a small part of the nation's burden, and making lighter the load that rested upon his mother. Till night it never left him; his lowly toil seemed nobler; he almost rejoiced. that he was poor. But his mother! would she give him uip? Paul knew that he was very near her heart, nearer than any other. It would be a bitter trial; but then Mag.


Enlisted. 47
finished, folded and put into the knap-
sack, and the stockings were all ready for
the last one to be toed off, when a step
was .heard upon the gravel walk, and
Mrs. Bailey said, It is your father,
Paul, you had better go to bed, both of
you."
" I'll stay and see him, mother, I sha'n't
have another chance, perhaps."
Mrs. Bailey looked a shade more
anxious, but it was too late to object, for
immediately the door opened and the
father made his appearance. He was not
more intoxicated than usual, but enough
so to be angry or foolish, whichever feel-
ing should chance to be uppermost; for-
tunately for the family, it proved to be
the latter.



PAGE 1

50 Paul and Margaret. clothes, of course, only for absolute necessities, you know." "Yes, father, Maggie must go to school, she is all ready; I have bought her two new dresses, and they are all made, and a pair of shoes for winter, and the same for mother." "You don't say! I thought you hadn't got your bounty !" "I hadn't the last time I saw you, but I got it soon after; now you promise to let Maggie go, do you ?" Yes-yes-anything : but where's the bounty?" "I've got it in the bank, father, and arranged so that you can have the best possible use of it." "That's right Paul, that's right; honor


.. .. .



PAGE 1

-1 120 Paul and Margaret. have strength for it by resting now; then arranging the pillows and darkening the room, she gently kissed the pale, weary face, and said, "You are among friends; we will take good care of you; now go to sleep and I will awaken you in time for dinner." A moment more and the door closed, and the tumultuous throbbings of Maggie's heart grew more and more quiet until she slept. Mrs. Maybrook joined her husband who was reading in the library. "Stephen" said she to her husband, "I really think Ihave made a discovery; this child must be the sister of the young man wounded in the thigh, who sings so much for the comfort of the other soldiers." "What makes you think so, dear ?"



PAGE 1

PAUL'S FATHER WANTS THE BANK-iOOK. Page 52.


18 Paul and Margaret.
reality though it be, it is not that they
are without the pale of civilized society,
or that of friends they have none; it
is not that their. days are made up of
drudgery and want; none of these. The
mother with her inherent self-reliance
and strength of character could bear
all these, if but he who had years before
vowed to cherish and protect were true.
Paul would have been satisfied, .and
Margaret would have had a youth of
childlike joy, had the father not been
what he was-a miserable sot, drunken,
brutish and vile, steeped in rum from
morn till night, satisfying his morbid
cravings with the pittance taken from his
hopeless wife and children; compelling
them to labor while he sat daily in the



PAGE 1

8 2 Paul and Margaret. upon a litter, and bore him away to a place of greater safety and comfort. Soon he wrote with his own hand:"DEAR MOTHER AND MAGGIE:I'm a trifle wounded; not much; no. thing to cause you a moment's anxiety; the doctor says I shall be about in a few weeks. I saved! only think, mother, and so many noble ones dead. It was a fearful strife; I never dreamed men could fight so; I never thought I should have such feelings as I had in battle; but it was over when night came, and I lay on the field and looked up to the stars and grew calm and happy again. I send you some violets I picked there and pressed in my bible; they made me think of



PAGE 1

The Letter. 151 the lead and point out to others the path of duty; he had always thought she might be fitted for a different position in society than she had occupied, but he did not expect to see the child mature so rapidly. She seemed suddenly to have become a woman, with a strong will, a fervent, tender nature, a mind and heart well fitted to press bravely on in the conflict of life, ready to take up every duty, expecting with confidence every success, forgetting that she was a child while at work, but, with a child's humility, shrinking from observation as soon as the work was done. What has caused this change ? Merely that Maggie has taken up her life work earlier than many do, and it is a work that


Aspirations. 21
to utter, the disappointment, the hopeless
agony, other first years of trial, and none
but He knew how slowly she had gath-
ered up the fragments of her shattered
faith at last, and was now walking
beneath His love, suffering still, hopeless
still, as regards this life, and smitten
to the dust, but patient, quiet, silently
prayerful in feeling, undemonstrative, and
severe in manner only. None but He
knew how with a mother's depth of affec-
tion she yearned over her children. Poor
woman! it was not wilful sinning that
caused her to repress outward manifesta-
tions of love. Mistaken, certainly, she
was, but not hard and cruel, when she de-
prived her children of the little sunlight
she might have scattered about their sha-


Aspirations. 19
bar-room, listening to low jokes, swal-
lowing huge portions of poison, and sacri-
ficing the life blood of those who should
have been dear to him, but were not.
Nothing was dear to him but the mug
which he held in his nerveless hand
and carried hourly to his bloated lips.
A strange love, one would say, surely
"a most unaccountable love for a man-
"a being made to walk upright, to lift
his forehead to the eternal heavens; to
bear about with him all the gifts of the
creator-conscience, reason, love and hope
-to bear them until he chose to trample
them under foot, and appear daily before
the world and before the still merciful
Giver with his poor, needy, starving soul,
clothed upon with rags, scarce covered


126 Paul and Margaret.
"Paul!" came feebly from the quivering
lips, and Maggie wound her arms gently
and lovingly about his neck. She would
not cry, but the working of her face told
the struggle within. More than one of the
noble sufferers around turned away to
hide the tears they could not check, and
doubtless thought with many a pang of
dear ones they would like to see and fold
once more within their arms.
Mrs. Maybrook's tender heart was
deeply touched; she had not the power
to hide her emotion, but walked away
and began to distribute, with streaming
eyes, the delicacies she had brought them.
There was something for all who were
able to bear it, and a kind word of sym-
pathy and encouragement for each. Her


88 Paul and Margaret.
again-you know mother, we couldn't
"bear it; I thought I'd ask Mr. Hobert."
" But where would you go to find him
where so many are sick? no, no, child,
you are wild."
"I wrote in my letter to know if he
was coming to Washington; the papers
say that thousands of the wounded are
"brought there; he may be among them;
the next letter will tell. I'll ask Mr.
Hobert about it," she persisted, in calm,
even tones.
Mrs. Bailey looked with amazement
upon the child, changed in one night to a
woman, with a woman's feelings, energy
and determination; still she shook her
head doubtfully, and thought to herself
"How much she is like Paul; I never


New Associations. 133
was intoxicating drink in any form; if
there was a human being he shrunk from
-considering him upon the lowest level
that a human being can reach-it was the
rumseller, or whoever would, no matter
what his social position, put the poisoned
cup to the lips of another. Paul felt
degraded by contact with such a man;
and well he might, with his true manli-
ness, his innate nobleness of character.
Maggie walked home with her new
friend as in a dream; she could scarcely
realize she had seen Paul, had sat by him,
had smoothed his hair and had clasped his
feverish hands in her small, cool ones; had
held the cup for him when he took the
drops prepared by his nurse, and told him
all the particulars of her journey. How
12


122 Paul and MAargaret.
anxiety for him, but he is always cheerful,
when I am there, at least; only I noticed
a day or two ago a letter came to him,
and his face was radiant as he read it;
afterwards he seemed thoughtful, but it
didn't last long; he was thinking of home,
poor fellow."
"Have you ordered the basket filled
yet ?"
"Yes, it is already packed in the hall;
and now I must leave you, and get ready
too ; we will start immediately after
dinner."
Maggie was wakened with a kiss, some-
thing so new to her that her eyes filled
with tears of pleasure.
" Have you a fresh dress in your bag,
dear ?" asked Mrs Maybrook.



PAGE 1

172 Paul azd Margaret. did, it was impossible to say what the result would be. He gave the directions which seemed necessary, and left, saying he would be in again before night. Following closely the advice of the doctor, she sat by the bed and watched him, praying and hoping for a return of his reason; if only he had a short time, if he could but know that life hung by a thread, he might listen while she pointed him to the Saviour as the only hope of life eternal. The neighbors prepared her supper, and silently she tasted a morsel and returned to the bedside. The doctor came and went; there was no change; nothing to be done but apply the restoratives he had before left, and with fearful anxiety she