Puss in boots

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Puss in boots
Physical Description:
6 p. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Ives, Sarah Noble, 1864-1944 ( Illustrator )
McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Publisher:
McLoughlin Bro's.
Place of Publication:
Springfield Mass
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Cats -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Fairy tales -- 1880   ( rbgenr )
Genre:
Fairy tales   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Springfield

Notes

General Note:
Title from cover.
General Note:
Illustrations signed Nobel Ives.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001870309
notis - AJU5033
oclc - 29116112
System ID:
UF00025999:00001

Related Items

Related Items:
Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Full Text
$44).4 4AAatiLAI. 44 -ML 4e..4,*4444 .-4~"i~ rl; f~ d-~r ~444~


PUSS IN BOOTSTHERE was once a miller who hadthree sons. On dying, he dividedhis property amongst the sons in this way:to the eldest he gave his mill; to thesecond, his ass; and to the youngest,his cat and a pair of boots., \ This young fellow, whose namef, was Jack, thought he had been veryIf l, shabbily treated. "My brothers,"j- said he, "will both be able. / tto support themselves com-Sfortably, but I am likely todie of hunger."The cat had been rub-bing against Jack's legs ina loving manner, and whenTP he heard these words helooked up, and, to Jack'sL- great surprise, spoke asS. follows: "Dear master, donot feel so downcast. Let me have thepair of boots and a bag, and you willfind that you have not so bad a bargainas you think."Although Jack could not imagine how Puss was going to help him,he made up his mind to trust him with the boots and a bag, and findout what he would do.Puss set off with a bold air for a place where he knew there werea great many wild rabbits. He put some lettuce inside of the bag,and set it on the ground wide open. Then he hid himself and waited.The Baldwin Library9 nS"'B Z:


PUSS IN BOOTSIn a few minutes two foolish youngrabbits, sniffing the lettuce, ran straight intothe bag, when Puss quickly pulledthe strings, and had them caught.Very proud of his success, thecat went to the royal palace, andasked to speak to the King. Hisair was so grand that the sentinel onguard dared not refuse him. He wasled before his Majesty, and making a lowbow, said, "Sire, I wish to present toyou these two rabbits, on behalf of mymaster, the Marquis of Carabas."The King accepted A PRESENT FOR THE KINGthe present, and desired Puss to convey his thanksto his master.For several days Puss continued to capture gameof one sort or another by the same trick.Besides getting food enough for his masterSand himself, he was able to take a presentto the King every few days. His MajestySoften expressed a wish to see the Marquis,but as Jack had no clothes fit to appear inat court, Puss advised him to wait a while.One day the cat heard that the Kingintended to go out riding with"the Princess, his daughter, and he-told his master to go and bathe in ariver along the bank of which the" royal carriage would pass."Jack stood shivering in the waterTHE SENTINEL ON GUARD until his Majesty's carriage came in


Br~ r-q r~lFUS RESTOCNSLEHS ASE


"HW H RBIT ER AUH** ^1iii%~~


PUSS IN BOOTSsight. Puss at once began to cry loudly, "Help! help! or my lord,the Marquis of Carabas, will drown!"The King looked out of the carriage window, and recognizingPuss, ordered his guards to rescue theMarquis.Puss told his Majesty that robbershad run away with his master's clothes,although the fact was that he hadhidden them under a stone. TheSKin g ord ered a groom to fetch ahandsome suit for the Marquis,k and when Jack put thison he looked as fine as areal lord.The King invited himinto the royal carriage.Jack hesitated, but thePrincess, who was verypretty, smiled so sweetlyat him that he overcamehis shyness, and took hisSseat with as much of anair of ease as he couldcommand.PUSS AND THE REAPERS Puss, greatly delighted,ran on ahead of the carriage until he came to a fieldof wheat, in which reapers were at work. Going up to them he saidfiercely, "Reapers, if you don't say, when the King comes, that thisfield belongs to the Marquis of Carabas, you shall all be chopped asfine as mince-meat."When the King came along he exclaimed to the reapers, "Whata fine field of wheat! To whom does it belong?" "To the Marquis


PUSS IN BOOTSof Carabas," they replied, for the cat's threats had frightened themgreatly. Puss, as he ran on, told all the other men he saw at workto give the same answer, and the King began to think the Marquisof Carabas must be very rich.The cat at length reached a splendid castle belonging to an ogrewho was the real owner of the domains the King had been ridingthrough. Puss knocked boldly at the door, and sent in a politemessage to the ogre, asking leave to pay his respects. The ogre re-ceived him with as much civility as could be expected from an ogre,and they were soon chatting sociably together."I have been told," said the cat to the ogre, "that you have thepower of changing yourselfinto the shape of large an-imals, such as an elephantfor instance.""That is quite true," said "/the ogre, "as you can see foryourself," and in a momenthe stood before the cat inthe shape of an immenseelephant."Wonderful!" said Puss."But can you change yourshape to any animal youchoose ?""Certainly," replied theogre proudly. "To prove Nthat what I say is true, youshall see me become a lion."When the cat beheld a THE OGRE TAKES THE SHAPE OF AN ELEPHANTgreat, fierce-looking lion standing before him, he was thrown into sucha panic that he flew from the room, and stayed outside till the ogre,


PUSS PRESENTS THE RABBITS TO THE KING


PUSS AND THE OGRE HAVE A SOCIABLE CHAT


PUSS IN BOOTStaking again his natural form, called to him, with a laugh, to comeback. Puss then returned, and began to compliment the ogre highlyon his wonderful power. "I can imagine," he concluded, " only onething that would astonish memore."What is that?" inquiredthe ogre.;Ai N"I To see you take theform of a verytiny animal, saya mouse, for in-stance. That, Isuppose, wouldbe an utter im-S possibility," saidPuss."Pooh!" said the ogre, "that is nomore trouble to me than the other, asI will quickly show you."So saying he at once assumed theshape of a mouse, and began friskingabout on the floor. This was justS. 1L ^ what Puss wanted, aud as quick as a"" flash he sprang on the mouse andgobbled him up.S ,PUS IS THROWN By this time the King had nearlyINTo A PANIC reached the castle, and Puss hurriedto the entrance to receive him when he drove up. The cat's masterwas indeed astonished when he beheld him standing on the castlesteps, and heard him say to the King: "Welcome, your Majesty, tothe castle of my lord, the Marquis of Carabas."The Marquis gave his hand to the pretty young Princess to help


PUSS IN BOOTSher out. The King and Princess thenwent in together, Puss leading the way.While they were walking through ..the rooms of the castle, Puss slippedaway, and had a fine dinnergot ready, and on their return /they sat down and feastedmerrily.The King was charmed withthe manners and looks of theMarquis, and he saw that hisdaughter was already quite inlove with him. So, afterdrinking five or sixglasses of wine, heat length tookhim aside anda said, " It will beyour own fault,y o u r o wd n 1f a u l t ,T H E E N D O F T H E O G R Emy lord Marquis,if you do not become my son-in-law."The Marquis at once acted upon this plainhint, and had little difficulty in persuadingthe Princess to become his promised bride.The cat's joy was so great that he had togo out of doors and stand on his head for"a while, kicking his hind legs in the air."The wedding soon took place, and theunion of the young pair was a very happyone. Puss, as a reward for his valuableSservices, was made a lord, and cut a greatPUSS FEELScJOYFUL figure at court.JOYFU\


iIIII~MZMII~i#=T41__k=II"II


Full Text

PAGE 1

PUSS IN BOOTS THERE was once a miller who had three sons. On dying, he divided his property amongst the sons in this way: to the eldest he gave his mill; to the second, his ass; and to the youngest, his cat and a pair of boots. ,\ This young fellow, whose name f, was Jack, thought he had been very If l, shabbily treated. "My brothers," jsaid he, "will both be able ., /, tto support themselves comSfortably, but I am likely to die of hunger." The cat had been rubbing against Jack's legs in a loving manner, and when TP he heard these words he looked up, and, to Jack's L-great surprise, spoke as S. follows: "Dear master, do not feel so downcast. Let me have the pair of boots and a bag, and you will find that you have not so bad a bargain as you think." Although Jack could not imagine how Puss was going to help him, he made up his mind to trust him with the boots and a bag, and find out what he would do. Puss set off with a bold air for a place where he knew there were a great many wild rabbits. He put some lettuce inside of the bag, and set it on the ground wide open. Then he hid himself and waited. The Baldwin Library 9 nS"'B Z:



PAGE 1

PUSS AND THE OGRE HAVE A SOCIABLE CHAT



PAGE 1

PUSS PRESENTS THE RABBITS TO THE KING



PAGE 1

PUSS IN BOOTS taking again his natural form, called to him, with a laugh, to come back. Puss then returned, and began to compliment the ogre highly on his wonderful power. "I can imagine," he concluded, only one thing that would astonish me more. "What is that?" inquired the ogre. ;Ai N"I To see you take the form of a very tiny animal, say a mouse, for instance. That, I suppose, would be an utter imS possibility," said Puss. "Pooh!" said the ogre, "that is no more trouble to me than the other, as I will quickly show you." So saying he at once assumed the shape of a mouse, and began frisking about on the floor. This was just S. 1L ^ what Puss wanted, aud as quick as a "" flash he sprang on the mouse and gobbled him up. S ,PUS IS THROWN By this time the King had nearly INTo A PANIC reached the castle, and Puss hurried to the entrance to receive him when he drove up. The cat's master was indeed astonished when he beheld him standing on the castle steps, and heard him say to the King: "Welcome, your Majesty, to the castle of my lord, the Marquis of Carabas." The Marquis gave his hand to the pretty young Princess to help



PAGE 1

PUSS IN BOOTS her out. The King and Princess then went in together, Puss leading the way. While they were walking through .. the rooms of the castle, Puss slipped away, and had a fine dinner got ready, and on their return / they sat down and feasted merrily. The King was charmed with the manners and looks of the Marquis, and he saw that his daughter was already quite in love with him. So, after drinking five or six glasses of wine, he at length took him aside and a said, It will be your own fault, y o u r o wd n 1f a u l t ,T H E E N D O F T H E O G R E my lord Marquis, if you do not become my son-in-law." The Marquis at once acted upon this plain hint, and had little difficulty in persuading the Princess to become his promised bride. The cat's joy was so great that he had to go out of doors and stand on his head for "a while, kicking his hind legs in the air. "The wedding soon took place, and the union of the young pair was a very happy one. Puss, as a reward for his valuable Sservices, was made a lord, and cut a great PUSS FEELSc JOYFUL figure at court. JOYFU\



PAGE 1

PUSS IN BOOTS In a few minutes two foolish young rabbits, sniffing the lettuce, ran straight into the bag, when Puss quickly pulled the strings, and had them caught. Very proud of his success, the cat went to the royal palace, and asked to speak to the King. His air was so grand that the sentinel on guard dared not refuse him. He was led before his Majesty, and making a low bow, said, "Sire, I wish to present to you these two rabbits, on behalf of my master, the Marquis of Carabas." The King accepted A PRESENT FOR THE KING the present, and desired Puss to convey his thanks to his master. For several days Puss continued to capture game of one sort or another by the same trick. Besides getting food enough for his master Sand himself, he was able to take a present to the King every few days. His Majesty Soften expressed a wish to see the Marquis, but as Jack had no clothes fit to appear in at court, Puss advised him to wait a while. One day the cat heard that the King intended to go out riding with "the Princess, his daughter, and he -told his master to go and bathe in a river along the bank of which the royal carriage would pass. "Jack stood shivering in the water THE SENTINEL ON GUARD until his Majesty's carriage came in



PAGE 1

PUSS IN BOOTS of Carabas," they replied, for the cat's threats had frightened them greatly. Puss, as he ran on, told all the other men he saw at work to give the same answer, and the King began to think the Marquis of Carabas must be very rich. The cat at length reached a splendid castle belonging to an ogre who was the real owner of the domains the King had been riding through. Puss knocked boldly at the door, and sent in a polite message to the ogre, asking leave to pay his respects. The ogre received him with as much civility as could be expected from an ogre, and they were soon chatting sociably together. "I have been told," said the cat to the ogre, "that you have the power of changing yourself into the shape of large animals, such as an elephant for instance." "That is quite true," said ."/ the ogre, "as you can see for yourself," and in a moment he stood before the cat in the shape of an immense elephant. "Wonderful!" said Puss. "But can you change your shape to any animal you choose ?" "Certainly," replied the ogre proudly. "To prove N that what I say is true, you shall see me become a lion." When the cat beheld a THE OGRE TAKES THE SHAPE OF AN ELEPHANT great, fierce-looking lion standing before him, he was thrown into such a panic that he flew from the room, and stayed outside till the ogre,



PAGE 1

"HW H RBIT ER AUH ** ^1 iii %~~



PAGE 1

$44) .4 4 AA ati LAI. 44 -ML 4e. .4,* 4444 .-4 ~"i~ rl; f~ d-~r ~444~



PAGE 1

iII II~ MZM II~ i# =T41 __k= II "II



PAGE 1

PUSS IN BOOTS sight. Puss at once began to cry loudly, "Help! help! or my lord, the Marquis of Carabas, will drown!" The King looked out of the carriage window, and recognizing Puss, ordered his guards to rescue the Marquis. Puss told his Majesty that robbers had run away with his master's clothes, although the fact was that he had hidden them under a stone. The SKin g ord ered a groom to fetch a handsome suit for the Marquis, k and when Jack put this on he looked as fine as a real lord. The King invited him into the royal carriage. Jack hesitated, but the Princess, who was very pretty, smiled so sweetly at him that he overcame his shyness, and took his Sseat with as much of an air of ease as he could command. PUSS AND THE REAPERS Puss, greatly delighted, ran on ahead of the carriage until he came to a field of wheat, in which reapers were at work. Going up to them he said fiercely, "Reapers, if you don't say, when the King comes, that this field belongs to the Marquis of Carabas, you shall all be chopped as fine as mince-meat." When the King came along he exclaimed to the reapers, "What a fine field of wheat! To whom does it belong?" "To the Marquis



PAGE 1

Br~ r-q r~l FUS RESTOCNSLEHS ASE