Mother Goose rhymes

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Material Information

Title:
Mother Goose rhymes
Uniform Title:
Mother Goose
Alternate Title:
Mother Goose's rhymes
Physical Description:
65-128 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Publisher:
McLoughlin Bros.
Place of Publication:
New York
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Nursery rhymes -- 1880   ( rbgenr )
Baldwin -- 1880
Genre:
Nursery rhymes   ( rbgenr )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York

Notes

General Note:
Mother Goose's rhymes.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001865621
oclc - 28946025
notis - AJU0122
System ID:
UF00025818:00001

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Full Text
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MOTHER GOOSERHYMESMcLOUGHLIN BROS.NEW YORK


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A carrion crow crow sat on a oak,Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, he ding do!Watching a tailor shape his coat;Sing he, sing ho, the old carrion crow,Fol de riddle. lol de riddle, he ding do! 65


Wife, bring me my old bent bow;Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, he ding do!That I may shoot yon carrion crow;Sing he, sing ho, the old carrion crow,Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, he ding do'The tailor shot, and he missed his mark;Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, he ding do!And shot the miller's sow right through the heart;Sing he, sing ho, the old carrion crow,Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, he ding do!Wife! oh wife! bring brandy in a spoon;Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, he ding do!For the old miller's sow is in a swoon;Sing he, sing ho, the old carrion crow,Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, he ding do!Awake, arise, pull out your eyes,And hear what time of day;And when you have done,Pull out your tongue,And see what you can say.[A Chimney. )Black within, and red without;Four corners round about.66


Ten little Injuns standing in a line-One went home, and then there were nine.Nine little Injuns swinging on a gate-One tumbled off, and then there were eightEight little Injuns never heard of heaven -One kicked the bucket, and then there were seven.Seven little Injuns cutting up tricks -One went to bed, and then there were six.Six little Injuns kicking all alive -One broke his neck, and then there were five.Five little Injuns on a cellar door -One tumbled off, and then there were four.Four little Injuns out on a spree -One got drunk, and then there were three.Three little Injuns out in a canoe--One fell over-board, and then there were two.Two little Injuns fooling with a gun -One shot the other, and then there was one.One little Injun living all alone-He got married, and then there was none!He that would thriveMust rise at five;He that hath thrivenMay lie till seven;And he that by the plough would thrive,Himself must either hold or drive.i. ~~~ ~ ~ ***" ** *ha '. 'hpog wo"; ;**,ve **{~~ ~~


Daffy-down-dilly has come upto town,In a fine petticoat and a greengown.There was an old crowSat upon a clod;There's an end of my song--SThat's odd!Deedle, deedle, dumpling, my son John,One shoe off, and one shoe on.Deedle, deedle, dumpling, my son John.Bye, baby, bunting,Daddy's gone a-hunting,To get a little rabbit skin,To wrap his baby bunting in.Little Robin Red-Breastt Sat upon his hurdle,With a pair of speckled legsAnd a green girdle.88


Little Miss MuffettShe sat on a tuffett,Eating of curds and whey ;There came a blackspider,Who sat down besideAnd frihtened Miss Miss Muf-fett away.Eggs, butter, cheese, bread,Stick, stock, stone, dead.Stick him up, stick him down,Stick him in the old man's crown.Rain, rain, go away;Come again another day;Little Johnny wants to phlay.I'll tell you a storyAbout Mary MorcyAnd now my story's begun.I'll tell you anotherAbout her brother,And now my story's done.' " 69


There was a fat man of Bombay,Who was smoking one sunshiny dayWhen a bird, called a snipe,Flew away with his pipe,Which vexed the fat man of Bombay.They that wash on Monday,Have all the week to dry;They that wash on Tuesday,Are not so much awry;They that wash on Wednesday,Are not so much to blame;They that wash on Thursday,Wash for shame;They that wash on Friday,Wash in need;And they that wash on Saturday,Oh they are sluts indeed.Hub a dub, dub,Three men in a tub;And who do you think they be?The butcher, the baker,The candlestick maker;Turn 'em out, knaves all three.70


Wooley Foster has gone to sea,With silver buckles at his knee;When he comes back he'll marry me-Bonny Wooley Foster!Wooley Foster has a cow,Black and white about the mow:Open the gates and let her through-Wooley Foster's ain cow IWooley Foster has a hen,Cockle button, cockle ben;She lays eggs for gentlemen -But none for Wooley Foster![ One. ]As 1 was going to St. Ives,I met a man with seven wives,Every wife had seven sacksEvery sack had seven cats,Every cat had seven kits;Kits, cats, sacks, and wives,How many were there going to St. Ives?[A Plum Pudding.]Flour of Virginia, fruit of Spain,Met together in a shower of rain,Put in a bag tied round with a string,If you tell me this riddle, I'll give you a pin.71I


Ride a cock horseTo Banbury CrossTo see little Jennyi Upon a white horseRings on her fingers,Bells on her toes,She shall have musicWherever she goes.L NEW VERSION.'With bells on her gloves,And bells in her ears;She shall have musicWhere'er she appears.Cock a doodle doo IMy dame has lost her shoe;My master's lost his fiddle stick,And don't know what to do.Cock a doodle doo!What is my dame to do?Till master finds his fiddle stick,She'll dance without her shoe.Shake a leg, wag a leg, when will you gang ?"At midsummer, mother, when the days are lang.12


"To make your candles lastforeverYou wives and maids giveear-oTo put them out is the only _way,"Says honest John Boldero.Shoe the horse and shoethe mare,But let the little colt gobare.Old father Gray-Beard,Without tooth or tongue;If you'll give me your finger,I'll give you my thumb.Little Jack Jingle,He used to live single;But when he got tired of thiskind of life.He left off being single, andlived with his wife.


[To be read rapidly.]Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers;A peck of pickled peppers Peter Piper picked;If Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers,Where's the peck of pickled peppers Peter Piperpicked ?My grandmother sent me a new-fashioned, three-cornered, cambric, country-cut handkerchief. Not anold-fashioned, three-cornered, cambric, country-cut hand-kerchief; but a new-fashioned, three-cornered, cambric,country-cut handkerchief.[Tobacco.]Make three-fourths of a cross,And a circle complete,And let two semicirclesOn a perpendicular meet:Next add a triangleThat stands on two feet;Next two semicircles,And a circle complete.The fair maid who, the first of May,Goes to the fields at break of day,And washes in dew from the hawthorn tree,Will ever after handsome be.


[A play with the face. The child exclaims:]Ring the bell! giving a lock of its hair a pull.Knock at the door tapping its forehead.Draw the latch! pulling up its nose.And walk in! opening its mouth and putting,in its finger.[Game on a child's features.]Here sits the Lord Mayor, .forehead.Here sit his two men, eyes.Here sits the cock, right cheek.Here sits the hen, .. .left cheek.Here sit the little chickens, top of nose.Here they run in; mouth.Chinchopper, chinchopper,Chinchopper, chin! chuck the chin.If all the world was apple-pie,And all the sea was ink,And all the trees were bread and cheese,What should we have for drink?The man in the wilderness asked me,How many strawberries grow in the sea?I answered him, as I thought good,As many as red herrings grow in the wood.T6


To market, to market, to buy a fat pig,Home again, home again, jiggety jig.To market, to market, to buy a fat hog,Home again, home again, jiggety jog.I would if I cou'd,If I cou'dn't, how cou'd I?I cou'dn't without I cou'd, cou.d I?Cou'd you, without you cou'd, cou'd ye?Cou'd ye, cou'd ye ?Cou'd you, without you cou'd, cou'd ye?76


Upon my word and nonorAs I went to Bonner,I met a pig,Without a wig,Upon my word and honor.Lady-bug, lady-bug,Fly away home,Your house is on fire,( ", Your children at home.A C harley loves good cake and ale,Charley loves good candy,Charley loves to kiss the girls,r' When they are clean and handy.TJ


The sow came in with the saddle,The little pig rocked the cradle,The dish jumped up on the table,To see the pot swallow the ladle.The spit that stood behind the door,Threw the pudding-stick on the floor."Odsplut!" said the gridiron,"Can't you agree?I'm the head constable,Bring them to me."Little Johnny Pringle had a little Pig,It was very little, so was not very big,As it was playing beneath the shed,In half a minute poor Piggy was dead:So Johnny Pringle he sat down and cried,And Betty Pringle she lay down and died,There is the history of one, two, and three,Johnny Pringle, Betty Pringle, and Piggie Wiggie.[ To be sung in a high wind. ]Arthur O'Bower has broken his band,And he comes roaring up the land;King of Scots with all his powerNever can turn Sir Arthur O'Bower.78


There were two birds sat upon a stone,Fal de ral-al de ral-laddy.One flew away, and then there was one,Fal de ral-al de ral-laddy.The other flew after, and then there was none,Fal de ral-al de ral-laddy.So the poor stone was left all alone,Fal de ral-al de ral-laddy.One of these little birds back again flew,Fal de ral-al de ral-laddy.The other came after, and then there were two,Fal de ral-al de ral-laddy.Says one to the other, "Pray how do you do?"Fal de ral-al de ral-laddy."Very well, thank you, and pray how are you?"Fal de ral-al de ral-laddy.Thomas A' Tattamus took two Ts,To tie two tups to two tall trees,To frighten the terrible Thomas A' TattamuslTell me how many Ts there are in all that.There was an old woman, her name it was Peg,Her head was of wood, and she wore a cork leg,The neighbors all pitched her into the water.Her leg was drowned first, and her head followed a'ter.79


I had a little doggy, that used to sit and beg;But doggy tumbled down the stairs and broke his little leg.Oh! doggy I will nurse you, and try to make you well,And you shall have a collar with a pretty little bell."Ah doggy, don't you think you should very faithful be,SFor having such a loving friend to comfort you as me ?And when your leg is better, and you can run and play,SWe'll have a scamper in the fields, and see them making hay.But doggy you must promise, and mind your word you keep,Not once to tease the little lambs, or run among the sheep;And then the yellow chicks, that play upon the grass-SYou must not even wag your tail to scare them as you pass.so


Hey diddle diddle, the eat and the fiddle;The cow jumped over the moon;The little dog laughed to see such sport,6 And the dish ran after the spoon. 816 :.. ..


Pretty John Watts,We are troubled with rats,Will you drive them out of the house?We have mice, too, in plenty,That feast in the pantry,But let them stay and nibble away,What harm in a little brown mouse?[Two of the strongest children are selected, A and B; A stands within a ring orthe children, B being outside. ]A. Who is going round my sheepfold?B. Only poor old Jacky Lingo.A. Don't steal any of my black sheep.B. No, no more I will, only by one.Up, says Jacky Lingo. (Strikes one.)[The child struck leaves the ring, and takes hold of B behind; P in the same mannertakes the other children, one by one, gradually increasing his tail on each repetition of theverses, until he has got the whole: A then tries to get them back; B runs away withthem; they try to shelter themselves behind B; A drags them off, one by one, settingthem against a wall, until he has recovered all. A regular tearing game as children say. ]A cat came fiddling out of a barnWith a pair of bag-pipes under her arm:She could sing nothing but fiddle-cum-feeThe mouse has married the humble-bee;Pipe, cat- dance, mouse-We'll have a wedding at our good house.U


SA cinder-sifter. ]A riddle, a riddle, as I suppose,A hundred eyes, and never a nose.There was an owl lived in an oak,Wisky, wasky, weedle;And every word he ever spokeWas fiddle, faddle, feedle.A gunner chanced to come that way,Wisky, wasky, weedle;Says he, "I'll shoot you, silly bird,"Fiddle, faddle, feedle.See, saw, sacra-down,Which is the way to Boston town?One foot up, the other foot down,That is the way to Boston town.There were two blind men went to seeTwo cripples run a race;The bull did fight the humble-bee,And scratched him in the face.88


wander, He is not very good,Mother Goose hd a house, market-r son Jack,e n sh wanted to A live goose he bought.On a very fine gander.'Twas built in a wood, A live goose he bought.Where an owl at the door "Here, Mother," says he,For sentinel stood. "It will not go for naught."S4


Jack's goose and her gander Jack sold his gold eggSGrew very fond; To a rascally knave,-They'd both eat together, Not half of its valueOr swim in one pond. To poor Jack he gave.Jack found one morning, Then Jack went a-courtingAs I have been told, A lady so gay,IHis goose had laid him As fair as a lily,An egg of pure gold. And sweet as the May.Jack rode to his mother, The knave and the SquireThe news for to tell; Came close at his back,She called him a good boy, And began to belaborAnd said it was well. The sides of poor Jack.j, .^ Ov gi *J


And then the gold egg The knave got the goose,Was thrown into the sea; Which he vowed he'd kill,But Jack he jumped in, Resolving at onceAnd got it back presently. His pockets to fill.Jack's mother came in,And caught the goose soon,And mounting its back,Flew up to the moon.Merry are the bells, and merry would they ring,Merry was myself, and merry could I sing;With a merry sing-song, happy, gay, and free,And a merry ding-dong, happy let us be!Waddle goes your gait, and hollow are your hoseNoddle goes your pate, and purple is your noseMerry is your sing-song, happy, gay, and free,With a merry ding-dong, happy let us be IMerry have we met, and merry have we been,Merry let us part, and merry meet again;With our merry sing-song, happy, gay, and free,And a merry ding-dong, happy let us belso


TOM THUMB'S ALPHABET.A was an Archer, and shot at a frog,B was a Butcher, and had a great dog.C was a Captain, all covered with lace,D was a Drunkard, and had a red face.E was an Esquire, with pride on his brow,F was a Farmer, and followed the plow.G was a Gamester, who had but ill luck,H was a Hunter, and hunted a buck.I was an Innkeeper, who loved to bouse,J was a Joiner, and built up a house.K was King George, who once governed this land,L was a Lady, who had a white hand.M was a Miser, who hoarded up gold,N was a Nobleman, gallant and bold.O was au Oyster-man, and went about town,P was a Parson, and wore a black gown.Q was a Queen, and was fond of good flip,R was a Robber, and wanted a whip.S was a Sailor, and spent all he got,T was a Tinker, and mended a pot.U was a Usurer, a miserable elf,V was a Vintner, who drank all himself.W was a Watchman, and guarded the door,X was Expensive, and so became poor.Y was a Youth, that did not love school,Z was a Zany, a poor harmless fool


"Willy boy, Willy boy, where are you going ?I will go with you, if I may.""I am going to the meadows, to see them mowing.I am going to see them make the hay."tigh diddle doubt, mycandle's out,My little maid is not athome;Saddle my hog, and bridle"-_ my dog,Nnd fetch my little maidhome.


Little Jack Horner sat in a corner,Eating a Christmas pie;He put in his thumb, and he took out a plum,And said, "What a good boy am I !"S ittle Tom Tucker1 kSings for his supper.S; What shall he eat?White bread and butter.Without e'er a knife ?^ How will he be marriedWithout e'er a wife ?


As I was going to market upon a market day,I met the finest ram, sir, that ever fed on hay.On hay, on hay, on hay -I met the finest ram, sir, that ever fed on hay.This ram was fat behind, sir; this ram was fat before;This ram was ten yards round, sir; indeed he was nomore.No more, no more, no moreThis ram was ten yards round, sir; indeed he was nomore.The horns grew on his head, sir, they were so wondroushigh,As I've been plainly told, sir, they reached up to thesky.The sky, the sky, the sky-As I've been plainly told, sir, they reached up to thesky.The tail grew on his back, sir, was six yards and an ell,And it was sent to market to toll the market bell.The bell, the bell, the bell-And it was sent to market to toll the market bell.A-milking, a-milking, my maid,"Cow, take care of your heels," she said;"And you shall have some nice new hay,If you'll quietly let me milk away."90


Dame, get up and bake your pies,Bake your pies, bake your pies;Dame, get up and bake your pies,On Christmas-day in the morning.Dame, what makes your maidens lie,Maidens lie, maidens lie,Dame, what makes your maidens lie,On Christmas-day in the morning?Dame, what makes your ducks to die,Ducks to die, ducks to die;Dame, what makes your ducks to die,On Christmas-day in the morning?Their wings are cut and they cannot fly,Cannot fly, cannot fly;Their wings are cut and they cannot fly,On Christmas-day in the morning.Dance to your daddy,My little babby;Dance to your daddy,My little lamb.You shall have a fishyIn a little dishy;You shall have a fishyWhen the boat comes in.


-A diller, a dollar,A ten o'clock scholar,What makes you come sosoon ?You used to come at teno'clock,But now you come at noon.Bye, baby bumpkin,Where's Tony Lumpkin?SMy lady's on her death-bed,-- With eating half a pumpkin.SiBarber, barber, shave a pig;How many hairs will make aV_ wig ?"enough."SGive the poor barber a pinchof snuff.L _, .. .. ... 2soon /


,Then proud as could be, did heS- Hnsh-a-bye baby, on the tree top,Slen the wind blows the cradlewill rock,When the bough breaks, the .cradlewill fall,S Down comes hush-a-bye, baby, and all. .93


Once I saw a little birdCome hop, hop, hop;So I cried, "Little bird,Will you stop, stop, stop?"And was going to the window,To say "How do you do?"But he shook his little tail,And far away he flew!I love sixpence, pretty little sixpence,I love sixpence better than my life;I spent a penny of it, I spent anotherAnd took fourpence home to my wife.Oh, my little fourpence, pretty little fourpence,I love fourpence better than my life;I spent a penny of it, I spent another,And I took twopence home to my wife.Oh, my little twopence, my pretty little twopence,I love twopence better than my life:I spent a penny of it, I spent another,And I took nothing home to my wife.Oh, my little nothing, my pretty little nothing,What will nothing buy for my wife ?I have nothing, I spend nothing,I love nothing better than my wife.94


FAn Egg.]In marble walls as white as milk,Lined with a skin as soft as silk,Within a fountain crystal clear,A golden apple doth appear.No doors there are to this stronghold,Yet thieves break in and steal the gold.Heigh ding-a-ding, what shall I sing?How many holes in a skimmer?Four-and-twenty. I'm half starving!Mother, pray give me some dinner.O that I was where I would be,Then would I be where I am not!But where I am I must be,And where I would be I cannot.There was an old woman, and what do you think,She lived upon nothing but victuals and drink;Victuals and drink were the chief of her diet;Yet this tiresome old woman could never be quiet.95


There was an old man of Tobago,Who lived on rice, gruel, and sago,Till, much to his bliss,His physician said this," To a leg, sir, of muttonyou may go."Pease pudding hot,Pease pudding cold,Pease pudding in the pot,Nine days old.Some like it hot, [Some like it cold,Some like it in the pot,ine days old.


A aSimple Simon met a pieman,Going to the fair.Says Simple Simon to the pieman,"Let me taste your ware."....i ...


Says the pieman to Simple Simon"Show me first your penny."Says Simple Simon to the pieman,"Indeed, I have not any."Simple Simon went a-fishing,For to catch a whale;All the water he had got,Was in his mother's pail.Simple Simon went to lookIf plums grew on a thistle;He pricked his fingers very much,Which made poor Simon whistle.Then Simple Simon went a-hunting,For to catch a hare;He rode on a goat about the street,But could not find one there.He went for water in a sieve,But soon it all run through:And now poor Simple SimonBids you all adieu !As Tommy Snooks and Bessie BrooksWere walking out one Sunday,Says Tommy Snooks to Bessie Brooks,"To-morrow will be Monday."


A was an apple-pie.B bit it;C cut it;D dealt it;E eat it;F fought for it:G got it;H had it;,I and J jumped for it;K kept it;L longed for it;M mourned for it;N nodded at it;0 opened it;P peeped in it;Q quartered it;R ran for it;S stole it;T took it;U and V viewed it;W wanted it;X, Y, Z, and &,All wished for a piece in hand.Shoe the wild horse, and shoe the gray mare;If the horse won't be shod, let him go bare.09


r14The man in the moon,Came tumbling down,And asked the way to Norwich.He went by the south,And burnt his mouthWith eating cold pease porridge.Fiddle-de-dee, fiddle-de dee,The fly shall marry the humble bee.They went to the church, and married was she,The fly has married the humble-bee.L00


Cry, baby, cry, Tell tale, tit!Put your finger in your Your tongue shall be sllt.eye, And all the dogs in theAnd tell your mother it town,wasn't I. Shall have a little bit.Tom, Tom, the piper's son,Stole a pig nd away he | 'run;The pig was eat, \And Toni was beat,And Tom ran crying downt, Mhe street. O -I o ^ affay^~ h~ -I I^Mlo


My true love lives far from me,Perrie, Merrie, Dixie, Dominie.Many a rich present he sends to me,Petrum, Partrum, Paradise, Temporie,Perrie, Merrie, Dixie, Dominie.He sent me a goose without a bone;He sent me a cherry without a stone.Petrum, &c.He sent me a Bible no man could read;He sent me a blanket without a thread.Petrum, &c.How could there be a goose witnout a bone?How could there be a cherry without a stone?Petrum, &c.How could there be a Bible no man could read?How could there be a blanket without a thread?Petrum, &c.S When a goose is in the egg-shell, there is no bone;S When the cherry is in the blossom, there is no stone.Petrum, &c.SWhen the Bible is in the press, no man it can read;S When the wool is on the sheep's back, there is no thread." 10 Petrum, &c.S........ .. 1 0 2


I This is said to be a certain cure for the hiccough if repeated in one breath. ]When a twister a-twisting, will twist him a twist,For the twisting of his twist, he three times doth untwistBut if one of the twines of the twist do untwist,The twine that untwisteth, untwisteth the twistUntwirling the twine that untwisteth between,He twirls, with the twister, the two in a twine;Then twice having twisted the twines of the twine,He twisteth the twine he had twined in twain.The twain that, in twining, before in the twine,As twines were intwisted, he now doth untwine:'Twixt the twain intertwisting a twine more between,He, twirling his twister, makes a twist of the twine.Rowley Powley, pudding and pie,Kissed the girls and made them cry;When the girls begin to cry,Rowley Powley runs away.There was a man, and his name was Dob -And he had a wife, and her name was Mob,And lie had a dog, and he called it Cob,And she had a cat, called Chitterabob..10


Jack and Jill went up the hill,To fetch a pail of water;Jack fell down, and broke his crown,And Jill came tumbling after.Up Jack got and home did trot,As fast as he could caper;" Dame Jill had the job to plaster his knob"With vinegar and brcwn paper._ See, saw, Margery Daw,"Sold her bed and lay uponstraw.Was not she a dirt slut,S'l' " +t .- straw.'*" ii ,Jd To sell her bed and live inUpackgot adhm dirt ?


i*/ iLittle boy blue, come blow your horn;The sheep's in the meadow, the cow's in the corn.Where's the little boy that looks after the sheep?He's under the hay-cock, fast asleep.Go wake him, go wake him! oh! no, not I,For if I do, he'll be sure to cry.105 r


Robin the Bobbin the big-bellied Ben,He eat more meat than fourscore men;He eat a cow, he eat a calf,He eat a hog and a half;He eat a church, he eat a steeple,He eat the priest and all the people!"A cow and a calf,An ox and a half,A church and a steeple,And all the good people,And yet he complained that his stomach wasn't fullThe lion and the unicornWere fighting for the crown:The lion beat the unicornSAll round about the town.Some gave them white bread,And some gave them brown;SSome gave them plum cake,"And sent them out of town.106Ciaey fok ar ......mac! o .. ...... ........ .. ...... ............ ... .. ...


I saw a ship a-sailing,A-sailing on the sea;And, oh! it was all ladenWith pretty things for thee!There were comfits in the cabin,And apples in the hold;The sails were made of silk,And the masts were make of gold.The four-and-twenty sailors,That stood between the decks,Were four-and-twenty white mice,With chains about their necks.The captain was a duck,With a packet on his back:"And when the ship began to move,The captain said, Quack I quack !"rOne child holds a wand to the face of another, repeating these lines, and making grim-aces, to cause the latter to laugh, and so to the others; those who laugh payinga forfeit.]Buff says Buff to all his men,And I say Buff to you again;Buff neither laughs nor smiles,But carrie s his faceWith a very good grace,And passes the stick to the very next place.SI o- 10T *- Buf netherlauhs nr smle/


Little Tommy Grace"had a pain in hisface,So bad he could notlearn a letter,\ When in came DickyLong,Singing such a fun.ny song,That Tommy laughed,and found his facemuch better.Pity Patty Polt,Shoe the wild colt:S Here a nail,And there a nail,Pity Patty Polt,108os


One misty, moisty morning,When cloudy was the weather,I chanced to meet an old man clothed all in leather.And how do you dc again?The North Wind doth blow,OAnd we shall have snow,And what will poor Robindo then ?e He will hopbe to a barn,How do you do and his w do you dog,' A a Poor th in1g !~ ewilhp oa an


There was a man and he was mad,And he jumped into a pea-swad; *The pea-swad was over-full,". "'i So he jumped into a roaring bull;The roaring bull was over-fat,, So he jumped into a gentleman's hat;The gentleman's hat was over-fine,So he jumped into a bottle of wine;r The bottle of wine was over-dear,"So he jumped into a bottle of beer;The bottle of beer was over-thick,So he jumped into a club-stick;The club-stick was over-narrow,So he jumped into a wheel-barrow;The wheel-barrow began to crack,So he jumped on to a hay-stack;The hay-stack began to blaze,So he did nothing but cough and sneeze!I'll tell you a story,About John-a-Nory;* And now my story's begun*SI'll tell you another,About Jack and his brother;And now my story's done.l0 The pod or shll of a peaS 110:


She put a mouse in a bag,And sent it to mill.The miller declaredBy the point of his knifeHe never took tollOf a mouse in his life.Hogs in the garden, catch'em Towser;Cow's in the corn-field, run boys, run;Cat's in the cream-pot, run girls, run girls;Fire on the mountains, run boys, run.If a man who turnips criesCries not when his father dies,It is a proof that he would ratherHave a turnip than his father.Cold and raw the north winds blow,Bleak in the morning early;All the hills are covered with snow,And winter's now come fairly.[ ...,,,,,,::,.., ,,. ,, ,,. : ".;..:..


I',z Al-so, kli"Pussy-cat, pussy-cat, where have you been?""I've been to London.to visit the Queen!""Pussy-cat, pussy-cat, what did you there?""I frightened a little mouse under her chair.'[A Hlorse-shoer]What shoemaker makes shoes without leather,"With all the four elements put together?A Fire and water, earth and air;112 ..Every customer has two pair.S" l 12


4 Il-, K,Littko Bo-Peep and her Sheep, befor-e she lost them. ii3


LITTLE Bo-PEEP has lost her sheep,"And cannot tell where to find them;Let them alone, and they'll come home,And bring their tails behind them.Little Bo-Peep fell fast asleep,And dreamt she heard them bleating;But when she awoke, she found it a joke,For still they all were fleeting.Then up she took her little crook,Determined for to find them;She found them indeed, but it made her heart bleed,For they'd left their tails behind them.It happened one day, as Bo-Peep did stray,Unto -a meadow hard by-There she espied their tails side by side,All hung on a tree to dry.She heaved a sigh, and wiped her eye,And over the hillocks she raced.And tried what she could, as a shepherdess should,That each tail should be properly placed.RocK-a-bye, baby, thy cradle is green;Father's a nobleman, mother's a queen;And Betty's a lady, and wears a gold ring;And Johnny's a drummer,-and drums for the king.' ~ *L, ;!~~~~,,~ i.~~ ',.,. '1~_,;_- '._:,,,, ;;;;__;,I,.~;, ll---x,., ,1,


Little Jack-a-Dandy Come dance a jigWanted sugar candy To my Granny's pig,And fairly for it cried; With a rawdy, rowdy, dow-But little Billy Cook dy;Who always reads his Come dance a jigResolved to have a battle,Had spoiled his nice new rattle.Just then flew by a monstrous crow,As big as a tar-barrel.Which frightened both the heroes so,They quite forgot their quarrel.There was a little nobby colt,His name was Nobby Gray,His head was made of pouce straw,His tail was made of hay.He could ramble, he could trot,He could carry a mustard-pot,"Round the town of Woodstock.Hey, Jenny, hey]~j


There was a little man, and he had a little gun,And his bullets were made of lead, lead, lead;lHe shot Johnny Sprig through the middle of his wig,And knocked it right off his head, head, head.Division is as bad,The Rule of Three perplexesAnd me,And Practice drives me mad.SLeg over leg,/ As the dog went to Dover,When he came to a stile,Jump he went over.115


Dck-o-ry diek-o-ry dock TheS..." "mouse ran up the cock ThP/e.lock 1 trucA One, The mouse ran down ;,- ",, ,., II micko ry, dick.o ry, dock.. .f


SThe "Three Knights of Spain" is a game in which the children form themselves in twoparties, one representing a courtly dame and her daughters, the other the suitors of thedaughters. The last party, moving backwards and forwards, with their arms entwined, ap.proach and recede from the mother party, which is stationary, singing to a very sweet air.Suitors.We are three brethren out of Spain,Come to court your daughter Jane.Mother.NMy daughter Jane she is too young,And has not learned her mother tongue.Suitors.Be she young or be she old,For her beauty she must be sold;So fare you well, my lady gay,We'll call again another day.Mother.Turn back, turn back, thou scornful knight,And rub thy spurs till they be bright.S.. Suitors.Of my spurs take you no thought,For in this town they were not bought-So fare you well my lady gay,We'll call again another day.118


The fairest maid that I can see,Is pretty Nancy,-come to me.Here comes your daughter safe and sound,Every pocket with a thousand pound; .Every finger with a gay gold ring;PleAnd take the fairest in your daughter inght.e man had one eye, and the tree two apples upon it.There was a man who had no eyes,e fairest mabroad that I canthe skiee,H e s aw a tree with apples on it,He took no apples our yet left no apples on it.Mollie, my pocket with and I fell ousand pound;Every finger with a gay gold ring;Please t o take you think it was aboutThe l an had one ee, and the tree two apples uponThere was a man who had no eyes,He went abroad to view the skies; '.^'y |:'*He saw a tree with apples on it,He took no apples off, yet left no apples on it.Mollie, my sister, and I fell out,And what do you think it was about?She loved coffee, and I loved tea,And that was the reason we couldn't agree. .* I n |


.o t eP Goo!sei-s4etodiesAway, birds, awayTake a little, and leave alittle,And do not come again; hFor if you do,I will shoot you through,And then there will bean end of you.Some little mice sat in abarn to spin.Pussy came by, and shepopped her head in;" Shall I come in and cntW vyour tihreads off?""Oh no, kind sir, you will. snp our heads off."~~ i~i ~,, '\~e~il~ i~;k1~S~U~i Lii~~k~~


If j- -li s7 -There was an old woman, as I've hea ll,She went to market her eggs to sellLIShe went to market all on a market y,And she fell asleep on the king's highway.There came by a peddler, whose name was Stout,He cut her petticoats all round about;He cut her petticoats up to the knees,Which made the old woman to shiver and freezeWhen the little old woman first did wake,She began to shiver, and she began to shake;


She began to wonder, and she began to cry,"Lauk a mercy on me, this can't be I!"But if it be I, as I hope it be,I've a little dog at home, and he'll know me.If it be I, he'll wag his little tail,And if it be not I, he'll loudly bark and wail."Home went the little woman all in the dark,Up got the little dog, and he began to bark;He began to bark, so she began to cry,"Lauk a mercy on me, this is none of I."John Cook had a little gray mare; he, haw, humHer back stood up, and her bones they were bare; he,haw, hum!John Cook was riding up Shuter's bank; he, haw, hum!And there his nag did kick and prank; he, haw, hum!John Cook was riding up Shuter's hill; he, haw, hum !His mare fell down and she made her will I he, haw, hum!"The bridle and saddle were laid on the shelf; he,haw, hum IIf you want any more you may sing it yourself; he,s12 haw, hum.


Dingty, diddledy, my mammy's maid,She stole oranges, I'm afraid:Some in her pocket, some in her sleeve,She stole oranges, I do believe.Saturday night shall be my whole care,To powder my locks and curl my hair;On Sunday morning my love will come in,And marry me then with a pretty gold ring.The rose is red, the violet blue,The gillyflower sweet-and so are you:These are hee ar e words you bade me sayFor a pair of new gloves on Easter-day.If I'd as much money ap I could spend,I never would cry old chairs to mend;Old chairs to mend, old chairs to mend;I never would cry old chairs to mend.If I'd as much money as I could tell,I never would cry old clothes to sell;Old clothes to sell, old clothes to sell;I never would cry old clothes to sell. 13135'* I-


, *,Jack Sprat could eat no fat,His wife could eat no lean;And so betwixt them both, you see,They licked the platter clean.See a pin and pick it up,All the day you'll have goodluck.See a pin and let it lay,M Bad luck you'll have all the day." John come sell thy fiddle,', And buy thy wife a gown.if "No, I'll not sell my fiddle,:' For ne'er a wife in town.124


INSa-There was an old woman who lived in a shoe,She had so many children, she didn't know what to do,She gave them some broth, without any bread,She whipped them all round, and sent them to bed.125


Johnny shall have a new bonnet,And Johnny shall go to the fair,And Johnny shall have a blue ribbonTo tie up his bonny brown 'hair.And why may not I love Johnny ?And why may not Johnny love me?And why may not I love Johnny,As well as another body?And here's a leg for a stocking,And here is a leg for a shoe,And he has a kiss for his daddy,And two for his mammy, I trow.And why may not I love Johnny;And why may not Johnny love me?And why may not I love Johnny,As well as another body.In the following, the various parts of the countenance are touched as the linesare repeated; and at the close the chin i3 struck playfully, that the tonguemay be gently bitten.Eye winker,Tom Tinker,Nose dropper,SMouth eater,Chin chopper,ise Chin chopper.


There was a little man,And he had a little gun,And his bullets were made of lead, lead, lead;He went to the brook,And saw a little duck,And he shot it through the head, head, head.He carried it homeTo his old wife Joan,And bid her a fire for to make, make, make,To roast the little duck,He bad shot in the brook,And he'd go and fetch her the drake, drake, drake.About the bush, Willy, about the bee-hive,About the bush, Willy, I'll meet thee alive.Birds of a feather flock together,And so will pigs and swine;Rats and mice will have their choice,And so will I have mine.Johnny Armstrong killed a calf,Peter Henderson got the half:Willie Wilkinson got the head,-Ring the bell, the calf is dead! IIN


I had a little hobby horse.And it was a dapple gray,Its head was made of pea-straw,Its tail was made of hay.I sold it to an old womanFor a copper groat;And I'll not sing my song againWithout a new coat.H op away, skip away, my baby wants to playMy baby wants to play every day.S. . ... + .. ...


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The Baldwin Library nivwniy win I ib LIm FIQ"



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I had a little doggy, that used to sit and beg; But doggy tumbled down the stairs and broke his little leg. Oh! doggy I will nurse you, and try to make you well, And you shall have a collar with a pretty little bell. "Ah doggy, don't you think you should very faithful be, SFor having such a loving friend to comfort you as me ? And when your leg is better, and you can run and play, SWe'll have a scamper in the fields, and see them making hay. But doggy you must promise, and mind your word you keep, Not once to tease the little lambs, or run among the sheep; And then the yellow chicks, that play upon the grassYou must not even wag your tail to scare them as you pass. so



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I had a little hobby horse. And it was a dapple gray, Its head was made of pea-straw, Its tail was made of hay. I sold it to an old woman For a copper groat; And I'll not sing my song again Without a new coat. H op away, skip away, my baby wants to play My baby wants to play every day. S. ........ .+ ... ....



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Hey diddle diddle, the eat and the fiddle; The cow jumped over the moon; The little dog laughed to see such sport, 6 And the dish ran after the spoon. 81 6 .:.. ..



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, *, Jack Sprat could eat no fat, His wife could eat no lean; And so betwixt them both, you see, They licked the platter clean. See a pin and pick it up, All the day you'll have good luck. See a pin and let it lay, M -Bad luck you'll have all the day. John come sell thy fiddle, ', And buy thy wife a gown. if "No, I'll not sell my fiddle, :' For ne'er a wife in town. 124



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The sow came in with the saddle, The little pig rocked the cradle, The dish jumped up on the table, To see the pot swallow the ladle. The spit that stood behind the door, Threw the pudding-stick on the floor. "Odsplut!" said the gridiron, "Can't you agree? I'm the head constable, Bring them to me." Little Johnny Pringle had a little Pig, It was very little, so was not very big, As it was playing beneath the shed, In half a minute poor Piggy was dead: So Johnny Pringle he sat down and cried, And Betty Pringle she lay down and died, There is the history of one, two, and three, Johnny Pringle, Betty Pringle, and Piggie Wiggie. [ To be sung in a high wind. ] Arthur O'Bower has broken his band, And he comes roaring up the land; King of Scots with all his power Never can turn Sir Arthur O'Bower. 78



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SA cinder-sifter. ] A riddle, a riddle, as I suppose, A hundred eyes, and never a nose. There was an owl lived in an oak, Wisky, wasky, weedle; And every word he ever spoke Was fiddle, faddle, feedle. A gunner chanced to come that way, Wisky, wasky, weedle; Says he, "I'll shoot you, silly bird," Fiddle, faddle, feedle. See, saw, sacra-down, Which is the way to Boston town? One foot up, the other foot down, That is the way to Boston town. There were two blind men went to see Two cripples run a race; The bull did fight the humble-bee, And scratched him in the face. 88



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I',z Al-so, k li "Pussy-cat, pussy-cat, where have you been?" "I've been to London.to visit the Queen!" "Pussy-cat, pussy-cat, what did you there?" "I frightened a little mouse under her chair.' [A Hlorse-shoer] What shoemaker makes shoes without leather, "With all the four elements put together? A Fire and water, earth and air; 112 ..Every customer has two pair. S" l 12



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Wooley Foster has gone to sea, With silver buckles at his knee; When he comes back he'll marry meBonny Wooley Foster! Wooley Foster has a cow, Black and white about the mow: Open the gates and let her throughWooley Foster's ain cow I Wooley Foster has a hen, Cockle button, cockle ben; She lays eggs for gentlemen But none for Wooley Foster! [ One. ] As 1 was going to St. Ives, I met a man with seven wives, Every wife had seven sacks Every sack had seven cats, Every cat had seven kits; Kits, cats, sacks, and wives, How many were there going to St. Ives? [A Plum Pudding.] Flour of Virginia, fruit of Spain, Met together in a shower of rain, Put in a bag tied round with a string, If you tell me this riddle, I'll give you a pin. 71 I



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Ten little Injuns standing in a lineOne went home, and then there were nine. Nine little Injuns swinging on a gateOne tumbled off, and then there were eight Eight little Injuns never heard of heaven One kicked the bucket, and then there were seven. Seven little Injuns cutting up tricks One went to bed, and then there were six. Six little Injuns kicking all alive One broke his neck, and then there were five. Five little Injuns on a cellar door One tumbled off, and then there were four. Four little Injuns out on a spree One got drunk, and then there were three. Three little Injuns out in a canoe-One fell over-board, and then there were two. Two little Injuns fooling with a gun One shot the other, and then there was one. One little Injun living all aloneHe got married, and then there was none! He that would thrive Must rise at five; He that hath thriven May lie till seven; And he that by the plough would thrive, Himself must either hold or drive. i. ~~~ ~ ~ ***" ** *ha '. 'hpog wo"; ;**,ve **{~~ ~~



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Upon my word and nonor As I went to Bonner, I met a pig, Without a wig, Upon my word and honor. Lady-bug, lady-bug, Fly away home, Your house is on fire, ( ", Your children at home. A C harley loves good cake and ale, Charley loves good candy, Charley loves to kiss the girls, r' When they are clean and handy. TJ



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-A diller, a dollar, A ten o'clock scholar, What makes you come so soon ? You used to come at ten o'clock, But now you come at noon. Bye, baby bumpkin, Where's Tony Lumpkin? SMy lady's on her death-bed, -With eating half a pumpkin. SiBarber, barber, shave a pig; How many hairs will make a V_ wig ? "enough." SGive the poor barber a pinch of snuff. L _, ., .. „ .. .... .„ 2 „ „ soon /



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wander, He is not very good, Mother Goose hd a house, market-r son Jack, e n sh wanted to A live goose he bought. On a very fine gander. 'Twas built in a wood, A live goose he bought. Where an owl at the door "Here, Mother," says he, For sentinel stood. "It will not go for naught." S4



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I saw a ship a-sailing, A-sailing on the sea; And, oh! it was all laden With pretty things for thee! There were comfits in the cabin, And apples in the hold; The sails were made of silk, And the masts were make of gold. The four-and-twenty sailors, That stood between the decks, Were four-and-twenty white mice, With chains about their necks. The captain was a duck, With a packet on his back: "And when the ship began to move, The captain said, Quack I quack !" rOne child holds a wand to the face of another, repeating these lines, and making grimaces, to cause the latter to laugh, and so to the others; those who laugh paying a forfeit.] Buff says Buff to all his men, And I say Buff to you again; Buff neither laughs nor smiles, But carrie s his face With a very good grace, And passes the stick to the very next place. SI o10T -Buf netherlauhs nr smle/



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"To make your candles last forever You wives and maids give ear-o To put them out is the only way," Says honest John Boldero. Shoe the horse and shoe the mare, But let the little colt go bare. Old father Gray-Beard, Without tooth or tongue; If you'll give me your finger, I'll give you my thumb. Little Jack Jingle, He used to live single; But when he got tired of this kind of life. He left off being single, and lived with his wife.



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Wife, bring me my old bent bow; Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, he ding do! That I may shoot yon carrion crow; Sing he, sing ho, the old carrion crow, Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, he ding do' The tailor shot, and he missed his mark; Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, he ding do! And shot the miller's sow right through the heart; Sing he, sing ho, the old carrion crow, Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, he ding do! Wife! oh wife! bring brandy in a spoon; Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, he ding do! For the old miller's sow is in a swoon; Sing he, sing ho, the old carrion crow, Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, he ding do! Awake, arise, pull out your eyes, And hear what time of day; And when you have done, Pull out your tongue, And see what you can say. [A Chimney. ) Black within, and red without; Four corners round about. 66



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FAn Egg.] In marble walls as white as milk, Lined with a skin as soft as silk, Within a fountain crystal clear, A golden apple doth appear. No doors there are to this stronghold, Yet thieves break in and steal the gold. Heigh ding-a-ding, what shall I sing? How many holes in a skimmer? Four-and-twenty. I'm half starving! Mother, pray give me some dinner. O that I was where I would be, Then would I be where I am not! But where I am I must be, And where I would be I cannot. There was an old woman, and what do you think, She lived upon nothing but victuals and drink; Victuals and drink were the chief of her diet; Yet this tiresome old woman could never be quiet. 95



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Daffy-down-dilly has come up to town, In a fine petticoat and a green gown. There was an old crow Sat upon a clod; There's an end of my song-SThat's odd! Deedle, deedle, dumpling, my son John, One shoe off, and one shoe on. Deedle, deedle, dumpling, my son John. Bye, baby, bunting, Daddy's gone a-hunting, To get a little rabbit skin, To wrap his baby bunting in. Little Robin Red-Breast t Sat upon his hurdle, With a pair of speckled legs And a green girdle. 88



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Little Miss Muffett She sat on a tuffett, Eating of curds and whey ; There came a black spider, Who sat down beside And frihtened Miss Miss Muffett away. Eggs, butter, cheese, bread, Stick, stock, stone, dead. Stick him up, stick him down, Stick him in the old man's crown. Rain, rain, go away; Come again another day; Little Johnny wants to phlay. I'll tell you a story About Mary Morcy And now my story's begun. I'll tell you another About her brother, And now my story's done. 69



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There was an old man of Tobago, Who lived on rice, gruel, and sago, Till, much to his bliss, His physician said this, To a leg, sir, of mutton you may go." Pease pudding hot, Pease pudding cold, Pease pudding in the pot, Nine days old. Some like it hot, [ Some like it cold, Some like it in the pot, ine days old.



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There was a little man, And he had a little gun, And his bullets were made of lead, lead, lead; He went to the brook, And saw a little duck, And he shot it through the head, head, head. He carried it home To his old wife Joan, And bid her a fire for to make, make, make, To roast the little duck, He bad shot in the brook, And he'd go and fetch her the drake, drake, drake. About the bush, Willy, about the bee-hive, About the bush, Willy, I'll meet thee alive. Birds of a feather flock together, And so will pigs and swine; Rats and mice will have their choice, And so will I have mine. Johnny Armstrong killed a calf, Peter Henderson got the half: Willie Wilkinson got the head,Ring the bell, the calf is dead! IIN



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Jack and Jill went up the hill, To fetch a pail of water; Jack fell down, and broke his crown, And Jill came tumbling after. Up Jack got and home did trot, As fast as he could caper; Dame Jill had the job to plaster his knob "With vinegar and brcwn paper. See, saw, Margery Daw, "Sold her bed and lay upon straw. Was not she a dirt slut, S'l' +t .straw. '*" ii Jd To sell her bed and live in Upackgot adhm dirt ?



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AT



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Robin the Bobbin the big-bellied Ben, He eat more meat than fourscore men; He eat a cow, he eat a calf, He eat a hog and a half; He eat a church, he eat a steeple, He eat the priest and all the people! "A cow and a calf, An ox and a half, A church and a steeple, And all the good people, And yet he complained that his stomach wasn't full The lion and the unicorn Were fighting for the crown: The lion beat the unicorn SAll round about the town. Some gave them white bread, And some gave them brown; SSome gave them plum cake, "And sent them out of town. 106 Ciaey fok ar ......ma c! o .. ....... ........ .. ...... ............ .... .. ...



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Jack's goose and her gander Jack sold his gold egg SGrew very fond; To a rascally knave,They'd both eat together, Not half of its value Or swim in one pond. To poor Jack he gave. Jack found one morning, Then Jack went a-courting As I have been told, A lady so gay, IHis goose had laid him As fair as a lily, An egg of pure gold. And sweet as the May. Jack rode to his mother, The knave and the Squire The news for to tell; Came close at his back, She called him a good boy, And began to belabor And said it was well. The sides of poor Jack. j, .^ Ov gi *J



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Dck-o-ry diek-o-ry dock The S. .. "mouse ran up the cock Th P/ e.lock 1 trucA One, The mouse ran down ; ,",, ,., II _ .m icko -ry, dick.o -ry, dock. ... f



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If j --li s 7 There was an old woman, as I've hea ll, She went to market her eggs to sellLI She went to market all on a market y, And she fell asleep on the king's highway. There came by a peddler, whose name was Stout, He cut her petticoats all round about; He cut her petticoats up to the knees, Which made the old woman to shiver and freeze When the little old woman first did wake, She began to shiver, and she began to shake;



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My true love lives far from me, Perrie, Merrie, Dixie, Dominie. Many a rich present he sends to me, Petrum, Partrum, Paradise, Temporie, Perrie, Merrie, Dixie, Dominie. He sent me a goose without a bone; He sent me a cherry without a stone. Petrum, &c. He sent me a Bible no man could read; He sent me a blanket without a thread. Petrum, &c. How could there be a goose witnout a bone? How could there be a cherry without a stone? Petrum, &c. How could there be a Bible no man could read? How could there be a blanket without a thread? Petrum, &c. S When a goose is in the egg-shell, there is no bone; S When the cherry is in the blossom, there is no stone. Petrum, &c. SWhen the Bible is in the press, no man it can read; S When the wool is on the sheep's back, there is no thread. 1 0 P e t r u m & c S........ .. .1 0 2



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She put a mouse in a bag, And sent it to mill. The miller declared By the point of his knife He never took toll Of a mouse in his life. Hogs in the garden, catch'em Towser; Cow's in the corn-field, run boys, run; Cat's in the cream-pot, run girls, run girls; Fire on the mountains, run boys, run. If a man who turnips cries Cries not when his father dies, It is a proof that he would rather Have a turnip than his father. Cold and raw the north winds blow, Bleak in the morning early; All the hills are covered with snow, And winter's now come fairly. [ „ ...,,,,,,::,.., .„,„,,. „ „ ,, .„,,.„ : ".;..:..



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Little Tommy Grace "had a pain in his face, So bad he could not learn a letter, \ When in came Dicky Long, Singing such a fun. ny song, That Tommy laughed, and found his face much better. Pity Patty Polt, Shoe the wild colt: S Here a nail, And there a nail, Pity Patty Polt, 108os



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Pretty John Watts, We are troubled with rats, Will you drive them out of the house? We have mice, too, in plenty, That feast in the pantry, But let them stay and nibble away, What harm in a little brown mouse? [Two of the strongest children are selected, A and B; A stands within a ring or the children, B being outside. ] A. Who is going round my sheepfold? B. Only poor old Jacky Lingo. A. Don't steal any of my black sheep. B. No, no more I will, only by one. Up, says Jacky Lingo. (Strikes one.) [The child struck leaves the ring, and takes hold of B behind; P in the same manner takes the other children, one by one, gradually increasing his tail on each repetition of the verses, until he has got the whole: A then tries to get them back; B runs away with them; they try to shelter themselves behind B; A drags them off, one by one, setting them against a wall, until he has recovered all. A regular tearing game as children say. ] A cat came fiddling out of a barn With a pair of bag-pipes under her arm: She could sing nothing but fiddle-cum-fee The mouse has married the humble-bee; Pipe, catdance, mouseWe'll have a wedding at our good house. U



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Little Jack Horner sat in a corner, Eating a Christmas pie; He put in his thumb, and he took out a plum, And said, "What a good boy am I !" S ittle Tom Tucker 1 kSings for his supper. S; What shall he eat? White bread and butter. Without e'er a knife ? ^ How will he be married Without e'er a wife ?



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A was an apple-pie. B bit it; C cut it; D dealt it; E eat it; F fought for it: G got it; H had it;, I and J jumped for it; K kept it; L longed for it; M mourned for it; N nodded at it; 0 opened it; P peeped in it; Q quartered it; R ran for it; S stole it; T took it; U and V viewed it; W wanted it; X, Y, Z, and &, All wished for a piece in hand. Shoe the wild horse, and shoe the gray mare; If the horse won't be shod, let him go bare. 09



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Says the pieman to Simple Simon "Show me first your penny." Says Simple Simon to the pieman, "Indeed, I have not any." Simple Simon went a-fishing, For to catch a whale; All the water he had got, Was in his mother's pail. Simple Simon went to look If plums grew on a thistle; He pricked his fingers very much, Which made poor Simon whistle. Then Simple Simon went a-hunting, For to catch a hare; He rode on a goat about the street, But could not find one there. He went for water in a sieve, But soon it all run through: And now poor Simple Simon Bids you all adieu As Tommy Snooks and Bessie Brooks Were walking out one Sunday, Says Tommy Snooks to Bessie Brooks, "To-morrow will be Monday."



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There were two birds sat upon a stone, Fal de ral-al de ral-laddy. One flew away, and then there was one, Fal de ral-al de ral-laddy. The other flew after, and then there was none, Fal de ral-al de ral-laddy. So the poor stone was left all alone, Fal de ral-al de ral-laddy. One of these little birds back again flew, Fal de ral-al de ral-laddy. The other came after, and then there were two, Fal de ral-al de ral-laddy. Says one to the other, "Pray how do you do?" Fal de ral-al de ral-laddy. "Very well, thank you, and pray how are you?" Fal de ral-al de ral-laddy. Thomas A' Tattamus took two Ts, To tie two tups to two tall trees, To frighten the terrible Thomas A' Tattamusl Tell me how many Ts there are in all that. There was an old woman, her name it was Peg, Her head was of wood, and she wore a cork leg, The neighbors all pitched her into the water. Her leg was drowned first, and her head followed a'ter. 79



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Fc *dI w& -" i' ""iir ili-il: . : Tb::ri sA:' ;"--;".-i.lrit :" -P -j;p,_ ars: rl "I : '-5;g.: "-lii"''"": ',ili "?"1". i r"" I'Y. *ri p, a 11 i -a.ii c;%asia u-i I ;?i aiiissri g iai x;r



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There was a man and he was mad, And he jumped into a pea-swad; The pea-swad was over-full, ". "'i So he jumped into a roaring bull; The roaring bull was over-fat, So he jumped into a gentleman's hat; The gentleman's hat was over-fine, So he jumped into a bottle of wine; r The bottle of wine was over-dear, "So he jumped into a bottle of beer; The bottle of beer was over-thick, So he jumped into a club-stick; The club-stick was over-narrow, So he jumped into a wheel-barrow; The wheel-barrow began to crack, So he jumped on to a hay-stack; The hay-stack began to blaze, So he did nothing but cough and sneeze! I'll tell you a story, About John-a-Nory; And now my story's begun* SI'll tell you another, About Jack and his brother; And now my story's done. l0 The pod or shll of a pea S 110:



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r14 The man in the moon, Came tumbling down, And asked the way to Norwich. He went by the south, And burnt his mouth With eating cold pease porridge. Fiddle-de-dee, fiddle-de dee, The fly shall marry the humble bee. They went to the church, and married was she, The fly has married the humble-bee. L00



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Dame, get up and bake your pies, Bake your pies, bake your pies; Dame, get up and bake your pies, On Christmas-day in the morning. Dame, what makes your maidens lie, Maidens lie, maidens lie, Dame, what makes your maidens lie, On Christmas-day in the morning? Dame, what makes your ducks to die, Ducks to die, ducks to die; Dame, what makes your ducks to die, On Christmas-day in the morning? Their wings are cut and they cannot fly, Cannot fly, cannot fly; Their wings are cut and they cannot fly, On Christmas-day in the morning. Dance to your daddy, My little babby; Dance to your daddy, My little lamb. You shall have a fishy In a little dishy; You shall have a fishy When the boat comes in.



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A carrion crow crow sat on a oak, Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, he ding do! Watching a tailor shape his coat; Sing he, sing ho, the old carrion crow, Fol de riddle. lol de riddle, he ding do! 65



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Little Jack-a-Dandy Come dance a jig Wanted sugar candy To my Granny's pig, And fairly for it cried; With a rawdy, rowdy, dowBut little Billy Cook dy; Who always reads his Come dance a jig Resolved to have a battle, Had spoiled his nice new rattle. Just then flew by a monstrous crow, As big as a tar-barrel. Which frightened both the heroes so, They quite forgot their quarrel. There was a little nobby colt, His name was Nobby Gray, His head was made of pouce straw, His tail was made of hay. He could ramble, he could trot, He could carry a mustard-pot, "Round the town of Woodstock. Hey, Jenny, hey ]~j



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She began to wonder, and she began to cry, "Lauk a mercy on me, this can't be I! "But if it be I, as I hope it be, I've a little dog at home, and he'll know me. If it be I, he'll wag his little tail, And if it be not I, he'll loudly bark and wail." Home went the little woman all in the dark, Up got the little dog, and he began to bark; He began to bark, so she began to cry, "Lauk a mercy on me, this is none of I." John Cook had a little gray mare; he, haw, hum Her back stood up, and her bones they were bare; he, haw, hum! John Cook was riding up Shuter's bank; he, haw, hum! And there his nag did kick and prank; he, haw, hum! John Cook was riding up Shuter's hill; he, haw, hum His mare fell down and she made her will I he, haw, hum! "The bridle and saddle were laid on the shelf; he, haw, hum I If you want any more you may sing it yourself; he, s12 haw, hum.



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MOTHER GOOSE RHYMES McLOUGHLIN BROS. NEW YORK



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As I was going to market upon a market day, I met the finest ram, sir, that ever fed on hay. On hay, on hay, on hay I met the finest ram, sir, that ever fed on hay. This ram was fat behind, sir; this ram was fat before; This ram was ten yards round, sir; indeed he was no more. No more, no more, no more This ram was ten yards round, sir; indeed he was no more. The horns grew on his head, sir, they were so wondrous high, As I've been plainly told, sir, they reached up to the sky. The sky, the sky, the skyAs I've been plainly told, sir, they reached up to the sky. The tail grew on his back, sir, was six yards and an ell, And it was sent to market to toll the market bell. The bell, the bell, the bellAnd it was sent to market to toll the market bell. A-milking, a-milking, my maid, "Cow, take care of your heels," she said; "And you shall have some nice new hay, If you'll quietly let me milk away." 90



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[To be read rapidly.] Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers; A peck of pickled peppers Peter Piper picked; If Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers, Where's the peck of pickled peppers Peter Piper picked ? My grandmother sent me a new-fashioned, threecornered, cambric, country-cut handkerchief. Not an old-fashioned, three-cornered, cambric, country-cut handkerchief; but a new-fashioned, three-cornered, cambric, country-cut handkerchief. [Tobacco.] Make three-fourths of a cross, And a circle complete, And let two semicircles On a perpendicular meet: Next add a triangle That stands on two feet; Next two semicircles, And a circle complete. The fair maid who, the first of May, Goes to the fields at break of day, And washes in dew from the hawthorn tree, Will ever after handsome be.



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LITTLE Bo-PEEP has lost her sheep, "And cannot tell where to find them; Let them alone, and they'll come home, And bring their tails behind them. Little Bo-Peep fell fast asleep, And dreamt she heard them bleating; But when she awoke, she found it a joke, For still they all were fleeting. Then up she took her little crook, Determined for to find them; She found them indeed, but it made her heart bleed, For they'd left their tails behind them. It happened one day, as Bo-Peep did stray, Unto -a meadow hard byThere she espied their tails side by side, All hung on a tree to dry. She heaved a sigh, and wiped her eye, And over the hillocks she raced. And tried what she could, as a shepherdess should, That each tail should be properly placed. RocK-a-bye, baby, thy cradle is green; Father's a nobleman, mother's a queen; And Betty's a lady, and wears a gold ring; And Johnny's a drummer,-and drums for the king. ~ *L, ;!~~~~,,~ i.~~ ',.,. '1~_,;_'._:,,,, ;;;;__;,I,.~;, ll---x,., ,1,



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L4 Simple Simon met a pieman, Going to the fair. Says Simple Simon to the pieman, "Let me taste your ware." ....i ...



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[A play with the face. The child exclaims:] Ring the bell! ..giving a lock of its hair a pull. Knock at the door .tapping its forehead. Draw the latch! ..pulling up its nose. And walk in! ...opening its mouth and putting, in its finger. [Game on a child's features.] Here sits the Lord Mayor, ..forehead. Here sit his two men, ..eyes. Here sits the cock, ...right cheek. Here sits the hen, .... .left cheek. Here sit the little chickens, ..top of nose. Here they run in; ....mouth. Chinchopper, chinchopper, Chinchopper, chin! ...chuck the chin. If all the world was apple-pie, And all the sea was ink, And all the trees were bread and cheese, What should we have for drink? The man in the wilderness asked me, How many strawberries grow in the sea? I answered him, as I thought good, As many as red herrings grow in the wood. T6



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Once I saw a little bird Come hop, hop, hop; So I cried, "Little bird, Will you stop, stop, stop?" And was going to the window, To say "How do you do?" But he shook his little tail, And far away he flew! I love sixpence, pretty little sixpence, I love sixpence better than my life; I spent a penny of it, I spent another And took fourpence home to my wife. Oh, my little fourpence, pretty little fourpence, I love fourpence better than my life; I spent a penny of it, I spent another, And I took twopence home to my wife. Oh, my little twopence, my pretty little twopence, I love twopence better than my life: I spent a penny of it, I spent another, And I took nothing home to my wife. Oh, my little nothing, my pretty little nothing, What will nothing buy for my wife ? I have nothing, I spend nothing, I love nothing better than my wife. 94



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4:~; <-1g! "-I: il~ Ei



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.o t eP Goo!sei-s4etodies Away, birds, away Take a little, and leave a little, And do not come again; h For if you do, I will shoot you through, And then there will be an end of you. Some little mice sat in a barn to spin. Pussy came by, and she popped her head in; Shall I come in and cnt W vyour tihreads off?" "Oh no, kind sir, you will .snp our heads off." ~~ i~i ~,, '\~e~il~ i~;k1~S~U~i Lii~~k~~



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Cry, baby, cry, Tell tale, tit! Put your finger in your Your tongue shall be sllt. eye, And all the dogs in the And tell your mother it town, wasn't I. Shall have a little bit. Tom, Tom, the piper's son, Stole a pig nd away he | run; The pig was eat, \ And Toni was beat, And Tom ran crying down t, Mhe street. -O I o ^ affay^~ h~ -I -.I^Mlo



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The fairest maid that I can see, Is pretty Nancy,-come to me. Here comes your daughter safe and sound, Every pocket with a thousand pound; Every finger with a gay gold ring; PleAnd take the fairest in your daughter inght. e man had one eye, and the tree two apples upon it. There was a man who had no eyes, e fairest mabroad that I canthe skiee, H e s aw a tree with apples on it, He took no apples our yet left no apples on it. Mollie, my pocket with and I fell ousand pound; Every finger with a gay gold ring; Please t o take you think it was about The l an had one ee, and the tree two apples upon There was a man who had no eyes, He went abroad to view the skies; '.^'y |:'* He saw a tree with apples on it, He took no apples off, yet left no apples on it. Mollie, my sister, and I fell out, And what do you think it was about? She loved coffee, and I loved tea, And that was the reason we couldn't agree. I n | '



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I This is said to be a certain cure for the hiccough if repeated in one breath. ] When a twister a-twisting, will twist him a twist, For the twisting of his twist, he three times doth untwist But if one of the twines of the twist do untwist, The twine that untwisteth, untwisteth the twist Untwirling the twine that untwisteth between, He twirls, with the twister, the two in a twine; Then twice having twisted the twines of the twine, He twisteth the twine he had twined in twain. The twain that, in twining, before in the twine, As twines were intwisted, he now doth untwine: 'Twixt the twain intertwisting a twine more between, He, twirling his twister, makes a twist of the twine. Rowley Powley, pudding and pie, Kissed the girls and made them cry; When the girls begin to cry, Rowley Powley runs away. There was a man, and his name was Dob And he had a wife, and her name was Mob, And lie had a dog, and he called it Cob, And she had a cat, called Chitterabob. .10





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i* / i Little boy blue, come blow your horn; The sheep's in the meadow, the cow's in the corn. Where's the little boy that looks after the sheep? He's under the hay-cock, fast asleep. Go wake him, go wake him! oh! no, not I, For if I do, he'll be sure to cry. 105 r



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Johnny shall have a new bonnet, And Johnny shall go to the fair, And Johnny shall have a blue ribbon To tie up his bonny brown 'hair. And why may not I love Johnny ? And why may not Johnny love me? And why may not I love Johnny, As well as another body? And here's a leg for a stocking, And here is a leg for a shoe, And he has a kiss for his daddy, And two for his mammy, I trow. And why may not I love Johnny; And why may not Johnny love me? And why may not I love Johnny, As well as another body. In the following, the various parts of the countenance are touched as the lines are repeated; and at the close the chin i3 struck playfully, that the tongue may be gently bitten. Eye winker, Tom Tinker, Nose dropper, SMouth eater, Chin chopper, ise Chin chopper.



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Dingty, diddledy, my mammy's maid, She stole oranges, I'm afraid: Some in her pocket, some in her sleeve, She stole oranges, I do believe. Saturday night shall be my whole care, To powder my locks and curl my hair; On Sunday morning my love will come in, And marry me then with a pretty gold ring. The rose is red, the violet blue, The gillyflower sweet-and so are you: These are hee ar e words you bade me say For a pair of new gloves on Easter-day. If I'd as much money ap I could spend, I never would cry old chairs to mend; Old chairs to mend, old chairs to mend; I never would cry old chairs to mend. If I'd as much money as I could tell, I never would cry old clothes to sell; Old clothes to sell, old clothes to sell; I never would cry old clothes to sell. 13 135' I-





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"Willy boy, Willy boy, where are you going ? I will go with you, if I may." "I am going to the meadows, to see them mowing. I am going to see them make the hay." tigh diddle doubt, my candle's out, My little maid is not at home; Saddle my hog, and bridle "-_ my dog, Nnd fetch my little maid home.



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There was a fat man of Bombay, Who was smoking one sunshiny day When a bird, called a snipe, Flew away with his pipe, Which vexed the fat man of Bombay. They that wash on Monday, Have all the week to dry; They that wash on Tuesday, Are not so much awry; They that wash on Wednesday, Are not so much to blame; They that wash on Thursday, Wash for shame; They that wash on Friday, Wash in need; And they that wash on Saturday, Oh they are sluts indeed. Hub a dub, dub, Three men in a tub; And who do you think they be? The butcher, the baker, The candlestick maker; Turn 'em out, knaves all three. 70



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To market, to market, to buy a fat pig, Home again, home again, jiggety jig. To market, to market, to buy a fat hog, Home again, home again, jiggety jog. I would if I cou'd, If I cou'dn't, how cou'd I? I cou'dn't without I cou'd, cou.d I? Cou'd you, without you cou'd, cou'd ye? Cou'd ye, cou'd ye ? Cou'd you, without you cou'd, cou'd ye? 76



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IN SaThere was an old woman who lived in a shoe, She had so many children, she didn't know what to do, She gave them some broth, without any bread, She whipped them all round, and sent them to bed. 125



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TOM THUMB'S ALPHABET. A was an Archer, and shot at a frog, B was a Butcher, and had a great dog. C was a Captain, all covered with lace, D was a Drunkard, and had a red face. E was an Esquire, with pride on his brow, F was a Farmer, and followed the plow. G was a Gamester, who had but ill luck, H was a Hunter, and hunted a buck. I was an Innkeeper, who loved to bouse, J was a Joiner, and built up a house. K was King George, who once governed this land, L was a Lady, who had a white hand. M was a Miser, who hoarded up gold, N was a Nobleman, gallant and bold. O was au Oyster-man, and went about town, P was a Parson, and wore a black gown. Q was a Queen, and was fond of good flip, R was a Robber, and wanted a whip. S was a Sailor, and spent all he got, T was a Tinker, and mended a pot. U was a Usurer, a miserable elf, V was a Vintner, who drank all himself. W was a Watchman, and guarded the door, X was Expensive, and so became poor. Y was a Youth, that did not love school, Z was a Zany, a poor harmless fool





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Ride a cock horse To Banbury Cross To see little Jenny i Upon a white horse Rings on her fingers, Bells on her toes, She shall have music Wherever she goes. L NEW VERSION.' With bells on her gloves, And bells in her ears; She shall have music Where'er she appears. Cock a doodle doo I My dame has lost her shoe; My master's lost his fiddle stick, And don't know what to do. Cock a doodle doo! What is my dame to do? Till master finds his fiddle stick, She'll dance without her shoe. Shake a leg, wag a leg, when will you gang ? "At midsummer, mother, when the days are lang. 12



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SThe "Three Knights of Spain" is a game in which the children form themselves in two parties, one representing a courtly dame and her daughters, the other the suitors of the daughters. The last party, moving backwards and forwards, with their arms entwined, ap. proach and recede from the mother party, which is stationary, singing to a very sweet air. Suitors. We are three brethren out of Spain, Come to court your daughter Jane. Mother. NMy daughter Jane she is too young, And has not learned her mother tongue. Suitors. Be she young or be she old, For her beauty she must be sold; So fare you well, my lady gay, We'll call again another day. Mother. Turn back, turn back, thou scornful knight, And rub thy spurs till they be bright. S.. Suitors. Of my spurs take you no thought, For in this town they were not boughtSo fare you well my lady gay, We'll call again another day. 118



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One misty, moisty morning, When cloudy was the weather, I chanced to meet an old man clothed all in leather. And how do you dc again? The North Wind doth blow, OAnd we shall have snow, And what will poor Robin do then ? e He will hopbe to a barn, How do you do and his w do you dog, A a Poor th in1g ~ ewilhp oa an





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And then the gold egg The knave got the goose, Was thrown into the sea; Which he vowed he'd kill, But Jack he jumped in, Resolving at once And got it back presently. His pockets to fill. Jack's mother came in, And caught the goose soon, And mounting its back, Flew up to the moon. Merry are the bells, and merry would they ring, Merry was myself, and merry could I sing; With a merry sing-song, happy, gay, and free, And a merry ding-dong, happy let us be! Waddle goes your gait, and hollow are your hose Noddle goes your pate, and purple is your nose Merry is your sing-song, happy, gay, and free, With a merry ding-dong, happy let us be I Merry have we met, and merry have we been, Merry let us part, and merry meet again; With our merry sing-song, happy, gay, and free, And a merry ding-dong, happy let us bel so



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,Then proud as could be, did he SHnsh-a-bye baby, on the tree top, Slen the wind blows the cradle will rock, When the bough breaks, the .cradle will fall, S Down comes hush-a-bye, baby, and all. 93



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4 Il -, K, Littko Bo-Peep and her Sheep, befor-e she lost them. ii3



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There was a little man, and he had a little gun, And his bullets were made of lead, lead, lead; lHe shot Johnny Sprig through the middle of his wig, And knocked it right off his head, head, head. Division is as bad, The Rule of Three perplexes And me, And Practice drives me mad. SLeg over leg, / As the dog went to Dover, When he came to a stile, Jump he went over. 115