Nursery rhymes

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Material Information

Title:
Nursery rhymes
Series Title:
Playtime toy books
Physical Description:
12 p : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Frederick Warne and Co ( Publisher )
Publisher:
Frederick Warne & Co.
Place of Publication:
London
New York
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Nursery rhymes -- 1880   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1880   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1880
Genre:
Nursery rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
Netherlands

Notes

General Note:
Title from cover.
General Note:
Includes publisher's advertisement.
General Note:
Printed in Holland.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
General Note:
"Untearable" cover.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001869997
oclc - 29149917
notis - AJU4674
System ID:
UF00025811:00001

Related Items

Related Items:
Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Full Text
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NURSERY RHYMES.Little Bo-peep has lost her sheep,And can't tell where to find them;Leave them alone, and they'll come home,And bring their tails behind them.Little Bo-peep fell fast asleep,And dreamt she heard them bleating; .And when she awoke, she found it a joke,For they were all still fleeting.Then up she took her little crook,Determined for to find them;She found them, indeed, but it made herheart bleed, Little Tommy Tittlemouse- For they'd left all their tails behind 'em. lived in a little house;He caught fishesLittle Boy Blue come blow up your horn, in other men's dishes.The sheep's in the meadow, the cow's inthe corn ;Sr Little Polly FlindersWhere's the little boy that looks after the .sheep ? Sate among the cindersHe's under the hay-cock fast asleep. Warming her prettylittle toes 1Her mother came.... and caught her,` *0\ .' And whippedher little daughter,For spoilingher nice new clothes.Little Miss Muffet,' She sat on a tuffet,Eating her curds and whey;-- But there came a greatspiderWho sat down beside her,And frightened Miss Muffetaway.The Baldwin Library"N IUniv" itr


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NURSERY RHYMES.Sing a song of sixpence,S. A p o c k e t f u l l o f r y e ;Four-a nd-twenty blackbirdsBaked in a pie;When the pie was open'dj The birds began to sing;Was not that a dainty dishTo set before the king?The king was in his counting-houseCounting out his money;The queen was in the parlourEating bread and honey;The maid was in the gardenThe Queen of Hearts, she made some tarts, Hanging out the clothes,All on a summer's day; There came a little blackbird,The Knave of Hearts, he stole those tarts, And snapt off her nose.And took them clean away.The King of Hearts, called for those tarts,And beat the Knave full sore;The Knave of Hearts brought back thosetarts,And vowed he'd steal no more.Old king Cole was a merry old soul,And a merry old soul was he;./ He called for his pipe,And he called for his bowl,And he called for his fiddlers three.3i Each fiddler had a very fine fiddle,A very fine fiddle had he.. ......... 1.. Oh, there's none so rare as can compareWith king Cole and his fiddlers three.


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NURSERY RHYMES.Goosey, goosey, gander,Where shall I wander ?Up stairs, down stairs,And in my lady's chamber;There I met an old manThat would not say hisprayers;I took him by the left leg,And threw him down stairs.Hickory, Dickory, Dock,The mouse ran up the clock, Goosey, goosey gander,The clock struck one, Who stands yonder?The mouse did run; Little Betsy Baker;Hickory, Dickory, Dock. Take her up, and shake her.Leg over leg, I like little pussy,Her coat is so warm,As the dog went to Dover; And i her' And if I don t hurt her,When he came to a stile,Shell do me no harmShell do me no harm;Jump he went over. So I'll not pull her tail,Nor drive her away,But Pussy and IVery gently will play.Bah, bah, black sheep,SI-ave you any wool ?ji .Yes, marry, have I,Three bags full:- One for my master,And one for my dame,SBut none for the little boyWho cries in the lane.


NURSERY RHYMES.Some little mice sat in a barn to spin,Pussy came by and popped her head in; ,Shall I come in and cut your threads off ?Oh no! kind sir, you would snap ourheads off.Snail, snail, come out of your hole, There was a rat, for want of stairs,Or else I will beat you as black as a coal. Went down a rope to say his prayers.I had a little pony,His name was Dapple-gray,I lent him to a lady,. To ride a mile away;S... ..She whipped him, she slashed him,She rode him through the mire;I would not lend my pony nowFor all the lady's hire.Little cock robin peep'd out of his cabin.To see the cold winter come in," Tit for tat, what matter for that,"He'll hide his head under his wing IThere was an owl lived in an oak, A gunner chanced to conme that way,Wisky, wasky, weedle; Wisky, wasky, weedle ;And every word he ever spoke Says he, " I'll shoot you, silly bird."Was fiddle, faddle, feedle. Fiddle, faddle, feedle.Hey! diddle, diddle,The cat and the fiddle,The cow jumped over the moon;The little dog laugh'dTo see the sport,While the dish ran away withthe spoon.


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NURSERY RHYMES.I saw a ship a-sailing,A-sailing on the sea,And, oh it was all ladenWith pretty things for thee.There were comfits in the cabinAnd apples in the holdThe sails were made of silk,And the masts were made of gold."The four-and-twenty sailorsThere was a crooked man, and he went That stood between the decks,S. Were four-and-twenty white mice,a crooked mile, With chains about their necks.He found a crooked sixpence against acrooked stile; I The captain was a duck,,. .With a packet on his back;He bought a crooked cat, which caught a With a packet on his back;"And when the ship began to move,crooked mouse, The captain said, " Quack, quack!"And they all lived together in a littlecrooked house.The man in the moon came tumblingdown,There was an old woman of Leeds, And asked his way to Norwich,Who spent all her time in good deeds ; He went by the south and burnt hisShe worked for the poor mouthTill her fingers were sore, With supping cold pease-porridge.This pious old woman of Leeds!Jack Sprat could eat no fat,His wife could eat no lean;And so, betwixt them both, you see,They made the platter clean.My little old man and I fell out,I'll tell you what 'twas all aboutI had money and he had none,And that's the way the noise begun.


NURSERY RHYMES.Humpty-Dumpty sat on a wall,Humpty-Dumpty had a great fall;All the king's horses, and all 'the king'smen,... Cannot put Humpty- Dumpty togetheragain.-An Egg.,, Flour of England, fruit of Spain,Met together in a shower of rain ;Put in a bag, tied round with a string,If you'll tell me this riddle, I'll give you .a ring.", -A Plum Pudding."Little Nancy Etticoat,Hick-a-more, Hack-a-more, In a white petticoat,On the king's kitchen door; And a red nose;All the king's horses, The longer she stands,And all the king's men, The shorter she grows.A nd all th e king s m n -A Candle.Couldn't drive Hick-a-moreOff the king's kitchen door. Formed long ago, yet made to-day,-Sunshine. Employed while others sleep;What few would like to give away,Black we are, but much admired : -Nor any wish to keep.Men seek for us till they are tired. -A Bed.We tire the horse, but comfort man ;Tell me this riddle if you can. ..-Coals.As I went through the garden gap,Who should I meet but Dick Red-cap! IA stick in his hand, a stone in his throat,If you tell me this riddle I'll give youa groat.And my head is nailed on at the top : P-A Turnstile.* X ,312


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NURSERY RHYMES.Simple Simon met a pieman, The North wind doth blow,Going to the fair; And we shall have snow,Says Simple Simon to the pieman, And what will poor Robin do then ?Let me taste your ware. He will hop to a barn,Says the pieman to Simple Simon, And to keep himself warm" Show me first your penny." Will hide his head under his wing,Says Simple Simon to the pieman, Poor thing." Indeed I have not any."Polly, put the kettle on,Simple Simon went a-fishing, Polly, put the kettle on,For to catch a whale; Polly, put the kettle on,All the water he had got oy t th ,Was in his mother's pail. And let's drink tea.He went to shoot a wild duck, Sukey, take it off again,But the wild duck flew away; Sukey, take it off again,Says Simon, " I can't hit him, Sukey, take it off again,Because he will not stay." They're all gone away.See, saw, Margery Daw, Ride a cock-horse to Banbury Cross,Jenny shall have a new master; To see what Tommy can buy;She shall have but a penny a day, A penny white loaf, a penny white cake,Because she can't work any faster. And a twopenny apple pie.


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NURSERY RHYMES.Where are you going to, my pretty maid?I'm going a-milking, sir, she said.May I go. with you, my pretty maidYou're kindly welcome, sir, she said.What is your father, my pretty maid ?My father's a farmer, sir, she said.Say, will you marry me, my pretty maid ?Yes, if you please, kind sir, she said,What is your fortune, my pretty maid ?My face is my fortune, sir, she said.Then I won't marry you, my pretty maid!Nobody asked you, sir! she said.Curly locks, curly locks, wilt thou bemine ?Thou shalt not wash dishes, nor yet feedthe swineBut sit on a cushion, and sew a fineseam,And feed upon strawberries, sugar, andcream.Willy boy, Willy boy, where are youI will go with you if I may.I am going to the meadows, to see themmowing.Daffy-Down-Dilly has come up to town, I am going to see them make the hay.In a yellow petticoat, and a green gown.I'll tell you a storyAbout Jack a Nory,And now my story's begun;I'll tell you anotherAbout Jack and his brother,-AND NOW MY STORY'S DONE.


7 ,m6YTIME TON BOOKS.ch ontaining numerous c oloure d and plain,-ad -ound in attractive tarn is ed'e v em.al orul with, this olmmeSOME'ALPHABET., i' FARMYARD ALPHAdET.,;MRS~FtRY;-RHYME A 8C;QAETALPHABET.f_`W HITT INGTON.K8 AND JUDY.`XXPLE PIE.''4,'OUND THE CIRCUS.11_I HND JUDY.OURtTE, ANIMALS..'NBOOTS.fRIDING HOOD.SERY RHYMES,G~iTH E R U BBARD.INTO Z-00LAND.tAt PL'YY HOL.0A rU-NE BOOK OF TRADES.L E HOUSE WE LIVE IN.ERY NUMBERS.'2D ONE Ak' TWO.''tOF FUN AND FROLIC.F, NNY FAILNDS.AOW wow,ELLAlt EWONDE4.0L LAMP.tbogo maiked* are ako'kepit inLXE N 0R lNfkERS 'RU-TlBLE


Full Text

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NURSERY RHYMES. Little Bo-peep has lost her sheep, And can't tell where to find them; Leave them alone, and they'll come home, And bring their tails behind them. Little Bo-peep fell fast asleep, And dreamt she heard them bleating; And when she awoke, she found it a joke, For they were all still fleeting. Then up she took her little crook, Determined for to find them; She found them, indeed, but it made her heart bleed, Little Tommy Tittlemouse -For they'd left all their tails behind 'em. lived in a little house; He caught fishes Little Boy Blue come blow up your horn, in other men's dishes. The sheep's in the meadow, the cow's in the corn ; Sr Little Polly Flinders Where's the little boy that looks after the .inde sheepSate among the cinders He's under the hay-cock fast asleep. Warming her pretty little toes 1 Her mother came ..and caught her, S*7 g J And whipped her little daughter, For spoiling her nice new clothes. Little Miss Muffet, She sat on a tuffet, Eating her curds and whey; But there came a great spider Who sat down beside her, And frightened Miss Muffet away. The Baldwin Library "N -IUniv" itr mBof ~. rs~da



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NURSERY RHYMES. I saw a ship a-sailing, A-sailing on the sea, And, oh it was all laden With pretty things for thee. SThere were comfits in the cabin SAnd apples in the hold; The sails were made of silk, SAnd the masts were made of gold. The four-and-twenty sailors That stood between the decks, There was a crooked man, and he went That stood between the decks SWere four-and-twenty white mice, a crooked mile, SWith chains about their necks. He found a crooked sixpence against a crooked stile; The captain was a duck, .With a packet on his back; He bought a crooked cat, which caught a W a "And when the ship began to move, crooked mouse, The captain said, Quack, quack!" And they all lived together in a little crooked house. The man in the moon came tumbling down, There was an old woman of Leeds, And asked his way to Norwich, Who spent all her time in good deeds; He went by the south and burnt his She worked for the poor mouth Till her fingers were sore, With supping cold pease-porridge. This pious old woman of Leeds! Jack Sprat could eat no fat, His wife could eat no lean; And so, betwixt them both, you see, They made the platter clean. My little old man and I fell out, I'll tell you what 'twas all about I had money and he had none, And that's the way the noise begun.



PAGE 1

7 m6 iIN !( YTIME TO BOOKS. ch ontaining numerous c oloure d and plain ,-ad -ound in attractive tarn is ed'e v em. al orul with, this olmme SOME'ALPHABET. i' FARMYARD ALPHAdET. ,;MRS~FtRY;-RHYME A 8C; QAETALPHABET. f_`W HITT INGTON. K8 AND JUDY. `XXPLE PIE. ''4,'OUND THE CIRCUS. 11_I HND JUDY. OURtTE, ANIMALS.. 'NBOOTS. fRIDING HOOD. SERY RHYMES, G~iTH E R U BBARD. INTO Z-00LAND. tAt PL'Y Y HOL.0A rU-N E BOOK OF TRADES. L E HOUSE WE LIVE IN. ERY NUMBERS. '2D ONE Ak' TWO. ''tOF FUN AND FROLIC. F, NNY FAILNDS. AOW wow, ELLA lt EWONDE4.0L LAMP. tbog maiked* are ako'kepit in XE N R' NfERS RU_,TIBLE sx~~1 :;7: AIL ~



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NURSERY RHYMES. SHumpty-Dumpty sat on a wall, Humpty-Dumpty had a great fall; All the king's horses, and all'the king's men, .Cannot put Humpty-Dumpty together again. -An Egg. Flour of England, fruit of Spain, Met together in a shower of rain ; Put in a bag, tied round with a string, If you'll tell me this riddle, I'll give you a ring. "-A Plum Pudding. "Little Nancy Etticoat, Hick-a-more, Hack-a-more, In a white petticoat, On the king's kitchen door; And a red nose; All the king's horses, The longer she stands, And all the king's men, The shorter she grows. A nd all th e king s m n -A Candle. Couldn't drive Hick-a-more Off the king's kitchen oor. Formed long ago, yet made to-day, -Sunshine. Employed while others sleep; What few would like to give away, Black we are, but much admired: Nor any wish to keep. Men seek for us till they are tired. -A Bed. We tire the horse, but comfort man ; Tell me this riddle if you can. -Coals. As I went through the garden gap, Who should I meet but Dick Red-cap! A stick in his hand, a stone in his throat, If you tell me this riddle I'll give you a groat. And my head is nailed on at the top -' '\ P -A Turnstile. .X -,312



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NURSERY RHYMES. ^ Some little mice sat in a barn to spin, Pussy came by and popped her head in; Shall I come in and cut your threads off? Oh no! kind sir, you would snap our heads off. Snail, snail, come out of your hole, There was a rat, for want of stairs, Or else I will beat you as black as a coal. Went down a rope to say his prayers. I had a little pony, I .His name was Dapple-gray, I lent him to a lady, To ride a mile away; ..She whipped him, she slashed him, She rode him through the mire; S. I w ould not lend m y pony now For all the lady's hire. Little cock robin peep'd out of his cabin. "To see the cold winter come in, ..... -:. T it fo r tat, w h a t m atter fo r th at, "He'll hide his head under his wing I There was an owl lived in an oak, A gunner chanced to cone that way, Wisky, wasky, weedle; Wisky, wasky, weedle; And every word he ever spoke Says he, I'll shoot you, silly bird." Was fiddle, faddle, feedle. Fiddle, faddle, feedle. Hey! diddle, diddle, The cat and the fiddle, The cow jumped over the moon; The little dog laugh'd To see the sport, While the dish ran away with ": the spoon.



PAGE 1

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NURSERY RHYMES. Simple Simon met a pieman, The North wind doth blow, Going to the fair; And we shall have snow, Says Simple Simon to the pieman, And what will poor Robin do then ? Let me taste your ware. He will hop to a barn, Says the pieman to Simple Simon, And to keep himself warm Show me first your penny." Will hide his head under his wing, Says Simple Simon to the pieman, Poor thing. Indeed I have not any." Polly, put the kettle on, Simple Simon went a-fishing, Polly, put the kettle on, For to catch a whale For to catch a whale; Polly, put the kettle on, All the water he had got And let's drnk te Was in his mother's pail. And let's drik tea. He went to shoot a wild duck, Sukey, take it off again, But the wild duck flew away; Sukey, take it off again, Says Simon, I can't hit him, Sukey, take it off again, Because he will not stay." They're all gone away. ISI See, saw, Margery Daw, Ride a cock-horse to Banbury Cross, Jenny shall have a new master; To see what Tommy can buy; She shall have but a penny a day, A penny white loaf, a penny white cake, Because she can't work any faster. And a twopenny apple pie.



PAGE 1

NURSERY RHYMES. Goosey, goosey, gander, Where shall I wander? Up stairs, down stairs, And in my lady's chamber; There I met an old man That would not say his prayers; I took him by the left leg, And threw him down stairs. Hickory, Dickory, Dock, The mouse ran up the clock, Goosey, goosey gander, The clock struck one, Who stands yonder? The mouse did run; Little Betsy Baker; Hickory, Dickory, Dock. Take her up, and shake her. Leg over leg, I like little pussy, g ....... Her coat is so warm, As the dog went to Dover; An i hr And if I don't hurt her, When he came to a stile, She'll do me no harm Shell do me no harm; Jump he went over. So I'll not pull her tail, i Nor drive her away, But Pussy and I Very gently will play. Bah, bah, black sheep, H ave you any wool ? Yes, marry, have I, Three bags full: One for my master, And one for my dame, SBut none for the little boy Who cries in the lane. f~'~P



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NURSERY RHYMES. Where are you going to, my pretty maid? I'm going a-milking, sir, she said. May I go. with you, my pretty maid? You're kindly welcome, sir, she said. What is your father, my pretty maid ? My father's a farmer, sir, she said. Say, will you marry me, my pretty maid ? Yes, if you please, kind sir, she said, What is your fortune, my pretty maid ? My face is my fortune, sir, she said. Then I won't marry you, my pretty maid! Nobody asked you, sir she said. Curly locks, curly locks, wilt thou be mine ? Thou shalt not wash dishes, nor yet feed the swine; But sit on a cushion, and sew a fine seam, And feed upon strawberries, sugar, and cream. Willy boy, Willy boy, where are you going? I will go with you if I may. I am going to the meadows, to see them mowing. Daffy-Down-Dilly has come up to town, I am going to see them make the hay. In a yellow petticoat, and a green gown. I'll tell you a story About Jack a Nory, And now my story's begun ; I'll tell you another About Jack and his brother,AND NOW MY STORY'S DONE.



PAGE 1

NURSERY RHYMES. S .Sing a song of sixpence, S. A pocket full of rye ; Four-a nd-twenty blackbirds Baked in a pie; S;When the pie was open'd jI The birds began to sing; SWas not that a dainty dish To set before the king? "The king was in his countinghouse Counting out his money; The queen was in the parlour Eating bread and honey; The maid was in the garden The Queen of Hearts, she made some tarts, Hanging out the clothes, All on a summer's day; There came a little blackbird, The Knave of Hearts, he stole those tarts, And snapt off her nose. And took them clean away. The King of Hearts, called for those tarts, And beat the Knave full sore; The Knave of Hearts brought back those tarts, And vowed he'd steal no more. Old king Cole was a merry old soul, And a merry old soul was he; .He called for his pipe, And he called for his bowl, And he called for his fiddlers three. 3 Each fiddler had a very fine fiddle, SA very fine fiddle had he. .......... .Oh, there's none so rare as can compare With king Cole and his fiddlers three.