• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 How to use this soil survey
 Table of Contents
 Foreword
 General nature of the county
 General soil map units
 Detailed soil map units
 Use and management of the...
 Soil properties
 Classification of the soils
 Soil series and their morpholo...
 Formation of the soils
 Reference
 Glossary
 Tables
 General soil map
 Index to map sheets
 Map






Title: Soil survey of Taylor County, Florida
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00025745/00001
 Material Information
Title: Soil survey of Taylor County, Florida
Physical Description: 311 p., 3, 69 folded p. of plates : ill. (some col.), maps (some col.) ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Natural Resources Conservation Service
Publisher: The Service
Place of Publication: Washington D.C.?
Publication Date: [2000]
 Subjects
Subject: Soil surveys -- Florida -- Taylor County   ( lcsh )
Soils -- Maps -- Florida -- Taylor County   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (p. 177-179).
Statement of Responsibility: United States Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service ; in cooperation with University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Agricultural Experiment Stations; and Soil and Water Science Department; and the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: Shipping list no.: 2001-0099-P.
General Note: "Issued 2000"--P. 7.
General Note: Includes index to map sheets.
Funding: U.S. Department of Agriculture Soil Surveys
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00025745
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Government Documents Department, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 003481961
oclc - 45878838
notis - ANN2484

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    How to use this soil survey
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Foreword
        Page 9
        Page 10
    General nature of the county
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        How this survey was made
            Page 15
        Map unit composition
            Page 16
    General soil map units
        Page 17
        Soils on rises and knolls and in depressions
            Page 17
            Ortega-Kershaw-Ridgewood
                Page 17
            Ridgewood-Pamlico-Ortega
                Page 18
            Albany-Otela-Surrency
                Page 18
        Soils in areas of flatwoods, on flats, in depressions, and on flood plains
            Page 19
            Leon-Pamlico-Wesconnett
                Page 19
            Chaires-Meadowbrook-Clara
                Page 20
            Sapelo-Surrency-Plummer
                Page 21
            Wekiva-Tooles-Chaires and similar soils
                Page 22
        Soils in depressions, on flood plains, and in tidal marshes
            Page 22
            Dorovan-Pamlico-Sapelo
                Page 22
            Bayvi
                Page 23
        Broad land use considerations
            Page 23
            Page 24
    Detailed soil map units
        Page 25
        Clara and Osier fine sands
            Page 26
        Chaires fine sand
            Page 27
        Leon fine sand
            Page 28
            Page 29
        Meadowbrook fine sand
            Page 30
        Sapelo fine sand
            Page 31
            Page 32
        Mandarin-Hurricane complex, 0 to 3 percent slopes
            Page 33
        Ortega fine sand, 0 to 5 percent slopes
            Page 34
        Hurricane fine sand, 0 to 3 percent slopes
            Page 35
        Chipley-Lynn Haven, depressional-Boulogne complex, 0 to 3 percent slopes
            Page 36
            Page 37
        Ridgewood fine sand, 0 to 3 percent slopes
            Page 38
        Lutterloh-Ridgewood complex, 0 to 3 percent slopes
            Page 39
            Page 40
        Ousley-Leon-Clara complex, 0 to 3 percent slopes, occasionally flooded
            Page 41
        Otela-Ortega-Lutterloh complex, 0 to 5 percent slopes
            Page 42
            Page 43
        Melvina-Mandarin complex, 0 to 3 percent slopes
            Page 44
        Kershaw fine sand, 0 to 8 percent slopes
            Page 45
        Ocilla sand
            Page 46
        Melvina-Moriah-Lutterloh complex
            Page 47
            Page 48
        Albany sand, 0 to 5 percent slopes
            Page 49
        Pottsburg fine sand
            Page 50
            Page 51
        Resota-Hurricane complex, 0 to 5 percent slopes
            Page 52
        Plummer fine sand
            Page 53
        Surrency, Starke, and Croatan soils, depressional
            Page 54
        Albany-Surrency, depressional, complex, 0 to 3 percent slopes
            Page 55
            Page 56
        Dorovan and Pamlico soils, depressional
            Page 57
        Wesconnett, Evergreen, and Pamlico soils, depressional
            Page 58
        Clara and Bodiford soils, frequently flooded
            Page 59
        Tooles, Meadowbrook, and Wekiva soils, frequently flooded
            Page 59
            Page 60
        Tooles and Meadowbrook soils, depressional
            Page 61
        Clara and Meadowbrook soils, depressional
            Page 62
        Lutterloh fine sand, limestone substratum
            Page 62
            Page 63
            Page 64
        Tooles-Meadowbrook complex
            Page 65
        Chaires fine sand, limestone substratum
            Page 66
        Pits
            Page 67
        Wekiva-Tennille-Tooles complex, occasionally flooded
            Page 67
            Page 68
        Seaboard-Bushnell-Matmon complex, 0 to 3 percent slopes
            Page 69
        Tooles-Nutall complex, frequently flooded
            Page 70
        Clara, depressional-Clara-Meadowbrook complex, occasionally flooded
            Page 71
            Page 72
        Bayvi muck, frequently flooded
            Page 73
        Meadowbrook-Tooles-Clara, depressional, complex
            Page 74
            Page 75
        Arents, moderately wet, rarely flooded
            Page 76
        Sapelo fine sand
            Page 77
        Leon mucky fine sand
            Page 77
        Arents, sanitary landfill
            Page 78
        Chaires, limestone substratum, complex, rarely flooded
            Page 79
        Wekiva-Tooles, depressional-Tennille complex, rarely flooded
            Page 80
            Page 81
        Tooles-Tennille-Wekiva complex, depressional
            Page 82
        Steinhatchee fine sand
            Page 83
        Tooles-Wekiva complex
            Page 84
        Yellowjacket and Maurepas mucks, frequently flooded
            Page 85
        Yellowjacket and Maurepas mucks, depressional
            Page 86
        Matmon-Wekiva-Rock outcrop complex, occasionally flooded
            Page 87
        Eunola, Goldhead, and Tooles fine sands, commonly flooded
            Page 88
            Page 89
        Chiefland-Chiefland, frequently flooded, complex
            Page 90
        Leon fine sand, rarely flooded
            Page 91
        Chaires fine sand, rarely flooded
            Page 92
        Chipley sand, 0 to 5 percent slopes
            Page 93
        Mascotte sand
            Page 94
            Page 95
            Page 96
    Use and management of the soils
        Page 97
        Woodland management and productivity
            Page 97
            Page 98
            Page 99
        Grazing lands
            Page 100
        Windbreaks and environmental plantings
            Page 101
        Crops and pasture
            Page 101
            Yields per acre
                Page 102
            Land capability classes
                Page 102
        Hydric soils
            Page 103
        Ecological communities
            Page 104
            Page 105
            Page 106
        Prime farmland
            Page 107
        Recreation
            Page 107
            Page 108
        Wildlife habitat
            Page 109
        Engineering
            Page 110
            Building site development
                Page 111
            Sanitary facilities
                Page 111
            Construction materials
                Page 112
            Water management
                Page 113
                Page 114
    Soil properties
        Page 115
        Engineering index properties
            Page 115
        Physical and chemical properties
            Page 116
        Soil and water features
            Page 117
            Page 118
        Physical, chemical, and mineralogical analyses of selected soils
            Page 119
            Page 120
        Engineering index test data
            Page 121
            Page 122
    Classification of the soils
        Page 123
    Soil series and their morphology
        Page 123
        Albany series
            Page 123
        Bayvi series
            Page 124
        Bodiford series
            Page 125
        Boulogne series
            Page 126
        Bushnell series
            Page 127
        Chaires series
            Page 128
        Chiefland series
            Page 129
        Chipley series
            Page 130
        Clara series
            Page 131
        Croatan series
            Page 131
        Dorovan series
            Page 132
        Eunola series
            Page 132
        Evergreen series
            Page 133
        Goldhead series
            Page 134
        Hurricane series
            Page 135
        Kershaw series
            Page 136
        Leon series
            Page 136
        Lutterloh series
            Page 137
        Lynn Haven series
            Page 138
        Mandarin series
            Page 139
        Mascotte series
            Page 140
        Matmon series
            Page 141
        Maurepas series
            Page 142
        Meadowbrood series
            Page 142
            Page 143
            Page 144
            Page 145
            Page 146
        Melvina series
            Page 147
        Moriah series
            Page 148
        Nutall series
            Page 149
        Ocilla series
            Page 150
        Ortega series
            Page 151
        Osier series
            Page 152
        Otela series
            Page 153
        Ousley series
            Page 154
        Pamlico series
            Page 155
        Plummer series
            Page 155
        Pottsburg series
            Page 156
        Resota series
            Page 157
        Ridgewood series
            Page 158
        Sapelo series
            Page 158
        Seaboard series
            Page 159
        Starke series
            Page 160
        Steinhatchee series
            Page 161
        Surrency series
            Page 162
        Tennille series
            Page 163
        Tooles series
            Page 163
        Wekiva series
            Page 164
        Wesconnett series
            Page 165
        Yellowjacket series
            Page 166
            Page 167
            Page 168
    Formation of the soils
        Page 169
        Factors of soil formation
            Page 169
        Parent material
            Page 169
        Climate
            Page 169
        Plants and animals
            Page 169
        Relief
            Page 170
        Time
            Page 170
        Processes of horizon differentiation
            Page 170
        Geomorphology
            Page 171
            Page 172
            Page 173
            Page 174
            Page 175
            Page 176
    Reference
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
    Glossary
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
    Tables
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195 (MULTIPLE)
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
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        Page 270
        Page 271
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        Page 273
        Page 274
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        Page 276
        Page 277
        Page 278
        Page 279
        Page 280
        Page 281
        Page 282
        Page 283
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        Page 285
        Page 286
        Page 287
        Page 288
        Page 289
        Page 290
        Page 291
        Page 292
        Page 293
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        Page 304
        Page 305
        Page 306
        Page 307
        Page 308
        Page 309
        Page 310
        Page 311
    General soil map
        Page 312
    Index to map sheets
        Page 313
        Page 314
    Map
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
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        Page 69
Full Text


USDA United States
SDepartment of
Agriculture
Natural
Resources
Conservation
Service


In cooperation with
the University of Florida.
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences,
Agricultural Experiment
Stations, and
Soil and Water Science
Department; and
the Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer
Services


Soil Survey of

Taylor County,

Florida




















How to Use This Soil Survey


General Soil Map

The general soil map, which is a color map, shows the survey area divided into groups of associated soils called
general soil map units. This map is useful in planning the use and management of large areas.

To find information about your area of interest, locate that area on the map, identify the name of the map unit in the
area on the color-coded map legend, then refer to the section General Soil Map Units for a general description of
the soils in your area.


Detailed Soil Maps

The detailed soil maps can be useful in planning the use and
management of small areas.


To find information about your area
of interest, locate that area on the
Index to Map Sheets. Note the
number of the map sheet and turn
to that sheet.

Locate your area of interest on
the map sheet. Note the map unit
symbols that are in that area. Turn
to the Contents, which lists the
map units by symbol and name
and shows the page where each
map unit is described.

The Contents shows which table
has data on a specific land use for
each detailed soil map unit. Also
see the Contents for sections of
this publication that may address
your specific needs.


44 13 5
. 17. D. .t8 9 -S
INDEX TO MAP SHEETS


MAP SHEET


AREA OF INTEREST
NOTE: Map unit symbols in a soil
survey may consist only of numbers or
letters, or they may be a combination
of numbers and letters.


MAP SHEET





















This soil survey is a publication of the National Cooperative Soil Survey, a joint effort
of the United States Department of Agriculture and other Federal agencies, State
agencies including the Agricultural Experiment Stations, and local agencies. The Natural
Resources Conservation Service (formerly the Soil Conservation Service) has
leadership for the Federal part of the National Cooperative Soil Survey.
Major fieldwork for this soil survey was completed in 1994. Soil names and
descriptions were approved in 1998. Unless otherwise indicated, statements in this
publication refer to conditions in the survey area in 1995.This survey was made
cooperatively by the Natural Resources Conservation Service and the University of
Florida's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Agricultural Experiment Stations,
and Soil and Water Science Department; the Florida Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services; and the Florida Department of Transportation.The survey is part of
the technical assistance furnished to the Taylor County Soil and Water Conservation
District. The Taylor County Board of County Commissioners contributed office space for
the soil survey project office.
Soil maps in this survey may be copied without permission. Enlargement of these
maps, however, could cause misunderstanding of the detail of mapping. If enlarged,
maps do not show the small areas of contrasting soils that could have been shown at a
larger scale.
The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination in all its programs
and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, disability,
political beliefs, sexual orientation, or marital or family status. (Not all prohibited bases
apply to all programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for
communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should
contact USDA's TARGET Center at (202) 720-2600 (voice and TDD).
To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights,
Room 326-W, Whitten Building, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C.
20250-9410 or call (202) 720-5964 (voice and TDD). USDA is an equal opportunity
provider and employer.


Cover: A nursery in an area of Ortega fine sand, 0 to 5 percent slopes, where pine seeds are
planted and grown to seedlings.


Additional information about the Nation's natural resources is available on the
Natural Resources Conservation Service home page on the World Wide Web. The
address is http://www.nrcs.usda.gov (click on "Technical Resources").

















Contents


Cover .................................................. ............. 1
How to UseThis Soil Survey ................................ 3
C ontents ......................................................... 5
Forew ord ...................................... .................... 9
General Nature of the County ................................ 11
How This Survey Was Made.............................. 15
Map Unit Composition ....................................... .. 16
General Soil Map Units ...................................... ... 17
Soils on Rises and Knolls and in Depressions .... 17
1. Ortega-Kershaw-Ridgewood .................. 17
2. Ridgewood-Pamlico-Ortega ................... 18
3. Albany-Otela-Surrency ........................... 18
Soils in Areas of Flatwoods, on Flats, in
Depressions, and on Flood Plains .............. 19
4. Leon-Pamlico-Wesconnett ...................... 19
5. Chaires-Meadowbrook-Clara ................. 20
6. Sapelo-Surrency-Plummer...................... 21
7. Wekiva-Tooles-Chaires and Similar
Soils ................................................ ..... 22
Soils in Depressions, on Flood Plains, and in
Tidal Marshes ............................................... 22
8. Dorovan-Pamlico-Sapelo ........................ 22
9. Bayvi ................................... ............ 23
Broad Land Use Considerations ....................... 23
Detailed Soil Map Units....................................... .. 25
3-Clara and Osier fine sands .......................... 26
5-Chaires fine sand ........................................... 27
6-Leon fine sand ............................................. 28
8-Meadowbrook fine sand ............................... 30
9-Sapelo fine sand ........................................... 31
10-Mandarin-Hurricane complex, 0 to 3
percent slopes .............................................. 33
12-Ortega fine sand, 0 to 5 percent slopes....... 34
13-Hurricane fine sand, 0 to 3 percent
slopes ..................................... ............ 35
14-Chipley-Lynn Haven, depressional-
Boulogne complex, 0 to 3 percent slopes ..... 36
15-Ridgewood fine sand, 0 to 3 percent
slopes ......................................... ..... 38
16-Lutterloh-Ridgewood complex, 0 to 3
percent slopes ............................ ......... 39
17-Ousley-Leon-Clara complex, 0 to 3
percent slopes, occasionally flooded ............ 41
19-Otela-Ortega-Lutterloh complex, 0 to 5
percent slopes ........................ .......... .... 42


20-Melvina-Mandarin complex, 0 to 3
percent slopes ........................................... 44
21-Kershaw fine sand, 0 to 8 percent
slopes ...................................... ........... .. 45
22- Ocilla sand .............................................. 46
23-Melvina-Moriah-Lutterloh complex ............... 47
24-Albany sand, 0 to 5 percent slopes ........... 49
25- Pottsburg fine sand ...................................... 50
26-Resota-Hurricane complex, 0 to 5 percent
slopes ..................................... .......... .. 52
27-Plummer fine sand ................................... 53
28-Surrency, Starke, and Croatan soils,
depressional ................................... ......... 54
29-Albany-Surrency, depressional, complex,
0 to 3 percent slopes ................................ 55
30-Dorovan and Pamlico soils, depressional..... 57
33-Wesconnett, Evergreen, and Pamlico
soils, depressional ................................ .... 58
34-Clara and Bodiford soils, frequently
flooded ................................... ........... .. 59
35-Tooles, Meadowbrook, and Wekiva soils,
frequently flooded ..................................... .. 59
37-Tooles and Meadowbrook soils,
depressional .................................. ......... 61
38-Clara and Meadowbrook soils,
depressional ................................... ......... 62
40-Lutterloh fine sand, limestone
substratum ................................... .......... 62
41-Tooles-Meadowbrook complex ................ 65
45-Chaires fine sand, limestone substratum ..... 66
46- Pits ........................................ ........... ... 67
48-Wekiva-Tennille-Tooles complex,
occasionally flooded ............................. .... 67
49-Seaboard-Bushnell-Matmon complex,
0 to 3 percent slopes ................................ 69
51-Tooles-Nutall complex, frequently
flooded .................................... ........... .. 70
52-Clara, depressional-Clara-Meadowbrook
complex, occasionally flooded .................. 71
53-Bayvi muck, frequently flooded ................ 73
54-Meadowbrook-Tooles-Clara, depressional,
com plex ................................................... ... 74
55-Arents, moderately wet, rarely flooded......... 76
57- Sapelo fine sand ....................................... 77
58-Leon mucky fine sand ................................ 77





















59-Arents, sanitary landfill ............................ 78
60-Chaires, limestone substratum-
Meadowbrook, limestone substratum,
complex, rarely flooded............................. 79
61--Wekiva-Tooles, depressional-Tennille
complex, rarely flooded............................. 80
62-Tooles-Tennille-Wekiva complex,
depressional ............................................ 82
63-Steinhatchee fine sand ................................ 83
64-Tooles-Wekiva complex ............................... 84
65-Yellowjacket and Maurepas mucks,
frequently flooded ....................................... 85
67-Yellowjacket and Maurepas mucks,
depressional ............................................ 86
68-Matmon-Wekiva-Rock outcrop complex,
occasionally flooded ................................. 87
69-Eunola, Goldhead, and Tooles fine sands,
commonly flooded .................................... 88
70-Chiefland-Chiefland, frequently flooded,
com plex .................................... ........... 90
71-Leon fine sand, rarely flooded .................. 91
72-Chaires fine sand, rarely flooded .................. 92
73-Chipley sand, 0 to 5 percent slopes ............. 93
74-Mascotte sand ........................................... 94
Use and Management of the Soils.................... 97
Woodland Management and Productivity ............ 97
Grazing Lands ................................................. 100
Windbreaks and Environmental Plantings ......... 101
Crops and Pasture........................................... 101
Yields per Acre ........................................... 102
Land Capability Classes ............................. 102
Hydric Soils ..................................................... 103
Ecological Communities .................................. 104
Prime Farmland ............................................... 107
Recreation ..................................................... 107
W wildlife Habitat ................................................. 109
Engineering ... ................................... ......... 110
Building Site Development ............................ 111
Sanitary Facilities ................................... 111
Construction Materials .................................. 112
Water Management .................................... 113
Soil Properties ............................................ 115
Engineering Index Properties ............ .... 115
Physical and Chemical Properties ................... 116


Soil and W ater Features ................................... 117
Physical, Chemical, and Mineralogical
Analyses of Selected Soils........................ 119
Engineering Index Test Data............................. 121
Classification of the Soils .................................. 123
Soil Series and Their Morphology .......................... 123
Albany Series .................................................. 123
Bayvi Series .................................................... 124
Bodiford Series................................................. 125
Boulogne Series ............................................... 126
Bushnell Series ................................................ 127
Chaires Series ................................................. 128
Chiefland Series ............................................... 129
Chipley Series .................................................. 130
Clara Series ..................................................... 131
Croatan Series ................................................. 131
Dorovan Series ................................................ 132
Eunola Series ................................................... 132
Evergreen Series.............................................. 133
Goldhead Series ............................................... 134
Hurricane Series .............................................. 135
Kershaw Series ................................................ 136
Leon Series ...................................................... 136
Lutterloh Series ................................................ 137
Lynn Haven Series ........................................... 138
Mandarin Series ............................................... 139
Mascotte Series ................................................ 140
Matmon Series ................................................. 141
Maurepas Series .............................................. 142
Meadowbrook Series ........................................ 142
Melvina Series ..:.............................................. 147
Moriah Series ................................................. 148
Nutall Series .................................................... 149
Ocilla Series .................................................. 150
Ortega Series .................................................... 151
Osier Series ........................... ..................... 152
Otela Series ................ ..................... ......... 153
Ousley Series ........................ ............... 154
Pamlico Series ................................................... 155
Plummer Series................................................ 155
Pottsburg Series.............................................. 156
Resota Series............................... ......... 157
Ridgewood Series ............................................ 158
Sapelo Series .......................................... 158





















Seaboard Series ....................... ..... .....
Starke Series .........................................
Steinhatchee Series ..........................................
Surrency Series................................... ..........
Tennille Series ................................... ...........
Tooles Series .................................. .............
W ekiva Series ................................... ...........
Wesconnett Series .............................. ....
Yellowjacket Series ..........................................
Formation of the Soils .....................................
Factors of Soil Formation ...............................
Parent M material ................................................
C lim ate ............................................... ............
Plants and Animals ......................... .....
R elief ........................................... ...............
Tim e ................................................ .............
Processes of Horizon Differentiation ...............
Geom orphology ................................... .........
References ................................. ...............
G lossary ......................................... ..............
Tables ............................................ ...............
Table 1.-Temperature and Precipitation ...........
Table 2.-Freeze Dates in Spring and Fall .........
Table 3.-Growing Season ...............................


Table 4.-Acreage and Proportionate Extent
of the Soils .............................................. 196
Table 5.-Comprehensive Hydric Soils List....... 197
Table 6.-Woodland Management and
Productivity............................................... 208
Table 7.-Land Capability Classes and Yields
per Acre of Crops and Pasture................... 216
Table 8.-Recreational Development ................. 221
Table 9.- W wildlife Habitat ................................ 229
Table 10.-Building Site Development............. 235
Table 11.-Sanitary Facilities ............................ 243
Table 12.-Construction Materials .................... 252
Table 13.-Water Management ........................ 259
Table 14.-Engineering Index Properties ......... 268
Table 15.-Physical and Chemical Properties
of the Soils ............................................... 282
Table 16.-Soil and Water Features................. 291
Table 17.-Physical Analyses of Selected
Soils ......................................................... 296
Table 18.-Chemical Analyses of Selected
Soils ...................................... 301
Table 19.-Clay Mineralogy of Selected Soils... 307
Table 20.-Engineering Index Test Data ........... 309
Table 21.-Classification of the Soils .............. 311


Issued 2000


I I




















Foreword


This soil survey contains information that affects land use planning in this survey
area. It contains predictions of soil behavior for selected land uses. The survey also
highlights soil limitations, improvements needed to overcome the limitations, and the
impact of selected land uses on the environment.
This soil survey is designed for many different users. Farmers, ranchers, foresters,
and agronomists can use it to evaluate the potential of the soil and the management
needed for maximum food and fiber production. Planners, community officials,
engineers, developers, builders, and home buyers can use the survey to plan land use,
select sites for construction, and identify special practices needed to ensure proper
performance. Conservationists, teachers, students, and specialists in recreation, wildlife
management, waste disposal, and pollution control can use the survey to help them
understand, protect, and enhance the environment.
Various land use regulations of Federal, State, and local governments may impose
special restrictions on land use or land treatment.The information in this report is
intended to identify soil properties that are used in making various land use or land
treatment decisions. Statements made in this report are intended to help the land users
identify and reduce the effects of soil limitations that affect various land uses. The
landowner or user is responsible for identifying and complying with existing laws and
regulations.
Great differences in soil properties can occur within short distances. Some soils are
seasonally wet or subject to flooding. Some are shallow to bedrock. Some are too
unstable to be used as a foundation for buildings or roads. Clayey or wet soils are poorly
suited to use as septic tank absorption fields. A high water table makes a soil poorly
suited to basements or underground installations.
These and many other soil properties that affect land use are described in this soil
survey. Broad areas of soils are shown on the general soil map. The location of each soil
is shown on the detailed soil maps. Each soil in the survey area is described.
Information on specific uses is given for each soil. Help in using this publication and
additional information are available at the local office of the Natural Resources
Conservation Service or the Cooperative Extension Service.




T. Niles Glasgow
State Conservationist
Natural Resources Conservation Service
















Soil Survey of


Taylor County, Florida


By Frank C. Watts, Elmer L. Readle, David A. Dearstyne, and Robert L. Weatherspoon,
Natural Resources Conservation Service

Fieldwork by Robert Baldwin, Paul Belzer, Richard Benareck, Robert A. Casteel, Eddie
Cummings, David A. Dearstyne, Richard D. Ford, Charlie French, Gerome Gorton, Steve
Herriman, David A. Howell, Adam G. Hyde, David Johnson, Darrell E. Leach, Robert H.
Lisante, Kenneth J. Liudahl, Kenneth Monroe, Chris V. Noble, Doug Van Patten, Elmer L.
Readle, Richard Rolling, Todd Solem, Tom J. Solem, Kevin J. Sullivan, Darryl Trickier,
David Trochlell, and Robert L.Weatherspoon, Natural Resources Conservation Service

United States Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service,
in cooperation with
the University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Agricultural
Experiment Stations, and Soil and Water Science Department; and the Florida
Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services




TAYLOR COUNTY is on the coast of the Gulf of Mexico
in the northwestern part of the Florida Peninsula '
(fig. 1). It is bordered on the north by Madison County,
on the west by Jefferson County, on the south by Dixie
County, and on the east by Lafayette County. Taylor r-
County has an irregular outline; the Acuilla River forms -
part of the western border, and the Steinhatchee River
forms part of the southern border.
The total area of the county, including areas of
water, is 667,700 acres, or 1,055 square miles.The
county is about 44 miles long from north to south and
37 miles from east to west.

General Nature of the County
This section gives general information about the
county. It describes the climate, seasonal high water
tables, history and development, farming,
tables, history and development, farming, Figure 1.-Location of Taylor County in Florida.
transportation facilities, and mineral resources.

Climate the Gulf of Mexico on maximum temperatures in
summer and on minimum temperatures in winter is
The climate in Taylor County is characterized by pronounced along the coast but diminishes a few miles
long, hot, humid summers and mild winters (USDC, inland.
1990). It is favorable for the production of crops, Table 1 gives data on temperature and precipitation
livestock, and pine trees. The moderating influence of for the survey area as recorded at Perry, Florida, for






Soil Survey


the period 1961 to 1990. Table 2 shows probable dates
of the first freeze in fall and the last freeze in spring.
Table 3 provides data on length of the growing season.
In winter, the average temperature is 57 degrees F
and the average daily minimum temperature is 44
degrees F.The lowest temperature on record, which
occurred at Perry on January 21, 1985, is 7 degrees F.
In summer, the average temperature is 81 degrees and
the average daily maximum temperature is 91 degrees.
The highest recorded temperature, which occurred on
July 15, 1980, is 104 degrees F.
Of the total annual precipitation, 36 inches, or 62
percent, usually falls in April through September, which
includes the growing season for most crops. In 2 years
out of 10, the rainfall in April through September is less
than 19 inches. The heaviest 1-day rainfall during the
period of record was 10.26 inches at Perry on July 25,
1980.Thunderstorms occur on about 83 days each
year, and most occur in summer.
Growing degree days, shown in table 1, are
equivalent to "heat units." During the month, growing
degree days accumulate by the amount that the
average temperature each day exceeds a base
temperature (40 degrees F).The normal monthly
accumulation is used to schedule single or successive
plantings of a crop between the last freeze in spring
and the first freeze in fall.
Snowfall is rare. No measurable snowfall occurs in
99 percent of the winters. In 1 percent, the snowfall,
usually of short duration, is less than 1 inch.
The average relative humidity in midafternoon is
about 55 percent. Humidity is higher at night, and the
average at dawn is about 90 percent. The sun shines
65 percent of the time possible in summer and 60
percent in winter. The prevailing wind is from the south.
Average windspeed is highest, 8 miles per hour, in
spring.
Every few years a tropical storm or hurricane affects
the area. During a two or three day period, 15 or more
inches of precipitation can fall.


Seasonal High WaterTables

The seasonal high water table is the depth to free
water that stands in an unlined borehole for a
significant period of time (more than a few weeks)
during the wettest seasons of the year. In Taylor
County, the soils typically are wettest from late
December through March and from June through
September.These wet periods correspond to the
seasonally highest periods of rainfall. More rain falls in
the summer than in the winter; however, more
evapotranspiration occurs in the summer (SSSA,


1997). The driest part of the year is October through
the first part of December.This dry period corresponds
to the seasonally lowest period of rainfall. The second
driest part of the year is April and May. During these
months evapotranspiration rates are much greater than
in the winter, and although more rain falls than in
November and early December, less rain falls than in
winter or summer.

History and Development

Mary Lou Whitfield, historian, prepared this section.

Indians occupied Florida for thousands of years
before the arrival of the first European explorers. The
Indians were from five main groups: the Timucua,
Apalachee, Ais, Tekesta, and Calusa. The Timucua
Indians, who had fifteen different tribes, occupied the
area that is now Taylor County (Fernald, 1981).
In 1513, Juan Ponce de Leon landed on the coast of
what is now northeastern Florida and was credited with
discovering Florida. He named the land La Florida (La-
Flor-EE-da) for Pascua Florida, Spain's Easter Feast of
the Flowers (Florida Department of State, n.d.).When
Spain lost control of the area to the English in 1762,
the Timucuan Indians lost their tribal identify and were
absorbed by the Seminole Indian tribe. Spain regained
possession of the area in 1783 and encouraged
migration into Florida through land grants.
The early Spanish explorers are believed to have
established a mission on the lower Fenholloway River
in the area now known as the Thomas Mill Hammock
(Cash, 1948).
During the settlement period, the area supported a
tribe of Seminole Indians whom the settlers considered
a constant source of peril. General Andrew Jackson
was sent to punish these Seminole Indians for their
raids. His troops engaged them at Natural Bridge on
the Econfina River on April 12,1818 (Cash, 1948). No
other fighting in Taylor County was reported.
Florida became an American territory in 1821.
In 1838, General Zachary Taylor, for whom the
county was later named, commanded troops against
the warring Seminole Indians during the Seminole
Indian War of 1835-1842. He and his troops built five
forts on the Econfina, Fenholloway, and Steinhatchee
Rivers.
Florida became a state on March 3,1845.
In the early 1850's, the first settlement, "Pisgah,"
was established. A post office named "Fenholloway"
was established at Pisgah on May 6, 1854. It is
possible that one of the houses in Pisgah was the first
house in Taylor County made from sawed lumber
instead of being of log construction. This house was






Taylor County, Florida


used in the later part of the Civil War as headquarters
for Confederate Major Charles H. Canfield.
Taylor County, named in honor of President Zachary
Taylor, was partitioned from Madison County on
December 23, 1856, as Florida's 34th county. In 1860,
the first census of the county reported the population
at 1,384. The next census showed an increase of 99.
A post office named "Rose Head" was established in
the county on February 23, 1869. On May 28, 1875,
the name was changed to Perry.
The first turpentine still was built in 1899 about 5
miles north of Perry. Gum rosin was produced from the
large areas of virgin slash pine and longleaf pine in the
county.
The first railroad to enter the county was the South
Georgia Railway. It entered the county in 1902 from the
north. Other railroads entered the county to transport
timber products in the early 1900's from the east and
south. The only railroad still in the county is the
Southern Railway System, which uses the old route of
the South Georgia Railway.
Taylor County has grown slowly over the years. It
has remained mostly rural, dependent upon
commercial woodland production and agriculture.The
1990 census reported a population of 20,002. Of this
total, 8,231 were in the city of Perry.

Farming
Mary Lou Whitfield, historian, prepared this section.

The favorable climate and soils in Taylor County
attracted settlers from the southeastern states from
about 1815 to the late 1820's and early 1830's. During
the Civil War, beef cattle, hogs, and sugarcane were
grown for the troops. Also, salt was produced from
boiled-down seawater.
In the 1870's, agriculture in the county consisted of
small farms raising scrub cattle and hogs on an open
range. Cedar trees were cut along coastal swamps and
then dragged by teams of oxen or floated in streams to
the Gulf of Mexico. These cedar logs were rafted to
Cedar Key for processing into pencils.
The first timber mills in Taylor County processed red
cypress, yellow pine, or both. Pine was used for
building homes and other buildings; oak and cedar were
used for furniture. The wood was also processed for
automobile parts and skiing equipment.
Cotton was grown in the county following the Civil
War. It thrived until 1916 when the Mexican boll weevil
all but wiped it out.
In the 1920's, dipping cattle became compulsory for
the eradication of the Texas fever tick and thousands
of range cattle were sold off. These cattle were
restocked with Brahma, Hereford, and Angus beef


cattle, resulting in improved herds. Several dairy herds
of Jerseys and Guernseys were in operation for a
time.
In 1940, statewide legislation required fencing
livestock off public highways. In 1964, a county
referendum required stockholders to keep their stock
within fenced-in areas. This brought the open range to a
close.
In the early 1950's, a cellulose plant was
established at Foley, the former location of a wood-pulp
processing plant.
A wide variety of crops, including flue-cured
tobacco, corn, watermelons, peanuts, soybeans,
peaches, wheat, oats, rye grains, and field peas have
been grown in the county. These crops are still grown in
the county. Most of the cropland, however, has been
converted to pasture or the production of pine.
More than 20,500 acres in the county is used for
crops and pasture (University of Florida, 1994).The
acreage used for crops and pasture has gradually
decreased as land is used for urban development and
timber production.

Transportation Facilities

Taylor County is served by a good network of
county, State, and Federal highways. U.S. Highway 19
crosses the county in a north-south route, U.S.
Highway 27 crosses the county in a north-east route,
U.S. Highway 98 crosses the county in a west-south
route, and U.S. Highway 221 crosses the county north
from Perry. All of the highways pass through the Perry.
They generally follow the same routes as the first
"hardroads" constructed beginning in 1916. Numerous
forestry roads have been built throughout the county.
They facilitate the growing and harvesting of timber
and reforestation. They provide transportation to most
areas of the county.
The Seaboard Coast Line Railroad provides freight
transportation northward from Perry using the route of
the South Georgia Railway, which was the first railroad
to enter the county.
Regularly scheduled commercial air transportation is
not available in the county. A small local airport is in
Perry.

Mineral Resources

Taylor County contains deposits of several
economic mineral commodities. The most important of
these is dolostone. Other minerals of lesser potential
include limestone and sand. The economic potential
and mining status of each commodity are summarized
in the following paragraphs (Spencer, 1996).






Soil Survey


Figure 2.-An area of Wekiva-Tennille-Tooles complex, occasionally flooded, where the limestone bedrock is quarried for lime.
Lime is used to raise soil reaction and for road construction.


Dolomite
Shallow, dolomitized Suwannee Limestone is
present in the Cabbage Grove area (Townships 3 and 4
South; Ranges 4, 5, and 6 East) in the northwestern
part of Taylor County (fig. 2). This area is one of only
about five high-quality dolomite producing areas in
Florida (Schmidt, 1979). The dolomite in Taylor County
is mined primarily for use as road gravel. The rock is
extracted by dragline, crushed onsite, and trucked to
customers. Four companies operate in the Cabbage
Grove area.
Elsewhere in the county, private pits produce
dolomite on a sporadic, as-needed basis. The Florida
Department of Transportation operates a road-base pit
in Section 4, Township 5 South, Range 5 East, and a
private construction company maintains a pit
southwest of Perry. Although sufficient dolomite
reserves for continued commercial mining are present
in Taylor County, the lack of more extensive local
markets for the product precludes an extensive
industry in this commodity.
Limestone
The Ocala Limestone is near the surface under the
southernmost part of Taylor County. The economic


grade varies considerably from one area to another.
Although mining potential remains high, no companies
commercially mine limestone in the county. A private
construction company operates a private pit in the
Suwannee Limestone southwest of Perry, and another
corporation maintains two private road-base pits in the
southeastern part of the county. Low local demand
precludes extensive mining of this mineral.

Sand
A number of shallow private pits in Taylor County
produce fill sand. Pleistocene quartz sand deposits are
present as a blanket of variable thickness over most of
the county. Because of low local demand for sand
products, the potential for commercial mining is low.
Clay
Clay is sporadically present as a component of the
undifferentiated surficial sediments covering Taylor
County. Due to the impure nature of the clay, it is not
an economic commodity in the county.
Peat
Peat forms in a wet, reducing environment when the
rate of accumulation of organic materials exceeds the





Taylor County, Florida


rate of decomposition. Shallow wetlands in the San
Pedro Bay region in the northeastern part of Taylor
County provide potential sites of peat formation.
Although a peat survey has not been conducted in the
county, studies in adjacent counties indicate that the
peat formed in such areas is too thin to be of economic
interest (Davis, 1946; Bond, 1986).

How This Survey Was Made

This survey was made to provide information about
the soils and miscellaneous areas in the survey area.
The information includes a description of the soils and
miscellaneous areas and their location and a
discussion of their suitability, limitations, and
management for specified uses. Soil scientists
observed the steepness, length, and shape of the
slopes; the general pattern of drainage; the kinds of
crops and native plants; and the kinds of bedrock
(USDA, National Soil Survey Handbook; USDA, 1993).
They dug many holes to study the soil profile, which is
the sequence of natural layers, or horizons, in a soil.
The profile extends from the surface down into the
unconsolidated material in which the soil formed.The
unconsolidated material is devoid of roots and other
living organisms and has not been changed by other
biological activity.
The soils and miscellaneous areas in the survey
area are in an orderly pattern that is related to the
geology, landforms, relief, climate, and natural
vegetation of the area. Each kind of soil and
miscellaneous area is associated with a particular kind
of landform or with a segment of the landform. By
observing the soils and miscellaneous areas in the
survey area and relating their position to specific
segments of the landform, a soil scientist develops a
concept or model of how they were formed.Thus,
during mapping, this model enables the soil scientist to
predict with a considerable degree of accuracy the kind
of soil or miscellaneous area at a specific location on
the landscape.
Commonly, individual soils on the landscape merge
into one another as their characteristics gradually
change. To construct an accurate soil map, however,
soil scientists must determine the boundaries between
the soils. They can observe only a limited number of
soil profiles. Nevertheless, these observations,
supplemented by an understanding of the soil-
vegetation-landscape relationship, are sufficient to
verify predictions of the kinds of soil in an area and to
determine the boundaries.
Soil scientists recorded the characteristics of the
soil profiles that they studied. They noted color,
texture, size and shape of soil aggregates, kind and


amount of rock fragments, distribution of plant roots,
reaction, and other features that enable them to
identify soils. After describing the soils in the survey
area and determining their properties, the soil
scientists assigned the soils to taxonomic classes
(units). Taxonomic classes are concepts. Each
taxonomic class has a set of soil characteristics with
precisely defined limits. The classes are used as a
basis for comparison to classify soils systematically.
Soil taxonomy, the system of taxonomic classification
used in the United States, is based mainly on the kind
and character of soil properties and the arrangement of
horizons within the profile. After the soil scientists
classified and named the soils in the survey area, they
compared the individual soils with similar soils in the
same taxonomic class in other areas so that they
could confirm data and assemble additional data based
on experience and research.
While a soil survey is in progress, samples of some
of the soils in the area generally are collected for
laboratory analyses and for engineering tests. Soil
scientists interpret the data from these analyses and
tests as well as the field-observed characteristics and
the soil properties to determine the expected behavior
of the soils under different uses. Interpretations for all
of the soils are field tested through observation of the
soils in different uses and under different levels of
management. Some interpretations are modified to fit
local conditions, and some new interpretations are
developed to meet local needs. Data are assembled
from other sources, such as research information,
production records, and field experience of specialists.
For example, data on crop yields under defined levels
of management are assembled from farm records and
from field or plot experiments on the same kinds of
soil.
Predictions about soil behavior are based not only
on soil properties but also on such variables as climate
and biological activity. Soil conditions are predictable
over long periods of time, but they are not predictable
from year to year. For example, soil scientists can
predict with a fairly high degree of accuracy that a
given soil will have a high water table within certain
depths in most years, but they cannot predict that a
high water table will always be at a specific level in the
soil on a specific date.
After soil scientists located and identified the
significant natural bodies of soil in the survey area,
they drew the boundaries of these bodies on aerial
photographs and identified each as a specific map unit.
Aerial photographs show trees, buildings, fields, roads,
and rivers, all of which help in locating boundaries
accurately.
The descriptions, names, and delineations of the










soils in this survey area do not fully agree with those of
the soils in adjacent survey areas. Differences are the
result of a better knowledge of soils, modifications in
series concepts, or variations in the intensity of mapping
or in the extent of the soils in the survey areas.

Map Unit Composition

A map unit delineation on a soil map represents an
area dominated by one major kind of soil or an area
dominated by several kinds of soil. A map unit is
identified and named according to the taxonomic
classification of the dominant soil or soils. Within a
taxonomic class there are precisely defined limits for
the properties of the soils. On the landscape, however,
the soils are natural objects. In common with other
natural objects, they have a characteristic variability in
their properties. Thus, the range of some observed
properties may extend beyond the limits defined for a
taxonomic class. Areas of soils of a single taxonomic
class rarely, if ever, can be mapped without including
areas of soils of other taxonomic classes.
Consequently, every map unit is made up of the soil or
soils for which it is named and some soils that belong
to other taxonomic classes. In the detailed soil map
units, these latter soils are called inclusions or
included soils. In the general soil map units, they are
called minor soils.


Most inclusions have properties and behavioral
patterns similar to those of the dominant soil or soils in
the map unit, and thus they do not affect use and
management. These are called noncontrasting (similar)
inclusions. They may or may not be mentioned in the
map unit descriptions. Other inclusions, however, have
properties and behavior divergent enough to affect use
or require different management. These are contrasting
(dissimilar) inclusions. They generally occupy small
areas and cannot be shown separately on the soil
maps because of the scale used in mapping. The
inclusions of contrasting soils are mentioned in the
map unit descriptions. A few inclusions may not have
been observed and consequently are not mentioned in
the descriptions, especially where the soil pattern was
so complex that it was impractical to make enough
observations to identify all of the kinds of soils on the
landscape.
The presence of inclusions in a map unit in no way
diminishes the usefulness or accuracy of the soil data.
The objective of soil mapping is not to delineate pure
taxonomic classes of soils but rather to separate the
landscape into segments that have similar use and
management requirements.The delineation of such
landscape segments on the map provides sufficient
information for the development of resource plans, but
onsite investigation is needed to plan for intensive
uses in small areas.

















General Soil Map Units


The general soil map at the back of this publication
shows broad areas that have a distinctive pattern of
soils, relief, and drainage. Each map unit on the
general soil map is a unique natural landscape.
Typically, it consists of one or more major soils or
miscellaneous areas and some minor soils or
miscellaneous areas. It is named for the major soils or
miscellaneous areas.The components of one map unit
can occur in another but in a different pattern.
The general soil map can be used to compare the
suitability of large areas for general land uses. Areas of
suitable soils can be identified on the map. Likewise,
areas where the soils are not suitable can be
identified.
Because of its small scale, the map is not suitable
for planning the management of a farm or field or for
selecting a site for a road or building or other structure.
The soils in any one map unit differ from place to place
in slope, depth, drainage, and other characteristics that
affect management.


Soils on Rises and Knolls and in
Depressions

1. Ortega-Kershaw-Ridgewood

Very deep, moderately well drained, excessively
drained, and somewhat poorly drained soils that formed
in sandy and loamy marine sediments on the lower
Coastal Plain

Setting
Location: Southwestern part of the county
Landscape: Lowlands
Landform: Rises, knolls, and depressions
Slope: 0 to 8 percent
Composition
Percent of the survey area: 8.4
Ortega soils-56 percent
Kershaw soils-18 percent
Ridgewood soils-1 1 percent
Minor soils-15 percent


Soil Characteristics
Ortega
Surface layer: Gray fine sand
Substratum:Very pale brown, light yellowish brown,
and white fine sand
Depth class: Very deep
Drainage class: Moderately well drained
Depth to seasonal high water table: 42 to 72 inches
Slope: 0 to 5 percent
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Kershaw
Surface layer: Dark grayish brown fine sand
Substratum:Yellowish brown, brownish yellow, and very
pale brown fine sand
Depth class:Very deep
Drainage class: Excessively drained
Depth to seasonal high water table: More than 72
inches
Slope: 0 to 8 percent
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Ridgewood
Surface layer: Grayish brown fine sand
Substratum:Yellowish brown, light yellowish brown, and
light gray fine sand
Depth class: Very deep
Drainage class: Somewhat poorly drained
Depth to seasonal high water table: 18 to 42 inches
Slope: 0 to 3 percent
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Minor soils
* Clara, Osier, and Pottsburg soils on flats
* Leon and Mandarin soils in areas of flatwoods
* Albany, Hurricane, Otela, and Resota soils on rises
and knolls
Use and Management
Major use: Woodland
Woodland
Management concerns: Equipment limitations, seedling
mortality, plant competition
Cropland
Management concerns: Droughtiness, fast intake,
wetness

















General Soil Map Units


The general soil map at the back of this publication
shows broad areas that have a distinctive pattern of
soils, relief, and drainage. Each map unit on the
general soil map is a unique natural landscape.
Typically, it consists of one or more major soils or
miscellaneous areas and some minor soils or
miscellaneous areas. It is named for the major soils or
miscellaneous areas.The components of one map unit
can occur in another but in a different pattern.
The general soil map can be used to compare the
suitability of large areas for general land uses. Areas of
suitable soils can be identified on the map. Likewise,
areas where the soils are not suitable can be
identified.
Because of its small scale, the map is not suitable
for planning the management of a farm or field or for
selecting a site for a road or building or other structure.
The soils in any one map unit differ from place to place
in slope, depth, drainage, and other characteristics that
affect management.


Soils on Rises and Knolls and in
Depressions

1. Ortega-Kershaw-Ridgewood

Very deep, moderately well drained, excessively
drained, and somewhat poorly drained soils that formed
in sandy and loamy marine sediments on the lower
Coastal Plain

Setting
Location: Southwestern part of the county
Landscape: Lowlands
Landform: Rises, knolls, and depressions
Slope: 0 to 8 percent
Composition
Percent of the survey area: 8.4
Ortega soils-56 percent
Kershaw soils-18 percent
Ridgewood soils-1 1 percent
Minor soils-15 percent


Soil Characteristics
Ortega
Surface layer: Gray fine sand
Substratum:Very pale brown, light yellowish brown,
and white fine sand
Depth class: Very deep
Drainage class: Moderately well drained
Depth to seasonal high water table: 42 to 72 inches
Slope: 0 to 5 percent
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Kershaw
Surface layer: Dark grayish brown fine sand
Substratum:Yellowish brown, brownish yellow, and very
pale brown fine sand
Depth class:Very deep
Drainage class: Excessively drained
Depth to seasonal high water table: More than 72
inches
Slope: 0 to 8 percent
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Ridgewood
Surface layer: Grayish brown fine sand
Substratum:Yellowish brown, light yellowish brown, and
light gray fine sand
Depth class: Very deep
Drainage class: Somewhat poorly drained
Depth to seasonal high water table: 18 to 42 inches
Slope: 0 to 3 percent
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Minor soils
* Clara, Osier, and Pottsburg soils on flats
* Leon and Mandarin soils in areas of flatwoods
* Albany, Hurricane, Otela, and Resota soils on rises
and knolls
Use and Management
Major use: Woodland
Woodland
Management concerns: Equipment limitations, seedling
mortality, plant competition
Cropland
Management concerns: Droughtiness, fast intake,
wetness

















General Soil Map Units


The general soil map at the back of this publication
shows broad areas that have a distinctive pattern of
soils, relief, and drainage. Each map unit on the
general soil map is a unique natural landscape.
Typically, it consists of one or more major soils or
miscellaneous areas and some minor soils or
miscellaneous areas. It is named for the major soils or
miscellaneous areas.The components of one map unit
can occur in another but in a different pattern.
The general soil map can be used to compare the
suitability of large areas for general land uses. Areas of
suitable soils can be identified on the map. Likewise,
areas where the soils are not suitable can be
identified.
Because of its small scale, the map is not suitable
for planning the management of a farm or field or for
selecting a site for a road or building or other structure.
The soils in any one map unit differ from place to place
in slope, depth, drainage, and other characteristics that
affect management.


Soils on Rises and Knolls and in
Depressions

1. Ortega-Kershaw-Ridgewood

Very deep, moderately well drained, excessively
drained, and somewhat poorly drained soils that formed
in sandy and loamy marine sediments on the lower
Coastal Plain

Setting
Location: Southwestern part of the county
Landscape: Lowlands
Landform: Rises, knolls, and depressions
Slope: 0 to 8 percent
Composition
Percent of the survey area: 8.4
Ortega soils-56 percent
Kershaw soils-18 percent
Ridgewood soils-1 1 percent
Minor soils-15 percent


Soil Characteristics
Ortega
Surface layer: Gray fine sand
Substratum:Very pale brown, light yellowish brown,
and white fine sand
Depth class: Very deep
Drainage class: Moderately well drained
Depth to seasonal high water table: 42 to 72 inches
Slope: 0 to 5 percent
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Kershaw
Surface layer: Dark grayish brown fine sand
Substratum:Yellowish brown, brownish yellow, and very
pale brown fine sand
Depth class:Very deep
Drainage class: Excessively drained
Depth to seasonal high water table: More than 72
inches
Slope: 0 to 8 percent
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Ridgewood
Surface layer: Grayish brown fine sand
Substratum:Yellowish brown, light yellowish brown, and
light gray fine sand
Depth class: Very deep
Drainage class: Somewhat poorly drained
Depth to seasonal high water table: 18 to 42 inches
Slope: 0 to 3 percent
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Minor soils
* Clara, Osier, and Pottsburg soils on flats
* Leon and Mandarin soils in areas of flatwoods
* Albany, Hurricane, Otela, and Resota soils on rises
and knolls
Use and Management
Major use: Woodland
Woodland
Management concerns: Equipment limitations, seedling
mortality, plant competition
Cropland
Management concerns: Droughtiness, fast intake,
wetness






Soil Survey


Pasture and hayland
Management concerns: Droughtiness, fast intake,
wetness
Urban development
Management concerns:Wetness, poor filter, seepage,
too sandy, cutbanks cave, droughtiness,
corrosivity


2. Ridgewood-Pamlico-Ortega

Very deep, somewhat poorly drained, very poorly
drained, and moderately well drained soils that
formed in sandy marine sediments and highly
decomposed organic material on the lower Coastal
Plain

Setting
Location:Throughout the county
Landscape: Lowlands
Landform: Ridgewood and Ortega-rises and knolls;
Pamlico-depressions
Slope: 0 to 5 percent
Composition
Percent of the survey area: 7.2
Ridgewood soils-31 percent
Pamlico soils-1 2 percent
Ortega soils-1 1 percent
Minor soils-46 percent
Soil Characteristics
Ridgewood
Surface layer: Grayish brown fine sand
Substratum:Yellowish brown, light yellowish brown, and
light gray fine sand
Depth class: Very deep
Drainage class: Somewhat poorly drained
Depth to seasonal high water table: 18 to 42 inches
Slope: 0 to 3 percent
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Pamlico
Surface layer: Dark brown muck
Subsurface layer: Black and dark reddish brown muck
Substratum: Black mucky fine sand and brown fine
sand
Depth class:Very deep
Drainage class:Very poorly drained
Seasonal high water table: At the surface to 24 inches
above the surface
Slope: 0 to 1 percent
Parent material: Highly decomposed organic matter


Ortega
Surface layer: Gray fine sand
Substratum:Very pale brown, light yellowish brown,
and white fine sand
Depth class: Very deep
Drainage class: Moderately well drained
Depth to seasonal high water table: 42 to 72 inches
Slope: 0 to 5 percent
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Minor soils
Chipley, Hurricane, and Kershaw soils on rises and
knolls
Leon, Melvina, and Mandarin soils in areas of
flatwoods
Clara soils on flats and in areas of flatwoods
Evergreen, Pamlico, and Wesconnett soils in
depressions
Use and Management
Major use: Woodland
Woodland
Management concerns: Ridgewood and Ortega-
droughtiness, fast intake, wetness, equipment
limitations, seedling mortality, plant competition;
Pamlico-not suited
Cropland
Management concerns: Ridgewood and Ortega-
droughtiness, fast intake, wetness; Pamlico-not
suited
Pasture and hayland
Management concerns: Ridgewood and Ortega-
droughtiness, fast intake, wetness; Pamlico-not
suited
Urban development
Management concerns: Ridgewood and Ortega-
wetness, poor filter, seepage, too sandy, cutbanks
cave, droughtiness, corrosivity; Pamlico-not
suited

3. Albany-Otela-Surrency

Very deep, somewhat poorly drained, moderately well
drained, and very poorly drained soils that formed in
sandy and loamy marine sediments on the lower
Coastal Plain
Setting
Location: In and north of Perry
Landscape: Lowlands
Landform: Albany and Otela-rises and knolls;
Surrency-depressions






Soil Survey


Pasture and hayland
Management concerns: Droughtiness, fast intake,
wetness
Urban development
Management concerns:Wetness, poor filter, seepage,
too sandy, cutbanks cave, droughtiness,
corrosivity


2. Ridgewood-Pamlico-Ortega

Very deep, somewhat poorly drained, very poorly
drained, and moderately well drained soils that
formed in sandy marine sediments and highly
decomposed organic material on the lower Coastal
Plain

Setting
Location:Throughout the county
Landscape: Lowlands
Landform: Ridgewood and Ortega-rises and knolls;
Pamlico-depressions
Slope: 0 to 5 percent
Composition
Percent of the survey area: 7.2
Ridgewood soils-31 percent
Pamlico soils-1 2 percent
Ortega soils-1 1 percent
Minor soils-46 percent
Soil Characteristics
Ridgewood
Surface layer: Grayish brown fine sand
Substratum:Yellowish brown, light yellowish brown, and
light gray fine sand
Depth class: Very deep
Drainage class: Somewhat poorly drained
Depth to seasonal high water table: 18 to 42 inches
Slope: 0 to 3 percent
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Pamlico
Surface layer: Dark brown muck
Subsurface layer: Black and dark reddish brown muck
Substratum: Black mucky fine sand and brown fine
sand
Depth class:Very deep
Drainage class:Very poorly drained
Seasonal high water table: At the surface to 24 inches
above the surface
Slope: 0 to 1 percent
Parent material: Highly decomposed organic matter


Ortega
Surface layer: Gray fine sand
Substratum:Very pale brown, light yellowish brown,
and white fine sand
Depth class: Very deep
Drainage class: Moderately well drained
Depth to seasonal high water table: 42 to 72 inches
Slope: 0 to 5 percent
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Minor soils
Chipley, Hurricane, and Kershaw soils on rises and
knolls
Leon, Melvina, and Mandarin soils in areas of
flatwoods
Clara soils on flats and in areas of flatwoods
Evergreen, Pamlico, and Wesconnett soils in
depressions
Use and Management
Major use: Woodland
Woodland
Management concerns: Ridgewood and Ortega-
droughtiness, fast intake, wetness, equipment
limitations, seedling mortality, plant competition;
Pamlico-not suited
Cropland
Management concerns: Ridgewood and Ortega-
droughtiness, fast intake, wetness; Pamlico-not
suited
Pasture and hayland
Management concerns: Ridgewood and Ortega-
droughtiness, fast intake, wetness; Pamlico-not
suited
Urban development
Management concerns: Ridgewood and Ortega-
wetness, poor filter, seepage, too sandy, cutbanks
cave, droughtiness, corrosivity; Pamlico-not
suited

3. Albany-Otela-Surrency

Very deep, somewhat poorly drained, moderately well
drained, and very poorly drained soils that formed in
sandy and loamy marine sediments on the lower
Coastal Plain
Setting
Location: In and north of Perry
Landscape: Lowlands
Landform: Albany and Otela-rises and knolls;
Surrency-depressions





Taylor County, Florida


Slope: 0 to 5 percent
Composition
Percent of the survey area: 1.9
Albany soils-29 percent
Otela soils-22 percent
Surrency soils-1 2 percent
Minor soils-37 percent
Soil Characteristics
Albany
Surface layer: Dark grayish brown sand
Subsurface layer: Grayish brown, very pale brown, and
light gray sand
Subsoil: Pale brown fine sandy loam and light gray
sandy clay loam
Depth class: Very deep
Drainage class: Somewhat poorly drained
Depth to seasonal high water table: 12 to 30 inches
Slope: 0 to 5 percent
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Otela
Surface layer: Dark brown fine sand
Subsurface layer: Brownish yellow, very pale brown,
and yellowish brown fine sand to loamy fine sand
Subsoil:Yellowish brown fine sandy loam and gray
sandy clay loam
Depth class: Very deep
Drainage class: Moderately well drained
Depth to seasonal high water table: 48 to 72 inches
Slope: 0 to 5 percent
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Surrency
Surface layer: Black mucky fine sand
Subsurface layer: Light gray fine sand
Subsoil: Gray sandy clay loam
Depth class: Very deep
Drainage class:Very poorly drained
Seasonal high water table: At the surface to 12 inches
above the surface
Slope: 0 to 2 percent
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Minor soils
* Ortega and Otela soils on rises and knolls
* Plummer soils on flats and in areas of flatwoods
* Croatan and Starke soils in depressions
Use and Management
Major use: Woodland
Woodland
Management concerns: Albany and Otela-equipment
limitations, seedling mortality, plant competition;
Surrency-not suited


Cropland
Management concerns: Albany and Otela-
droughtiness, fast intake, wetness: Surrency-not
suited
Pasture and hayland
Management concerns: Albany and Otela-
droughtiness, fast intake, wetness: Surrency-not
suited
Urban development
Management concerns: Albany and Otela-wetness,
poor filter, seepage, too sandy, cutbanks cave,
droughtiness, corrosivity; Surrency-not suited


Soils in Areas of Flatwoods, on
Flats, in Depressions, and on
Flood Plains


4. Leon-Pamlico-Wesconnett

Very deep, poorly drained and very poorly drained soils
that formed in sandy marine sediments and highly
decomposed organic material on the lower Coastal
Plain
Setting
Location:Throughout the county
Landscape: Lowlands
Landform: Leon-flatwoods; Pamlico and Wesconnett-
depressions
Slope: 0 to 2 percent

Composition
Percent of the survey area: 22.2
Leon soils-34 percent
Pamlico soils-1 4 percent
Wesconnett soils-9 percent
Minor soils-43 percent

Soil Characteristics
Leon
Surface layer:Very dark gray fine sand
Subsurface layer: Grayish brown and light gray fine
sand
Subsoil: Black and dark reddish brown fine sand
Substratum: Dark yellowish brown and yellowish brown
fine sand
Depth class: Very deep
Drainage class: Poorly drained
Depth to seasonal high water table: 6 to 18 inches
Slope: 0 to 2 percent
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments





Taylor County, Florida


Slope: 0 to 5 percent
Composition
Percent of the survey area: 1.9
Albany soils-29 percent
Otela soils-22 percent
Surrency soils-1 2 percent
Minor soils-37 percent
Soil Characteristics
Albany
Surface layer: Dark grayish brown sand
Subsurface layer: Grayish brown, very pale brown, and
light gray sand
Subsoil: Pale brown fine sandy loam and light gray
sandy clay loam
Depth class: Very deep
Drainage class: Somewhat poorly drained
Depth to seasonal high water table: 12 to 30 inches
Slope: 0 to 5 percent
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Otela
Surface layer: Dark brown fine sand
Subsurface layer: Brownish yellow, very pale brown,
and yellowish brown fine sand to loamy fine sand
Subsoil:Yellowish brown fine sandy loam and gray
sandy clay loam
Depth class: Very deep
Drainage class: Moderately well drained
Depth to seasonal high water table: 48 to 72 inches
Slope: 0 to 5 percent
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Surrency
Surface layer: Black mucky fine sand
Subsurface layer: Light gray fine sand
Subsoil: Gray sandy clay loam
Depth class: Very deep
Drainage class:Very poorly drained
Seasonal high water table: At the surface to 12 inches
above the surface
Slope: 0 to 2 percent
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Minor soils
* Ortega and Otela soils on rises and knolls
* Plummer soils on flats and in areas of flatwoods
* Croatan and Starke soils in depressions
Use and Management
Major use: Woodland
Woodland
Management concerns: Albany and Otela-equipment
limitations, seedling mortality, plant competition;
Surrency-not suited


Cropland
Management concerns: Albany and Otela-
droughtiness, fast intake, wetness: Surrency-not
suited
Pasture and hayland
Management concerns: Albany and Otela-
droughtiness, fast intake, wetness: Surrency-not
suited
Urban development
Management concerns: Albany and Otela-wetness,
poor filter, seepage, too sandy, cutbanks cave,
droughtiness, corrosivity; Surrency-not suited


Soils in Areas of Flatwoods, on
Flats, in Depressions, and on
Flood Plains


4. Leon-Pamlico-Wesconnett

Very deep, poorly drained and very poorly drained soils
that formed in sandy marine sediments and highly
decomposed organic material on the lower Coastal
Plain
Setting
Location:Throughout the county
Landscape: Lowlands
Landform: Leon-flatwoods; Pamlico and Wesconnett-
depressions
Slope: 0 to 2 percent

Composition
Percent of the survey area: 22.2
Leon soils-34 percent
Pamlico soils-1 4 percent
Wesconnett soils-9 percent
Minor soils-43 percent

Soil Characteristics
Leon
Surface layer:Very dark gray fine sand
Subsurface layer: Grayish brown and light gray fine
sand
Subsoil: Black and dark reddish brown fine sand
Substratum: Dark yellowish brown and yellowish brown
fine sand
Depth class: Very deep
Drainage class: Poorly drained
Depth to seasonal high water table: 6 to 18 inches
Slope: 0 to 2 percent
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments






Soil Survey


Pamlico
Surface layer: Dark brown muck
Subsurface layer: Black and dark reddish brown muck
Substratum: Black mucky fine sand and brown fine
sand
Depth class:Very deep
Drainage class: Very poorly drained
Seasonal high water table: At the surface to 24 inches
above the surface
Slope: 0 to 1 percent
Parent material: Highly decomposed organic matter

Wesconnett
Surface layer: Black fine sand
Subsoil:Very dark gray, dark reddish brown, and brown
fine sand
Substratum: Light gray fine sand
Depth class:Very deep
Drainage class: Very poorly drained
Seasonal high water table: At the surface to 24 inches
above the surface
Slope: 0 to 2 percent
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments

Minor soils
* Hurricane and Ridgewood soils on rises and knolls
* Mascotte soils in areas of flatwoods
* Clara, Bodiford, and Plummer soils on flats and in
areas of flatwoods
* Croatan soils in depressions

Use and Management

Major use: Woodland

Woodland
Management concerns: Leon-equipment limitations,
seedling mortality, plant competition; Pamlico and
Wesconnett-not suited

Cropland
Management concerns: Leon-wetness,
droughtiness, fast intake; Pamlico and
Wesconnett-not suited

Pasture and hayland
Management concerns: Leon-wetness,
droughtiness, fast intake; Pamlico and
Wesconnett-not suited

Urban development
Management concerns: Leon-wetness, poor filter,
seepage, too sandy, cutbanks cave, corrosivity;
Pamlico and Wesconnett-not suited


5. Chaires-Meadowbrook-Clara

Very deep, poorly drained soils that formed in sandy
and loamy marine sediments on the lower Coastal Plain
Setting
Location:Throughout the county
Landscape: Lowlands
Landform: Chaires-flatwoods; Meadowbrook and
Clara-flats and depressions
Slope: 0 to 2 percent
Composition
Percent of the survey area: 9.5
Chaires soils-33 percent
Meadowbrook soils-1 1 percent
Clara soils-10 percent
Minor soils-46 percent

Soil Characteristics
Chaires
Surface layer: Very dark gray fine sand
Subsurface layer: Light brownish gray fine sand
Upper part of the subsoil: Black and dark reddish
brown fine sand
Next part of the subsoil: Dark yellowish brown fine
sand
Lowerpart of the subsoil: Light gray and light olive gray
sandy clay loam
Depth class: Very deep
Drainage class: Poorly drained
Depth to seasonal high water table: 6 to 18 inches
Slope: 0 to 2 percent
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Meadowbrook
Surface layer: Dark grayish brown sand
Subsurface layer: Very pale brown and light gray fine
sand
Subsoil: Light brownish gray sandy clay loam
Depth class:Very deep
Drainage class: Poorly drained
Seasonal high water table: At the surface to a depth of
12 inches
Slope: 0 to 2 percent
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Clara
Surface layer: Very dark grayish brown mucky fine
sand
Subsurface layer: Grayish brown fine sand
Subsoil:Yellowish brown fine sand
Substratum: Light gray fine sand
Depth class:Very deep
Drainage class: Poorly drained






Taylor County, Florida


Seasonal high water table: At the surface to a depth of
12 inches
Slope: 0 to 2 percent
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Minor soils
* Lutterloh and Moriah soils on rises and knolls
* Leon, Mandarin, and Melvina soils in areas of flatwoods
* Clara, Bodiford, Meadowbrook, and Tooles soils on
flats and in areas of flatwoods
* Maurepas, Tooles, and Yellowjacket soils in
depressions and on flood plains
Use and Management
Major use: Woodland
Woodland
Management concerns: Equipment limitations, seedling
mortality, plant competition
Cropland
Management concerns:Wetness, droughtiness, fast
intake
Pasture and hayland
Management concerns:Wetness, droughtiness, fast
intake
Urban development
Management concerns: Wetness, poor filter, seepage,
too sandy, cutbanks cave, corrosivity


6. Sapelo-Surrency-Plummer

Very deep, poorly drained and very poorly drained soils
that formed in sandy and loamy marine sediments on
the lower Coastal Plain
Setting
Location: Northern part of the county
Landscape: Lowlands
Landform: Flats and depressions
Slope: 0 to 2 percent
Composition
Percent of the survey area: 10.3
Sapelo soils-31 percent
Surrency soils-10 percent
Plummer soils-8 percent
Minor soils-51 percent

Soil Characteristics
Sapelo
Surface layer: Very dark gray fine sand
Subsurface layer: Gray and light gray fine sand
Subsoil: Black and dark reddish brown fine sand


Second subsurface layer: Light gray fine sand
Second Subsoil: Light brownish gray sandy clay loam
and light olive gray fine sandy loam
Depth class:Very deep
Drainage class: Poorly drained
Depth to seasonal high water table: At the surface to a
depth of 18 inches
Slope: 0 to 2 percent
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Surrency
Surface layer: Black mucky fine sand
Subsurface layer: Light gray fine sand
Subsoil: Gray sandy clay loam
Depth class:Very deep
Drainage class:Very poorly drained
Seasonal high water table: At the surface to 12 inches
above the surface
Slope: 0 to 2 percent
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Plummer
Surface layer: Black fine sand
Subsurface layer: Grayish brown, gray, and light gray
fine sand
Subsoil: Gray fine sandy loam
Depth class:Very deep
Drainage class: Poorly drained
Depth to seasonal high water table: At the surface to a
depth of 12 inches
Slope: 0 to 2 percent
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Minor soils
* Albany soils on rises and knolls
* Leon and Sapelo soils in areas of flatwoods
* Croatan, Dorovan, and Pamlico soils in depressions
and on flood plains
* Starke soils in depressions

Use and Management
Major use: Woodland
Woodland
Management concerns: Sapelo and Plummer-
equipment limitations, seedling mortality, plant
competition; Surrency-not suited
Cropland
Management concerns: Sapelo and Plummer-
wetness, droughtiness, fast intake; Surrency-not
suited
Pasture and hayland
Management concerns: Sapelo and Plummer-
wetness, droughtiness, fast intake; Surrency and
Starke-not suited






Soil Survey


Urban development
Management concerns: Sapelo and Plummer-
wetness, poor filter, seepage, too sandy, cutbanks
cave, corrosivity; Surrency and Starke-not suited


7. Wekiva-Tooles-Chaires and Similar
Soils

Shallow to very deep, poorly drained soils that formed
in sandy and loamy marine sediments over limestone
on the lower Coastal Plain

Setting
Location: Inland along the Gulf Coast
Landscape: Lowlands
Landform:Wekiva-flats; Tooles-flats and
depressions; Chaires-flatwoods
Slope: 0 to 2 percent
Composition
Percent of the survey area: 23.1
Wekiva soils-21 percent
Tooles soils-19 percent
Chaires soils-1 4 percent
Minor soils-46 percent

Soil Characteristics
Wekiva
Surface layer: Black fine sand
Subsurface layer:Yellowish brown fine sand
Subsoil:Yellowish brown fine sandy loam
Bedrock: Limestone
Depth class: Shallow and moderately deep
Drainage class: Poorly drained
Seasonal high water table: At the surface to 12 inches
above surface
Slope: 0 to 2 percent
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Tooles
Surface layer: Very dark gray fine sand
Subsurface layer: Brown and yellowish brown fine sand
Subsoil layer: Light gray sandy clay loam
Bedrock: Limestone
Depth class: Deep
Drainage class: Poorly drained
Seasonal high water table: At the surface to 12 inches
above surface
Slope: 0 to 2 percent
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Chaires
Surface layer:Very dark gray fine sand


Subsurface layer: Light brownish gray fine sand
Subsoil: Black, dark reddish brown, and yellowish
brown fine sand
Second subsurface layer: Dark yellowish brown fine
sand
Second subsoil: Light gray and light olive gray sandy
clay loam
Depth class:Very deep
Drainage class: Poorly drained
Depth to seasonal high water table: 6 to 18 inches
Slope: 0 to 2 percent
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Minor soils
Bushnell, Lutterloh, Matmon, Moriah, and Seaboard
soils on rises and knolls
Chaires and Melvina soils in areas of flatwoods
Bodiford, Bushnell, and Nutall soils on flats and in
depressions
Use and Management
Major use: Woodland
Woodland
Management concerns: Equipment limitations, seedling
mortality, plant competition
Cropland
Management concerns:Wetness, droughtiness, fast
intake
Pasture and hayland
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, fast
intake
Urban development
Management concerns:Wetness, poor filter, seepage,
too sandy, cutbanks cave, corrosivity


Soils in Depressions, on Flood
Plains, and in Tidal Marshes


8. Dorovan-Pamlico-Sapelo

Very deep, very poorly drained soils that formed in
highly decomposed organic material and sandy marine
sediments on the lower Coastal Plain

Setting
Location: Northern and eastern parts of the county
Landscape: Lowlands
Landform: Flats and depressions
Slope: 0 to 2 percent






Soil Survey


Urban development
Management concerns: Sapelo and Plummer-
wetness, poor filter, seepage, too sandy, cutbanks
cave, corrosivity; Surrency and Starke-not suited


7. Wekiva-Tooles-Chaires and Similar
Soils

Shallow to very deep, poorly drained soils that formed
in sandy and loamy marine sediments over limestone
on the lower Coastal Plain

Setting
Location: Inland along the Gulf Coast
Landscape: Lowlands
Landform:Wekiva-flats; Tooles-flats and
depressions; Chaires-flatwoods
Slope: 0 to 2 percent
Composition
Percent of the survey area: 23.1
Wekiva soils-21 percent
Tooles soils-19 percent
Chaires soils-1 4 percent
Minor soils-46 percent

Soil Characteristics
Wekiva
Surface layer: Black fine sand
Subsurface layer:Yellowish brown fine sand
Subsoil:Yellowish brown fine sandy loam
Bedrock: Limestone
Depth class: Shallow and moderately deep
Drainage class: Poorly drained
Seasonal high water table: At the surface to 12 inches
above surface
Slope: 0 to 2 percent
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Tooles
Surface layer: Very dark gray fine sand
Subsurface layer: Brown and yellowish brown fine sand
Subsoil layer: Light gray sandy clay loam
Bedrock: Limestone
Depth class: Deep
Drainage class: Poorly drained
Seasonal high water table: At the surface to 12 inches
above surface
Slope: 0 to 2 percent
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Chaires
Surface layer:Very dark gray fine sand


Subsurface layer: Light brownish gray fine sand
Subsoil: Black, dark reddish brown, and yellowish
brown fine sand
Second subsurface layer: Dark yellowish brown fine
sand
Second subsoil: Light gray and light olive gray sandy
clay loam
Depth class:Very deep
Drainage class: Poorly drained
Depth to seasonal high water table: 6 to 18 inches
Slope: 0 to 2 percent
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Minor soils
Bushnell, Lutterloh, Matmon, Moriah, and Seaboard
soils on rises and knolls
Chaires and Melvina soils in areas of flatwoods
Bodiford, Bushnell, and Nutall soils on flats and in
depressions
Use and Management
Major use: Woodland
Woodland
Management concerns: Equipment limitations, seedling
mortality, plant competition
Cropland
Management concerns:Wetness, droughtiness, fast
intake
Pasture and hayland
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, fast
intake
Urban development
Management concerns:Wetness, poor filter, seepage,
too sandy, cutbanks cave, corrosivity


Soils in Depressions, on Flood
Plains, and in Tidal Marshes


8. Dorovan-Pamlico-Sapelo

Very deep, very poorly drained soils that formed in
highly decomposed organic material and sandy marine
sediments on the lower Coastal Plain

Setting
Location: Northern and eastern parts of the county
Landscape: Lowlands
Landform: Flats and depressions
Slope: 0 to 2 percent






Soil Survey


Urban development
Management concerns: Sapelo and Plummer-
wetness, poor filter, seepage, too sandy, cutbanks
cave, corrosivity; Surrency and Starke-not suited


7. Wekiva-Tooles-Chaires and Similar
Soils

Shallow to very deep, poorly drained soils that formed
in sandy and loamy marine sediments over limestone
on the lower Coastal Plain

Setting
Location: Inland along the Gulf Coast
Landscape: Lowlands
Landform:Wekiva-flats; Tooles-flats and
depressions; Chaires-flatwoods
Slope: 0 to 2 percent
Composition
Percent of the survey area: 23.1
Wekiva soils-21 percent
Tooles soils-19 percent
Chaires soils-1 4 percent
Minor soils-46 percent

Soil Characteristics
Wekiva
Surface layer: Black fine sand
Subsurface layer:Yellowish brown fine sand
Subsoil:Yellowish brown fine sandy loam
Bedrock: Limestone
Depth class: Shallow and moderately deep
Drainage class: Poorly drained
Seasonal high water table: At the surface to 12 inches
above surface
Slope: 0 to 2 percent
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Tooles
Surface layer: Very dark gray fine sand
Subsurface layer: Brown and yellowish brown fine sand
Subsoil layer: Light gray sandy clay loam
Bedrock: Limestone
Depth class: Deep
Drainage class: Poorly drained
Seasonal high water table: At the surface to 12 inches
above surface
Slope: 0 to 2 percent
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Chaires
Surface layer:Very dark gray fine sand


Subsurface layer: Light brownish gray fine sand
Subsoil: Black, dark reddish brown, and yellowish
brown fine sand
Second subsurface layer: Dark yellowish brown fine
sand
Second subsoil: Light gray and light olive gray sandy
clay loam
Depth class:Very deep
Drainage class: Poorly drained
Depth to seasonal high water table: 6 to 18 inches
Slope: 0 to 2 percent
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Minor soils
Bushnell, Lutterloh, Matmon, Moriah, and Seaboard
soils on rises and knolls
Chaires and Melvina soils in areas of flatwoods
Bodiford, Bushnell, and Nutall soils on flats and in
depressions
Use and Management
Major use: Woodland
Woodland
Management concerns: Equipment limitations, seedling
mortality, plant competition
Cropland
Management concerns:Wetness, droughtiness, fast
intake
Pasture and hayland
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, fast
intake
Urban development
Management concerns:Wetness, poor filter, seepage,
too sandy, cutbanks cave, corrosivity


Soils in Depressions, on Flood
Plains, and in Tidal Marshes


8. Dorovan-Pamlico-Sapelo

Very deep, very poorly drained soils that formed in
highly decomposed organic material and sandy marine
sediments on the lower Coastal Plain

Setting
Location: Northern and eastern parts of the county
Landscape: Lowlands
Landform: Flats and depressions
Slope: 0 to 2 percent






Taylor County, Florida


Composition
Percent of the survey area: 13.0
Dorovan soils-38 percent
Pamlico soils-26 percent
Sapelo soils-1 5 percent
Minor soils-21 percent

Soil Characteristics
Dorovan
Surface layer:Very dark brown muck
Subsurface layer: Black muck
Substratum: Black mucky fine sand
Depth class: Very deep
Drainage class:Very poorly drained
Seasonal high water table: At the surface to 24 inches
above the surface
Slope: 0 to 1 percent
Parent material: Highly decomposed organic matter

Pamlico
Surface layer: Dark brown muck
Subsurface layer: Black and dark reddish brown muck
Substratum: Black mucky fine sand and brown fine
sand
Depth class:Very deep
Drainage class:Very poorly drained
Seasonal high water table: At the surface to 24 inches
above the surface
Slope: 0 to 1 percent
Parent material: Highly decomposed organic matter

Sapelo
Surface layer:Very dark gray fine sand
Subsurface layer: Gray and light gray fine sand
Subsoil: Black and dark reddish brown fine sand
Second subsurface layer: Light gray fine sand
Second subsoil layer: Light brownish gray sandy clay
loam and light olive gray fine sandy loam
Depth class: Very deep
Drainage class: Very poorly drained
Seasonal high water table: At the surface to a depth of
18 inches
Slope: 0 to 2 percent
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine
sediments
Minor soils
* Ridgewood soils on rises and knolls
* Leon soils on flats and in depressions

Use and Management
Major uses: Not suited to woodland, cropland, pasture,
hayland, or urban development


9. Bayvi


Very deep, very poorly drained soils that formed in
sandy marine sediments on the lower Coastal Plain

Setting
Location: Southern and western parts of the county
bordering the Gulf of Mexico
Landscape: Lowlands (fig. 3)
Landform: Salt marshes
Slope: 0 to 1 percent
Composition
Percent of the survey area: 4.4
Bayvi soils-81 percent
Minor soils-1 9 percent
Soil Characteristics
Bayvi
Surface layer: Black muck
Subsurface layer: Black mucky loamy sand and very
dark grayish brown sand
Substratum: Grayish brown and gray sand
Depth class: Very deep
Drainage class:Very poorly drained
Seasonal high water table: At the surface to a depth of
6 inches
Slope: 0 to 1 percent
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Minor soils
* Chaires and Leon soils in areas of flatwoods
Use and Management
Major uses: Not suited to woodland, cropland, pasture,
hayland, or urban development


Broad Land Use Considerations

The soils in the Taylor County vary in their suitability
for major land uses. About 87 percent of the acreage is
used for the production of pine trees. Much of the
acreage in general soil map units 4, 5, and 6 is used
for woodland.The seasonal high water table is the main
limitation. Because of wetness, the equipment
limitations are moderate or severe on these soils. The
wetness can be overcome by harvesting only during
the drier periods or by using special equipment.
The soils in units 7, 8, and 9 are frequently flooded,
ponded, or both, mainly in winter and summer.
Flooding, ponding, and wetness are the major
limitations affecting these units for most uses.
Only a small acreage in the county is used for
pasture. Units 4, 5, and 6 are best suited to grasses.






Taylor County, Florida


Composition
Percent of the survey area: 13.0
Dorovan soils-38 percent
Pamlico soils-26 percent
Sapelo soils-1 5 percent
Minor soils-21 percent

Soil Characteristics
Dorovan
Surface layer:Very dark brown muck
Subsurface layer: Black muck
Substratum: Black mucky fine sand
Depth class: Very deep
Drainage class:Very poorly drained
Seasonal high water table: At the surface to 24 inches
above the surface
Slope: 0 to 1 percent
Parent material: Highly decomposed organic matter

Pamlico
Surface layer: Dark brown muck
Subsurface layer: Black and dark reddish brown muck
Substratum: Black mucky fine sand and brown fine
sand
Depth class:Very deep
Drainage class:Very poorly drained
Seasonal high water table: At the surface to 24 inches
above the surface
Slope: 0 to 1 percent
Parent material: Highly decomposed organic matter

Sapelo
Surface layer:Very dark gray fine sand
Subsurface layer: Gray and light gray fine sand
Subsoil: Black and dark reddish brown fine sand
Second subsurface layer: Light gray fine sand
Second subsoil layer: Light brownish gray sandy clay
loam and light olive gray fine sandy loam
Depth class: Very deep
Drainage class: Very poorly drained
Seasonal high water table: At the surface to a depth of
18 inches
Slope: 0 to 2 percent
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine
sediments
Minor soils
* Ridgewood soils on rises and knolls
* Leon soils on flats and in depressions

Use and Management
Major uses: Not suited to woodland, cropland, pasture,
hayland, or urban development


9. Bayvi


Very deep, very poorly drained soils that formed in
sandy marine sediments on the lower Coastal Plain

Setting
Location: Southern and western parts of the county
bordering the Gulf of Mexico
Landscape: Lowlands (fig. 3)
Landform: Salt marshes
Slope: 0 to 1 percent
Composition
Percent of the survey area: 4.4
Bayvi soils-81 percent
Minor soils-1 9 percent
Soil Characteristics
Bayvi
Surface layer: Black muck
Subsurface layer: Black mucky loamy sand and very
dark grayish brown sand
Substratum: Grayish brown and gray sand
Depth class: Very deep
Drainage class:Very poorly drained
Seasonal high water table: At the surface to a depth of
6 inches
Slope: 0 to 1 percent
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Minor soils
* Chaires and Leon soils in areas of flatwoods
Use and Management
Major uses: Not suited to woodland, cropland, pasture,
hayland, or urban development


Broad Land Use Considerations

The soils in the Taylor County vary in their suitability
for major land uses. About 87 percent of the acreage is
used for the production of pine trees. Much of the
acreage in general soil map units 4, 5, and 6 is used
for woodland.The seasonal high water table is the main
limitation. Because of wetness, the equipment
limitations are moderate or severe on these soils. The
wetness can be overcome by harvesting only during
the drier periods or by using special equipment.
The soils in units 7, 8, and 9 are frequently flooded,
ponded, or both, mainly in winter and summer.
Flooding, ponding, and wetness are the major
limitations affecting these units for most uses.
Only a small acreage in the county is used for
pasture. Units 4, 5, and 6 are best suited to grasses.






































Figure 3.-An area of water in the foreground; Bayvi muck, frequently flooded, in the middle; and Leon fine sand, rarely
flooded in the background. These areas provide recreational opportunities. Photo courtesy of Will Beers, photographer.


Soils in units 1, 2, and 3 are generally unsuited to
grasses because of droughtiness.
Little of the county is developed for urban uses.
Generally, the moderately well drained and excessively
drained soils are well suited to building site development.
The Albany, Kershaw, Ortega, Otela, and Ridgewood
soils in units 1, 2, and 3 are examples. In most of the
other units, the seasonal high water table, the hazard of
ponding, and the slope are the main management
concerns. The soils on flood plains and in depressions,
such as those in units 7, 8, and 9, are unsuitable as
sites for buildings because of flooding and ponding.
The seasonal high water table is a major limitation
throughout the county, and alternative waste disposal
systems (mounded septic tank absorption fields) are
used.


The suitability of the soils for recreational
development ranges from poorly suited to well suited,
depending on the intensity of the expected use. Units
7, 8, and 9 are very poorly suited to many of these
uses because of wetness, flooding, and ponding. All of
the soils are suited to some recreational uses, such as
paths and trails for hiking or horseback riding. Small
areas that are suitable for intensive recreational uses
generally are available in the units that otherwise have
severe limitations.
The suitability for wildlife habitat generally is good
throughout the county. All of the units have soils that
are generally well suited to habitat for openland wildlife,
woodland wildlife, or both. Areas in units 7, 8, and 9
and scattered areas in units 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 are suited
to wetland habitat.

















Detailed Soil Map Units


The map units delineated on the detailed maps at
the back of this survey represent the soils or
miscellaneous areas in the survey area. The map unit
descriptions in this section, along with the maps and
interpretative tables, can be used to determine the
suitability and potential of a unit for specific uses. They
also can be used to plan the management needed for
those uses. More information about each map unit is
given under the heading "Use and Management of the
Soils."
A map unit delineation on a map represents an area
dominated by one or more major kinds of soil or
miscellaneous areas. A map unit is identified and named
according to the taxonomic classification of the dominant
soils or miscellaneous areas. Within a taxonomic class
there are precisely defined limits for the properties of the
soils. On the landscape, however, the soils and
miscellaneous areas are natural phenomena, and they
have the characteristic variability of all natural
phenomena.Thus, the range of some observed
properties may extend beyond the limits defined for a
taxonomic class. Areas of soils of a single taxonomic
class rarely, if ever, can be mapped without including
areas of other taxonomic classes. Consequently, every
map unit is made up of the soils or miscellaneous areas
for which it is named and some "included" areas that
belong to other taxonomic classes.
Most included soils have properties similar to those
of the dominant soil or soils in the map unit, and thus
they do not affect use and management.These are
called noncontrasting, or similar, inclusions. They may
or may not be mentioned in the map unit description.
Other included soils and miscellaneous areas,
however, have properties and behavioral
characteristics divergent enough to affect use or to
require different management. These are called
contrasting, or dissimilar, inclusions. They generally are
in small areas and could not be mapped separately
because of the scale used. Some small areas of
strongly contrasting soils or miscellaneous areas are
identified by a special symbol on the maps. The
included areas of contrasting soils or miscellaneous
areas are mentioned in the map unit descriptions. A
few included areas may not have been observed, and
consequently they are not mentioned in the


descriptions, especially where the pattern was so
complex that it was impractical to make enough
observations to identify all the soils and miscellaneous
areas on the landscape.
The presence of included areas in a map unit in no
way diminishes the usefulness or accuracy of the data.
The objective of mapping is not to delineate pure
taxonomic classes but rather to separate the
landscape into landforms or landform segments that
have similar use and management requirements. The
delineation of such segments on the map provides
sufficient information for the development of resource
plans, but if intensive use of small areas is planned,
onsite investigation is needed to define and locate the
soils and miscellaneous areas.
An identifying symbol precedes the map unit name
in the map unit descriptions. Each description includes
general facts about the unit and gives the principal
hazards and limitations to be considered in planning for
specific uses.
Soils that have profiles that are almost alike make
up a soil series. Except for differences in texture of the
surface layer, all the soils of a series have major
horizons that are similar in composition, thickness, and
arrangement.
Soils of one series can differ in texture of the
surface layer, slope, depth to rock, stoniness, salinity,
degree of erosion, and other characteristics that affect
their use. On the basis of such differences, a soil
series is divided into soil phases. Most of the areas
shown on the detailed soil maps are phases of soil
series. The name of a soil phase commonly indicates a
feature that affects use or management. For example,
Chaires fine sand, limestone substratum, is a phase of
the Chaires series.
Some map units are made up of two or more major
soils or miscellaneous areas.These map units are
complexes or undifferentiated groups.
A complex consists of two or more soils or
miscellaneous areas in such an intricate pattern or in
such small areas that they cannot be shown separately
on the maps. The pattern and proportion of the soils or
miscellaneous areas are somewhat similar in all areas.
Tooles-Tennille-Wekiva complex, depressional, is an
example.






Soil Survey


An undifferentiated group is made up of two or more
soils or miscellaneous areas that could be mapped
individually but are mapped as one unit because
similar interpretations can be made for use and
management. The pattern and proportion of the soils or
miscellaneous areas in a mapped area are not uniform.
An area can be made up of only one of the major soils
or miscellaneous areas, or it can be made up of all of
them. Dorovan and Pamlico soils, depressional, is an
undifferentiated group in this survey area.
This survey includes miscellaneous areas. Such
areas have little or no soil material and support little or
no vegetation. Pits is an example.
Table 4 gives the acreage and proportionate extent
of soils in each map unit. Other tables give properties
of the soils and the limitations, capabilities, and
potentials for many uses. The Glossary defines many
of the terms used in describing the soils or
miscellaneous areas.


3-Clara and Osier fine sands

Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Flats
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 3 to more than 400 acres
Composition
Clara and similar soils: 45 percent
Osier and similar soils: 30 percent
Dissimilar soils: 25 percent
Typical Profile
Clara
Surface layer:
0 to 6 inches-very dark grayish brown fine sand
Subsurface layer:
6 to 19 inches-grayish brown fine sand
Subsoil:
19 to 32 inches-yellowish brown fine sand
Substratum:
32 to 80 inches-light gray fine sand
Osier
Surface layer:
0 to 5 inches-very dark grayish brown fine sand
Substratum:
5 to 18 inches-brown fine sand
18 to 25 inches-pale brown fine sand


25 to 50 inches-light brownish gray fine sand
50 to 80 inches-light gray fine sand
Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class: Very deep
Drainage class: Poorly drained
Permeability: Rapid throughout
Slope class: Nearly level
Available water capacity: Clara-moderate; Osier-low
Shrink-swellpotential: Low
Hazard of flooding: None
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Depth to bedrock: No bedrock within a depth of 80
inches
Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
Goldhead, Meadowbrook, Plummer, and Pottsburg
soils on flats
Boulogne and Sapelo soils in areas of flatwoods
Albany, Lutterloh, Ocilla, and Ridgewood soils on
rises and knolls
Similar soils:
Clara-like soils that have limestone bedrock below a
depth of 60 inches and Clara-like soils that do not have
a gray to light gray subsurface layer; in positions
similar to those of the Clara soil
Use and Management
Dominant uses: Timber production and wildlife habitat
Other uses: Crops, pasture, and urban development
Woodland
Potential productivity: High
Trees to plant: Slash pine and loblolly pine
Management concerns: Equipment limitations, seedling
mortality, and plant competition
Management considerations:
* Site preparation, such as bedding, helps to establish
seedlings, reduces the seedling mortality rate, and
increases the early growth rate.
* Chopping and bedding help to minimize debris,
control competing vegetation, and facilitate planting.
* Using field machinery equipped with large tires or
tracks and harvesting during dry periods help to
overcome the equipment limitations and minimize
soil compaction and root damage during thinning
activities.
* Logging systems that leave plant debris well
distributed over the site increase the content of organic
matter and improve fertility.
* Trees in areas of this map unit respond well to
applications of fertilizer.






Taylor County, Florida


Cropland
Suitability: Poor
Commonly grown crops: Corn, grain sorghum, and
tobacco
Management concerns:Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* Crop rotations that include close-growing cover crops
improve tilth and reduce the hazard of erosion.
* The cover crops and all crop residue should be
returned to the soil.
* Good tilth and nutrient management are required for
maximum yields.
* Special erosion-control practices are not normally
needed.
* Irrigation is not normally used for crops on these
soils.
Pasture and hayland
Suitability: Well suited
Commonly grown grasses: Bahiagrass and improved
bermudagrass
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* A total management system for the water table
should remove excess water rapidly and provide a
means of applying subirrigation.
* A combination of tile drains and open ditches may be
needed to maintain the water table at the preferred
depth.
* The proper spacing of tile drains is important for
obtaining adequate drainage.
* Tile drains can provide a means of applying
subirrigation during periods of low rainfall.
* Nutrient management maximizes yields.
* Controlled grazing helps to maintain vigorous plants
and maximum yields.
Urban development
Suitability: Poor
Management concerns: Wetness, poor filter, seepage,
too sandy, cutbanks cave, droughtiness, and
corrosivity
Management considerations:
* The local Health Department can be contacted for
guidance regarding sanitary facilities.
* Building structures on the highest part of the
landscape and using artificial drainage reduce the risk
of damage from wetness.
* Using corrosion-resistant materials reduces the risk
of damage to uncoated steel and concrete.
* Lawns need irrigation during periods of low rainfall.


* Digging trenches during dry periods minimizes
sloughing.
Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: Clara-IVw; Osier-Vw
Woodland ordination symbol: 11W for slash pine
Ecological community: North Florida Flatwoods


5-Chaires fine sand

Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Flatwoods
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 3 to more than 300 acres
Composition
Chaires and similar soils: 81 percent
Dissimilar soils: 19 percent
Typical Profile
Surface layer:
0 to 6 inches-very dark gray fine sand
Subsurface layer:
6 to 20 inches-light brownish gray fine sand
Subsoil:
20 to 26 inches-black fine sand
26 to 30 inches-dark reddish brown fine sand
Second subsurface layer:
30 to 52 inches-dark yellowish brown fine sand
Second subsoil:
52 to 80 inches-light gray and light olive gray sandy
clay loam
Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class:Very deep
Drainage class: Poorly drained
Permeability: Moderately slow or slow in the subsoil
Available water capacity: Moderate
Shrink-swellpotential: Low
Slope class: Nearly level
Hazard of flooding: None
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Bedrock: Bedrock is within a depth of 60 inches in
about 13 percent of the map unit and within a
depth of 61 to 80 inches in about 5 percent. Where
present, it is at a depth of about 30 to 78 inches.
The best estimate for overall average depth to
bedrock (where present) is 56 inches.






Soil Survey


Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
Chaires, Meadowbrook, Osier, and Tooles soils in
depressions
Chaires, Meadowbrook, Pottsburg, Tooles, Osier, and
Wekiva soils on flats
Steinhatchee soils in areas of flatwoods
Melvina, Moriah, and Ridgewood soils on rises and
knolls
Similar soils:
Chaires-like soils that have limestone bedrock within
a depth of 80 inches, have an organic-stained subsoil
at a depth of more than 30 inches, have a loamy
subsoil at a depth of less than 40 inches, or have
limestone at a depth of more than 60 inches; in
positions similar to those of the Chaires soil

Use and Management
Dominant uses: Timber production and wildlife habitat
Other uses: Crops, pasture, and urban development
Woodland
Potential productivity: High
Trees to plant: Slash pine and loblolly pine
Management concerns: Equipment limitations, seedling
mortality, and plant competition
Management considerations:
* Site preparation, such as bedding, helps to establish
seedlings, reduces the seedling mortality rate, and
increases the early growth rate.
* Chopping and bedding help to minimize debris,
control competing vegetation, and facilitate planting.
* Using field machinery equipped with large tires or
tracks and harvesting during dry periods help to
overcome the equipment limitations and minimize soil
compaction and root damage during thinning activities.
* Logging systems that leave plant debris well
distributed over the site increase the content of organic
matter and improve fertility.
* Trees in areas of this map unit respond well to
applications of fertilizer.
Cropland
Suitability: Poor
Commonly grown crops: Corn, grain sorghum, and
tobacco
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* Crop rotations that include close-growing cover crops
improve tilth and reduce the hazard of erosion.
* The cover crops and all crop residue should be
returned to the soil.


* Good tilth and nutrient management are required for
maximum yields.
* Special erosion-control practices are not normally
needed.
* Irrigation is not normally used for crops on this soil.
Pasture and hayland
Suitability: Well suited
Commonly grown grasses: Bahiagrass and improved
bermudagrass
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
A total management system for the water table
should remove excess water rapidly and provide a
means of applying subirrigation.
A combination of tile drains and open ditches may be
needed to maintain the water table at the preferred
depth.
The proper spacing of tile drains is important for
obtaining adequate drainage.
Tile drains can provide a means of applying
subirrigation during periods of low rainfall.
Nutrient management maximizes yields.
Controlled grazing helps to maintain vigorous plants
and maximum yields.
Urban development
Suitability: Poor
Management concerns: Wetness, percs slowly, poor
filter, seepage, too sandy, cutbanks cave, and
corrosivity
Management considerations:
* The local Health Department can be contacted for
guidance regarding sanitary facilities.
* Building structures on the highest part of the
landscape and using artificial drainage reduce the risk
of damage from wetness.
* Using corrosion-resistant materials reduces the risk
of damage to uncoated steel and concrete.
* Lawns need irrigation during periods of low rainfall.
* Digging trenches during dry periods minimizes
sloughing.
Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: IVw
Woodland ordination symbol: 10W for slash pine
Ecological community: North Florida Flatwoods


6-Leon fine sand
Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Flatwoods






Taylor County, Florida


Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 3 to more than 500 acres
Composition
Chaires and similar soils: 78 percent
Dissimilar soils: 22 percent
Typical Profile
Surface layer:
0 to 6 inches-very dark gray fine sand
Subsurface layer:
6 to 11 inches-grayish brown fine sand
11 to 25 inches-light gray fine sand
Subsoil:
25 to 30 inches-black fine sand
30 to 34 inches-dark reddish brown fine sand
Substratum:
34 to 56 inches-dark yellowish brown fine sand
56 to 80 inches-yellowish brown fine sand
Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class: Very deep
Drainage class: Poorly drained
Permeability: Moderate or moderately rapid in the
subsoil
Available water capacity: Low
Shrink-swell potential: Low
Slope class: Nearly level
Hazard of flooding: None
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Bedrock: Bedrock is within a depth of 60 inches in
about 1 percent of the map unit and within a depth
of 61 to 80 inches in about 3 percent. Where
present, it is at a depth of about 60 to 78 inches.
The best estimate for overall average depth to
bedrock (where present) is 70 inches.
Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Chaires, Meadowbrook, Osier, and Tooles soils and
Osier-like soils that have a thick, dark surface layer; on
flood plains and in depressions
* Chaires, Meadowbrook, Osier, Pottsburg, Tennille,
Tooles, and Wekiva soils on flats
* Leon, Leon-like soils that have an organic-stained
subsoil below a depth of 30 inches, and Steinhatchee
soils; on flatwoods
* Moriah and Ridgewood soils on rises and knolls
Similar soils:
* Leon-like soils that have limestone bedrock within a


depth of 80 inches, have an organic-stained subsoil
below a depth of 30 inches, do or do not have
limestone below a depth of 60 inches, or have a loamy
subsoil at a depth of less than 40 inches; in positions
similar to those of the Leon soil
Use and Management
Dominant uses: Timber production and wildlife habitat
Other uses: Crops, pasture, and urban development
Woodland
Potential productivity: High
Trees to plant: Slash pine and loblolly pine
Management concerns: Equipment limitations, seedling
mortality, and plant competition
Management considerations:
* Site preparation, such as bedding, helps to establish
seedlings, reduces the seedling mortality rate, and
increases the early growth rate.
* Chopping and bedding help to minimize debris,
control competing vegetation, and facilitate planting.
* Using field machinery equipped with large tires or
tracks and harvesting during dry periods help to
overcome the equipment limitations and minimize soil
compaction and root damage during thinning activities.
* Logging systems that leave plant debris well
distributed over the site increase the content of organic
matter and improve fertility.
* Trees in areas of this map unit respond well to
applications of fertilizer.
Cropland
Suitability: Poor
Commonly grown crops: Corn, grain sorghum, and
tobacco
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* Crop rotations that include close-growing cover crops
improve tilth and reduce the hazard of erosion.
* The cover crops and all crop residue should be
returned to the soil.
* Good tilth and nutrient management are required for
maximum yields.
* Special erosion-control practices are not normally
needed.
* Irrigation is not normally used for crops on this soil.
Pasture and hayland
Suitability: Well suited
Commonly grown grasses: Bahiagrass and improved
bermudagrass
Management concerns:Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake






Soil Survey


Management considerations:
* A total management system for the water table
should remove excess water rapidly and provide a
means of applying subirrigation.
* A combination of tile drains and open ditches may be
needed to maintain the water table at the preferred
depth.
* The proper spacing of tile drains is important for
obtaining adequate drainage.
* Tile drains can provide a means of applying
subirrigation during periods of low rainfall.
* Nutrient management maximizes yields.
* Controlled grazing helps to maintain vigorous plants
and maximum yields.
Urban development
Suitability: Poor
Management concerns:Wetness, poor filter, seepage,
too sandy, cutbanks cave, and corrosivity
Management considerations:
* The local Health Department can be contacted for
guidance regarding sanitary facilities.
* Building structures on the highest part of the
landscape and using artificial drainage reduce the risk
of damage from wetness.
* Using corrosion-resistant materials reduces the risk
of damage to uncoated steel and concrete.
* Lawns need irrigation during periods of low rainfall.
* Digging trenches during dry periods minimizes
sloughing.
Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: IVw
Woodland ordination symbol: 10W for slash pine
Ecological community: North Florida Flatwoods


8-Meadowbrook fine sand

Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Flats
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 3 to more than 200 acres
Composition
Meadowbrook and similar soils: 80 percent
Dissimilar soils: 20 percent
Typical Profile
Surface layer:
0 to 9 inches-dark grayish brown fine sand


Subsurface layer:
9 to 31 inches-very pale brown fine sand
31 to 58 inches-light gray fine sand
Subsoil:
58 to 80 inches-light brownish gray sandy clay loam

Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class: Very deep
Drainage class: Poorly drained
Permeability: Moderately slow or moderate in the
subsoil
Available water capacity: Low
Shrink-swellpotential: Low
Slope class: Nearly level
Hazard of flooding: None
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Bedrock: Bedrock is within a depth of 60 inches in
about 1 percent of the map unit and within a depth
of 61 to 80 inches in about 10 percent. Where
present, it is at a depth of about 55 to 76 inches.
The best estimate for overall average depth to
bedrock is 70 inches.

Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Meadowbrook soils in depressions
* Chaires and Clara soils and Goldhead-like soils that
have a loamy subsoil at a depth of less than 20 inches
* Meadowbrook-like soils that have a weak, organic-
stained subsoil directly beneath the surface layer
* Tennille soils on flats
* Chaires soils and Chaires-like soils that have an
organic-stained subsoil below a depth of 30 inches
* Chaires-like soils that have limestone below a depth
of 60 inches
* Leon soils in areas of flatwoods
Similar soils:
* Meadowbrook-like soils that have limestone bedrock
above and below a depth of 80 inches and Goldhead-
like soils that have pale brown, brown, light yellowish
brown, and yellowish brown subsurface layers; in
positions similar to those of the Meadowbrook soil

Use and Management
Dominant uses: Timber production and wildlife habitat
Other uses: Crops, pasture, and urban development
Woodland
Potential productivity: High
Trees to plant: Slash pine and loblolly pine






Taylor County, Florida


Management concerns: Equipment limitations, seedling
mortality, and plant competition
Management considerations:
* Site preparation, such as bedding, helps to establish
seedlings, reduces the seedling mortality rate, and
increases the early growth rate.
* Chopping and bedding help to minimize debris,
control competing vegetation, and facilitate planting.
* Using field machinery equipped with large tires or
tracks and harvesting during dry periods help to
overcome the equipment limitations and minimize soil
compaction and root damage during thinning activities.
* Logging systems that leave plant debris well
distributed over the site increase the content of organic
matter and improve fertility.
* Trees in areas of this map unit respond well to
applications of fertilizer.

Cropland
Suitability: Poor
Commonly grown crops: Corn, grain sorghum, and
tobacco
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* Crop rotations that include close-growing cover crops
improve tilth and reduce the hazard of erosion.
* The cover crops and all crop residue should be
returned to the soil.
* Good tilth and nutrient management are required for
maximum yields.
* Special erosion-control practices are not normally
needed.
* Irrigation is not normally used for crops on this soil.

Pasture and hayland
Suitability: Well suited
Commonly grown grasses: Bahiagrass and improved
bermudagrass
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* A total management system for the water table
should remove excess water rapidly and provide a
means of applying subirrigation.
* A combination of tile drains and open ditches may be
needed to maintain the water table at the preferred
depth.
* The proper spacing of tile drains is important for
obtaining adequate drainage.
* Tile drains can provide a means of applying
subirrigation during periods of low rainfall.
* Nutrient management maximizes yields.


* Controlled grazing helps to maintain vigorous plants
and maximum yields.
Urban development
Suitability: Poor
Management concerns: Wetness, percs slowly,
seepage, too sandy, cutbanks cave, droughtiness,
and corrosivity
Management considerations:
* The local Health Department can be contacted for
guidance regarding sanitary facilities.
* Building structures on the highest part of the
landscape and using artificial drainage reduce the risk
of damage from wetness.
* Using corrosion-resistant materials reduces the risk
of damage to uncoated steel and concrete.
* Lawns need irrigation during periods of low rainfall.
* Digging trenches during dry periods minimizes
sloughing.
Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: IVw
Woodland ordination symbol: 11W for slash pine
Ecological community: North Florida Flatwoods


9-Sapelo fine sand
Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Flatwoods
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 3 to more than 400 acres
Composition
Sapelo and similar soils: 80 percent
Dissimilar soils: 20 percent
Typical Profile
Surface layer:
0 to 6 inches-very dark gray fine sand
Subsurface layer:
6 to 12 inches-gray fine sand
12 to 28 inches-light gray fine sand
Subsoil:
28 to 34 inches-black fine sand
34 to 45 inches-dark reddish brown fine sand
Second subsurface layer:
45 to 60 inches-light gray fine sand
Second subsoil:
60 to 73 inches-light brownish gray sandy clay loam






Soil Survey


73 to 80 inches-light olive gray fine sandy loam
Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class:Very deep
Drainage class: Poorly drained
Permeability: Moderately slow or moderate in the
subsoil
Available water capacity: Low
Shrink-swellpotential: Low
Slope class: Nearly level
Hazard of flooding: None
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
Leon, Sapelo, and Surrency soils in depressions
Clara, Osier, Meadowbrook, and Pottsburg soils on
flats
Boulogne and Leon soils in areas of flatwoods
Albany and Ocilla soils on rises and knolls
Similar soils:
Sapelo-like soils that have limestone bedrock within
a depth of 80 inches; Mascotte soils; Mascotte-like
soils that do not have a subsurface layer and a weak,
organic-stained subsoil directly beneath the surface
layer; and some Mascotte soils that have a loamy
subsoil below a depth of 40 inches; in positions similar
to those of the Sapelo soil
Use and Management
Dominant uses: Timber production and wildlife habitat
Other uses: Crops, pasture, and urban development
Woodland
Potential productivity: High
Trees to plant: Slash pine and loblolly pine
Management concerns: Equipment limitations, seedling
mortality, and plant competition
Management considerations:
* Site preparation, such as bedding, helps to establish
seedlings, reduces the seedling mortality rate, and
increases the early growth rate.
* Chopping and bedding help to minimize debris,
control competing vegetation, and facilitate planting.
* Using field machinery equipped with large tires or
tracks and harvesting during dry periods help to
overcome the equipment limitations and minimize soil
compaction and root damage during thinning activities.
* Logging systems that leave plant debris well
distributed over the site increase the content of organic
matter and improve fertility.
* Trees in areas of this map unit respond well to
applications of fertilizer.


Cropland
Suitability: Poor
Commonly grown crops: Corn, grain sorghum, and
tobacco
Management concerns:Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
Crop rotations that include close-growing cover crops
improve tilth and help to control erosion.
The cover crops and all crop residue should be
returned to the soil.
Good tilth and nutrient management are required for
maximum yields.
Special erosion-control practices are not normally
needed.
Irrigation is not normally used for crops on this soil.
Pasture and hayland
Suitability: Well suited
Commonly grown grasses: Bahiagrass and improved
bermudagrass
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* A total management system for the water table
should remove excess water rapidly and provide a
means of applying subirrigation.
* A combination of tile drains and open ditches may be
needed to maintain the water table at the preferred
depth.
* The proper spacing of tile drains is important for
obtaining adequate drainage.
* Tile drains can provide a means of applying
subirrigation during periods of low rainfall.
* Nutrient management maximizes yields.
* Controlled grazing helps to maintain vigorous plants
and maximum yields.
Urban development
Suitability: Poor
Management concerns: Wetness, seepage, too
sandy, cutbanks cave, droughtiness, and
corrosivity
Management considerations:
* The local Health Department can be contacted for
guidance regarding sanitary facilities.
* Building structures on the highest part of the
landscape and using artificial drainage reduce the risk
of damage from wetness.
* Using corrosion-resistant materials reduces the risk
of damage to uncoated steel and concrete.
* Lawns need irrigation during periods of low rainfall.
* Digging trenches during dry periods minimizes
sloughing.






Taylor County, Florida


Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: Illw
Woodland ordination symbol: 7W for slash pine
Ecological community: North Florida Flatwoods


10-Mandarin-Hurricane complex,
0 to 3 percent slopes

Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Flatwoods
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 3 to more than 150 acres
Composition
Mandarin and similar soils: 62 percent
Hurricane and similar soils: 18 percent
Dissimilar soils: 20 percent
Typical Profile
Mandarin
Surface layer:
0 to 7 inches-dark gray fine sand
Subsurface layer:
7 to 15 inches-gray fine sand
15 to 26 inches-light gray fine sand
Subsoil:
26 to 30 inches-dark reddish brown fine sand
30 to 34 inches-reddish brown fine sand
34 to 44 inches-yellowish brown fine sand
Substratum:
44 to 80 inches-light gray fine sand
Hurricane
Surface layer:
0 to 8 inches-very dark grayish brown fine sand
Subsurface layer:
8 to 22 inches-light yellowish brown fine sand
22 to 32 inches-very pale brown fine sand
32 to 48 inches-yellow fine sand
48 to 63 inches-white fine sand
Subsoil:
63 to 69 inches-brown fine sand
69 to 80 inches-black fine sand
Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class: Very deep
Drainage class: Somewhat poorly drained
Permeability: Mandarin-moderate in the subsoil;


Hurricane-moderately rapid in the subsoil
Available water capacity: Mandarin-moderate;
Hurricane-low
Shrink-swell potential: Low
Slope class: Nearly level
Hazard of flooding: None
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Content of organic matter in the surface layer: Low
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Depth to bedrock: No bedrock within a depth of 80
inches
Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Evergreen and Wesconnett soils in depressions
* Lynn Haven soils on flats
* Leon, Boulogne, Pottsburg, and Sapelo soils in areas
of flatwoods
* Ortega soils on rises and knolls
Similar soils:
* Soils that are similar to the Mandarin and Hurricane
soils but that have limestone bedrock within a depth of
80 inches; Mandarin-like soils that have a weak,
organic-stained subsoil; Mandarin-like soils that have
an organic-stained subsoil below a depth of 30 inches;
Mandarin-like soils that have a dark surface layer; and
Ridgewood soils; in positions similar to those of the
Mandarin and Hurricane soils
Use and Management
Dominant uses: Timber production and wildlife habitat
Other uses: Crops, pasture, and urban development
Woodland
Potential productivity: Moderate
Trees to plant: Slash pine and longleaf pine
Management concerns: Equipment limitations, seedling
mortality, and plant competition
Management considerations:
* Site preparation, such as bedding, helps to establish
seedlings, reduces the seedling mortality rate, and
increases the early growth rate.
* Chopping and bedding help to minimize debris,
control competing vegetation, and facilitate planting.
* Using field machinery equipped with large tires or
tracks and harvesting during dry periods help to
overcome the equipment limitations and minimize soil
compaction and root damage during thinning activities.
* Logging systems that leave plant debris well
distributed over the site increase the content of organic
matter and improve fertility.
Cropland
Suitability: Poor






Soil Survey


Commonly grown crops: Corn, grain sorghum, and
tobacco
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
Crop rotations that include close-growing cover crops
improve tilth and reduce the hazard of erosion.
The cover crops and all crop residue should be
returned to the soil.
Good tilth and nutrient management are required for
maximum yields.
Special erosion-control practices are not normally
needed.
The irrigation of high-value crops is typically feasible
where irrigation water is readily available.
Pasture and hayland
Suitability: Moderately well suited
Commonly grown grasses: Bahiagrass and improved
bermudagrass
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* Nutrient management maximizes yields.
* Controlled grazing helps to maintain vigorous plants
and maximum yields.
Urban development
Suitability: Fair
Management concerns: Wetness, poor filter, seepage,
too sandy, cutbanks cave, and droughtiness
Management considerations:
* The local Health Department can be contacted for
guidance regarding sanitary facilities.
* Using corrosion-resistant materials reduces the risk
of damage to uncoated steel and concrete.
* Lawns need irrigation during periods of low rainfall.
* Digging trenches during dry periods minimizes
sloughing.
Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: Mandarin-VIs;
Hurricane-lIlw
Woodland ordination symbol: Mandarin-8S for slash
pine; Hurricane-11W for slash pine
Ecological community: Upland Hardwood Hammocks


12-Ortega fine sand, 0 to 5
percent slopes

Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Rises and knolls


Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 3 to more than 1,000 acres
Composition
Ortega and similar soils: 78 percent
Dissimilar soils: 22 percent
Typical Profile
Surface layer:
0 to 5 inches-gray fine sand
Substratum:
5 to 42 inches-very pale brown fine sand
42 to 61 inches-light yellowish brown fine sand
61 to 80 inches-white fine sand
Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class:Very deep
Drainage class: Moderately well drained
Permeability: Rapid throughout
Available water capacity: Low
Shrink-swell potential: Low
Slope class: Nearly level and gently sloping
Hazard of flooding: None
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Depth to bedrock: No bedrock within a depth of 80
inches
Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Lynn Haven soils in depressions and on flats
* Boulogne and Leon soils in areas of flatwoods
* Hurricane and Ridgewood soils on the lower rises
and knolls
* Kershaw soils on the higher rises and knolls
Similar soils:
* Ortega-like soils that have an organic-stained subsoil
below a depth of 60 inches; in positions similar to
those of the Ortega soil

Use and Management
Dominant uses: Timber production and wildlife habitat
Other uses: Crops, pasture, and urban development
Woodland
Potential productivity: Moderate
Trees to plant: Slash pine, loblolly pine, and longleaf
pine
Management concerns: Equipment limitations, seedling
mortality, and plant competition
Management considerations:
* Site preparation, such as bedding, helps to establish






Taylor County, Florida


seedlings, reduces the seedling mortality rate, and
increases the early growth rate.
* Chopping and bedding help to minimize debris,
control competing vegetation, and facilitate planting.
* Using field machinery equipped with large tires or
tracks and harvesting during dry periods help to
overcome the equipment limitations and minimize soil
compaction and root damage during thinning activities.
* Logging systems that leave plant debris well
distributed over the site increase the content of organic
matter and improve fertility.
Cropland
Suitability: Poor
Commonly grown crops: Corn, grain sorghum, and
tobacco
Management concerns: Droughtiness and fast intake
Management considerations:
* Crop rotations that include close-growing cover crops
improve tilth and help to control erosion.
* The cover crops and all crop residue should be
returned to the soil.
* Good tilth and nutrient management are required for
maximum yields.
* Special erosion-control practices are not normally
needed.
* The irrigation of high-value crops is typically feasible
where irrigation water is readily available.
Pasture and hayland
Suitability: Moderately well suited
Commonly grown grasses: Bahiagrass and improved
bermudagrass
Management concerns: Droughtiness and fast intake
Management considerations:
* Nutrient management maximizes yields.
* Controlled grazing helps to maintain vigorous plants
and maximum yields.
Urban development
Suitability: Fair
Management concerns:Wetness, poor filter, seepage,
too sandy, cutbanks cave, and droughtiness
Management considerations:
* The local Health Department can be contacted for
guidance regarding sanitary facilities.
* Using corrosion-resistant materials reduces the risk
of damage to uncoated steel and concrete.
* Lawns need irrigation during periods of low rainfall.
* Digging trenches during dry periods minimizes
sloughing.
Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: Ills
Woodland ordination symbol: 10S for slash pine


Ecological community: Longleaf Pine-Turkey Oak Hills


13-Hurricane fine sand, 0 to 3
percent slopes

Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Rises and knolls
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 3 to more than 200 acres
Composition
Hurricane and similar soils: 77 percent
Dissimilar soils: 23 percent
Typical Profile
Surface layer:
0 to 8 inches-very dark grayish brown fine sand
Subsurface layer:
8 to 22 inches-light yellowish brown fine sand
22 to 32 inches-very pale brown fine sand
32 to 48 inches-yellow fine sand
48 to 63 inches-white fine sand
Subsoil:
63 to 69 inches-brown fine sand
69 to 80 inches-black fine sand
Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class:Very deep
Drainage class: Somewhat poorly drained
Permeability: Moderately rapid in the subsoil
Available water capacity: Low
Shrink-swellpotential: Low
Slope class: Nearly level and gently sloping
Hazard of flooding: None
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Bedrock: Bedrock is within a depth of 60 inches in
about 5 percent of the map unit and within a depth
of 61 to 80 inches in about 1 percent. Where
present, it is at a depth of about 35 to 65 inches.
The best estimate for overall average depth to
bedrock is 50 inches.
Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Evergreen, Lynn Haven, and Osier soils in
depressions
* Osier and Tooles soils on flats
* Boulogne, Chaires, Mandarin, and Leon soils in
areas of flatwoods






Soil Survey


* Lutterloh, Ridgewood, and Ortega soils on rises and
knolls
Similar soils:
* Hurricane-like soils that have limestone bedrock
within a depth of 80 inches or have an organic-stained
subsoil within a depth of 50 inches and Pottsburg-like
soils that have a seasonal high water table at a depth
of 12 to 24 inches; in positions similar to those of the
Hurricane soil
Use and Management
Dominant uses: Timber production and wildlife habitat
Other uses: Crops, pasture, and urban development
Woodland
Potential productivity: Moderate
Trees to plant: Slash pine, loblolly pine, and longleaf
pine
Management concerns: Equipment limitations, seedling
mortality, and plant competition
Management considerations:
Site preparation, such as bedding, helps to establish
seedlings, reduces the seedling mortality rate, and
increases the early growth rate.
Chopping and bedding help to minimize debris,
control competing vegetation, and facilitate planting.
Using field machinery equipped with large tires or
tracks and harvesting during dry periods help to
overcome the equipment limitations and minimize soil
compaction and root damage during thinning activities.
Logging systems that leave plant debris well
distributed over the site increase the content of organic
matter and improve fertility.
Cropland
Suitability: Poor
Commonly grown crops: Corn, grain sorghum, and
tobacco
Management concerns:Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* Crop rotations that include close-growing cover crops
improve tilth and help to control erosion.
* The cover crops and all crop residue should be
returned to the soil.
* Good tilth and nutrient management are required for
maximum yields.
* Special erosion-control practices are not normally
needed.
* The irrigation of high-value crops is typically feasible
where irrigation water is readily available.
Pasture and hayland
Suitability: Moderately well suited


Commonly grown grasses: Bahiagrass and improved
bermudagrass
Management concerns: Droughtiness and rapid
leaching of plant nutrients
Management considerations:
Nutrient management maximizes yields.
Controlled grazing helps to maintain vigorous plants
and maximum yields.
Urban development
Suitability: Fair
Management concerns: Wetness, poor filter, seepage,
cutbanks cave, droughtiness, and corrosivity
Management considerations:
The local Health Department can be contacted for
guidance regarding sanitary facilities.
Using corrosion-resistant materials reduces the risk
of damage to uncoated steel and concrete.
Lawns need irrigation during periods of low rainfall.
Digging trenches during dry periods minimizes
sloughing.
Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: Illw
Woodland ordination symbol: 11W for slash pine
Ecological community: Upland Hardwood Hammocks


14-Chipley-Lynn Haven,
depressional-Boulogne complex, 0
to 3 percent slopes
Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Chipley-rises and knolls; Lynn Haven-
depressions; Boulogne-flatwoods
Shape of areas: Rounded or irregular
Size of areas: 5 to more than 200 acres
Composition
Chipley and similar soils: 30 percent
Lynn Haven and similar soils: 25 percent
Boulogne and similar soils: 19 percent
Dissimilar soils: 26 percent
Typical Profile
Chipley
Surface layer:
0 to 9 inches-brown sand
Substratum:
9 to 48 inches-yellowish brown sand
48 to 69 inches-light yellowish brown sand
69 to 80 inches-light gray sand






Taylor County, Florida


Lynn Haven
Surface layer:
0 to 13 inches-very dark brown mucky fine sand
Subsurface layer:
13 to 19 inches-light brownish gray fine sand
Subsoil:
19 to 27 inches-black fine sand
27 to 31 inches-dark brown fine sand
31 to 34 inches-dark yellowish brown fine sand
Second subsurface layer:
34 to 52 inches-yellowish brown fine sand
Second subsoil:
52 to 80 inches-dark reddish brown fine sand
Boulogne
Surface layer:
0 to 5 inches-black fine sand
Subsoil:
5 to 14 inches-dark brown fine sand
Substratum:
14 to 20 inches-dark grayish brown fine sand
20 to 31 inches-grayish brown fine sand
31 to 80 inches-light gray fine sand

Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class:Very deep
Drainage class: Chipley-somewhat poorly drained;
Lynn Haven-very poorly drained; Boulogne-
poorly drained
Permeability: Chipley-rapid throughout; Lynn Haven-
moderately rapid or moderate in the subsoil;
Boulogne-moderately rapid in the subsoil
Available water capacity: Chipley and Boulogne-low;
Lynn Haven-moderate
Shrink-swell potential: Low
Slope class: Nearly level and gently sloping
Hazard of flooding: None
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Content of organic matter in the surface layer:
Chipley-low or very low; Lynn Haven-moderate;
Boulogne-low
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Depth to bedrock: No bedrock within a depth of 80
inches

Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Pamlico, Starke, and Surrency soils in depressions
* Clara and Osier soils on flats
* Goldhead-like soils that have a weak, organic-


stained subsoil directly beneath the surface layer; in
areas of flatwoods
* Albany, Kershaw, Ortega, and Otela soils on rises
and knolls
Similar soils:
* Similar soils that have limestone bedrock within a
depth of 80 inches; on rises, on knolls, in areas of
flatwoods, and in depressions
* Chipley-like soils that have a thick, dark surface
layer; on rises and knolls
* Lynn Haven-like soils that do not have subsurface
layers; in depressions
* Pottsburg-like soils that have a thick, dark surface
layer; in depressions
* Pottsburg soils in areas of flatwoods
* Hurricane soils and Pottsburg-like soils that have a
seasonal high water table at a depth of 12 to 24 inches;
on rises and knolls
Use and Management
Dominant uses: Timber production and wildlife habitat
Other uses: Crops, pasture, and urban development
Woodland
Potentialproductivity: Chipley-moderate; Lynn
Haven-not suited; and Boulogne-high
Trees to plant: Chipley-slash pine, loblolly pine, and
longleaf pine; Boulogne-slash pine and loblolly
pine
Management concerns: Equipment limitations, seedling
mortality, and plant competition
Management considerations:
* Site preparation, such as bedding, helps to establish
seedlings, reduces the seedling mortality rate, and
increases the early growth rate.
* Chopping and bedding help to minimize debris,
control competing vegetation, and facilitate planting.
* Using field machinery equipped with large tires or
tracks and harvesting during dry periods help to
overcome the equipment limitations and minimize soil
compaction and root damage during thinning activities.
* Logging systems that leave plant debris well
distributed over the site increase the content of organic
matter and improve fertility.
Cropland
Suitability: Chipley-poor; Lynn Haven-unsuited;
Boulogne-fair
Commonly grown crops: Corn, grain sorghum, and
tobacco
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* The irrigation of high-value crops on the Chipley soil






Soil Survey


is typically feasible where irrigation water is readily
available.
* Crops produced on the Boulogne soil are not
normally irrigated.
* Crop rotations that include close-growing cover crops
improve tilth and help to control erosion.
* The cover crops and all crop residue should be
returned to the soil.
* Good tilth and nutrient management are required for
maximum yields.
* Special erosion-control practices are not normally
needed.
Pasture and hayland
Suitability: Chipley-moderately well suited; Lynn
Haven-unsuited; Boulogne-well suited
Commonly grown grasses: Bahiagrass and improved
bermudagrass
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
Nutrient management maximizes yields.
Controlled grazing helps to maintain vigorous plants
and maximum yields in areas of the Chipley soil.
A total management system for the water table in
areas of the Boulogne soil should remove excess
water rapidly and provide a means of applying
subirrigation.
A combination of tile drains and open ditches may be
needed to maintain the water table at the preferred
depth in areas of the Boulogne soil.
The proper spacing of tile drains is important for
obtaining adequate drainage in areas of the Boulogne
soil.
Tile drains can provide a means of applying
subirrigation during periods of low rainfall in areas of
the Boulogne soil.
Controlled grazing helps to maintain vigorous plants
and maximum yields in areas of the Boulogne soil.
Urban development
Suitability: Chipley and Boulogne-poor; Lynn Haven-
unsuited
Management concerns: Chipley and Boulogne-
wetness, poor filter, seepage, too sandy, cutbanks
cave, droughtiness, and corrosivity; Lynn Haven-
ponding, poor filter, seepage, too sandy, and
cutbanks cave
Management considerations:
* The local Health Department can be contacted for
guidance regarding sanitary facilities.
* Using corrosion-resistant materials reduces the risk
of damage to uncoated steel and concrete.
* Lawns need irrigation during periods of low rainfall.


* Digging trenches during dry periods minimizes
sloughing.
Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: Chipley Ills; Lynn
Haven-Vllw; Boulogne-Illw
Woodland ordination symbol: Chipley-8W for slash
pine; Lynn Haven-not assigned; Boulogne-1 1W
for slash pine
Ecological community: Chipley-Upland Hardwood
Hammocks; Lynn Haven-Shrub Bogs-Bay
Swamps; Boulogne-North Florida Flatwoods


15-Ridgewood fine sand, 0 to 3
percent slopes

Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Rises and knolls
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 3 to more than 200 acres
Composition
Ridgewood and similar soils: 77 percent
Dissimilar soils: 23 percent

Typical Profile
Surface layer:
0 to 9 inches-grayish brown fine sand
Substratum:
9 to 48 inches-yellowish brown fine sand
48 to 69 inches-light yellowish brown fine sand
69 to 80 inches-light gray fine sand

Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class:Very deeD
Drainage class: Somewhat poorly drained
Permeability: Rapid throughout
Available water capacity: Low
Shrink-swell potential: Low
Slope class: Nearly level and gently sloping
Hazard of flooding: None
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Depth to bedrock: No bedrock within a depth of 80
inches
Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Clara soil in depressions





Taylor County, Florida


* Clara, Lynn Haven, Osier, Plummer, and Pottsburg
soils and Pottsburg-like soils that have a subsoil; on flats
* Boulogne, Chaires, Leon, Mandarin, and Melvina
soils in areas of flatwoods
* Albany, Lutterloh, Ortega, and Resota soils on rises
and knolls
Similar soils:
* Hurricane soils in positions similar to those of the
Ridgewood soil

Use and Management
Dominant uses: Timber production and wildlife habitat
Other uses: Crops, pasture, and urban development
Woodland
Potentialproductivity: Moderate
Trees to plant: Slash pine and longleaf pine
Management concerns: Equipment limitations, seedling
mortality, and plant competition
Management considerations:
* Site preparation, such as bedding, helps to establish
seedlings, reduces the seedling mortality rate, and
increases the early growth rate.
* Chopping and bedding help to minimize debris,
control competing vegetation, and facilitate planting.
* Using field machinery equipped with large tires or
tracks and harvesting during dry periods help to
overcome the equipment limitations and minimize soil
compaction and root damage during thinning activities.
* Logging systems that leave plant debris well
distributed over the site increase the content of organic
matter and improve fertility.
Cropland
Suitability: Poor
Commonly grown crops: Corn, grain sorghum, and
tobacco
Management concerns:Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* Crop rotations that include close-growing cover crops
improve tilth and help to control erosion.
* The cover crops and all crop residue should be
returned to the soil.
* Good tilth and nutrient management are required for
maximum yields.
* Special erosion-control practices are not normally
needed.
* The irrigation of high-value crops is typically feasible
where irrigation water is readily available.
Pasture and hayland
Suitability: Moderately well suited


Commonly grown grasses: Bahiagrass and improved
bermudagrass
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* Nutrient management maximizes yields.
* Controlled grazing helps to maintain vigorous plants
and maximum yields.
Urban development
Suitability: Fair
Management concerns: Wetness, poor filter, seepage,
too sandy, cutbanks cave, droughtiness, and
corrosivity
Management considerations:
* The local Health Department can be contacted for
guidance regarding sanitary facilities.
* Using corrosion-resistant materials reduces the risk
of damage to uncoated steel and concrete.
* Lawns need irrigation during periods of low rainfall.
* Digging trenches during dry periods minimizes
sloughing.
Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: IVs
Woodland ordination symbol: 10W for slash pine
Ecological community: Upland Hardwood Hammocks


16-Lutterloh-Ridgewood
complex, 0 to 3 percent slopes

Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Rises and knolls
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or irregular
Size of areas: 3 to more than 200 acres
Composition
Lutterloh and similar soils: 58 percent
Ridgewood and similar soils: 21 percent
Dissimilar soils: 21 percent
Typical Profile
Lutterloh
Surface layer:
0 to 8 inches-dark gray fine sand
Subsurface layer:
8 to 21 inches-yellowish brown fine sand
21 to 51 inches-very pale brown fine sand
Subsoil:
51 to 61 inches-gray sandy clay loam






Soil Survey


61 to 80 inches-light gray sandy clay loam
Ridgewood
Surface layer:
0 to 9 inches-grayish brown fine sand
Substratum:
9 to 48 inches-yellowish brown fine sand
48 to 69 inches-light yellowish brown fine sand
69 to 80 inches-light gray fine sand
Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class: Very deep
Drainage class: Somewhat poorly drained
Permeability: Lutterloh-moderate to very slow in the
subsoil; Ridgewood-rapid throughout
Available water capacity: Low
Shrink-swellpotential: Lutterloh-moderate;
Ridgewood-low
Slope class: Nearly level and gently sloping
Hazard of flooding: None
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
overlying limestone
Bedrock: Bedrock is within a depth of 60 inches in
about 10 percent of the map unit and within a
depth of 61 to 80 inches in about 5 percent. Where
present, it is at a depth of about 10 to 70 inches.
The best estimate for overall average depth to
bedrock is 37 inches.
Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Meadowbrook soil in depressions
* Meadowbrook, Clara, and Tennille soils on flats
* Chaires soils that have limestone below a depth of
60 inches; in areas of flatwoods
* Moriah soils and Pottsburg-like soils that have a
seasonal high water table at a depth of 12 to 24 inches;
on rises and knolls
Similar soils:
* Ridgewood-like soils that have limestone bedrock
within a depth of 80 inches and Lutterloh soils that
have limestone below a depth of 60 inches; in positions
similar to those of the Lutterloh and Ridgewood soils
Use and Management
Dominant uses: Timber production and wildlife habitat
Other uses: Crops, pasture, and urban development
Woodland
Potentialproductivity: Moderate
Trees to plant: Slash pine, loblolly pine, and longleaf
pine


Management concerns: Equipment limitations, seedling
mortality, and plant competition
Management considerations:
Site preparation, such as bedding, helps to establish
seedlings, reduces the seedling mortality rate, and
increases the early growth rate.
Chopping and bedding help to minimize debris,
control competing vegetation, and facilitate planting.
Using field machinery equipped with large tires or
tracks and harvesting during dry periods help to
overcome the equipment limitations and minimize
soil compaction and root damage during thinning
activities.
Logging systems that leave plant debris well
distributed over the site increase the content of organic
matter and improve fertility.
Cropland
Suitability: Poor
Commonly grown crops: Corn, grain sorghum, and
tobacco
Management concerns:Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
Crop rotations that include close-growing cover crops
improve tilth and help to control erosion.
The cover crops and all crop residue should be
returned to the soil.
Good tilth and nutrient management are required for
maximum yields.
Special erosion-control practices are not normally
needed.
The irrigation of high-value crops is typically feasible
where irrigation water is readily available.
Pasture and hayland
Suitability: Moderately well suited
Commonly grown grasses: Bahiagrass and improved
bermudagrass
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* Nutrient management maximizes yields.
* Controlled grazing helps to maintain vigorous plants
and maximum yields.
Urban development
Suitability: Fair
Management concerns: Wetness, poor filter, seepage,
too sandy, cutbanks cave, droughtiness, and
corrosivity
Management considerations:
* The local Health Department can be contacted for
guidance regarding sanitary facilities.






Taylor County, Florida


* Using corrosion-resistant materials reduces the risk
of damage to uncoated steel and concrete.
* Lawns need irrigation during periods of low rainfall.
* Digging trenches during dry periods minimizes
sloughing.
Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: Lutterloh-11Iw;
Ridgewood-IVs
Woodland ordination symbol: 10W
Ecological community: Upland Hardwood Hammocks


17-Ousley-Leon-Clara complex, 0
to 3 percent slopes, occasionally
flooded
Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Ousley-rises and knolls; Leon-f latwoods;
Clara-flats
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 3 to 200 acres
Composition
Ousley and similar soils: 29 percent
Leon and similar soils: 28 percent
Clara and similar soils: 27 percent
Dissimilar soils: 16 percent
Typical Profile
Ousley
Surface layer:
0 to 4 inches-very dark gray fine sand
Substratum:
4 to 45 inches-very pale brown fine sand
45 to 80 inches-light gray fine sand
Leon
Surface layer:
0 to 6 inches-very dark gray fine sand
Subsurface layer:
6 to 11 inches-grayish brown fine sand
11 to 25 inches-light gray fine sand
Subsoil:
25 to 30 inches-black fine sand
30 to 34 inches-dark reddish brown fine sand
Substratum:
34 to 56 inches-dark yellowish brown fine sand
56 to 80 inches-yellowish brown fine sand


Clara
Surface layer:
0 to 6 inches-very dark grayish brown fine sand
Subsurface layer:
6 to 19 inches-grayish brown fine sand
Subsoil:
19 to 32 inches-yellowish brown fine sand
Substratum:
32 to 80 inches-light gray fine sand

Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class: Very deep
Drainage class: Ousley-somewhat poorly drained;
Leon and Clara-poorly drained
Permeability: Ousley-rapid throughout; Leon-
moderate or moderately rapid in the subsoil;
Clara-rapid throughout
Available water capacity: Low
Shrink-swellpotential: Low
Slope class: Nearly level and gently sloping
Flooding: Ousley-occassional for very brief periods;
Leon and Clara-occassional for brief periods
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Content of organic matter in the surface layer: Low
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Bedrock: Bedrock is within a depth of 60 inches in
about 6 percent of the map unit and within a depth
of 61 to 80 inches in about 6 percent. Where
present, it is at a depth of about 25 to 72 inches.
The best estimate for overall average depth to
bedrock is 51 inches.
Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Chaires soils in areas of flatwoods
* Lutterloh, Lutterloh-like soils that have a loamy
subsoil at a depth of 20 to 40 inches, Moriah soils, and
Seaboard soils; in positions similar to those of the
Ousley, Leon, and Clara soils
Similar soils:
* Osier soils on flats
* Boulogne soils and Leon-like soils that have
limestone at a depth of more than 60 inches; in areas
of flatwoods
* Ridgewood soils on rises and knolls

Use and Management
Dominant uses: Timber production and wildlife
habitat
Other uses: Crops, pasture, and urban development






Soil Survey


Woodland
Potentialproductivity: Ousley-moderate; Leon and
Clara-high
Trees to plant: Ousley-slash pine, loblolly pine, and
longleaf pine; Leon and Clara-slash pine and
loblolly pine
Management concerns: Equipment limitations, seedling
mortality, and plant competition
Management considerations:
Site preparation, such as bedding, helps to establish
seedlings, reduces the seedling mortality rate, and
increases the early growth rate.
Chopping and bedding help to minimize debris,
control competing vegetation, and facilitate planting.
Using field machinery equipped with large tires or
tracks and harvesting during dry periods help to
overcome the equipment limitations and minimize soil
compaction and root damage during thinning activities.
Logging systems that leave plant debris well
distributed over the site increase the content of organic
matter and improve fertility.
Cropland
Suitability: Poor
Commonly grown crops: Corn, grain sorghum, and
tobacco
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* Crop rotations that include close-growing cover crops
improve tilth and help to control erosion.
* The cover crops and all crop residue should be
returned to the soil.
* Good tilth and nutrient management are required for
maximum yields.
* Special erosion-control practices are not normally
needed.
* The irrigation of high-value crops is typically feasible
where irrigation water is readily available.
Pasture and hayland
Suitability: Ousley-moderately well suited; Leon and
Clara-well suited
Commonly grown grasses: Bahiagrass and improved
bermudagrass
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* Nutrient management maximizes yields.
* Controlled grazing helps to maintain vigorous plants
and maximum yields.
Urban development
Suitability: Not suited due to wetness, flooding, poor


filter, seepage, cutbanks cave, droughtiness, and
corrosivity
Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: Ousley-l Ilw; Leon-
IVw; Clara-Vlw
Woodland ordination symbol: Ousley-8W for slash
pine; Leon-10 W for slash pine; Clara--1 1W for
slash pine
Ecological community: Ousley-Upland Hardwood
Hammocks; and Leon and Clara-North Florida
Flatwoods

1 9-Otela-Ortega-Lutterloh
complex, 0 to 5 percent slopes

Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Rises and knolls
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 3 to more than 500 acres
Composition
Otela and similar soils' 49 percent
Ortega and similar soils: 24 percent
Lutterloh and similar soils: 23 percent
Dissimilar soils: 4 percent
Typical Profile
Otela
Surface layer:
0 to 7 inches-dark brown fine sand
Subsurface layer:
7 to 28 inches-brownish yellow fine sand
28 to 47 inches-very pale brown fine sand
47 to 54 inches-yellowish brown loamy fine sand
Subsoil:
54 to 63 inches-yellowish brown fine sandy loam
63 to 80 inches-gray sandy clay loam
Ortega
Surface layer:
0 to 5 inches-gray fine sand
Substratum:
5 to 42 inches-very pale brown fine sand
42 to 61 inches-light yellowish brown fine sand
61 to 80 inches-white fine sand
Lutterloh
Surface layer:
0 to 8 inches-dark grayish brown fine sand






Taylor County, Florida


Subsurface layer:
8 to 19 inches-yellowish brown fine sand
19 to 36 inches-very pale brown fine sand
36 to 51 inches-light gray fine sand
Subsoil:
51 to 64 inches-light brownish gray loamy fine sand
Bedrock:
64 inches-soft, weathered, fractured limestone
Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class: Very deep
Drainage class: Otela and Ortega-moderately well
drained; Lutterloh-somewhat poorly drained
Permeability: Otela-moderately slow or slow in the
subsoil; Oretga-rapid throughout; Lutterloh-
moderate to very slow in the subsoil
Available water capacity: Low
Shrink-swell potential: Otela-moderate; Ortega and
Lutterloh-low
Slope class: Nearly level and gently sloping
Hazard of flooding: None
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Depth to bedrock: No bedrock within a depth of 80
inches
Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Starke soils in depressions
* Plummer and Osier soils on flats
* Ocilla and Ridgewood soils in positions similar to
those of the Otela, Ortega, and Lutterloh soils
Similar soils:
* Soils that are similar to the Otela and Ortega soils
but that have limestone bedrock within a depth of 80
inches and Hurricane soils; in positions similar to those
of the Otela, Ortega, and Lutterloh soils
Use and Management
Dominant uses: Timber production and wildlife habitat
Other uses: Crops, pasture, and urban development
Woodland
Potential productivity: Moderate
Trees to plant: Slash pine, loblolly pine, and longleaf
pine
Management concerns: Equipment limitations, seedling
mortality, and plant competition
Management considerations:
* Site preparation, such as bedding, helps to establish
seedlings, reduces the seedling mortality rate, and
increases the early growth rate.


* Chopping and bedding help to minimize debris,
control competing vegetation, and facilitate planting.
* Using field machinery equipped with large tires or
tracks and harvesting during dry periods help to
overcome the equipment limitations and minimize soil
compaction and root damage during thinning activities.
* Logging systems that leave plant debris well
distributed over the site increase the content of organic
matter and improve fertility.

Cropland
Suitability: Poor
Commonly grown crops: Corn, grain sorghum, and
tobacco
Management concerns: Droughtiness and fast intake
Management considerations:
* Crop rotations that include close-growing cover crops
at least two-thirds of the time improve tilth and help to
control erosion.
* The cover crops and all crop residue should be
returned to the soil.
* Good tilth and nutrient management are required for
maximum yields.
* Special erosion-control practices are not normally
needed.
* The irrigation of high-value crops is typically feasible
where irrigation water is readily available.
Pasture and hayland
Suitability: Moderately well suited
Commonly grown grasses: Bahiagrass and improved
bermudagrass
Management concerns: Droughtiness and fast intake
Management considerations:
* Nutrient management maximizes yields.
* Controlled grazing helps to maintain vigorous plants
and maximum yields.
Urban development
Suitability: Fair
Management concerns: Otela-wetness, poor filter,
seepage, too sandy, cutbanks cave, droughtiness,
and percs slowly; Ortega and Lutterloh-wetness,
poor filter, seepage, too sandy, cutbanks cave, and
droughtiness
Management considerations:
* The local Health Department can be contacted for
guidance regarding sanitary facilities.
* Using corrosion-resistant materials reduces the risk
of damage to uncoated steel and concrete.
* Lawns need irrigation during periods of low rainfall.
* Digging trenches during dry periods minimizes
sloughing.






Soil Survey


Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: Otela and Ortega-Ill s;
Lutterloh-lllw
Woodland ordination symbol: Otela and Ortega-10S
for slash pine; Lutterloh-10 W for slash pine
Ecological community: Otela and Ortega-Upland
Hardwood Hammocks; Luttterloh-North Florida
Flatwoods


20-Melvina-Mandarin complex, 0
to 3 percent slopes

Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Flatwoods
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 5 to more than 600 acres
Composition
Melvina and similar soils: 40 percent
Mandarin and similar soils: 38 percent
Dissimilar soils: 22 percent
Typical Profile
Melvina
Surface layer:
0 to 6 inches-gray fine sand
Upper subsurface layer:
6 to 28 inches-white fine sand
Upper part of the subsoil:
28 to 32 inches-dark brown fine sand
32 to 39 inches-dark reddish brown and brown fine
sand
39 to 51 inches-pale brown fine sand
Lower subsurface layer:
51 to 53 inches-light gray fine sand
Lower part of the subsoil:
53 to 80 inches-light gray sandy clay loam
Mandarin
Surface layer:
0 to 7 inches-dark gray fine sand
Subsurface layer:
7 to 15 inches-gray fine sand
15 to 26 inches-light gray fine sand
Subsoil:
26 to 30 inches-dark reddish brown fine sand
30 to 34 inches-reddish brown fine sand


34 to 44 inches-yellowish brown fine sand
Substratum:
44 to 80 inches-light gray fine sand
Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class: Very deep
Drainage class: Somewhat poorly drained
Permeability: Melvina-moderately slow to very slow in
the subsoil; Mandarin-moderate in the subsoil
Available water capacity: Low
Shrink-swellpotential: Low
Slope class: Nearly level and gently sloping
Hazard of flooding: None
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Content of organic matter in the surface layer: Low
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Bedrock: Bedrock is within a depth of 60 inches in
about 13 percent of the map unit and within a
depth of 61 to 80 inches in about 14 percent.
Where present, it is at a depth of about 25 to 79
inches. The best estimate for overall average depth
to bedrock is 59 inches.
Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Meadowbrook soils on flats
* Chaires, Leon, and Steinhatchee soils in areas of
flatwoods
* Mandarin-like soils that have limestone bedrock
within a depth of 80 inches, Lutterloh soils, Lutterloh-
like soils that have a loamy subsoil at a depth of 20 to
40 inches, Moriah soils, Ortega soils, Otela soils,
Kershaw-like soils that have lamellae below a depth of
50 inches, Resota soils, and Ridgewood soils; on rises
and knolls
Similar soils:
* Hurricane soils, Melvina-like soils that have an
organic-stained subsoil below a depth of 30 inches,
Mandarin-like soils that have an organic-stained
subsoil at a depth of 30 to 50 inches; in positions
similar to those of the Melvina and Mandarin soils
* Pottsburg soils in areas of flatwoods
Use and Management
Dominant uses: Timber production and wildlife habitat
Other uses: Crops, pasture, and urban development
Woodland
Suitability: Poor
Trees to plant: Slash pine, loblolly pine, and longleaf
pine
Management concerns: Equipment limitations, seedling
mortality, and plant competition






Taylor County, Florida


Management considerations:
* Site preparation, such as bedding, helps to establish
seedlings, reduces the seedling mortality rate, and
increases the early growth rate.
* Chopping and bedding help to minimize debris,
control competing vegetation, and facilitate planting.
* Using field machinery equipped with large tires or
tracks and harvesting during dry periods help to
overcome the equipment limitations and minimize soil
compaction and root damage during thinning activities.
* Logging systems that leave plant debris well
distributed over the site increase the content of organic
matter and improve fertility.
* Trees in areas of this map unit respond well to
applications of fertilizer.

Cropland
Suitability: Poor
Commonly grown crops: Corn, grain sorghum, and
tobacco
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* Crop rotations that include close-growing cover crops
at least two-thirds of the time improve tilth and help to
control erosion.
* The cover crops and all crop residue should be
returned to the soil.
* Good tilth and nutrient management are required for
maximum yields.
* Special erosion-control practices are not normally
needed.
* Irrigation is not normally used for crops on these soils.
Pasture and hayland
Suitability: Moderately well suited
Commonly grown grasses: Bahiagrass and improved
bermudagrass
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* A total management system for the water table
should remove excess water rapidly and provide a
means of applying subirrigation.
* A combination of tile drains and open ditches may be
needed to maintain the water table at the preferred
depth.
* The proper spacing of tile drains is important for
obtaining adequate drainage.
* Tile drains can provide a means of applying
subirrigation during periods of low rainfall.
* Nutrient management maximizes yields.
* Controlled grazing helps to maintain vigorous plants
and maximum yields.


Urban development
Suitability: Poor
Management concerns: Melvina-wetness, poor filter,
seepage, too sandy, cutbanks cave, droughtiness,
corrosivity, percs slowly, and depth to rock;
Mandarin-wetness, poor filter, seepage, too sandy,
cutbanks cave, droughtiness, and corrosivity
Management considerations:
* The local Health Department can be contacted for
guidance regarding sanitary facilities.
* Building structures on the highest part of the
landscape and using artificial drainage reduce the risk
of damage from wetness.
* Using corrosion-resistant materials reduces the risk
of damage to uncoated steel and concrete.
* Lawns need irrigation during periods of low rainfall.
* Digging trenches during dry periods minimizes
sloughing.
Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: Melvina-IVs;
Mandarin-Vis
Woodland ordination symbol: Melvina-10 W for slash
pine; Mandarin-8S for slash pine
Ecological community: North Florida Flatwoods


21-Kershaw fine sand, 0 to 8
percent slopes

Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Rises and knolls
Landform position: Linear to concave
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 5 to more than 200 acres
Composition
Kershaw and similar soils: 81 percent
Dissimilar soils: 19 percent
Typical Profile
Surface layer:
0 to 6 inches-dark grayish brown fine sand
Substratum:
6 to 42 inches-yellowish brown fine sand
42 to 64 inches-brownish yellow fine sand
64 to 80 inches-very pale brown fine sand
Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class: Very deep
Drainage class: Excessively drained






Soil Survey


Permeability:Very rapid throughout
Available water capacity: Very low
Shrink-swellpotential: Low
Slope class: Nearly level to moderately sloping
Hazard of flooding: None
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Depth to bedrock: No bedrock within a depth of 80
inches

Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Ortega and Ridgewood soils on the lower rises and
knolls
* Boulogne soils in areas of flatwoods
Similar soils: None

Use and Management
Dominant uses: Timber production and wildlife habitat
Other uses: Urban development
Woodland
Potential productivity: Low
Trees to plant: Sand pine and longleaf pine
Management concerns: Equipment limitations, seedling
mortality, and plant competition
Management considerations:
* Chopping and bedding help to minimize debris,
control competing vegetation, and facilitate planting.
* Using field machinery equipped with large tires or
tracks and harvesting help to overcome the equipment
limitations and minimize soil compaction and root
damage during thinning activities.
* Logging systems that leave plant debris well
distributed over the site increase the content of organic
matter and improve fertility.
Cropland
Suitability: Not suited due to very low natural fertility,
droughtiness, and rapid leaching of plant
nutrients
Pasture and hayland
Suitability: Fair
Commonly grown grasses: Bahiagrass and improved
bermudagrass
Management concerns: Droughtiness, fast intake, and
slope
Management considerations:
* Intensive nutrient management maximizes yields.
* Controlled grazing helps to maintain vigorous plants
and maximum yields.


Urban development
Suitability: Good
Management concerns: Poor filter, seepage, cutbanks
cave, droughtiness, and corrosivity
Management considerations:
* The local Health Department can be contacted for
guidance regarding sanitary facilities.
* Using corrosion-resistant materials reduces the risk
of damage to uncoated steel and concrete.
* Lawns need irrigation during periods of low rainfall.
* Digging trenches during dry periods minimizes
sloughing.
Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: VI ls
Woodland ordination symbol: 8S for sand pine
Ecological community: Longleaf Pine-Turkey Oak Hills


22-Ocilla sand

Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Rises and knolls
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 3 to more than 200 acres
Composition
Ocilla and similar soils: 81 percent
Dissimilar soils: 19 percent
Typical Profile
Surface layer:
0 to 6 inches-dark grayish brown sand
Subsurface layer:
6 to 23 inches-brown sand
Subsoil:
23 to 28 inches-brownish yellow fine sandy loam
28 to 47 inches-light gray sandy clay loam
47 to 68 inches-light gray fine sandy loam
Substratum:
68 to 80 inches-light gray sandy loam
Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class:Very deep
Drainage class: Somewhat poorly drained
Permeability: Moderate or moderately slow in the
subsoil
Available water capacity: Moderate
Shrink-swellpotential: Low





Taylor County, Florida


Slope class: Nearly level
Hazard of flooding: None
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Depth to bedrock: No bedrock within a depth of 80
inches
Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Mascotte soils in areas of flatwoods
* Albany and Ridgewood soils on rises and knolls
Similar soils: None
Use and Management
Dominant uses: Timber production and wildlife habitat
Other uses: Crops, pasture, and urban development
Woodland
Potential productivity: Moderate
Trees to plant: Slash pine, loblolly pine, and longleaf
pine
Management concerns: Equipment limitations, seedling
mortality, and plant competition
Management considerations:
* Site preparation, such as bedding, helps to establish
seedlings, reduces the seedling mortality rate, and
increases the early growth rate.
* Chopping and bedding help to minimize debris,
control competing vegetation, and facilitate planting.
* Using field machinery equipped with large tires or
tracks and harvesting during dry periods help to
overcome the equipment limitations and minimize soil
compaction and root damage during thinning activities.
* Logging systems that leave plant debris well
distributed over the site increase the content of organic
matter and improve fertility.
Cropland
Suitability: Poor
Commonly grown crops: Corn, grain sorghum, and
tobacco
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* Crop rotations that include close-growing cover crops
at least two-thirds of the time improve tilth and help to
control erosion.
* The cover crops and all crop residue should be
returned to the soil.
* Good tilth and nutrient management are required for
maximum yields.
* Special erosion-control practices are not normally
needed.


* The irrigation of high-value crops is typically feasible
where irrigation water is readily available.
Pasture and hayland
Suitability: Moderately well suited
Commonly grown grasses: Bahiagrass and improved
bermudagrass
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* Nutrient management maximizes yields.
* Controlled grazing helps to maintain vigorous plants
and maximum yields.
Urban development
Suitability: Fair
Management concerns: Wetness, seepage, cutbanks
cave, droughtiness, and corrosivity
Management considerations:
* The local Health Department can be contacted for
guidance regarding sanitary facilities.
* Using corrosion-resistant materials reduces the risk
of damage to uncoated steel and concrete.
* Lawns need irrigation during periods of low rainfall.
* Digging trenches during dry periods minimizes
sloughing.
Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: Illw
Woodland ordination symbol: 8W for slash pine
Ecological community: Upland Hardwoods Hammocks


23-Melvina-Moriah-Lutterloh
complex

Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Flats and flatwoods
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 5 to more than 2,000 acres
Composition
Melvina and similar soils: 44 percent
Moriah and similar soils: 18 percent
Lutterloh and similar soils: 16 percent
Dissimilar soils: 22 percent
Typical Profile
Melvina


Surface layer:
0 to 6 inches-gray fine sand





Soil Survey


Upper subsurface layer:
6 to 28 inches-white fine sand
Upper subsoil:
28 to 32 inches-dark brown fine sand
32 to 39 inches-dark reddish brown and brown fine
sand
39 to 51 inches-pale brown fine sand
Lower subsurface layer:
51 to 53 inches-light gray fine sand
Lower subsoil:
53 to 80 inches-light gray sandy clay loam
Moriah
Surface layer:
0 to 5 inches-dark gray fine sand
Subsurface layer:
5 to 9 inches-light brownish gray fine sand
9 to 31 inches-white fine sand
31 to 34 inches-pinkish gray fine sand
Subsoil:
34 to 57 inches-light gray sandy clay loam
Bedrock:
57 inches-soft, weathered, fractured limestone
Lutterloh
Surface layer:
0 to 8 inches-dark grayish brown fine sand
Subsurface layer:
8 to 19 inches-yellowish brown fine sand
19 to 36 inches-very pale brown fine sand
36 to 51 inches-light gray fine sand
Subsoil:
51 to 64 inches-light brownish gray loamy fine sand
Bedrock:
64 inches-soft, weathered, fractured limestone
Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class: Melvina and Lutterloh-very deep;
Moriah-deep and very deep
Drainage class: Somewhat poorly drained
Permeability: Melvina-moderate to very slow in the
subsoil; Moriah-moderate in the subsoil;
Lutterloh-moderate to slow in the subsoil
Available water capacity: Very low
Shrink-swellpotential: Melvina and Moriah-low;
Lotterloh-moderate
Slope class: Nearly level
Hazard of flooding: None
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Content of organic matter in the surface layer:


Melvina-moderately low; Moriah-low or
moderately low; Lutterloh-low to moderate
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
overlying limestone
Bedrock: Bedrock is within a depth of 60 inches in
about 30 percent of the map unit and within a
depth of 61 to 80 inches in about 14 percent.
Where present, it is at a depth of about 22 to 77
inches. The best estimate for overall average depth
to bedrock is 50 inches.
Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Meadowbrook soils in depressions and on flats
* Melvina soils that have limestone bedrock within a
depth of 80 inches, Chaires-like soils that have an
organic-stained subsoil below a depth of 30 inches,
Steinhatchee soils, and Steinhatchee-like soils that
have limestone within a depth of 20 inches; in areas of
flatwoods
* Bushnell, Chiefland, Hurricane, Matmon, Ridgewood,
and Seaboard soils; Moriah-like soils that are better
drained than the Melvina, Moriah, and Lutterloh soils;
and Wekiva soils; on rises and knolls
Similar soils:
* Mandarin soils; Melvina-like soils that have an
organic-stained subsoil below a depth of 30 inches;
Melvina-like soils that have a weak, organic-stained
subsoil; and Moriah-like soils that have a shallow,
loamy subsoil; in positions similar to those of the
Melvina, Moriah, and Lutterloh soils
Use and Management
Dominant uses: Timber production and wildlife habitat
Other uses: Crops, pasture, and urban development
Woodland
Potential productivity: Moderate
Trees to plant: Slash pine, loblolly pine, and longleaf pine
Management concerns: Equipment limitations, seedling
mortality, and plant competition
Management considerations:
* Site preparation, such as bedding, helps to establish
seedlings, reduces the seedling mortality rate, and
increases the early growth rate.
* Chopping and bedding help to minimize debris,
control competing vegetation, and facilitate planting.
* Using field machinery equipped with large tires or
tracks and harvesting during dry periods help to
overcome the equipment limitations and minimize soil
compaction and root damage during thinning activities.
* Logging systems that leave plant debris well
distributed over the site increase the content of organic
matter and improve fertility.





Taylor County, Florida


* Trees in areas of this map unit respond well to
applications of fertilizer.
Cropland
Suitability: Melvina-poor; Moriah and Lutterloh-
moderately well suited
Commonly grown crops: Corn, grain sorghum, and
tobacco
Management concerns:Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* Crop rotations that include close-growing cover crops
improve tilth and help to control erosion.
* The cover crops and all crop residue should be
returned to the soil.
* Good tilth and nutrient management are required for
maximum yields.
* Special erosion-control practices are not normally
needed.
* Irrigation is not normally used for crops on these soils.
Pasture and hayland
Suitability: Melvina-poor; Moriah-moderately suited;
Lutterloh-well suited
Commonly grown grasses: Bahiagrass and improved
bermudagrass
Management concerns:Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* A total management system for the water table
should remove excess water rapidly and provide a
means of applying subirrigation.
* A combination of tile drains and open ditches may be
needed to maintain the water table at the preferred depth.
* The proper spacing of tile drains is important for
obtaining adequate drainage.
* Tile drains can provide a means of applying
subirrigation during periods of low rainfall.
* Nutrient management maximizes yields.
* Control grazing to prevent overgrazing.
Urban development
Suitability: Moderately suited
Management concerns: Melvina-wetness, percs
slowly, poor filter, seepage, depth to rock, too
sandy, cutbanks cave, droughtiness, and
corrosivity; Moriah-wetness, poor filter, seepage,
depth to rock, too sandy, cutbanks cave,
droughtiness, and corrosivity; Lutterloh-wetness,
poor filter, seepage, too sandy, cutbanks cave,
droughtiness, and corrosivity
Management considerations:
* The local Health Department can be contacted for
guidance regarding sanitary facilities.


* Building structures on the highest part of the
landscape and using artificial drainage reduce the risk
of damage from wetness.
* Using corrosion-resistant materials reduces the risk
of damage to uncoated steel and concrete.
* Lawns need irrigation during periods of low rainfall.
* Digging trenches during dry periods minimizes
sloughing.
Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: Melvina-IVs; Moriah
and Lutterloh-lllw
Woodland ordination symbol: Melvina and Lutterloh-
10W for slash pine; Moriah--11S for slash pine
Ecological community: North Florida Flatwoods


24-Albany sand, 0 to 5 percent
slopes
Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Flats and flatwoods
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 5 to more than 80 acres
Composition
Albany and similar soils: 76 percent
Dissimilar soils: 24 percent
Typical Profile
Surface layer:
0 to 10 inches-dark grayish brown sand
Subsurface layer:
10 to 26 inches-grayish brown sand
26 to 37 inches-very pale brown sand
37 to 50 inches-light gray sand
Subsoil:
50 to 57 inches-pale brown fine sandy loam
57 to 80 inches-light gray sandy clay loam
Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class: Very deep
Drainage class: Somewhat poorly drained
Permeability: Moderate or moderately slow in the
subsoil
Available water capacity: Low
Shrink-swellpotential: Low
Slope class: Nearly level and gently sloping
Hazard of flooding: None
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments





Soil Survey


Depth to bedrock: No bedrock within a depth of 80
inches

Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
Plummer and Lynn Haven soils on flats
Chaires and Sapelo soils in areas of flatwoods
Melvina and Ocilla soils on rises and knolls
Similar soils:
Hurricane soils in positions similar to those of the
Albany soil

Use and Management
Dominant uses: Timber production and wildlife habitat
Other uses: Crops, pasture, and urban development
Woodland
Potential productivity: Moderate
Trees to plant: Slash pine, loblolly pine, and longleaf
pine
Management concerns: Equipment limitations, seedling
mortality, and plant competition
Management considerations:
Site preparation, such as bedding, helps to establish
seedlings, reduces the seedling mortality rate, and
increases the early growth rate.
Chopping and bedding help to minimize debris,
control competing vegetation, and facilitate planting.
Using field machinery equipped with large tires or
tracks and harvesting during dry periods help to
overcome the equipment limitations and minimize soil
compaction and root damage during thinning
activities.
Logging systems that leave plant debris well
distributed over the site increase the content of organic
matter and improve fertility.
Cropland
Suitability: Poor
Commonly grown crops: Corn, grain sorghum, and
tobacco
Management concerns:Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* Crop rotations that include close-growing cover crops
at least two-thirds of the time improve tilth and help to
control erosion.
* The cover crops and all crop residue should be
returned to the soil.
* Good tilth and nutrient management are required for
maximum yields.
* Special erosion-control practices are not normally
needed.


* The irrigation of high-value crops is typically feasible
where irrigation water is readily available.
Pasture and hayland
Suitability: Moderately well suited
Commonly grown grasses: Bahiagrass and improved
bermudagrass
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
Nutrient management maximizes yields.
Controlled grazing helps to maintain vigorous plants
and maximum yields.
Urban development
Suitability: Fair
Management concerns:Wetness, seepage, too sandy,
cutbanks cave, droughtiness, and corrosivity
Management considerations:
The local Health Department can be contacted for
guidance regarding sanitary facilities.
Using corrosion-resistant materials reduces the risk
of damage to uncoated steel and concrete.
Lawns need irrigation during periods of low rainfall.
Digging trenches during dry periods minimizes
sloughing.

Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: IIIw
Woodland ordination symbol: 10W for slash pine
Ecological community: Upland Hardwood Hammocks


25-Pottsburg fine sand

Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Flatwoods
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 5 to more than 100 acres

Composition
Pottsburg and similar soils: 77 percent
Dissimilar soils: 23 percent

Typical Profile
Surface layer:
0 to 6 inches-dark gray fine sand
Subsurface layer:
6 to 15 inches-pale brown fine sand
15 to 52 inches-white fine sand





Taylor County, Florida


Subsoil:
52 to 80 inches-dark reddish brown fine sand
Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class:Very deep
Drainage class: Poorly drained
Permeability: Moderate in the subsoil
Available water capacity: Low
Shrink-swellpotential: Low
Slope class: Nearly level
Hazard of flooding: None
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Depth to bedrock: No bedrock within a depth of 80
inches
Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Lynn Haven soils, Leon soils, Meadowbrook soils,
Meadowbrook-like soils that have limestone below a
depth of 60 inches, and Osier soils; on flats
* Chaires and Boulogne soils in areas of flatwoods
* Chiefland, Hurricane, Moriah, Mandarin, and Ousley
soils and Pottsburg-like soils that have limestone
bedrock within a depth of 80 inches; in positions similar
to those of the Pottsburg soil
Similar soils:
* Boulogne and Leon soils in positions similar to those
of the Pottsburg soil
Use and Management
Dominant uses: Timber production
Other uses: Crops, pasture, and urban development
Woodland
Potential productivity: Moderately high
Trees to plant: Slash pine and loblolly pine
Management concerns: Equipment limitations, seedling
mortality, and plant competition
Management considerations:
* Site preparation, such as bedding, helps to establish
seedlings, reduces the seedling mortality rate, and
increases the early growth rate.
* Chopping and bedding help to minimize debris,
control competing vegetation, and facilitate planting.
* Using field machinery equipped with large tires or
tracks and harvesting during dry periods help to
overcome the equipment limitations and minimize soil
compaction and root damage during thinning activities.
* Logging systems that leave plant debris well
distributed over the site increase the content of organic
matter and improve fertility.
* Trees in areas of this map unit respond well to
applications of fertilizer.


Cropland
Suitability: Poor
Commonly grown crops: Corn, grain sorghum, and
tobacco
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
Crop rotations that include close-growing cover crops
improve tilth and help to control erosion.
The cover crops and all crop residue should be
returned to the soil.
Good tilth and nutrient management are required for
maximum yields.
Special erosion-control practices are not normally
needed.
Irrigation is not normally used for crops on this soil.
Pasture and hayland
Suitability: Well suited
Commonly grown grasses: Bahiagrass and improved
bermudagrass
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* A total management system for the water table
should remove excess water rapidly and provide a
means of applying subirrigation.
* A combination of tile drains and open ditches may be
needed to maintain the water table at the preferred
depth.
* The proper spacing of tile drains is important for
obtaining adequate drainage.
* Tile drains can provide a means of applying
subirrigation during periods of low rainfall.
* Nutrient management maximizes yields.
* Controlled grazing helps to maintain vigorous plants
and maximum yields.
Urban development
Suitability: Poor
Management concerns: Wetness, poor filter, seepage,
too sandy, cutbanks cave, droughtiness, and
corrosivity
Management considerations:
* The local Health Department can be contacted for
guidance regarding sanitary facilities.
* Building structures on the highest part of the
landscape and using artificial drainage reduce the risk
of damage from wetness.
* Using corrosion-resistant materials reduces the risk
of damage to uncoated steel and concrete.
* Lawns need irrigation during periods of low rainfall.
* Digging trenches during dry periods minimizes
sloughing.





Soil Survey


Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: IVw
Woodland ordination symbol: 10W for slash pine
Ecological community: North Florida Flatwoods


26-Resota-Hurricane complex, 0
to 5 percent slopes

Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Rises and knolls
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 40 to more than 60 acres
Composition
Resota and similar soils: 67 percent
Hurricane and similar soils: 20 percent
Dissimilar soils: 13 percent
Typical Profile
Resota
Surface layer:
0 to 3 inches-gray sand
Subsurface layer:
3 to 13 inches-white sand
Subsoil:
13 to 19 inches-strong brown sand
19 to 37 inches-brownish yellow sand
37 to 55 inches-very pale brown sand
Substratum:
55 to 80 inches-light gray fine sand
Hurricane
Surface layer:
0 to 8 inches-very dark grayish brown fine sand
Subsurface layer:
8 to 22 inches-light yellowish brown fine sand
22 to 32 inches-very pale brown fine sand
32 to 48 inches-yellow fine sand
48 to 63 inches-white fine sand
Subsoil:
63 to 69 inches-brown fine sand
69 to 80 inches-black fine sand
Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class:Very deep
Drainage class: Resota-moderately well drained;
Hurricane-somewhat poorly drained
Permeability: Resota-very rapid throughout;


Hurricane-moderately rapid in the subsoil
Available water capacity: Resota-very low;
Hurricane-low
Shrink-swellpotential: Low
Slope class: Nearly level and gently sloping
Hazard of flooding: None
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Content of organic matter in the surface layer:
Resota-very low; Hurricane-low or moderately low
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Depth to bedrock: No bedrock within a depth of 80
inches
Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
Leon soils in areas of flatwoods
Ortega-like soils that have an organic-stained subsoil
below a depth of 50 inches and Ridgewood soils; in
positions similar to those of the Resota and Hurricane
soils
Similar soils:
Mandarin soils in positions similar to those of the
Resota and Hurricane soils
Use and Management
Dominant uses: Timber production and wildlife habitat
Other uses: Crops, pasture, and urban development
Woodland
Potential productivity: Resota-low; Hurricane-high
Trees to plant: Slash pine, loblolly pine, and longleaf
pine
Management concerns: Equipment limitations, seedling
mortality, and plant competition
Management considerations:
* Site preparation, such as bedding, helps to establish
seedlings, reduces the seedling mortality rate, and
increases the early growth rate.
* Chopping and bedding help to minimize debris,
control competing vegetation, and facilitate planting.
* Using field machinery equipped with large tires or
tracks and harvesting during dry periods help to
overcome the equipment limitations and minimize soil
compaction and root damage during thinning activities.
* Logging systems that leave plant debris well
distributed over the site increase the content of organic
matter and improve fertility.
* Trees in areas of this map unit respond well to
applications of fertilizer.
Cropland
Suitability: Resota-not suited; Hurricane-moderate
Commonly grown crops: Corn, grain sorghum, and
tobacco





Taylor County, Florida


Management concerns:Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
Crop rotations that include close-growing cover crops
improve tilth and help to control erosion.
The cover crops and all crop residue should be
returned to the soil.
Good tilth and nutrient management are required for
maximum yields.
Special erosion-control practices are not normally
needed.
Irrigation is not normally used for crops on these
soils.
Pasture and hayland
Suitability: Resota-not suited; Hurricane-moderate
Commonly grown grasses: Bahiagrass and improved
bermudagrass
Management concerns:Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* A total management system for the water table
should remove excess water rapidly and provide a
means of applying subirrigation.
* A combination of tile drains and open ditches may be
needed to maintain the water table at the preferred
depth.
* The proper spacing of tile drains is important for
obtaining adequate drainage.
* Tile drains can provide a means of applying
subirrigation during periods of low rainfall.
* Nutrient management maximizes yields.
* Controlled grazing helps to maintain vigorous plants
and maximum yields.
Urban development
Suitability: Resota-moderately well suited;
Hurricane-moderate
Management concerns: Resota-wetness, seepage,
too sandy, cutbanks cave, droughtiness, and
corrosivity; Hurricane-wetness, poor filter,
seepage, too sandy, cutbanks cave, droughtiness,
and corrosivity
Management considerations:
* The local Health Department can be contacted for
guidance regarding sanitary facilities.
* Building structures on the highest part of the
landscape and using artificial drainage reduce the risk
of damage from wetness.
* Using corrosion-resistant materials reduces the risk
of damage to uncoated steel and concrete.
* Lawns need irrigation during periods of low rainfall.
* Digging trenches during dry periods minimizes
sloughing.


Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: Resota-Vls;
Hurricane-Illw
Woodland ordination symbol: Resota-8S for slash
pine; Hurricane-- 1W for slash pine
Ecological community: Upland Hardwood Hammocks


27-Plummer fine sand

Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Flatwoods and flats
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 5 to more than 120 acres

Composition
Plummer and similar soils: 77 percent
Dissimilar soils: 23 percent

Typical Profile
Surface layer:
0 to 7 inches-black fine sand
Subsurface layer:
7 to 14 inches-grayish brown fine sand
14 to 22 inches-gray fine sand
22 to 55 inches-light gray fine sand
Subsoil:
55 to 80 inches-gray fine sandy loam

Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class:Very deep
Drainage class: Poorly drained
Permeability: Moderate or moderately slow in the
subsoil
Available water capacity: Low
Shrink-swellpotential: Low
Slope class: Nearly level
Hazard of flooding: None
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Depth to bedrock: No bedrock within a depth of 80
inches
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Mascotte, Plummer, Goldhead, Starke, and Surrency
soils in depressions
* Goldhead-like soils that have a loamy subsoil within
a depth of 20 inches; on flats






Soil Survey


Similar soils:
* Plummer-like soils that have a weak, organic-stained
subsoil directly beneath the surface layer; in positions
similar to those of the Plummer soil
Use and Management
Dominant uses: Timber production and wildlife habitat
Other uses: Crops, pasture, and urban development
Woodland
Potential productivity: High
Trees to plant: Slash pine and loblolly pine
Management concerns: Equipment limitations, seedling
mortality, and plant competition
Management considerations:
Site preparation, such as bedding, helps to establish
seedlings, reduces the seedling mortality rate, and
increases the early growth rate.
Chopping and bedding help to minimize debris,
control competing vegetation, and facilitate planting.
Using field machinery equipped with large tires or
tracks and harvesting during dry periods help to
overcome the equipment limitations and minimize soil
compaction and root damage during thinning activities.
Logging systems that leave plant debris well
distributed over the site increase the content of organic
matter and improve fertility.
Trees in areas of this map unit respond well to
applications of fertilizer.
Cropland
Suitability: Poor
Commonly grown crops: Corn, grain sorghum, and
tobacco
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* Crop rotations that include close-growing cover crops
at least two-thirds of the time improve tilth and help to
control erosion.
* The cover crops and all crop residue should be
returned to the soil.
* Good tilth and nutrient management are required for
maximum yields.
* Special erosion-control practices are not normally
needed.
* Irrigation is not normally used for crops on this soil.
Pasture and hayland
Suitability: Moderately well suited
Commonly grown grasses: Bahiagrass and improved
bermudagrass
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake


Management considerations:
* A total management system for the water table
should remove excess water rapidly and provide a
means of applying subirrigation.
* A combination of tile drains and open ditches may be
needed to maintain the water table at the preferred
depth.
* The proper spacing of tile drains is important for
obtaining adequate drainage.
* Tile drains can provide a means of applying
subirrigation during periods of low rainfall.
* Nutrient management maximizes yields.
* Controlled grazing helps to maintain vigorous plants
and maximum yields.
Urban development
Suitability: Poor
Management concerns: Wetness, poor filter, seepage,
too sandy, cutbanks cave, droughtiness, and
corrosivity
Management considerations:
The local Health Department can be contacted for
guidance regarding sanitary facilities.
Building structures on the highest part of the
landscape and using artificial drainage reduce the risk
of damage from wetness.
Using corrosion-resistant materials reduces the risk
of damage to uncoated steel and concrete.
Lawns need irrigation during periods of low rainfall.
Digging trenches during dry periods minimizes
sloughing.
Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: IVw
Woodland ordination symbol: 11 W for slash pine
Ecological community: North Florida Flatwoods


28-Surrency, Starke, and Croatan
soils, depressional

Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Depressions
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 5 to more than 200 acres
Composition
Surrency and similar soils: 39 percent
Starke and similar soils: 27 percent
Croatan and similar soils: 21 percent
Dissimilar soils: 13 percent





Taylor County, Florida


Typical Profile
Surrency
Surface layer:
0 to 16 inches-black mucky fine sand
Subsurface layer:
16 to 38 inches-light gray fine sand
Subsoil:
38 to 80 inches-gray sandy clay loam
Starke
Surface layer:
0 to 6 inches-black mucky fine sand
6 to 21 inches-black fine sand
Subsurface layer:
21 to 32 inches-dark grayish brown fine sand
32 to 51 inches-light gray fine sand
Subsoil:
51 to 56 inches-light gray fine sandy loam
56 to 80 inches-light gray sandy clay loam
Croatan
Surface layer:
0 to 25 inches-dark reddish brown muck
Subsurface layer:
25 to 31 inches-black mucky fine sand
31 to 39 inches-brown fine sand
Substratum:
39 to 80 inches-grayish brown sandy clay loam

Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class: Very deep
Drainage class: Very poorly drained
Permeability: Surrency and Starke-moderate or
moderately slow in subsoil; Croatan-moderately
rapid to slow in the organic matter and
moderately rapid to moderately slow in the
substratum
Available water capacity: Surrency and Starke-
moderate; Croatan-high
Shrink-swellpotential: Low
Slope class: Nearly level
Hazard of flooding: None
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Content of organic matter in the surface layer:
Surrency-moderate to very high; Starke and
Croatan-very high
Parent material: Highly decomposed organic matter and
sandy and loamy marine sediments
Depth to bedrock: No bedrock within a depth of 80
inches


Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
Mascotte soils, Mascotte-like soils that have a
surface layer of muck that ranges from 8 to 16 inches
in thickness, Sapelo soils, and Sapelo-like soils that
have a surface layer of muck that ranges from 8 to 16
inches in thickness; in depressions
Clara, Lynn Haven, Pottsburg, and Sapelo soils all
having a seasonal high water table at the surface to a
depth of 6 inches; on flats
Similar soils:
Evergreen soils, Pamlico soils, Plummer soils,
Starke soils, Starke-like soils that have an organic-
stained subsoil, and Surrency-like soils that have a
loamy subsoil within a depth of 20 inches and that
may have 8 to 16 inches of muck; in positions
similar to those of the Surrency, Starke, and
Croatan soils

Use and Management
Dominant uses: Native vegetation and wildlife habitat
Woodland
Potential productivity: Not suited due to ponding
Cropland, hayland, pasture, and
urban development
Suitability: Not suited due to ponding

Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: V lw
Woodland ordination symbol: Not assigned
Ecological community: Shrub Bogs-Bay Swamps


29-Albany-Surrency,
depressional, complex, 0 to 3
percent slopes
Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Albany-rises and knolls; Surrency-
depressions
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 5 to more than 80 acres
Composition
Albany and similar soils: 45 percent
Surrency and similar soils: 38 percent
Dissimilar soils: 17 percent






Soil Survey


Typical Profile
Albany
Surface layer:
0 to 10 inches-dark grayish brown sand
Subsurface layer:
10 to 26 inches-grayish brown sand
26 to 37 inches-very pale brown sand
37 to 50 inches-light gray sand
Subsoil:
50 to 57 inches-pale brown fine sandy loam
57 to 80 inches-light gray sandy clay loam
Surrency
Surface layer:
0 to 16 inches-black mucky fine sand
Subsurface layer:
16 to 38 inches-light gray fine sand
Subsoil:
38 to 80 inches-gray sandy clay loam

Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class:Very deep
Drainage class: Albany-somewhat poorly drained;
Surrency-very poorly drained
Permeability: Moderate or moderately slow in the
subsoil
Available water capacity: Albany-low; Surrency-
moderately low
Shrink-swellpotential: Low
Slope class: Nearly level and gently sloping
Hazard of flooding: None
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Content of organic matter in the surface layer:
Albany-moderately low; Surrency-moderate or
moderately low
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Depth to bedrock: No bedrock within a depth of 80
inches

Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Plummer soils on flats
* Plummer-like soils that have a weak, organic-stained
subsoil directly beneath the surface layer and Sapelo
soils; in areas of flatwoods
Similar soils: None

Use and Management
Dominant uses: Timber production and wildlife habitat
Other uses: Crops, pasture, and urban development


Woodland
Potentialproductivity: Albany-moderately high;
Surrency-not suited
Trees to plant (Albany soil only): Slash pine, loblolly
pine, longleaf pine
Management concerns: Albany-equipment limitations,
seedling mortality, and plant competition
Management considerations:
Site preparation, such as bedding, helps to establish
seedlings, reduces the seedling mortality rate, and
increases the early growth rate.
Chopping and bedding help to minimize debris,
control competing vegetation, and facilitate planting.
Using field machinery equipped with large tires or
tracks and harvesting during dry periods help to
overcome the equipment limitations and minimize
soil compaction and root damage during thinning
activities.
Logging systems that leave plant debris well
distributed over the site increase the content of organic
matter and improve fertility.
Trees in areas of the Albany soil respond well to
applications of fertilizer.
Cropland
Suitability: Albany-moderate; Surrency-not suited
Commonly grown crops (Albany soil only): Corn, grain
sorghum, and tobacco
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, fast
intake, and ponding
Management considerations (Albany soil only):
Crop rotations that include close-growing cover crops
improve tilth and help to control erosion.
The cover crops and all crop residue should be
returned to the soil.
Good tilth and nutrient management are required for
maximum yields.
Special erosion-control practices are not normally
needed.
Irrigation is not normally used for crops on these
soils.
Pasture and hayland
Suitability: Albany-well suited; Surrency-not suited
Commonly grown grasses (Albany soil only):
Bahiagrass and improved bermudagrass
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, fast
intake, and ponding
Management considerations (Albany soil only):
* A total management system for the water table
should remove excess water rapidly and provide a
means of applying subirrigation.
* A combination of tile drains and open ditches may be
needed to maintain the water table at the preferred depth.






Taylor County, Florida


* The proper spacing of tile drains is important for
obtaining adequate drainage.
* Tile drains can provide a means of applying
subirrigation during periods of low rainfall.
* Nutrient management maximizes yields.
* Controlled grazing helps to maintain vigorous plants
and maximum yields.
Urban development
Suitability: Albany-moderately well suited; Surrency-
not suited
Management concerns (Albany soil only): Wetness,
seepage, too sandy, cutbanks cave, droughtiness,
and corrosivity
Management considerations (Albany soil only):
* The local Health Department can be contacted for
guidance regarding sanitary facilities.
* Building structures on the highest part of the
landscape and using artificial drainage reduce the risk
of damage from wetness.
* Using corrosion-resistant materials reduces the risk
of damage to uncoated steel and concrete.
* Lawns need irrigation during periods of low rainfall.
* Digging trenches during dry periods minimizes
sloughing.
Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: Albany-l Ilw; Surrency-
VlIw
Woodland ordination symbol: Albany-10 W for slash
pine; Surrency-not assigned
Ecological community: Albany-Upland Hard
Hammocks; Surrency-Shrub Bogs-Bay Swamps


30-Dorovan and Pamlico soils,
depressional

Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Flood plains and depressions
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 10 to more than 1,500 acres
Composition
Dorovan and similar soils: 56 percent
Pamlico and similar soils: 32 percent
Dissimilar soils: 12 percent
Typical Profile
Dorovan


Surface layer:
0 to 4 inches-very dark brown muck


Subsurface layer:
4 to 72 inches-black muck
Substratum:
72 to 80 inches-black mucky fine sand
Pamlico
Surface layer:
0 to 3 inches-dark brown muck


Subsurface layer:
3 to 9 inches-black muck
9 to 22 inches-black and dark reddish brown muck
Substratum:
22 to 25 inches-black mucky fine sand
25 to 65 inches-brown fine sand

Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class: Very deep
Drainage class: Very poorly drained
Permeability: Dorovan-moderate in the organic matter;
Pamlico-moderate or moderately rapid in the
organic matter
Available water capacity: Dorovan-very high;
Pamlico-high
Shrink-swell potential: Low
Slope class: Nearly level
Hazard of flooding: None
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Content of organic matter in the surface layer:Very high
Parent material: Highly decomposed organic matter
Depth to bedrock: No bedrock within a depth of 80
inches
Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Clara soils, Evergreen soils, Pamlico-like soils
underlain by limestone, and Sapelo soils; in depressions
* Leon and Sapelo soils on flats
* Leon soils in areas of flatwoods
* Wekiva soils on rises and knolls
Similar soils:
* Croatan soils in positions similar to those of the
Dorovan and Pamlico soils
Use and Management
Dominant uses: Native vegetation and wildlife habitat
Woodland
Potential productivity: Not suited due to ponding
Cropland, hayland, pasture, and
urban development
Suitability: Not suited due to ponding






Soil Survey


Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: VIIw
Woodland ordination symbol: Not assigned
Ecological community: Shrub Bogs-Bay Swamps


33-Wesconnett, Evergreen, and
Pamlico soils, depressional

Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Depressions
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 5 to more than 300 acres
Composition
Wesconnett and similar soils: 41 percent
Evergreen and similar soils: 25 percent
Pamlico and similar soils: 20 percent
Dissimilar soils: 14 percent
Typical Profile
Wesconnett
Surface layer:
0 to 10 inches-black fine sand
Subsoil:
10 to 21 inches-very dark gray fine sand
21 to 40 inches-dark reddish brown fine sand
40 to 62 inches-brown fine sand
Substratum:
62 to 80 inches-light gray fine sand
Evergreen
Surface layer:
0 to 9 inches-dark brown muck
Subsurface layer:
9 to 11 inches-black mucky fine sand
11 to 21 inches-dark gray fine sand
Subsoil:
21 to 25 inches-dark brown fine sand
25 to 50 inches-dark reddish brown fine sand
50 to 70 inches-strong brown fine sand
70 to 80 inches-brownish yellow fine sand
Pamlico
Surface layer:
0 to 3 inches-dark brown muck
Subsurface layer:
3 to 9 inches-black muck


9 to 22 inches-black and dark reddish brown muck
Substratum:
22 to 25 inches-black mucky fine sand
25 to 65 inches-brown fine sand

Soil Qualities and Properties
Depth class:Very deep
Drainage class: Very poorly drained
Permeability:Wesconnett-moderate or moderately
rapid in the subsoil; Evergreen-moderate in the
subsoil; Pamlico-moderate or moderately rapid in
the organic matter
Available water capacity: Wesconnett-moderate;
Evergreen and Pamlico-high
Shrink-swellpotential: Low
Slope class: Nearly level
Hazard of flooding: None
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Content of organic matter in the surface layer:
Wesconnett-moderate or high; Evergreen and
Pamlico-very high
Parent material: Highly decomposed organic matter and
sandy marine sediments
Depth to bedrock: No bedrock within a depth of 80
inches
Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
Starke and Surrency soils in depressions
Chaires soils, Clara soils, and Goldhead-like soils
that have a weak, organic-stained subsoil directly
beneath the surface layer; on flats
Pottsburg soils in areas of flatwoods
Similar soils:
Leon soils in depressions

Use and Management
Dominant uses: Native vegetation and wildlife
habitat
Woodland
Potential productivity: Not suited due to ponding
Cropland, hayland, pasture, and
urban development
Suitability: Not suited due to ponding

Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: VI w
Woodland ordination symbol: Not assigned
Ecological community: Shrub Bogs-Bay Swamps






Taylor County, Florida


34-Clara and Bodiford soils,
frequently flooded

Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Flood plains
Shape of areas: Long and narrow or irregular
Size of areas: 25 to more than 800 acres
Composition
Clara and similar soils: 58 percent
Bodiford and similar soils: 21 percent
Dissimilar soils: 21 percent
Typical Profile
Clara
Surface layer:
0 to 6 inches-very dark grayish brown mucky fine sand
Subsurface layer:
6 to 19 inches-grayish brown fine sand
Subsoil:
19 to 32 inches-yellowish brown fine sand
Substratum:
32 to 80 inches-light gray fine sand
Bodiford
Surface layer:
0 to 12 inches-dark reddish brown muck
Subsurface layer:
12 to 18 inches-black mucky fine sand
18 to 29 inches-brown fine sand
Subsoil:
29 to 51 inches-light brownish gray sandy clay loam
Bedrock:
51 inches-soft, weathered, fractured limestone
Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class: Clara-very deep; Bodiford-deep
Drainage class: Very poorly drained
Permeability: Clara-rapid throughout; Bodiford-
moderately slow in the subsoil
Available water capacity: Low
Shrink-swell potential: Low
Slope class: Nearly level
Flooding: Frequent for long periods
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Content of organic matter in the surface layer: Clara-
moderately low to high; Bodiford-very high
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
overlying limestone


Bedrock: Bedrock is within a depth of 60 inches in
about 16 percent of the map unit and within a
depth of 61 to 80 inches in about 1 percent. Where
present, it is at a depth of about 11 to 72 inches.
The best estimate for overall average depth to
bedrock is 43 inches.
Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Clara-like soils that have a surface layer of well
decomposed organic matter that ranges from 8 to 16
inches in thickness; Croatan soils; Bodiford-like soils
that have a mucky, clayey surface layer;
Meadowbrook-like soils that have a thick, dark surface
layer; Nutall-like soils that do not have a surface layer
of well decomposed organic matter that ranges from 8
to 16 inches in thickness or that do not have a thick,
dark surface layer; Pamlico soils; Tennille soils; and
Tooles soils; in positions similar to those of the Clara
and Bodiford soils
* Meadowbrook soils on flats
* Boulogne and Steinhatchee soils in areas of
flatwoods
Similar soils:
* Osier soils; Osier-like soils that have a thick, dark
surface layer; and Bodiford-like soils that have a
surface layer of well decomposed organic matter that
ranges from 8 to 16 inches in thickness; in positions
similar to those of the Clara and Bodiford soils
Use and Management
Dominant uses: Native vegetation and wildlife habitat
Woodland
Potential productivity: Not suited due to flooding
Cropland, hayland, pasture, and
urban development
Suitability: Not suited due to flooding
Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: Clara-VIw; Bodiford-
VIlw
Woodland ordination symbol: Not assigned
Ecological community: Swamp Hardwoods


35-Tooles, Meadowbrook, and
Wekiva soils, frequently flooded

Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Flood plains






Taylor County, Florida


34-Clara and Bodiford soils,
frequently flooded

Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Flood plains
Shape of areas: Long and narrow or irregular
Size of areas: 25 to more than 800 acres
Composition
Clara and similar soils: 58 percent
Bodiford and similar soils: 21 percent
Dissimilar soils: 21 percent
Typical Profile
Clara
Surface layer:
0 to 6 inches-very dark grayish brown mucky fine sand
Subsurface layer:
6 to 19 inches-grayish brown fine sand
Subsoil:
19 to 32 inches-yellowish brown fine sand
Substratum:
32 to 80 inches-light gray fine sand
Bodiford
Surface layer:
0 to 12 inches-dark reddish brown muck
Subsurface layer:
12 to 18 inches-black mucky fine sand
18 to 29 inches-brown fine sand
Subsoil:
29 to 51 inches-light brownish gray sandy clay loam
Bedrock:
51 inches-soft, weathered, fractured limestone
Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class: Clara-very deep; Bodiford-deep
Drainage class: Very poorly drained
Permeability: Clara-rapid throughout; Bodiford-
moderately slow in the subsoil
Available water capacity: Low
Shrink-swell potential: Low
Slope class: Nearly level
Flooding: Frequent for long periods
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Content of organic matter in the surface layer: Clara-
moderately low to high; Bodiford-very high
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
overlying limestone


Bedrock: Bedrock is within a depth of 60 inches in
about 16 percent of the map unit and within a
depth of 61 to 80 inches in about 1 percent. Where
present, it is at a depth of about 11 to 72 inches.
The best estimate for overall average depth to
bedrock is 43 inches.
Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Clara-like soils that have a surface layer of well
decomposed organic matter that ranges from 8 to 16
inches in thickness; Croatan soils; Bodiford-like soils
that have a mucky, clayey surface layer;
Meadowbrook-like soils that have a thick, dark surface
layer; Nutall-like soils that do not have a surface layer
of well decomposed organic matter that ranges from 8
to 16 inches in thickness or that do not have a thick,
dark surface layer; Pamlico soils; Tennille soils; and
Tooles soils; in positions similar to those of the Clara
and Bodiford soils
* Meadowbrook soils on flats
* Boulogne and Steinhatchee soils in areas of
flatwoods
Similar soils:
* Osier soils; Osier-like soils that have a thick, dark
surface layer; and Bodiford-like soils that have a
surface layer of well decomposed organic matter that
ranges from 8 to 16 inches in thickness; in positions
similar to those of the Clara and Bodiford soils
Use and Management
Dominant uses: Native vegetation and wildlife habitat
Woodland
Potential productivity: Not suited due to flooding
Cropland, hayland, pasture, and
urban development
Suitability: Not suited due to flooding
Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: Clara-VIw; Bodiford-
VIlw
Woodland ordination symbol: Not assigned
Ecological community: Swamp Hardwoods


35-Tooles, Meadowbrook, and
Wekiva soils, frequently flooded

Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Flood plains






Soil Survey


Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 5 to more than 150 acres
Composition
Tooles and similar soils: 40 percent
Meadowbrook and similar soils: 28 percent
Wekiva and similar soils: 23 percent
Dissimilar soils: 9 percent

Typical Profile
Tooles
Surface layer:
0 to 8 inches-grayish brown fine sand
Subsurface layer:
8 to 23 inches-brownish yellow fine sand
23 to 52 inches-very pale brown fine sand
Subsoil:
52 to 59 inches-light brownish gray sandy clay loam
Bedrock:
59 inches-soft, weathered, fractured limestone
Meadowbrook
Surface layer:
0 to 9 inches-dark grayish brown fine sand
Subsurface layer:
9 to 31 inches-very pale brown fine sand
31 to 58 inches-light gray fine sand
Subsoil:
58 to 80 inches-light brownish gray sandy clay loam
Wekiva
Surface layer:
0 to 6 inches-black fine sand
Subsurface layer:
6 to 14 inches-yellowish brown fine sand
Subsoil:
14 to 21 inches-yellowish brown fine sandy loam
Bedrock:
21 inches-soft, weathered, fractured limestone

Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class:Tooles-deep; Meadowbrook-very deep;
Wekiva-shallow and moderately deep
Drainage class: Poorly drained
Permeability: Tooles-slow in the subsoil;
Meadowbrook-moderate or moderately slow in the
subsoil; Wekiva-moderately slow in the subsoil
Available water capacity: Low


Shrink-swellpotential:Tooles-moderate; Meadowbrook
and Wekiva-low
Slope class: Nearly level
Flooding: Frequent for long periods
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Content of organic matter in the surface layer: Tooles
and Meadowbrook-moderately low or moderate;
Wekiva-moderate or high
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
overlying limestone
Bedrock: Bedrock is within a depth of 60 inches in
about 56 percent of the map unit and within a
depth of 61 to 80 inches in about 6 percent. Where
present, it is at a depth of about 15 to 65 inches.
The best estimate for overall average depth to
bedrock is 42 inches.

Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Similar soils that have limestone bedrock within a
depth of 80 inches
* Clara soils, Clara-like soils that have a surface
layer of highly decomposed organic matter that
ranges from 8 to 16 inches in thickness, Clara-like
soils that do not have a gray to light gray
subsurface layer, Meadowbrook-like soils that have
a surface layer of highly decomposed organic matter
that ranges from 8 to 16 inches in thickness, Nutall
soils, and Tennille soils; in positions similar to those
of the Tooles, Meadowbrook, and Wekiva soils
Similar soils:
* Goldhead soils, Meadowbrook-like soils that have
limestone below a depth of 60 inches, Tooles-like soils
that have a loamy subsoil within a depth of 20 inches,
and Wekiva soils that have limestone at a depth of 30
to 40 inches; in positions similar to those of the Tooles,
Meadowbrook, and Wekiva soils

Use and Management
Dominant uses: Timber production and wildlife habitat
Woodland
Potentialproductivity: Not suited due to seasonal
surface wetness and flooding
Cropland, hayland, pasture, and
urban development
Suitability: Not suited due to flooding

Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: Tooles and
Meadowbrook-Vlw; Wekiva-Vw






Taylor County, Florida


Woodland ordination symbol: Not assigned
Ecological community: Shrub Bogs-Bay Swamps


37-Tooles and Meadowbrook
soils, depressional

Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Depressions
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 5 to more than 150 acres

Composition
Tooles and similar soils: 48 percent
Meadowbrook and similar soils: 36 percent
Dissimilar soils: 16 percent

Typical Profile
Tooles
Surface layer:
0 to 7 inches-grayish brown fine sand
Subsurface layer:
7 to 24 inches-brownish yellow fine sand
24 to 52 inches-very pale brown fine sand
Subsoil:
52 to 59 inches-light brownish gray sandy clay loam
Bedrock:
59 inches-soft, weathered, fractured limestone
Meadowbrook
Surface layer:
0 to 9 inches-dark grayish brown fine sand
Subsurface layer:
9 to 31 inches-very pale brown fine sand
31 to 58 inches-light gray fine sand
Subsoil:
58 to 80 inches-light brownish gray sandy clay loam

Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class:Tooles-deep; Meadowbrook-very deep
Drainage class: Very poorly drained
Permeability:Tooles-slow in the subsoil;
Meadowbrook-moderate or moderately slow in the
subsoil
Available water capacity: Low
Shrink-swell potential: Tooles-moderate;
Meadowbrook-low


Slope class: Nearly level
Hazard of flooding: None
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Content of organic matter in the surface layer:
Tooles-moderately low to high; Meadowbrook-
moderate
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
overlying limestone
Bedrock: Bedrock is within a depth of 60 inches in
about 63 percent of the map unit and within a
depth of 61 to 80 inches in about 12 percent.
Where present, it is at a depth of about 15 to 75
inches. The best estimate for overall average depth
to bedrock is 44 inches.

Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Similar soils that have limestone bedrock within a
depth of 80 inches; Clara-like soils that do not have
a gray and light gray subsurface layer; Clara-like
soils that have a surface layer of highly
decomposed organic matter that ranges from 8 to 16
inches in thickness; Nutall soils; Pamlico'soils;
Surrency soils; Tennille soils; Wekiva soils; Wekiva-
like soils that have a thick, dark colored surface
layer; and Wekiva-like soils that have a mucky
clayey surface layer; in positions similar to those of
the Tooles and Meadowbrook soils
Similar soils:
* Goldhead-like soils that have yellow and brown
subsurface layers, Meadowbrook soils that have
limestone below a depth of 60 inches, Tooles-like soils
that have a loamy subsoil below a depth of 40 inches,
and Tooles-like soils that have a thick, dark surface
layer; in positions similar to those of the Tooles and
Meadowbrook soils
Use and Management
Dominant uses: Native vegetation and wildlife
habitat
Woodland
Potential productivity: Not suited due to ponding
Cropland, hayland, pasture, and
urban development
Suitability: Not suited due to ponding

Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: VI Iw
Woodland ordination symbol: Not assigned
Ecological community: Shrub Bogs-Bay Swamps






Soil Survey


38-Clara and Meadowbrook soils,
depressional

Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Depressions
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 5 to more than 200 acres
Composition
Clara and similar soils: 44 percent
Meadowbrook and similar soils: 32 percent
Dissimilar soils: 24 percent
Typical Profile
Clara
Surface layer:
0 to 6 inches-very dark grayish brown mucky fine
sand
Subsoil:
6 to 19 inches-grayish brown fine sand
Subsurface layer:
19 to 32 inches-yellowish brown fine sand
Substratum:
32 to 80 inches-light gray fine sand
Meadowbrook
Surface layer:
0 to 9 inches-dark grayish brown fine sand
Subsurface layer:
9 to 31 inches-very pale brown fine sand
31 to 58 inches-light gray fine sand
Subsoil:
58 to 80 inches-light brownish gray sandy clay loam
Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class:Very deep
Drainage class: Very poorly drained
Permeability: Clara-rapid throughout; Meadowbrook-
moderate or moderately slow in the subsoil
Available water capacity: Low
Shrink-swellpotential: Low
Slope class: Nearly level
Hazard of flooding: None
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Content of organic matter in the surface layer:
Clara-moderately low to high; Meadowbrook-
moderate
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
overlying limestone


Bedrock: Bedrock is within a depth of 60 inches in
about 7 percent of the map unit and within a depth
of 61 to 80 inches in about 1 percent. Where
present, it is at a depth of about 21 to 70 inches.
The best estimate for overall average depth to
bedrock is 45 inches.
Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
Clara-like soils that have a surface layer of highly
decomposed organic matter that ranges from 8 to 16
inches in thickness; Clara-like soils that have a thick,
dark surface layer and some that have a brightly
colored subsurface; Croatan soils; Dorovan soils;
Pottsburg-like soils that are very poorly drained and
have a thick, dark surface layer; and Starke soils; in
positions similar to those of the Clara and
Meadowbrook soils
Similar soils that have limestone bedrock within a
depth of 80 inches, Chaires soils, Tennille soils, and
Tooles soils; on flats
Chaires and Leon soils in areas of flatwoods
Similar soils:
Goldhead and Osier soils in positions similar to
those of the Clara and Meadowbrook soils

Use and Management
Dominant uses: Native vegetation and wildlife habitat
(fig. 4)
Woodland
Potential productivity: Not suited due to ponding
Cropland, hayland, pasture, and
urban development
Suitability: Not suited due to ponding

Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: VI Iw
Woodland ordination symbol: Not assigned
Ecological community: Swamp Hardwoods


40-Lutterloh fine sand, limestone
substratum

Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Rises and knolls
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 5 to more than 50 acres






Soil Survey


38-Clara and Meadowbrook soils,
depressional

Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Depressions
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 5 to more than 200 acres
Composition
Clara and similar soils: 44 percent
Meadowbrook and similar soils: 32 percent
Dissimilar soils: 24 percent
Typical Profile
Clara
Surface layer:
0 to 6 inches-very dark grayish brown mucky fine
sand
Subsoil:
6 to 19 inches-grayish brown fine sand
Subsurface layer:
19 to 32 inches-yellowish brown fine sand
Substratum:
32 to 80 inches-light gray fine sand
Meadowbrook
Surface layer:
0 to 9 inches-dark grayish brown fine sand
Subsurface layer:
9 to 31 inches-very pale brown fine sand
31 to 58 inches-light gray fine sand
Subsoil:
58 to 80 inches-light brownish gray sandy clay loam
Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class:Very deep
Drainage class: Very poorly drained
Permeability: Clara-rapid throughout; Meadowbrook-
moderate or moderately slow in the subsoil
Available water capacity: Low
Shrink-swellpotential: Low
Slope class: Nearly level
Hazard of flooding: None
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Content of organic matter in the surface layer:
Clara-moderately low to high; Meadowbrook-
moderate
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
overlying limestone


Bedrock: Bedrock is within a depth of 60 inches in
about 7 percent of the map unit and within a depth
of 61 to 80 inches in about 1 percent. Where
present, it is at a depth of about 21 to 70 inches.
The best estimate for overall average depth to
bedrock is 45 inches.
Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
Clara-like soils that have a surface layer of highly
decomposed organic matter that ranges from 8 to 16
inches in thickness; Clara-like soils that have a thick,
dark surface layer and some that have a brightly
colored subsurface; Croatan soils; Dorovan soils;
Pottsburg-like soils that are very poorly drained and
have a thick, dark surface layer; and Starke soils; in
positions similar to those of the Clara and
Meadowbrook soils
Similar soils that have limestone bedrock within a
depth of 80 inches, Chaires soils, Tennille soils, and
Tooles soils; on flats
Chaires and Leon soils in areas of flatwoods
Similar soils:
Goldhead and Osier soils in positions similar to
those of the Clara and Meadowbrook soils

Use and Management
Dominant uses: Native vegetation and wildlife habitat
(fig. 4)
Woodland
Potential productivity: Not suited due to ponding
Cropland, hayland, pasture, and
urban development
Suitability: Not suited due to ponding

Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: VI Iw
Woodland ordination symbol: Not assigned
Ecological community: Swamp Hardwoods


40-Lutterloh fine sand, limestone
substratum

Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Rises and knolls
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 5 to more than 50 acres






Taylor County, Florida




C~~~~ Ii t n, r
~4


i4


ri~~i~e~FC -4PIT u


Figure 4.-An area of Clara and Meadowbrook soils, depressional. Cypress trees are common in the center of such
depressions.






Soil Survey


Composition
Lutterloh and similar soils: 80 percent
Dissimilar soils: 20 percent
Typical Profile
Surface layer:
0 to 8 inches-dark grayish brown fine sand
Subsurface layer:
8 to 19 inches-yellowish brown fine sand
19 to 36 inches-very pale brown fine sand
36 to 51 inches-light gray fine sand
Subsoil:
51 to 64 inches-light brownish gray loamy fine sand
Bedrock:
64 inches-soft, weathered, fractured limestone
Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class: Deep
Drainage class: Somewhat poorly drained
Permeability: Moderate to slow in the subsoil
Available water capacity: Low or moderate
Shrink-swell potential: Low
Slope class: Nearly level
Hazard of flooding: None
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
overlying limestone
Bedrock: Bedrock is within a depth of 60 inches in
about 65 percent of the map unit and within a
depth of 61 to 80 inches in about 23 percent.
Where present, it is at a depth of about 30 to 75
inches. The best estimate for overall average depth
to bedrock is 52 inches.
Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Tooles soils on flats
* Chaires soils, Chaires-like soils that have limestone
below a depth of 60 inches, Leon soils, and
Steinhatchee-like soils that do not have a loamy
subsoil; in areas of flatwoods
* Seaboard soils in positions similar to those of the
Lutterloh soil
Similar soils:
* Lutterloh soils that do not have limestone below a
depth of 60 inches and Lutterloh-like soils that have a
loamy subsoil within a depth of 40 inches; in positions
similar to those of the Lutterloh soil
Use and Management
Dominant uses: Timber production and wildlife habitat
Other uses: Crops, pasture, and urban development


Woodland
Potential productivity: Moderately high
Trees to plant: Slash pine, loblolly pine, and longleaf
pine
Management concerns: Equipment limitations, seedling
mortality, and plant competition
Management considerations:
* Site preparation, such as bedding, helps to establish
seedlings, reduces the seedling mortality rate, and
increases the early growth rate.
* Chopping and bedding help to minimize debris,
control competing vegetation, and facilitate planting.
* Using field machinery equipped with large tires or
tracks and harvesting during dry periods help to
overcome the equipment limitations and minimize soil
compaction and root damage during thinning activities.
* Logging systems that leave plant debris well
distributed over the site increase the content of organic
matter and improve fertility.
Cropland
Suitability: Moderate
Commonly grown crops: Corn, grain sorghum, and
tobacco
Management concerns:Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* Crop rotations that include close-growing cover crops
improve tilth and help to control erosion.
* The cover crops and all crop residue should be
returned to the soil.
* Good tilth and nutrient management are required for
maximum yields.
* Special erosion-control practices are not normally
needed.
* The irrigation of high-value crops is typically feasible
where irrigation water is readily available.
Pasture and hayland
Suitability: Well suited
Commonly grown grasses: Bahiagrass and improved
bermudagrass
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* Nutrient management maximizes yields.
* Controlled grazing helps to maintain vigorous plants
and maximum yields.
Urban development
Suitability: Fair
Management concerns:Wetness, poor filter, seepage,
depth to rock, cutbanks cave, droughtiness, and
corrosivity






Taylor County, Florida


Management considerations:
* The local Health Department can be contacted for
guidance regarding sanitary facilities.
* Using corrosion-resistant materials reduces the risk
of damage to uncoated steel and concrete.
* Lawns need irrigation during periods of low rainfall.
* Digging trenches during dry periods minimizes
sloughing.
Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: Illw
Woodland ordination symbol: 10W for slash pine
Ecological community: North Florida Flatwoods


41 -Tooles-Meadowbrook
complex
Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Flood plains and depressions
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 5 to more than 50 acres

Composition
Tooles and similar soils: 48 percent
Meadowbrook and similar soils: 32 percent
Dissimilar soils: 20 percent

Typical Profile
Tooles
Surface layer:
0 to 8 inches-very dark gray fine sand
Subsurface layer:
8 to 23 inches-brown fine sand
Subsoil:
23 to 35 inches-yellowish brown fine sand
35 to 46 inches-light gray sandy clay loam
46 to 55 inches-pale yellow clay loam
Bedrock:
55 inches-soft, weathered, fractured limestone
Meadowbrook
Surface layer:
0 to 9 inches-dark grayish brown sand
Subsurface layer:
9 to 31 inches-reddish yellow fine sand
31 to 58 inches-light gray fine sand
Subsoil:
58 to 80 inches-light brownish gray sandy clay loam


Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class:Tooles-deep; Meadowbrook-very deep
Drainage class: Poorly drained
Permeability: Tooles-slow in the subsoil;
Meadowbrook-moderate or moderately slow in the
subsoil
Available water capacity: Low
Shrink-swell potential: Low
Slope class: Nearly level
Hazard of flooding: None
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Content of organic matter in the surface layer:
Moderately low or moderate
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
overlying limestone
Bedrock: Bedrock is within a depth of 60 inches in
about 61 percent of the map unit and within a
depth of 61 to 80 inches in about 2 percent. Where
present, it is at a depth of about 12 to 75 inches.
The best estimate for overall average depth to
bedrock is 44 inches.
Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Clara, Tennille, and Wekiva soils on flats
* Chaires soils, Chaires soils that have limestone
below a depth of 60 inches, and Leon soils; in areas of
flatwoods
* Lutterloh and Moriah soils on rises and knolls
Similar soils:
* Similar soils that have limestone bedrock within a
depth of 80 inches; Goldhead soils; Meadowbrook soils
that have limestone below a depth of 60 inches; and
Tooles-like soils that have limestone at a depth of less
than 40 inches, have a subsoil of loamy fine sand, or
have limestone at a depth of more than 60 inches; in
positions similar to those of the Tooles and
Meadowbrook soils
Use and Management
Dominant uses: Native vegetation and wildlife habitat
Woodland
Potential productivity: Not suited due to wetness at the
surface and ponding
Cropland, hayland, pasture, and
urban development
Suitability: Not suited due to wetness at the surface
and ponding
Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification:Tooles-lllw;
Meadowbrook-IVw






Soil Survey


Woodland ordination symbol: Not assigned
Ecological community: Shrub Bogs-Bay Swamps


45-Chaires fine sand, limestone
substratum

Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Flatwoods
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 5 to more than 250 acres
Composition
Chaires and similar soils: 77 percent
Dissimilar soils: 23 percent
Typical Profile
Surface layer:
0 to 8 inches-very dark gray fine sand
Subsurface layer:
8 to 18 inches-gray fine sand
Subsoil:
18 to 24 inches-dark reddish brown fine sand
24 to 35 inches-brown fine sand
35 to 61 inches-grayish brown sandy clay loam
Bedrock:
61 inches-soft, weathered, fractured limestone
Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class: Deep and very deep
Drainage class: Poorly drained
Permeability: Moderately slow or slow in the subsoil
Available water capacity: Low
Shrink-swell potential: Low
Slope class: Nearly level
Hazard of flooding: None
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments overlying
limestone
Bedrock: Bedrock is within a depth of 60 inches in
about 34 percent of the map unit and within a
depth of 61 to 80 inches in about 28 percent.
Where present, it is at a depth of about 15 to 76
inches. The best estimate for overall average depth
to bedrock is 58 inches.
Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Meadowbrook soils in depressions
* Chaires, wet, soils; Clara soils; Clara-like soils that


have limestone bedrock; Goldhead soils; Meadowbrook
soils; Meadowbrook soils that have a limestone
substratum; Leon, wet, soils; Pottsburg, wet, soils;
Tooles soils; Tennille soils; and Wekiva soils; on flats
* Leon soils, Pottsburg soils, Steinhatchee soils,
Steinhatchee-like soils that have limestone at a depth
of 20 to 40 inches, and Steinhatchee-like soils that do
not have a loamy subsoil; on flatwoods
Similar soils:
* Chaires soils and Chaires-like soils that have an
organic-stained subsoil at a depth 30 to 50 inches or
that have a subsoil of loamy fine sand; in positions
similar to those of the Chaires soils
Use and Management
Dominant uses: Timber production and wildlife habitat
Other uses: Crops, pasture, and urban development
Woodland
Potential productivity: Moderately high
Trees to plant: Slash pine and loblolly pine
Management concerns: Equipment limitations, seedling
mortality, and plant competition
Management considerations:
* Site preparation, such as bedding, helps to establish
seedlings, reduces the seedling mortality rate, and
increases the early growth rate.
* Chopping and bedding help to minimize debris,
control competing vegetation, and facilitate planting.
* Using field machinery equipped with large tires or
tracks and harvesting during dry periods help to
overcome the equipment limitations and minimize soil
compaction and root damage during thinning activities.
* Logging systems that leave plant debris well
distributed over the site increase the content of organic
matter and improve fertility.
* Trees in areas of this map unit respond well to
applications of fertilizer.
Cropland
Suitability: Poor
Commonly grown crops: Corn, grain sorghum, and
tobacco
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* Crop rotations that include close-growing cover crops
improve tilth and reduce the hazard of erosion.
* The cover crops and all crop residue should be
returned to the soil.
* Good tilth and nutrient management are required for
maximum yields.
* Special erosion-control practices are not normally
needed.






Taylor County, Florida


* Irrigation is not normally used for crops on this soil.
Pasture and hayland
Suitability: Moderately well suited
Commonly grown grasses: Bahiagrass and improved
bermudagrass
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* A total management system for the water table
should remove excess water rapidly and provide a
means of applying subirrigation.
* A combination of tile drains and open ditches may be
needed to maintain the water table at the preferred
depth.
* The proper spacing of tile drains is important for
obtaining adequate drainage.
* Tile drains can provide a means of applying
subirrigation during periods of low rainfall.
* Nutrient management maximizes yields.
* Controlled grazing helps to maintain vigorous plants
and maximum yields.
Urban development
Suitability: Poor
Management concerns: Wetness, percs slowly, depth
to rock, too sandy, cutbanks cave, droughtiness,
and corrosivity
Management considerations:
* The local Health Department can be contacted for
guidance regarding sanitary facilities.
* Building structures on the highest part of the
landscape and using artificial drainage reduce the risk
of damage from wetness.
* Using corrosion-resistant materials reduces the risk
of damage to uncoated steel and concrete.
* Lawns need irrigation during periods of low rainfall.
* Digging trenches during dry periods minimizes
sloughing.

Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: IVw
Woodland ordination symbol: 10W for slash pine
Ecological community: North Florida Flatwoods


46-Pits


Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Flats, flatwoods, rises, and knolls
Shape of areas: Generally, square or rectangular
Size of areas: 5 to more than 20 acres


Composition
Pits: 98 percent
Dissimilar soils: 2 percent
Typical Condition
This map unit consists of excavations from which
soil and other geologic material have been removed for
use in road construction, foundations, septic tank
absorption fields, or other purposes. The sides of the
excavations have short, steep side slopes. Most pits
are abandoned. Areas that have been excavated below
the normal seasonal high water table usually contain
water.
Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class: Variable
Drainage class: Poorly drained and very poorly drained
Permeability:Variable
Available water capacity: Variable
Shrink-swellpotential: Variable
Slope class: Variable
Hazard of flooding: Variable
Extent of rock outcrop: Variable
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments,
possibility overlying limestone
Bedrock: Variable
Use and Management
Dominant uses: Native vegetation and wildlife habitat
Woodland
Potential productivity: Not suited due to wetness at the
surface and ponding
Cropland, hayland, pasture, and
urban development
Suitability: Not suited due to wetness at the surface
and ponding
Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: Vills
Woodland ordination symbol: Not assigned
Ecological community: Not assigned


48-Wekiva-Tennille-Tooles
complex, occasionally flooded

Setting
Landscape: Gulf coast lowlands
Landform: Flats and depressions
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular






Taylor County, Florida


* Irrigation is not normally used for crops on this soil.
Pasture and hayland
Suitability: Moderately well suited
Commonly grown grasses: Bahiagrass and improved
bermudagrass
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* A total management system for the water table
should remove excess water rapidly and provide a
means of applying subirrigation.
* A combination of tile drains and open ditches may be
needed to maintain the water table at the preferred
depth.
* The proper spacing of tile drains is important for
obtaining adequate drainage.
* Tile drains can provide a means of applying
subirrigation during periods of low rainfall.
* Nutrient management maximizes yields.
* Controlled grazing helps to maintain vigorous plants
and maximum yields.
Urban development
Suitability: Poor
Management concerns: Wetness, percs slowly, depth
to rock, too sandy, cutbanks cave, droughtiness,
and corrosivity
Management considerations:
* The local Health Department can be contacted for
guidance regarding sanitary facilities.
* Building structures on the highest part of the
landscape and using artificial drainage reduce the risk
of damage from wetness.
* Using corrosion-resistant materials reduces the risk
of damage to uncoated steel and concrete.
* Lawns need irrigation during periods of low rainfall.
* Digging trenches during dry periods minimizes
sloughing.

Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: IVw
Woodland ordination symbol: 10W for slash pine
Ecological community: North Florida Flatwoods


46-Pits


Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Flats, flatwoods, rises, and knolls
Shape of areas: Generally, square or rectangular
Size of areas: 5 to more than 20 acres


Composition
Pits: 98 percent
Dissimilar soils: 2 percent
Typical Condition
This map unit consists of excavations from which
soil and other geologic material have been removed for
use in road construction, foundations, septic tank
absorption fields, or other purposes. The sides of the
excavations have short, steep side slopes. Most pits
are abandoned. Areas that have been excavated below
the normal seasonal high water table usually contain
water.
Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class: Variable
Drainage class: Poorly drained and very poorly drained
Permeability:Variable
Available water capacity: Variable
Shrink-swellpotential: Variable
Slope class: Variable
Hazard of flooding: Variable
Extent of rock outcrop: Variable
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments,
possibility overlying limestone
Bedrock: Variable
Use and Management
Dominant uses: Native vegetation and wildlife habitat
Woodland
Potential productivity: Not suited due to wetness at the
surface and ponding
Cropland, hayland, pasture, and
urban development
Suitability: Not suited due to wetness at the surface
and ponding
Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: Vills
Woodland ordination symbol: Not assigned
Ecological community: Not assigned


48-Wekiva-Tennille-Tooles
complex, occasionally flooded

Setting
Landscape: Gulf coast lowlands
Landform: Flats and depressions
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular






Soil Survey


Size of areas: 10 to more than 500 acres

Composition
Wekiva and similar soils: 44 percent
Tennille and similar soils: 28 percent
Tooles and similar soils: 16 percent
Dissimilar soils: 12 percent


Typical Profile
Wekiva
Surface layer:
0 to 6 inches-black fine sand
Subsurface layer:
6 to 14 inches-yellowish brown fine sand
Subsoil:
14 to 21 inches-light gray fine sandy loam
Bedrock:
21 inches-soft, weathered, fractured limestone
Tennille
Surface layer:
0 to 6 inches-black fine sand
Substratum:
6 to 14 inches-brown and dark grayish brown fine
sand
Bedrock:
14 inches-soft, weathered, fractured limestone
Tooles
Surface layer:
0 to 8 inches-very dark gray fine sand
Subsurface layer:
8 to 23 inches-brown fine sand
Subsoil:
23 to 35 inches-yellowish brown fine sand
35 to 46 inches-light gray sandy clay loam
46 to 55 inches-pale yellow clay loam
Bedrock:
55 inches-soft, weathered, fractured limestone

Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class:Wekiva-shallow and moderately deep;
Tennille-very shallow and shallow; Tooles-deep
Drainage class: Poorly drained
Permeability: Wekiva-moderately slow in the subsoil;
Tennille-rapid throughout; Tooles-slow in the
subsoil
Available water capacity: Low


Flooding: Occasional for brief periods
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Shrink-swell potential: Wekiva and Tennille-low;
Tooles-moderate
Slope class: Nearly level
Content of organic matter in the surface layer:
Wekiva-moderate or high; Tennille and Tooles-
moderately low or moderate
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
overlying limestone
Bedrock: Bedrock is within a depth of 60 inches in
about 98 percent of the map unit and within a
depth of 61 to 80 inches in about 1 percent. Where
present, it is at a depth of about 6 to 75 inches.
The best estimate for overall average depth to
bedrock is 24 inches.

Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Tennille-like soils that have a thick, dark surface
layer; on flats
* Chaires soils, Chaires-like soils that have a
limestone substratum, Steinhatchee soils, and
Steinhatchee-like soils that do not have a loamy
subsoil or that have limestone at a depth of less than
25 inches; in areas of flatwoods
* Matmon and Melvina soils on rises and knolls
Similar soils:
* Clara-like soils that have limestone below a depth of
60 inches, Meadowbrook soils, Tennille-like soils that
have an organic-stained subsoil, and Wekiva-like soils
that do not have a ioamy subsoil; in positions similar to
those of the Wekiva, Tennille, and Tooles soils

Use and Management
Dominant uses: Timber production and wildlife habitat
Other uses: Crops, pasture, and urban development
Woodland
Potential productivity: Poorly suited due to wetness at
the surface and flooding
Cropland, hayland, pasture, and
urban development
Suitability: Not suited due to wetness at the surface
and flooding
Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: Wekiva-Vw; Tennille
and Tooles-VIw
Woodland ordination symbol: Not assigned
Ecological community: Shrub Bogs-Bay Swamps






Taylor County, Florida


49-Seaboard-Bushnell-Matmon
complex, 0 to 3 percent slopes

Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Rises and knolls
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 5 to more than 40 acres
Composition
Seaboard and similar soils: 28 percent
Bushnell and similar soils: 25 percent
Matmon and similar soils: 23 percent
Dissimilar soils: 24 percent

Typical Profile
Seaboard
Surface layer:
0 to 3 inches-dark grayish brown fine sand
Substratum:
3 to 8 inches-yellowish brown fine sand
Bedrock:
8 inches-soft, weathered, fractured limestone
Bushnell
Surface layer:
0 to 10 inches-dark grayish brown fine sand
Subsurface layer:
10 to 14 inches-yellowish brown fine sand
Subsoil:
14 to 30 inches-yellowish brown sandy clay
Bedrock:
30 inches-soft, weathered, fractured limestone
Matmon
Surface layer:
0 to 4 inches-very dark grayish brown fine sand
Subsurface layer:
4 to 11 inches-yellowish brown fine sand
Subsoil:
11 to 19 inches-yellowish brown fine sandy loam
Bedrock:
19 inches-soft, weathered, fractured limestone

Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class: Seaboard-very shallow and shallow;
Bushnell-moderately deep; Matmon-shallow


Drainage class: Seaboard-moderately well drained;
Bushnell and Matmon-somewhat poorly drained
Permeability: Seaboard-rapid throughout; Bushnell-
slow in the subsoil; Matmon-moderately slow in
the subsoil
Available water capacity: Seaboard and Matmon-low;
Bushnell-moderate
Shrink-swell potential: Seaboard and Matmon-low;
Bushnell-moderate
Slope class: Nearly level and gently sloping
Hazard of flooding: None
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Content of organic matter in the surface layer:
Seaboard-low; Bushnell-moderately low or
moderate; Matmon-moderate or high
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
overlying limestone bedrock
Bedrock: Bedrock is within a depth of 60 inches in
about 86 percent of the map unit and within a
depth of 61 to 80 inches in about 3 percent. Where
present, it is at a depth of about 2 to 70 inches.
The best estimate for overall average depth to
bedrock is 26 inches.
Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Chaires soils in areas of flatwoods
* Lutterloh soils, Mandarin soils, Moriah soils, Moriah-
like soils that have limestone at a depth of 40 to 60
inches, Lutterloh-like soils that have a loamy subsoil at
a depth of 15 to 40 inches, Otela soils, and Ridgewood
soils; in positions similar to those of the Seaboard,
Bushnell, and Matmon soils
Similar soils:
* Matmon-like soils that have limestone at a depth of
20 to 40 inches, Moriah-like soils that have limestone
at a depth of 20 to 40 inches, Moriah-like soils that are
moderately well drained, Seaboard-like soils that have
limestone at a depth of less than 20 inches, Seaboard-
like soils that have a gray to light gray subsurface
layer over a brown and yellow subsoil, Seaboard-like
soils that are somewhat poorly drained, and Tennille
soils; in positions similar to those of the Seaboard,
Bushnell, and Matmon soils

Use and Management
Dominant uses: Timber production and wildlife habitat
Other uses: Crops, pasture, and urban development
Woodland
Potential productivity: Seabord-moderately high;
Bushnell-high; Matmon-moderate
Trees to plant: Slash pine and loblolly pine






Soil Survey


Management concerns: Equipment limitations, seedling
mortality, windthrow, and plant competition
Management considerations:
Site preparation, such as bedding, helps to establish
seedlings, reduces the seedling mortality rate, and
increases the early growth rate.
Pine trees planted in areas where limestone is close
to the surface do not grow to a commercially valuable
size due to high pH levels.
Chopping and bedding help to minimize debris,
control competing vegetation, and facilitate planting.
Using field machinery equipped with large tires or
tracks and harvesting during dry periods help to
overcome the equipment limitations and minimize soil
compaction and root damage during thinning
activities.
Logging systems that leave plant debris well
distributed over the site increase the content of organic
matter and improve fertility.
Trees in areas of this map unit respond well to
applications of fertilizer.
Cropland
Suitability: Seaboard-not suited; Bushnell-moderate;
Matmon-poor
Commonly grown crops: Corn, grain sorghum, and
tobacco
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* Crop rotations that include close-growing cover crops
improve tilth and help to control erosion.
* The cover crops and all crop residue should be
returned to the soil.
* Good tilth and nutrient management are required for
maximum yields.
* Special erosion-control practices are not normally
needed.
* Crops produced on these soils need irrigation.
Pasture and hayland
Suitability: Seaboard-not suited; Bushnell-moderate;
Matmon-moderately well suited
Commonly grown grasses: Bahiagrass and improved
bermudagrass
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* A combination of tile drains and open ditches may be
needed to maintain the water table at the preferred
depth.
* Tile drains can provide a means of applying
subirrigation during periods of low rainfall.
* Nutrient management maximizes yields.


* Controlled grazing helps to maintain vigorous plants
and maximum yields.
Urban development
Suitability: Seaboard-moderate; Bushnell and
Matmon-poor
Management concerns: Seaboard-depth to bedrock,
seepage, wetness, too sandy, droughtiness, and
corrosivity; Bushnell-depth to rock, wetness,
percs slowly, too clayey, shrinking and swelling,
low strength, and droughtiness; Matmon-depth to
rock, wetness, percs slowly, too sandy, too clayey,
and hard to pack
Management considerations:
The local Health Department can be contacted for
guidance regarding sanitary facilities.
Building structures on the highest part of the
landscape and using artificial drainage reduce the risk
of damage from wetness.
Using corrosion-resistant materials reduces the risk
of damage to uncoated steel and concrete.
Lawns need irrigation during periods of low rainfall.
Digging trenches during dry periods minimizes
sloughing.
Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: Seaboard-Vis;
Bushnell-Illw; Matmon-IVs
Woodland ordination symbol: Seaboard-10S for slash
pine; Bushnell-11W for slash pine; Matmon-9W
for slash pine
Ecological community: Upland Hardwood Hammocks


51-Tooles-Nutall complex,
frequently flooded

Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Flood plains
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 10 to more than 800 acres
Composition
Tooles and similar soils: 60 percent
Nutall and similar soils: 30 percent
Dissimilar soils: 10 percent
Typical Profile
Tooles
Surface layer:
0 to 8 inches-very dark gray fine sand






Taylor County, Florida


Subsurface layer:
8 to 23 inches-brown fine sand
23 to 35 inches-yellowish brown fine sand
35 to 46 inches-light gray sandy clay loam
46 to 55 inches-pale yellow clay loam
Bedrock:
55 inches-soft, weathered, fractured limestone
Nutall
Surface layer:
0 to 4 inches-black fine sand
Subsurface layer:
4 to 9 inches-mixed very dark gray and light gray fine
sand
9 to 13 inches-light gray fine sand
13 to 17 inches-brown fine sand
Subsoil:
17 to 30 inches-light greenish gray sandy clay loam
Bedrock:
30 inches-soft, weathered, fractured limestone
Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class:Tooles-deep; Nutall-moderately deep
Drainage class: Poorly drained
Permeability: Slow in the subsoil
Available water capacity: Tooles-low or moderate;
Nutall-moderate or high
Shrink-swell potential: Moderate
Slope class: Nearly level
Flooding: Frequent for long periods
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Content of organic matter in the surface layer: Tooles-
moderately low to high; Nutall-moderately low or
moderate
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
overlying limestone
Bedrock: Bedrock is within a depth of 60 inches in
about 36 percent of the map unit and within a
depth of 61 to 80 inches in about 14 percent.
Where present, it is at a depth of about 15 to 75
inches. The best estimate for overall average depth
to bedrock is 45 inches.
Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Goldhead, Starke, and Tennille soils in positions
similar to those of the Tooles and Nutall soils
* Similar soils that have a loamy subsoil within a depth
of 40 inches; on rises and knolls
Similar soils:
* Goldhead-like soils that have limestone at a depth of
more than 60 inches; Goldhead-like soils that have a


loamy subsoil within a depth of 20 inches; Tooles-like
soils that have a thick, dark surface layer; and Nutall-
like soils that have a surface layer of muck; in
positions similar to those of the Tooles and Nutall soils
Use and Management
Dominant uses: Native vegetation and wildlife habitat
Woodland
Potential productivity: Not suited due to flooding
Cropland, hayland, pasture, and urban development
Suitability: Not suited due to flooding
Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: Tooles-Vllw; Nutall-Vw
Woodland ordination symbol: Not assigned
Ecological community: Swamp Hardwoods


52-Clara, depressional-Clara-
Meadowbrook complex,
occasionally flooded
Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Depressions and flats
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 5 to more than 120 acres
Composition
Clara, depressional, and similar soils: 30 percent
Clara and similar soils: 29 percent
Meadowbrook and similar soils: 20 percent
Dissimilar soils: 21 percent
Typical Profile
Clara, depressional
Surface layer:
0 to 2 inches-very dark gray fine sand
Subsurface layer:
2 to 18 inches-grayish brown fine sand
Subsoil:
18 to 37 inches-pale brown fine sand
Substratum:
37 to 50 inches-light gray fine sand
50 to 80 inches-very pale brown fine sand
Clara
Surface layer:
0 to 6 inches-very dark grayish brown fine sand






Soil Survey


Subsurface layer:
6 to 19 inches-grayish brown fine sand
Subsoil:
19 to 32 inches-yellowish brown fine sand
Substratum:
32 to 80 inches-light gray fine sand
Meadowbrook
Surface layer:
0 to 9 inches-dark grayish brown fine sand
Subsurface layer:
9 to 31 inches-very pale brown fine sand
31 to 58 inches-light gray fine sand
Subsoil:
58 to 80 inches-light brownish gray sandy clay loam

Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class:Very deep
Drainage class: Clara, depressional-very poorly
drained; Clara and Meadowbrook-poorly drained
Permeability: Clara-rapid throughout; Meadowbrook-
moderate or moderately slow in the subsoil
Available water capacity: Low
Shrink-swellpotential: Low
Slope class: Nearly level
Flooding: Occasional for brief periods
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Content of organic matter in the surface layer: Clara
and Clara, depressional-moderately low to high;
Meadowbrook-moderately low or moderate
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
overlying limestone
Bedrock: Bedrock is within a depth of 60 inches in
about 7 percent of the map unit and within a depth
of 61 to 80 inches in about 9 percent. Where
present, it is at a depth of about 17 to 75 inches.
The best estimate for overall average depth to
bedrock is 49 inches.
Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Clara-like soils that have a surface layer of highly
decomposed organic matter that ranges from 8 to 16
inches in thickness; Tennille soils; Tennille-like soils
that have a thick, dark surface layer; and Tooles soils;
in depressions
* Leon soils on flats
* Chaires and Leon soils in areas of flatwoods
* Lutterloh, limestone substratum, soils; Lutterloh-like
soils that have a loamy subsoil at a depth of 20 to 40
inches; and Melvina soils; on rises and knolls


Similar soils:
* Similar soils that have limestone bedrock within a
depth of 80 inches; in positions similar to those of the
Clara, depressional, Clara, and Meadowbrook soils
* Clara-like soils that do not have a subsurface layer;
in depressions and on flats
* Meadowbrook, limestone substratum, soils on flats

Use and Management
Dominant uses: Timber production and wildlife habitat
Other uses: Crops, pasture, and urban development
Woodland
Potentialproductivity: Clara, depressional-not suited;
Clara and Meadowbrook-high
Trees to plant: Clara and Meadowbrook-slash pine
and loblolly pine
Management concerns: Equipment limitations, seedling
mortality, and plant competition
Management considerations:
* Site preparation, such as bedding, helps to establish
seedlings, reduces the seedling mortality rate, and
increases the early growth rate.
* Chopping and bedding help to minimize debris,
control competing vegetation, and facilitate planting.
* Using field machinery equipped with large tires or
tracks and harvesting during dry periods help to
overcome the equipment limitations and minimize soil
compaction and root damage during thinning activities.
* Logging systems that leave plant debris well
distributed over the site increase the content of organic
matter and improve fertility.
* Trees in areas of this map unit respond well to
applications of fertilizer.
Cropland
Suitability: Clara, depressional-not suited; Clara-
poor; Meadowbrook-poor
Commonly grown crops: Corn, grain sorghum, and
tobacco
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* Crop rotations that include close-growing cover crops
improve tilth and help to control erosion.
* The cover crops and all crop residue should be
returned to the soil.
* Good tilth and nutrient management are required for
maximum yields.
* Special erosion-control practices are not normally
needed.
* Irrigation is not normally used for crops on these
soils.






Taylor County, Florida


Pasture and hayland
Suitability: Clara, depressional-not suited; Clara and
Meadowbrook-moderately well suited
Commonly grown grasses: Bahiagrass and improved
bermudagrass
Management concerns:Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* A total management system for the water table
should remove excess water rapidly and provide a
means of applying subirrigation.
* A combination of tile drains and open ditches may be
needed to maintain the water table at the preferred
depth.
* The proper spacing of tile drains is important for
obtaining adequate drainage.
* Tile drains can provide a means of applying
subirrigation during periods of low rainfall.
* Nutrient management maximizes yields.
* Controlled grazing helps to maintain vigorous plants
and maximum yields.

Urban development
Suitability: Clara, depressional-not suited; Clara and
Meadowbrook-poor
Management concerns: Clara-flooding, wetness, poor
filter, seepage, too sandy, cutbanks cave, and
corrosivity; Meadowbrook-wetness, percs slowly,
seepage, too sandy, cutbanks cave, flooding, and
corrosivity
Management considerations:
* The local Health Department can be contacted for
guidance regarding sanitary facilities.
* Building structures on the highest part of the
landscape and using artificial drainage reduce the risk
of damage from wetness.
* Using corrosion-resistant materials reduces the risk
of damage to uncoated steel and concrete.
* Lawns need irrigation during periods of low
rainfall.
* Digging trenches during dry periods minimizes
sloughing.

Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: Clara, depressional-
VIlw; Clara-VIw; Meadowbrook-IVw
Woodland ordination symbol: Clara, depressional-not
assigned; Clara and Meadowbrook-11W for slash
pine
Ecological community: Clara, depressional-Shrub
Bogs-Bay Swamps; Clara and Meadowbrook-
North Florida Flatwoods


53-Bayvi muck, frequently
flooded

Setting
Landscape: Coastal swamps on the lower Coastal
Plain
Landform: Salt marshes
Shape of areas: Long and narrow or irregular
Size of areas: 10 to more than 2,000 acres
Composition
Bayvi and similar soils: 81 percent
Dissimilar soils: 19 percent
Typical Profile
Surface layer:
0 to 5 inches-black muck
Subsurface layer:
5 to 17 inches-black mucky loamy sand
17 to 31 inches-very dark grayish brown sand
Substratum:
31 to 53 inches-grayish brown sand
53 to 80 inches-gray sand

Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class:Very deep
Drainage class:Very poorly drained
Permeability: Rapid throughout
Available water capacity: Very low
Shrink-swellpotential: Low
Slope class: Nearly level
Flooding: Frequent for very long periods
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Content of organic matter in the surface layer: Very
high
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
and, in places, the underlying limestone
Bedrock: Bedrock is within a depth of 60 inches in
about 58 percent of the map unit and within a
depth of 61 to 80 inches in about 6 percent. Depth
to bedrock ranges from about 4 to 68 inches. The
best estimate for overall average depth to bedrock
is 38 inches.
Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Bayvi soils that have limestone bedrock within a
depth of 80 inches; Leon-like, Lynn Haven-like, and
Nutall-like soils that have tidal influence; soils that
have a dark, organic-stained subsoil, a loamy subsoil,
or limestone at a depth of 40 to 60 inches; soils that






Soil Survey


have a loamy subsoil over limestone at a depth of 40
to 60 inches; and Tennille-like soils, some that have a
thick, dark surface layer; in positions similar to those
of the Bayvi soil
Similar soils:
* Similar soils that have limestone below a depth of
60 inches; in positions similar to those of the Bayvi
soil
Use and Management
Dominant uses: Native vegetation and wildlife habitat
Woodland
Potential productivity: Not suited due to flooding
Cropland, hayland, pasture, and
urban development
Suitability: Not suited due to flooding
Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: Vlllw
Woodland ordination symbol: Not assigned
Ecological community: Salt Marsh


54-Meadowbrook-Tooles-Clara,
depressional, complex

Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Flats and depressions
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 5 to more than 60 acres

Composition
Tooles and similar soils: 27 percent
Meadowbrook and similar soils: 20 percent
Clara and similar soils: 20 percent
Wekiva and similar soils: 15 percent
Dissimilar soils: 18 percent


Typical Profile


Meadowbrook


Surface layer:
0 to 9 inches-dark grayish brown fine sand
Subsurface layer:
9 to 31 inches-very pale brown fine sand
31 to 58 inches-light gray fine sand
Subsoil:
58 to 80 inches-light brownish gray sandy clay loam


Tooles
Surface layer:
0 to 8 inches-very dark gray fine sand
Subsurface layer:
8 to 23 inches-brown fine sand
Subsoil:
23 to 35 inches-yellowish brown fine sand
35 to 46 inches-light gray sandy clay loam
46 to 55 inches-pale yellow clay loam
Bedrock:
55 inches-soft, weathered, fractured limestone
Clara
Surface layer:
0 to 6 inches-very dark grayish brown mucky fine
sand
Subsurface layer:
6 to 19 inches-grayish brown fine sand
Subsoil:
19 to 32 inches-yellowish brown fine sand
Substratum:
32 to 80 inches-light gray fine sand
Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class:Tooles-deep; Meadowbrook and Clara-
very deep
Drainage class:Tooles and Meadowbrook-poorly
drained; Clara-very poorly drained
Permeability: Meadowbrook-moderate or moderately
slow in the subsoil; Tooles-slow in the subsoil;
Clara-rapid throughout
Available water capacity: Low or moderate
Shrink-swell potential: Low
Slope class: Nearly level
Hazard of flooding: None
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Content of organic matter in the surface layer: Tooles
and Meadowbrook-moderately low or moderate;
Clara-moderately low to high
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
overlying limestone
Bedrock: Bedrock is within a depth of 60 inches in
about 37 percent of the map unit and within a
depth of 61 to 80 inches in about 7 percent. Where
present, it is at a depth of about 12 to 78 inches.
The best estimate for overall average depth to
bedrock is 44 inches.
Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Meadowbrook soils in depressions






Taylor County, Florida


* Tennille-like soils that have limestone at a depth of
20 to 40 inches, Tennille soils, and Tooles-like soils that
have limestone at a depth of 20 to 40 inches; on flats
* Boulogne, Chaires, Leon, and Steinhatchee soils in
areas of flatwoods
Similar soils:
* Goldhead soils, Meadowbrook-like soils that have
limestone below a depth of 60 inches, Meadowbrook-
like soils that have a seasonal high water table at the
surface to a depth of 6 inches, and Tooles-like soils
that have an argillic horizon within a depth of 20
inches; on flats
* Osier soils and Osier-like soils that have a thick,
dark surface layer; in depressions
Use and Management
Dominant uses: Timber production and wildlife habitat
Other uses: Crops, pasture, and urban development
Woodland
Potentialproductivity:Tooles and Meadowbrook-high;
Clara-unsuited
Trees to plant:Tooles and Meadowbrook-slash pine
and loblolly pine
Management concerns: Equipment limitations, seedling
mortality, windthrow, and plant competition
Management considerations:
* Site preparation, such as bedding, helps to establish
seedlings, reduces the seedling mortality rate, and
increases the early growth rate.
* Chopping and bedding help to minimize debris,
control competing vegetation, and facilitate planting.
* Using field machinery equipped with large tires or
tracks and harvesting during dry periods help to
overcome the equipment limitations and minimize soil
compaction and root damage during thinning activities.
* Logging systems that leave plant debris well
distributed over the site increase the content of organic
matter and improve fertility.
* Trees in areas of this map unit respond well to
applications of fertilizer.
Cropland
Suitability:Tooles-fair; Meadowbrook-poor; Clara-
not suited
Commonly grown crops: Corn, grain sorghum, and
tobacco
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* Crop rotations that include close-growing cover crops
improve tilth and reduce the hazard of erosion.
* The cover crops and all crop residue should be
returned to the soil.


* Good tilth and nutrient management are required for
maximum yields.
* Special erosion-control practices are not normally
needed.
* Irrigation is not normally used for crops on these
soils.
Pasture and hayland
Suitability:Tooles-fair; Meadbrook-poor; Clara-not
suited
Commonly grown grasses: Bahiagrass and improved
bermudagrass
Management concerns:Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* A total management system for the water table
should remove excess water rapidly and provide a
means of applying subirrigation.
* A combination of tile drains and open ditches may be
needed to maintain the water table at the preferred
depth.
* The proper spacing of tile drains is important for
obtaining adequate drainage.
* Tile drains can provide a means of applying
subirrigation during periods of low rainfall.
* Nutrient management maximizes yields.
* Controlled grazing helps to maintain vigorous plants
and maximum yields.
Urban development
Suitability:Tooles-poorly; Meadowbrook-poorly;
Clara-not suited
Management concerns:Tooles and Meadowbrook-
wetness, percs slowly, poor filter, seepage, too
sandy, cutbanks cave, and corrosivity
Management considerations:
* The local Health Department can be contacted for
guidance regarding sanitary facilities.
* Building structures on the highest part of the
landscape and using artificial drainage reduce the risk
of damage from wetness.
* Using corrosion-resistant materials reduces the risk
of damage to uncoated steel and concrete.
* Lawns need irrigation during periods of low rainfall.
* Digging trenches during dry periods minimizes
sloughing.

Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification:Tooles- Illw;
Meadowbrook-IVw; Clara-Vllw
Woodland ordination symbol: Tooles and
Meadowbrook-11 W for slash pine; Clara-not
assigned
Ecological community: Tooles and Meadowbrook-






Soil Survey


North Florida Flatwoods; Clara-Shrub Bogs-Bay
Swamps


55-Arents, moderately wet, rarely
flooded

Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Depressions and flats
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 5 to more than 30 acres
Composition
Arents and similar inclusions: 95 percent
Dissimilar soils: 5 percent
Typical Profile
This map unit is made up of heterogeneous
overburden material that was removed from other
areas and used in land leveling or as fill material to
elevate building sites above natural soils. Typically,
it consists of a 10-inch-thick surface layer over 22
inches of overburden. The surface layer and
overburden are a mixture of fine sand and fragments
of loamy subsoil material or dark, organic-stained
subsoil material from the associated Chaires,
Goldhead, Hurricane, Leon, and Mandarin soils.
Typically, the overburden is variable, discontinuous,
and has lenses, pockets, and streaks of black, gray,
and grayish brown fine sand.
Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Similar soils that contain shell fragments, rocks, and
organic matter
Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class: Very deep
Drainage class: Somewhat poorly drained
Permeability: Variable but generally rapid throughout
Available water capacity: Low
Shrink-swellpotential: Low
Slope class: Nearly level
Hazard of flooding: None
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Depth to bedrock: No bedrock within a depth of 80
inches
Use and Management
Dominant uses: Urban development


Woodland
Potential productivity: Moderate
Trees to plant: Slash pine and loblolly pine
Management concerns: Equipment limitations, seedling
mortality, and plant competition
Management considerations:
Site preparation, such as bedding, helps to establish
seedlings, reduces the seedling mortality rate, and
increases the early growth rate.
Chopping and bedding help to minimize debris,
control competing vegetation, and facilitate planting.
Using field machinery equipped with large tires or
tracks and harvesting during dry periods help to
overcome the equipment limitations and minimize soil
compaction and root damage during thinning activities.
Logging systems that leave plant debris well
distributed over the site increase the content of organic
matter and improve fertility.
Trees in areas of this map unit respond well to
applications of fertilizer.
Cropland
Suitability: Moderate
Commonlygrown crops: Corn, grain sorghum, and
tobacco
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* Crop rotations that include close-growing cover crops
improve tilth and help to control erosion.
* The cover crops and all crop residue should be
returned to the soil.
* Good tilth and nutrient management are required for
maximum yields.
* Crops produced in areas of this map unit do not
normally need special erosion-control practices.
* Crops produced in areas of this map unit are not
normally irrigated.
Pasture and hayland
Suitability: Moderately well suited
Commonly grown grasses: Bahiagrass and improved
bermudagrass
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* A total management system for the water table
should remove excess water rapidly and provide a
means of applying subirrigation.
* A combination of tile drains and open ditches may be
needed to maintain the water table at the preferred depth.
* The proper spacing of tile drains is important for
obtaining adequate drainage.






Taylor County, Florida


* Tile drains can provide a means of applying
subirrigation during periods of low rainfall.
* Nutrient management maximizes yields.
* Controlled grazing helps to maintain vigorous plants
and maximum yields.
Urban development
Suitability: Not suited due to wetness, poor filter,
seepage, too sandy, cutbanks cave, droughtiness,
corrosivity, and flooding
Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: Vis
Woodland ordination symbol: Not assigned
Ecological community: Not assigned


57-Sapelo fine sand
Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Flats and depressions
Shape of areas: Long and narrow or irregular
Size of areas: 5 to more than 140 acres
Composition
Sapelo and similar soils: 81 percent
Dissimilar soils: 19 percent
Typical Profile
Surface layer:
0 to 8 inches-black fine sand
Subsurface layer:
8 to 18 inches-light gray fine sand
Upper subsoil:
18 to 32 inches-dark reddish brown fine sand
Substratum:
32 to 46 inches-brown fine sand
Lower subsoil:
46 to 80 inches-gray sandy clay loam
Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class: Very deep
Drainage class: Poorly drained
Permeability: Moderate or moderately slow in the
subsoil
Available water capacity: Moderate
Shrink-swellpotential: Low
Slope class: Nearly level
Hazard of flooding: None
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments


Depth to bedrock: No bedrock within a depth of 80
inches
Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Croatan, Evergreen, Leon, and Pamlico soils in
depressions
* Leon soils in positions similar to those of the Sapelo
soil
Similar soils:
* Mascotte soils in positions similar to those of the
Sapelo soil
Use and Management
Dominant uses: Native vegetation and wildlife habitat
Woodland
Potential productivity: Not suited due to wetness at the
surface and ponding
Cropland, hayland, pasture, and
urban development
Suitability: Not suited due to wetness at the surface
and ponding
Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: VIw
Woodland ordination symbol: Not assigned
Ecological community: Shrub Bogs-Bay Swamps


58-Leon mucky fine sand
Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Flats and depressions
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or irregular
Size of areas: 5 to more than 50 acres
Composition
Leon and similar soils: 90 percent
Dissimilar soils: 10 percent
Typical Profile
Surface layer:
0 to 6 inches-black mucky fine sand
Subsurface layer:
6 to 10 inches-light gray fine sand
Subsoil:
10 to 14 inches-black fine sand
14 to 21 inches-dark reddish brown fine sand
21 to 42 inches-reddish brown and dark reddish brown
fine sand






Taylor County, Florida


* Tile drains can provide a means of applying
subirrigation during periods of low rainfall.
* Nutrient management maximizes yields.
* Controlled grazing helps to maintain vigorous plants
and maximum yields.
Urban development
Suitability: Not suited due to wetness, poor filter,
seepage, too sandy, cutbanks cave, droughtiness,
corrosivity, and flooding
Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: Vis
Woodland ordination symbol: Not assigned
Ecological community: Not assigned


57-Sapelo fine sand
Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Flats and depressions
Shape of areas: Long and narrow or irregular
Size of areas: 5 to more than 140 acres
Composition
Sapelo and similar soils: 81 percent
Dissimilar soils: 19 percent
Typical Profile
Surface layer:
0 to 8 inches-black fine sand
Subsurface layer:
8 to 18 inches-light gray fine sand
Upper subsoil:
18 to 32 inches-dark reddish brown fine sand
Substratum:
32 to 46 inches-brown fine sand
Lower subsoil:
46 to 80 inches-gray sandy clay loam
Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class: Very deep
Drainage class: Poorly drained
Permeability: Moderate or moderately slow in the
subsoil
Available water capacity: Moderate
Shrink-swellpotential: Low
Slope class: Nearly level
Hazard of flooding: None
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments


Depth to bedrock: No bedrock within a depth of 80
inches
Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Croatan, Evergreen, Leon, and Pamlico soils in
depressions
* Leon soils in positions similar to those of the Sapelo
soil
Similar soils:
* Mascotte soils in positions similar to those of the
Sapelo soil
Use and Management
Dominant uses: Native vegetation and wildlife habitat
Woodland
Potential productivity: Not suited due to wetness at the
surface and ponding
Cropland, hayland, pasture, and
urban development
Suitability: Not suited due to wetness at the surface
and ponding
Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: VIw
Woodland ordination symbol: Not assigned
Ecological community: Shrub Bogs-Bay Swamps


58-Leon mucky fine sand
Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Flats and depressions
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or irregular
Size of areas: 5 to more than 50 acres
Composition
Leon and similar soils: 90 percent
Dissimilar soils: 10 percent
Typical Profile
Surface layer:
0 to 6 inches-black mucky fine sand
Subsurface layer:
6 to 10 inches-light gray fine sand
Subsoil:
10 to 14 inches-black fine sand
14 to 21 inches-dark reddish brown fine sand
21 to 42 inches-reddish brown and dark reddish brown
fine sand






Soil Survey


Substratum:
42 to 60 inches-brown fine sand
60 to 65 inches-grayish brown fine sand
Second Subsoil:
65 to 80 inches-dark reddish brown fine sand
Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class:Very deep
Drainage class: Poorly drained
Permeability: Moderately rapid or moderate in the subsoil
Available water capacity: Moderate
Shrink-swell potential: Low
Slope class: Nearly level
Hazard of flooding: None
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Content of organic matter in the surface layer: High
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Depth to bedrock: No bedrock within a depth of 80
inches
Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Evergreen and Pamlico soils in depressions
* Mascotte and Sapelo soils on flats
* Boulogne and Leon soils in areas of flatwoods
Similar soils:
* Leon-like soils that have a subsoil of loamy fine sand
and Lynn Haven soils; in positions similar to those of
the Leon soil
Use and Management
Dominant uses: Native vegetation and wildlife habitat
Woodland
Potential productivity: Not suited due to wetness at the
surface and ponding
Cropland, hayland, pasture, and
urban development
Suitability: Not suited due to wetness at the surface
and ponding
Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: VIw
Woodland ordination symbol: Not assigned
Ecological community: Shrub Bogs-Bay Swamps


59-Arents, sanitary landfill

Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Flats and flatwoods


Shape of areas: Rectangular
Size of areas: 5 to more than 30 acres

Composition
Arents and similar inclusions: 95 percent
Dissimilar soils: 5 percent

Typical Profile
This map unit is made up of heterogeneous
overburden material that has been removed from
other areas and used to cover garbage. It consists
of a mixture of material from the associated
Chaires, Goldhead, Hurricane, Leon, and Mandarin
soils. Typically, the material is 2 to 3 feet thick, is
variable, and has discontinuous lenses, pockets,
and streaks of black, gray, and grayish brown fine
sand overlying garbage. Few to common black and
dark reddish brown, organic-stained, sandy
fragments and gray fine sandy loam and sandy clay
loam fragments are at a depth of 24 inches or more.
The soil material overlies large cells of garbage and
refuse. These cells range in thickness from 3 to 20
feet. In some areas, the mixture of sandy materials
is used as daily cover and the garbage is in
stratified layers within the sandy material.

Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Soils that contain shell fragments, rocks, organic
matter, or muck; in positions similar to those of the
Arents

Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class:Very deep
Drainage class: Somewhat poorly drained and
moderately well drained
Permeability: Variable but generally rapid throughout
Available water capacity: Low
Shrink-swell potential: Low
Slope class: Variable but generally nearly level
Hazard of flooding: None
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Depth to bedrock: No bedrock within a depth of 80
inches

Use and Management
Dominant uses: Native vegetation and wildlife habitat
Woodland
Potential productivity: Not suited due to subsidence
and variability of the soil properties






Taylor County, Florida


Cropland, hayland, pasture, and
urban development
Suitability: Not suited due to subsidence and variability
of the soil properties
Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: Vlls
Woodland ordination symbol: Not assigned
Ecological community: Not assigned


60-Chaires, limestone
substratum-Meadowbrook,
limestone substratum, complex,
rarely flooded
Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Flats and flatwoods
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 50 to more than 80 acres
Composition
Chaires and similar soils: 60 percent
Meadowbrook and similar soils: 19 percent
Dissimilar soils: 21 percent
Typical Profile
Chaires
Surface layer:
0 to 8 inches-very dark gray fine sand
Subsurface layer:
8 to 18 inches-gray fine sand
Subsoil:
18 to 24 inches-dark reddish brown fine sand
24 to 35 inches-brown fine sand
35 to 61 inches-grayish brown sandy clay loam
Bedrock:
61 inches-soft, weathered, fractured limestone
Meadowbrook
Surface layer:
0 to 3 inches-very dark gray fine sand
Subsurface layer:
3 to 35 inches-grayish brown fine sand
35 to 58 inches-dark yellowish brown fine sand
Subsoil:
58 to 75 inches-dark gray sandy clay loam


Bedrock:
75 inches-soft, weathered, fractured limestone
Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class: Deep and very deep
Drainage class: Poorly drained
Permeability: Moderate or moderately slow in the
subsoil
Available water capacity: Low
Shrink-swell potential: Chaires-moderate;
Meadowbrook-low
Slope class: Nearly level
Flooding: Rare
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Content of organic matter in the surface layer:
Chaires-moderate or high; moderately low or
moderate
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
overlying limestone
Bedrock: Bedrock is within a depth of 60 inches in
about 33 percent of the map unit and within a
depth of 61 to 80 inches in about 19 percent.
Where present, it is at a depth of about 38 to 75
inches. The best estimate for overall average depth
to bedrock is 47 inches.
Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Chaires, Clara, Goldhead, Leon, Lynn Haven, and
Meadowbrook soils in depressions
* Chaires, Clara, Goldhead, Leon, and Tooles soils on
flats
* Leon soils in areas of flatwoods
Similar soils:
* Chaires, limestone substratum, soils and
Meadowbrook soils; on flats
Use and Management
Dominant uses: Timber production and wildlife habitat
Other uses: Crops, pasture, and urban development
Woodland
Potential productivity: Chaires-moderate;
Meadowbrook-high
Trees to plant: Slash pine and loblolly pine
Management concerns: Equipment limitations, seedling
mortality, and plant competition
Management considerations:
* Site preparation, such as bedding, helps to establish
seedlings, reduces the seedling mortality rate, and
increases the early growth rate.
* Chopping and bedding help to minimize debris,
control competing vegetation, and facilitate planting.






Soil Survey


* Using field machinery equipped with large tires or
tracks and harvesting during dry periods help to
overcome the equipment limitations and minimize soil
compaction and root damage during thinning activities.
* Logging systems that leave plant debris well
distributed over the site increase the content of organic
matter and improve fertility.
* Trees in areas of this map unit respond well to
applications of fertilizer.
Cropland
Suitability: Poor
Commonly grown crops: Corn, grain sorghum, and
tobacco
Management concerns:Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
Crop rotations that include close-growing cover crops
at least two-thirds of the time improve tilth and help to
control erosion.
The cover crops and all crop residue should be
returned to the soil.
Good tilth and nutrient management are required for
maximum yields.
Special erosion-control practices are not normally
needed.
Irrigation is not normally used for crops on these soils.
Pasture and hayland
Suitability: Moderately well suited
Commonly grown grasses: Bahiagrass and improved
bermudagrass
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* A total management system for the water table
should remove excess water rapidly and provide a
means of applying subirrigation.
* A combination of tile drains and open ditches may be
needed to maintain the water table at the preferred
depth.
* The proper spacing of tile drains is important for
obtaining adequate drainage.
* Tile drains can provide a means of applying
subirrigation during periods of low rainfall.
* Nutrient management maximizes yields.
* Controlled grazing helps to maintain vigorous plants
and maximum yields.
Urban development
Suitability: Not suited due to wetness, percs slowly,
poor filter, seepage, depth to rock, too sandy,
cutbanks cave, droughtiness, corrosivity, and rare
flooding


Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: IVw
Woodland ordination symbol: Chaires-10 W for slash
pine; Meadowbrook-1 1W for slash pine
Ecological community: North Florida Flatwoods


61-Wekiva-Tooles, depressional-
Tennille complex, rarely flooded

Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Flats and depressions
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 10 to more than 170 acres

Composition
Wekiva and similar soils: 43 percent
Tooles and similar soils: 25 percent
Tennille and similar soils: 12 percent
Dissimilar soils: 20 percent
Typical Profile
Wekiva
Surface layer:
0 to 6 inches-black fine sand
Subsurface layer:
6 to 14 inches-yellowish brown fine sand
Subsoil:
14 to 21 inches-yellowish brown fine sandy loam
Bedrock:
21 inches-soft, weathered, fractured limestone
Tooles
Surface layer:
0 to 8 inches-very dark gray fine sand
Subsurface layer:
8 to 23 inches-brown fine sand
Subsoil:
23 to 35 inches-yellowish brown fine sand
35 to 46 inches-light gray sandy clay loam
46 to 55 inches-pale yellow clay loam
Bedrock:
55 inches-soft, weathered, fractured limestone
Tennille
Surface layer:
0 to 6 inches-black fine sand






Taylor County, Florida


Substratum:
6 to 14 inches-brown and dark grayish brown fine
sand
Bedrock:
14 inches-soft, weathered, fractured limestone
Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class:Wekiva-shallow and moderately deep;
Tooles-deep; Tennille-very shallow and shallow
Drainage class:Wekiva and Tennille-poorly drained;
Tooles-very poorly drained
Permeability:Wekiva-moderately slow in the subsoil;
Tooles-slow in the subsoil; and Tennille-rapid
throughout
Available water capacity: Low
Shrink-swell potential: Wekiva-low; Tooles and
Tennille-moderate
Slope class: Nearly level
Flooding: Rare
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Content of organic matter in the surface layer:
Wekiva-moderate or high;Tooles and Tennille-
moderately low or moderate
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
overlying limestone
Bedrock: Bedrock is within a depth of 60 inches in
about 96 percent of the map unit and within a
depth of 61 to 80 inches in about 3 percent. Where
present, it is at a depth of about 5 to 75 inches.
The best estimate for overall average depth to
bedrock is 33 inches.
Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Tooles and Wekiva soils in depressions
* Meadowbrook and Tooles soils on flats
* Chaires soils, Steinhatchee soils, and Steinhatchee-
like soils that have an organic-stained subsoil; in areas
of flatwoods
Use and Management
Dominant uses: Timber production and wildlife habitat
Other uses: Crops, pasture, and urban development
Woodland
Potential productivity: Tennille-low; Wekiva and
Tooles-not suited
Trees to plant:Tennille-slash pine and loblolly pine
Management concerns: Equipment limitations, seedling
mortality, windthrow, and plant competition
Management considerations:
* Site preparation, such as bedding, helps to establish
seedlings, reduces the seedling mortality rate, and
increases the early growth rate.


* Chopping and bedding help to minimize debris,
control competing vegetation, and facilitate planting.
* Using field machinery equipped with large tires or
tracks and harvesting during dry periods help to
overcome the equipment limitations and minimize soil
compaction and root damage during thinning activities.
* Logging systems that leave plant debris well
distributed over the site increase the content of organic
matter and improve fertility.
* Trees in areas of this map unit respond well to
applications of fertilizer.

Cropland
Suitability:Wekiva and Tennille-poor; Tooles-not suited
Commonly grown crops: Corn, grain sorghum, and
tobacco
Management concerns:Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* Crop rotations that include close-growing cover crops
at least two-thirds of the time improve tilth and help to
control erosion.
* The cover crops and all crop residue should be
returned to the soil.
* Good tilth and nutrient management are required for
maximum yields.
* Special erosion-control practices are not normally
needed.
* Irrigation is not normally used for crops on these soils.
Pasture and hayland
Suitability:Wekiva and Tennille-moderately well
suited; Tooles-not suited
Commonly grown grasses: Bahiagrass and improved
bermudagrass
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* A total management system for the water table
should remove excess water rapidly and provide a
means of applying subirrigation.
* A combination of tile drains and open ditches may be
needed to maintain the water table at the preferred depth.
* The proper spacing of tile drains is important for
obtaining adequate drainage.
* Tile drains can provide a means of applying
subirrigation during periods of low rainfall.
* Nutrient management maximizes yields.
* Controlled grazing helps to maintain vigorous plants
and maximum yields.
Urban development
Suitability: Not suited due to depth to rock, wetness,
flooding, and corrosivity






Soil Survey


Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: Wekiva-IVw; Tooles-
Vllw;Tennille-Vw
Woodland ordination symbol: Wekiva-8Wfor slash pine;
Tooles-not assigned; Tennille-8W for slash pine
Ecological community: Wekiva and Tennille-Wetland
Hardwood Hammocks; Tooles-Shrub Bogs-Bay
Swamps


62-Tooles-Tennille-Wekiva
complex, depressional

Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Depressions
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 5 to more than 30 acres
Composition
Tooles and similar soils: 45 percent
Tennille and similar soils: 25 percent
Wekiva and similar soils: 25 percent
Dissimilar soils: 5 percent
Typical Profile
Tooles
Surface layer:
0 to 8 inches-very dark gray fine sand
Subsurface layer:
8 to 23 inches-brown fine sand
Subsoil:
23 to 35 inches-yellowish brown fine sand
35 to 46 inches-light gray sandy clay loam
46 to 55 inches-pale yellow clay loam
Bedrock:
55 inches-soft, weathered, fractured limestone
Tennille
Surface layer:
0 to 6 inches-black fine sand
Substratum:
6 to 14 inches-brown and dark grayish brown fine
sand
Bedrock:
14 inches-soft, weathered, fractured limestone
Wekiva
Surface layer:
0 to 6 inches-black fine sand


Subsurface layer:
6 to 14 inches-yellowish brown fine sand
Subsoil:
14 to 21 inches-yellowish brown fine sandy loam
Bedrock:
21 inches-soft, weathered, fractured limestone

Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class:Tooles-deep; Tennille-very shallow and
shallow; Wekiva-shallow and moderately deep
Drainage class: Very poorly drained
Permeability:Tooles-slow in the subsoil; Tennille-
rapid throughout; Wekiva-moderately slow in the
subsoil
Available water capacity: Low
Shrink-swell potential: Moderate
Slope class: Nearly level
Hazard of flooding: None
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Content of organic matter in the surface layer: Tooles
and Tennille-moderately low or moderate;
Wekiva-moderate or high
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
overlying limestone
Bedrock: Bedrock is within a depth of 60 inches in
about 88 percent of the map unit and within a
depth of 61 to 80 inches in about 6 percent. Where
present, it is at a depth of about 15 to 75 inches.
The best estimate for overall average depth to
bedrock is 36 inches.
Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Goldhead soils in positions similar to those of the
Tooles, Tennille, and Wekiva soils
Similar soils:
* Tooles-like soils that do not have a loamy subsoil

Use and Management
Dominant uses: Native vegetation and wildlife habitat
Woodland
Potential productivity: Not suited due to ponding
Cropland, hayland, pasture, and
urban development
Suitability: Not suited due to ponding
Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: VIlw
Woodland ordination symbol: Not assigned
Ecological community: Shrub Bogs-Bay Swamps






Taylor County, Florida


63-Steinhatchee fine sand

Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Flatwoods
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 5 to more than 20 acres

Composition
Steinhatchee and similar soils: 80 percent
Dissimilar soils: 20 percent

Typical Profile
Surface layer:
0 to 5 inches-dark gray fine sand
Subsurface layer:
5 to 18 inches-gray fine sand
Subsoil:
18 to 22 inches-black fine sand
22 to 25 inches-dark brown fine sand
25 to 29 inches-yellowish brown fine sand
29 to 35 inches-gray sandy clay loam
Bedrock:
35 inches-soft, weathered, fractured limestone

Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class: Moderately deep
Drainage class: Poorly drained
Permeability: Moderately slow in the subsoil
Available water capacity: Low
Shrink-swellpotential: Low
Slope class: Nearly level
Hazard of flooding: None
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
overlying limestone
Depth to bedrock (where present): 24 to 40 inches

Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Meadowbrook, Tennille, and Tooles soils on flats
* Moriah soils on rises and knolls
Similar soils:
* Melvina soils in positions similar to those of the
Steinhatchee soil
Use and Management
Dominant uses: Timber production and wildlife habitat
Other uses: Crops, pasture, and urban development


Woodland
Potential productivity: High
Trees to plant: Slash pine and loblolly pine
Management concerns: Equipment limitations, seedling
mortality, and plant competition
Management considerations:
* Site preparation, such as bedding, helps to establish
seedlings, reduces the seedling mortality rate, and
increases the early growth rate.
* Chopping and bedding help to minimize debris,
control competing vegetation, and facilitate planting.
* Using field machinery equipped with large tires or
tracks and harvesting during dry periods help to
overcome the equipment limitations and minimize soil
compaction and root damage during thinning activities.
* Logging systems that leave plant debris well
distributed over the site increase the content of organic
matter and improve fertility.
* Trees in areas of this map unit respond well to
applications of fertilizer.
Cropland
Suitability: Moderate
Commonly grown crops: Corn, grain sorghum, and
tobacco
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* Crop rotations that include close-growing cover crops
improve tilth and help to control erosion.
* The cover crops and all crop residue should be
returned to the soil.
* Good tilth and nutrient management are required for
maximum yields.
* Special erosion-control practices are not normally
needed.
* Irrigation is not normally used for crops on this soil.
Pasture and hayland
Suitability: Well suited
Commonly grown grasses: Bahiagrass and improved
bermudagrass
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* A total management system for the water table
should remove excess water rapidly and provide a
means of applying subirrigation.
* A combination of tile drains and open ditches may be
needed to maintain the water table at the preferred depth.
* The proper spacing of tile drains is important for
obtaining adequate drainage.
* Tile drains can provide a means of applying
subirrigation during periods of low rainfall.






Soil Survey


* Nutrient management maximizes yields.
* Controlled grazing helps to maintain vigorous plants
and maximum yields.
Urban development
Suitability: Poor
Management concerns:Wetness, percs slowly,
seepage, depth to rock, too sandy, cutbanks cave,
and corrosivity
Management considerations:
The local Health Department can be contacted for
guidance regarding sanitary facilities.
Building structures on the highest part of the
landscape and using artificial drainage reduce the risk
of damage from wetness.
Using corrosion-resistant materials reduces the risk
of damage to uncoated steel and concrete.
Lawns need irrigation during periods of low rainfall.
Digging trenches during dry periods minimizes
sloughing.
Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: llw
Woodland ordination symbol: 11 W for slash pine
Ecological community: Wetland Hardwood Hammocks


64-Tooles-Wekiva complex

Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Flats
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 5 to more than 30 acres
Composition
Tooles and similar soils: 63 percent
Wekiva and similar soils: 27 percent
Dissimilar soils: 10 percent
Typical Profile
Tooles
Surface layer:
0 to 8 inches-very dark gray fine sand
Subsurface layer:
8 to 23 inches-yellowish brown fine sand
Subsoil:
23 to 35 inches-yellowish brown fine sand
35 to 46 inches-light gray sandy clay loam
46 to 55 inches-pale yellow clay loam
Bedrock:
55 inches-soft, weathered, fractured limestone


Wekiva
Surface layer:
0 to 6 inches-black fine sand
Subsurface layer:
6 to 14 inches-yellowish brown fine sand
Subsoil:
14 to 21 inches-yellowish brown fine sandy loam
Bedrock:
21 inches-soft, weathered, fractured limestone

Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class:Tooles-deep; Wekiva-shallow and
moderately deep
Drainage class: Poorly drained
Permeability: Tooles-slow in the subsoil; Wekiva-
moderately slow in the subsoil
Available water capacity: Low or moderate
Shrink-swell potential: Low
Slope class: Nearly level
Hazard of flooding: None
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Content of organic matter in the surface layer: Tooles-
moderately low or moderate; Wekiva-moderate or
high
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
overlying limestone
Bedrock: Bedrock is within a depth of 60 inches in
nearly 100 percent of the map unit at a depth of
about 28 to 60 inches. The best estimate for
overall average depth to bedrock is 46 inches.

Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Meadowbrook soils on flats
* Moriah soils on rises and knolls
Similar soils:
* Tooles-like soils that have a loamy subsoil below a
depth of 40 inches; in positions similar to those of the
Tooles and Wekiva soils
Use and Management
Dominant uses: Timber production and wildlife habitat
Other uses: Crops, pasture, and urban development
Woodland
Potential productivity: Tooles-high; Wekiva-not suited
Trees to plant:Tooles-slash pine and loblolly pine
Management concerns: Equipment limitations, seedling
mortality, windthrow, and plant competition
Management considerations:
* Site preparation, such as bedding, helps to establish






Taylor County, Florida


seedlings, reduces the seedling mortality rate, and
increases the early growth rate.
* Chopping and bedding help to minimize debris,
control competing vegetation, and facilitate planting.
* Using field machinery equipped with large tires or
tracks and harvesting during dry periods help to
overcome the equipment limitations and minimize soil
compaction and root damage during thinning
activities.
* Logging systems that leave plant debris well
distributed over the site increase the content of organic
matter and improve fertility.
* Trees in areas of this map unit respond well to
applications of fertilizer.

Cropland
Suitability:Tooles-moderate; Wekiva-poor
Commonly grown crops: Corn, grain sorghum, and
tobacco
Management concerns:Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* Crop rotations that include close-growing cover crops
at least two-thirds of the time improve tilth and help to
control erosion.
* The cover crops and all crop residue should be
returned to the soil.
* Good tilth and nutrient management are required for
maximum yields.
* Special erosion-control practices are not normally
needed.
* Irrigation is not normally used for crops on these
soils.
Pasture and hayland
Suitability:Tooles-well suited; Wekiva-poor
Commonly grown grasses: Bahiagrass and improved
bermudagrass
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* A total management system for the water table
should remove excess water rapidly and provide a
means of applying subirrigation.
* A combination of tile drains and open ditches may be
needed to maintain the water table at the preferred
depth.
* The proper spacing of tile drains is important for
obtaining adequate drainage.
* Tile drains can provide a means of applying
subirrigation during periods of low rainfall.
* Nutrient management maximizes yields.
* Controlled grazing helps to maintain vigorous plants
and maximum yields.


Urban development
Suitability: Poor
Management concerns: Tooles-wetness, percs slowly,
poor filter, seepage, depth to rock, too sandy,
cutbanks cave, and corrosivity; Wekiva-depth to
rock, wetness, and corrosivity
Management considerations:
* The local Health Department can be contacted for
guidance regarding sanitary facilities.
* Building structures on the highest part of the
landscape and using artificial drainage reduce the risk
of damage from wetness.
* Using corrosion-resistant materials reduces the risk
of damage to uncoated steel and concrete.
* Lawns need irrigation during periods of low rainfall.
* Digging trenches during dry periods minimizes
sloughing.
Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: Tooles- 1 Iw; Wekiva-
IVw
Woodland ordination symbol: Tooles-- 1W for slash
pine; Wekiva-8W for slash pine
Ecological community: Upland Hardwood Hammocks

65-Yellowjacket and Maurepas
mucks, frequently flooded

Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Flood plains
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 10 to more than 100 acres
Composition
Yellowjacket and similar soils: 45 percent
Maurepas and similar soils: 45 percent
Dissimilar soils: 10 percent
Typical Profile
Yellowjacket
Surface layer:
0 to 42 inches-black muck
Subsurface layer:
42 to 60 inches-very dark gray fine sand
Substratum:
60 to 80 inches-dark grayish brown fine sand
Maurepas
Surface layer:
0 to 25 inches-dark brown muck






Soil Survey


Subsurface layer:
25 to 60 inches-black muck
Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class: Very deep
Drainage class: Very poorly drained
Permeability: Rapid throughout
Available water capacity:Yellowjacket-high;
Maurepas-very high
Shrink-swell potential: Low
Slope class: Nearly level
Flooding: Frequent for long periods
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Content of organic matter in the surface layer: Very high
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments and woody
plant remains
Depth to bedrock: No bedrock within a depth of 80
inches
Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
Yellowjacket-like soils that have limestone below a
depth of 50 inches; in positions similar to those of the
Yellowjacket and Maurepas soils
Similar soils:
Soils that have a surface layer of organic matter that
ranges from 8 to 16 inches in thickness; in positions
similar to those of the Yellowjacket and Maurepas soils

Use and Management
Dominant uses: Native vegetation and wildlife habitat
Woodland
Potential productivity: Not suited due to wetness and
flooding
Cropland, hayland, pasture, and
urban development
Suitability: Not suited due to wetness and flooding
Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: Yellowjacket-VI Iw;
Maurepas-Vlllw
Woodland ordination symbol: Not assigned
Ecological community: Swamp Hardwoods


67-Yellowjacket and Maurepas
mucks, depressional

Setting
Landscape: Coastal swamps on the lower Coastal
Plain


Landform: Depressions
Landform position: Concave
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 10 to more than 80 acres
Composition
Yellowjacket and similar soils: 45 percent
Maurepas and similar soils: 40 percent
Dissimilar soils: 15 percent
Typical Profile
Yellowjacket
Surface layer:
0 to 42 inches-black muck
Subsurface layer:
42 to 60 inches-very dark gray fine sand
Substratum:
60 to 80 inches-dark grayish brown fine sand
Maurepas
Surface layer:
0 to 25 inches-dark brown muck
Subsurface layer:
25 to 60 inches-black muck
Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class: Deep and very deep
Drainage class: Very poorly drained
Permeability: Rapid throughout
Available water capacity:Yellowjacket-high;
Maurepas-very high
Shrink-swell potential: Low
Slope class: Nearly level
Hazard of flooding: None
Extent of rock outcrop: None
Content of organic matter in the surface layer: Very
high
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments and woody
plant remains
Depth to bedrock: No bedrock within a depth of 80
inches
Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Meadowbrook soils, Meadowbrook-like soils that
have a surface layer of well decomposed organic
matter that ranges from 8 to 16 inches in thickness,
and Tooles soils; in positions similar to those of the
Yellowjacket and Maurepas soils
Similar soils:
* Yellowjacket-like soils that have limestone
bedrock within a depth of 80 inches and that have a






Taylor County, Florida


surface layer of well decomposed organic matter
that ranges from 8 to 16 inches in thickness; in
positions similar to those of the Yellowjacket and
Maurepas soils
Use and Management
Dominant uses: Native vegetation and wildlife habitat
Woodland
Potential productivity: Not suited due to ponding
Cropland, hayland, pasture, and
urban development
Suitability: Not suited due to ponding

Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: Yellowjacket-VI Iw;
Maurepas-VIlIw
Woodland ordination symbol: Not assigned
Ecological community: Swamp Hardwoods


68-Matmon-Wekiva-Rock outcrop
complex, occasionally flooded

Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Rises, knolls, flats, and flood plains
Shape of areas: Rounded to long and narrow or
irregular
Size of areas: 5 to more than 40 acres
Composition
Matmon and similar soils: 40 percent
Wekiva and similar soils: 35 percent
Rock outcrop: 14 percent
Dissimilar soils: 11 percent
Typical Profile
Matmon
Surface layer:
0 to 4 inches-very dark grayish brown fine sand
Subsurface layer:
4 to 11 inches-yellowish brown fine sand
Subsoil:
11 to 19 inches-yellowish brown fine sandy loam
Bedrock:
19 inches-soft, weathered, fractured limestone
Wekiva
Surface layer:
0 to 6 inches-black fine sand


Subsurface layer:
6 to 14 inches-yellowish brown fine sand
Subsoil:
14 to 21 inches-yellowish brown fine sandy loam
Bedrock:
21 inches-soft, weathered, fractured limestone
Rock outcrop
0 inches-soft, weathered, fractured limestone

Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class: Matmon-shallow; Wekiva-shallow and
moderately deep; Rock outcrop-very shallow
Drainage class: Matmon-somewhat poorly drained;
Wekiva-poorly drained
Permeability: Matmon and Wekiva-moderately slow in
the subsoil
Available water capacity: Low
Shrink-swell potential: Low
Slope class: Nearly level
Flooding: Occasional for brief periods
Extent of Rock outcrop: Matmon and Wekiva-none;
Rock outcrop-extensive
Content of organic matter in the surface layer: Matmon
and Wekiva-moderate or high
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
overlying limestone
Bedrock: Bedrock is within a depth of 60 inches in
nearly 100 percent of the map unit at a depth of
about 7 to 23 inches. The best estimate for overall
average depth to bedrock is 16 inches.
Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Matmon-like soils that have limestone below a depth
of 20 inches in positions similar to those of the
Matmon soil
* Steinhatchee soils in areas of flatwoods
* Tennille soils on flats
Similar soils:
* Matmon-like soils that do not have a loamy subsoil;
in positions similar to those of the Matmon soil

Use and Management
Dominant uses: Native vegetation and wildlife habitat
Woodland
Potential productivity: Matmon and Wekiva-low; Rock
outcrop-unsuited
Trees to plant: Slash pine and loblolly pine
Management concerns: Equipment limitations, seedling
mortality, windthrow, and plant competition






Soil Survey


Management considerations:
* Site preparation, such as bedding, helps to establish
seedlings, reduces the seedling mortality rate, and
increases the early growth rate.
* Chopping and bedding help to minimize debris,
control competing vegetation, and facilitate planting.
* Using field machinery equipped with large tires or
tracks and harvesting during dry periods help to
overcome the equipment limitations and minimize soil
compaction and root damage during thinning activities.
* Logging systems that leave plant debris well
distributed over the site increase the content of organic
matter and improve fertility.
* Trees in areas of this map unit respond well to
applications of fertilizer.
Cropland
Suitability: Matmon and Wekiva-poor; Rock outcrop-
not suited
Commonly grown crops: Corn, grain sorghum, and
tobacco
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, fast
intake, and depth to bedrock
Management considerations:
* Crop rotations that include close-growing cover crops
improve tilth and help to control erosion.
* The cover crops and all crop residue should be
returned to the soil.
* Good tilth and nutrient management are required for
maximum yields.
* Special erosion-control practices are not normally
needed.
* Irrigation is not normally used for crops on these
soils.
Pasture and hayland
Suitability: Matmon-poor; Wekiva-moderate; Rock
outcrop-not suited
Commonly grown grasses: Bahiagrass and improved
bermudagrass
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, fast
intake, and depth to bedrock
Management considerations:
* A total management system for the water table
should remove excess water rapidly and provide a
means of applying subirrigation.
* A combination of tile drains and open ditches may be
needed to maintain the water table at the preferred
depth.
* The proper spacing of tile drains is important for
obtaining adequate drainage.
* Tile drains can provide a means of applying
subirrigation during periods of low rainfall.
* Nutrient management maximizes yields.


* Controlled grazing helps to maintain vigorous plants
and maximum yields.
Urban development
Suitability: Not suited due to flooding, depth to
bedrock, wetness, and corrosivity
Interpretive Groups
Land capability classification: Matmon-IVs; Wekiva-
Vw; Rock outcrop-Vllls
Woodland ordination symbol: Matmon-9W for slash
pine; Wekiva-8W for slash pine; Rock outcrop-
not assigned
Ecological community: Wetland Hardwood Hammock


69-Eunola, Goldhead, and Tooles
fine sands, commonly flooded

Setting
Landscape: Lowlands on the lower Coastal Plain
Landform: Flood plains
Shape of areas: Long and narrow
Size of areas: 5 to more than 40 acres
Composition
Eunola and similar soils: 49 percent
Goldhead and similar soils: 20 percent
Tooles and similar soils: 11 percent
Dissimilar soils: 20 percent
Typical Profile
Eunola
Surface layer:
0 to 6 inches-brown loamy fine sand
Subsurface layer:
6 to 15 inches-yellowish brown fine sandy loam
Subsoil:
15 to 40 inches-yellowish brown sandy clay loam
40 to 50 inches-gray fine sandy loam
Substratum:
50 to 80 inches-white loamy fine sand
Goldhead
Surface layer:
0 to 6 inches-very dark gray fine sand
Subsurface layer:
6 to 13 inches-grayish brown fine sand
13 to 35 inches-light yellowish brown fine sand
Subsoil:
35 to 55 inches-gray sandy clay loam






Taylor County, Florida


55 to 80 inches-light brownish gray fine sandy loam
Tooles
Surface layer:
0 to 8 inches-very dark gray fine sand
Subsurface layer:
8 to 23 inches-brown fine sand
23 to 35 inches-yellowish brown fine sand
35 to 46 inches-light gray sandy clay loam
46 to 55 inches-pale yellow clay loam
Bedrock:
55 inches-soft, weathered, fractured limestone
Soil Properties and Qualities
Depth class: Eunola and Goldhead-very deep;
Tooles-deep
Drainage class: Eunola-moderately well drained;
Goldhead and Tooles-poorly drained
Permeability: Eunola-moderate in the subsoil;
Goldhead-moderate or moderately slow in the
subsoil; Tooles-slow in the subsoil
Available water capacity: Eunola-moderate;
Goldhead-low; Tooles-low or moderate
Shrink-swell potential: Eunola and Goldhead-low;
Tooles-moderate
Slope class: Nearly level
Flooding: Eunola-occasional for very brief periods;
Goldhead and Tooles-frequent for long periods
Extent of rock outcrop: Low
Content of organic matter in the surface layer:
Eunola-low or moderately low; Goldhead and
Tooles-moderately low or moderate
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
overlying limestone
Bedrock: Bedrock is within a depth of 60 inches in
about 23 percent of the map unit and within a
depth of 61 to 80 inches in about 8 percent. Where
present, it is at a depth of about 36 to 70 inches.
The best estimate for overall average depth to
bedrock is 50 inches.
Minor Components
Dissimilar soils:
* Moriah soils; Wekiva-like soils that are very poorly
drained, that have a thick, dark surface layer, or that
have limestone at a depth of 20 to 40 inches; and
similar soils that are stained with sandy and loamy
layers caused by flooding; on flood plains
* Hurricane soils on rises and knolls
Similar soils:
* Meadowbrook soils and Tooles-like soils that have a
surface layer of muck; on flood plains


Use and Management
Dominant uses: Timber production and wildlife habitat
Other uses: Crops, pasture, and urban development
Woodland
Potentialproductivity: Eunola-high; Goldhead and
Tooles-not suited due to wetness and flooding
Trees to plant: Eunola-slash pine and loblolly pine
Management concerns: Equipment limitations, seedling
mortality, and plant competition
Management considerations:
* Site preparation, such as bedding, helps to establish
seedlings, reduces the seedling mortality rate, and
increases the early growth rate.
* Chopping and bedding help to minimize debris,
control competing vegetation, and facilitate planting.
* Using field machinery equipped with large tires or
tracks and harvesting during dry periods help to
overcome the equipment limitations and minimize soil
compaction and root damage during thinning activities.
* Logging systems that leave plant debris well
distributed over the site increase the content of organic
matter and improve fertility.
* Trees in areas of this map unit respond well to
applications of fertilizer.
Cropland
Suitability: Eunola-moderately well suited; Goldhead
and Tooles-not suited
Commonly grown crops: Corn, grain sorghum, and
tobacco
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake
Management considerations:
* Crop rotations that include close-growing cover crops
at least two-thirds of the time improve tilth and help to
control erosion.
* The cover crops and all crop residue should be
returned to the soil.
* Good tilth and nutrient management are required for
maximum yields.
* Special erosion-control practices are not normally
needed.
* Irrigation is not normally used for crops on these
soils.
Pasture and hayland
Suitability: Eunola-moderately well suited; Goldhead
and Tooles-not suited
Commonly grown grasses: Bahiagrass and improved
bermudagrass
Management concerns: Wetness, droughtiness, and
fast intake




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