• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Errata
 How to use this soil survey
 Table of Contents
 Foreword
 General nature of the county
 How this survey was made
 General soil map units
 Broad land use considerations
 Detailed soil map units
 Use and management of the...
 Soil properties
 Classification of the soils
 Soil series and their morpholo...
 Formation of the soils
 References
 Glossary
 Tables
 General soil map
 Map
 Index to map






Title: Soil survey of city of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE PAGE TEXT
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00025724/00001
 Material Information
Title: Soil survey of city of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida
Uniform Title: Soil survey of city of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida
Physical Description: 218 p., 55 p. of plates : ill., maps (some col.) ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Watts, Frank C
United States -- Natural Resources Conservation Service
University of Florida -- Agricultural Experiment Station
University of Florida -- Soil Science Dept
Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture and Consumer Services
Publisher: The Service
Place of Publication: Washington D.C.
Publication Date: [1998]
 Subjects
Subject: Soils -- Maps -- Florida -- Jacksonville   ( lcsh )
Soils -- Maps -- Florida -- Duval County   ( lcsh )
Soil surveys -- Florida -- Jacksonville   ( lcsh )
Soil surveys -- Florida -- Duval County   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (p. 119-122) and index to map sheets.
Statement of Responsibility: United States Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service ; in cooperation with University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Agricultural Experiment Stations, and Soil Science Department, and Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: Rev. ed. of: Soil survey of city of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida / by Leon T. Stem ... et al.. 1978.
Funding: U.S. Department of Agriculture Soil Surveys
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00025724
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Government Documents Department, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002526803
notis - AMP2671
oclc - 43271624
lccn - 99524597

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Errata
        Page 2
    How to use this soil survey
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Foreword
        Page 9
        Page 10
    General nature of the county
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    How this survey was made
        Page 15
        Use of ground-penetrating radar
            Page 16
        Survey procedures
            Page 16
            Page 17
            Page 18
    General soil map units
        Page 19
        Soils on dunes, on rises, on knolls, and in flatwoods
            Page 19
            Fripp-Crolla Mandarin
                Page 19
            Cornelia-Mandarin-Leon
                Page 20
            Ortega-Kershaw-Penney
                Page 21
        Soils on flats, in flatwoods, in depressions, on rises, and on knolls
            Page 22
            Leon-Hurricane/Ridgewood-Ortega
                Page 22
            Leon-Boulogne-Evergreen/Wesconnett
                Page 23
                Page 24
            Pelham-Mascotte/Sapelo-surrency
                Page 25
        Soils in depressions, on flats, on flood plains, and in tidal marshes
            Page 26
            Stockade-surrency-Pamlico
                Page 27
            Yulee-Yonges-Surrency
                Page 27
            Tisonia-maurepas
                Page 28
    Broad land use considerations
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Detailed soil map units
        Page 31
        Albany fine sand, 0 to 5 percent slopes
            Page 32
        Aquic Quartzipsamments, 0 to 2 percent slopes
            Page 32
        Arents, sanitary landfill
            Page 33
        Beaches, very frequently flooded
            Page 33
        Blanton fine sand, 0 to 6 percent slopes
            Page 33
        Boulogne fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes
            Page 33
        Corolla fine sand, gently undulating to rolling, rarely flooded
            Page 34
        Cornelia fine sand, 0 to 5 percent slopes
            Page 34
        Evergreen-Wesconnett complex, depressional, 0 to 2 percent slopes
            Page 34
        Fripp-corolla, rarely flooded, complex, gently undulating to hilly
            Page 35
        Hurricane and ridgewood soils, 0 to 5 percent slopes
            Page 36
        Kershaw fine sand, 2 to 8 percent slopes
            Page 37
        Kershaw fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes
            Page 37
        Kureb fine sand, 2 to 8 percent slopes
            Page 37
        Kureb fine sand, rolling, 8 to 20 percent slopes, very frequently flooded
            Page 37
        Leon fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes
            Page 38
        Leon fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes, very frequently flooded
            Page 39
        Lynn Haven fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes
            Page 40
        Mandarin fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes
            Page 40
        Mascotte fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes
            Page 40
        Maurepas muck, 0 to 1 percent slopes, frequently flooded
            Page 41
        Newham-Corolla, rarely flooded, complex, gently undulating to hilly, 2 to 20 percent slopes
            Page 41
        Mascotte-Pelham complex, 0 to 2 percent
            Page 41
        Ortega fine sand, 0 to 5 percent slopes
            Page 41
        Pamlico muck, depressional, 0 to 1 percent slopes
            Page 42
        Pelham fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes
            Page 42
        Pelham fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes
            Page 42
        Penney fine sand, 0 to 5 percent slopes
            Page 43
        Pits
            Page 43
        Pottsburng fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes
            Page 43
        Pottsburg fine sand, 0 to 3 percent slopes
            Page 43
        Rutlege mucky fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes, frequently flooded
            Page 44
        Sapelo fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes
            Page 44
        Surrency loamy fine sand, depressional, 0 to 2 percent slopes
            Page 44
        Surrency loamy fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes, frequently flooded
            Page 45
        Tisonia mucky peat, 0 to 1 percent slopes, very frequently flooded
            Page 45
        Urban land
            Page 45
        Urban-land-Leon-Boulogne complex 0 to 2 percent slopes
            Page 45
        Urban land-Ortega-Kershaw complex, 0 to 8 percent slopes
            Page 46
        Urban land-Mascotte-Sapelo complex, 0 to 2 percent slopes
            Page 47
        Pelham-Urban land complex, 0 to 2 percent slopes
            Page 48
        Urban land-Hurricane-Albany complex, 0 to 5 percent slopes
            Page 48
        Yonges fine sandy loam, 0 to 2 percent
            Page 48
        Yulee clay, 0 to 2 percent slopes, frequently flooded
            Page 49
        Goldhead, wet and Lynn Haven soils, 2 to 5 percent slopes
            Page 49
        Stockade fine sandy loam, depressional, 0 to 2 percent slopes
            Page 49
        Pelham fine sand, depressional, 0 to 2 percent slopes
            Page 50
        Yulee clay, depressional, 0 to 2 percent
            Page 50
        Dorovan muck, depressional, 0 to 2 percent slopes
            Page 50
        Lynchburg fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes
            Page 51
            Page 52
    Use and management of the soils
        Page 53
        Crops and pasture
            Page 53
            Page 54
        Prime farmland
            Page 55
        Hydric Soils
            Page 56
        Relationships between soils and native vegetation
            Page 57
            Page 58
        Woodland management and productivity
            Page 59
            Page 60
            Page 61
            Page 62
        Windbreaks and environmental plantings
            Page 63
        Recreation
            Page 63
        Wildlife habitat
            Page 64
        Coastal dune management
            Page 65
        Engineering
            Page 66
            Page 67
            Page 68
            Page 69
            Page 70
            Page 71
            Page 72
    Soil properties
        Page 73
        Engineering index properties
            Page 73
        Physical and chemical properties
            Page 74
        Soil and water features
            Page 75
            Page 76
        Physical, chemical, and mineralogical analyses of selected soils
            Page 77
            Page 78
        Engineering index test data
            Page 79
            Page 80
    Classification of the soils
        Page 81
    Soil series and their morphology
        Page 81
        Albany series
            Page 81
        Blanton series
            Page 82
        Boulogne series
            Page 83
        Cornelia series
            Page 84
        Corolla series
            Page 85
        Dorovan series
            Page 86
        Evergreen series
            Page 86
        Fripp series
            Page 87
        Goldhead series
            Page 87
        Hurricane series
            Page 88
        Kershaw series
            Page 89
        Kureb series
            Page 89
        Leon series
            Page 90
        Lynchburg series
            Page 91
        Lynn Haven series
            Page 92
            Page 93
            Page 94
            Page 95
            Page 96
        Mandarin series
            Page 97
        Mascotte series
            Page 97
            Page 98
        Maurepas series
            Page 99
        Newhan series
            Page 99
        Ortega series
            Page 100
        Pamlico series
            Page 100
        Pelham series
            Page 101
        Penney series
            Page 102
        Pottsburg series
            Page 103
        Ridgewood series
            Page 103
        Rutlege series
            Page 104
        Sapelo series
            Page 105
        Stockade series
            Page 106
        Surrency series
            Page 106
        Tisonia series
            Page 107
        Wesconnett series
            Page 108
        Yonges series
            Page 108
        Yulee series
            Page 109
            Page 110
    Formation of the soils
        Page 111
        Factors of soil formation
            Page 111
            Page 112
        Processes of horizon differentiation
            Page 113
        Geomorphology
            Page 113
            Page 114
            Page 115
            Page 116
            Page 117
            Page 118
    References
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
    Glossary
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
    Tables
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
        Page 216
        Page 217
        Page 218
    General soil map
        Page 219
    Map
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
    Index to map
        Page 220
        Page 221
Full Text


USDA


United States
Department of
Agriculture
Natural
Resources
Conservation
Service


In cooperation with
University of Florida,
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences,
Agricultural Experiment
Stations, and Soil Science
Department, and Florida
Department of Agriculture
and Consumer Services


Soil Survey of

City of

Jacksonville,

Duval County,

Florida








ERRATA SHEET
SOIL SURVEY REPORT
CITY OF JACKSONVILLE, DUVAL COUNTY, FLORIDA


Correction of map unit symbols on soil survey sheets
All locations are from southwest (lower left) corner of the soil survey match
line and not the photo imace. Measurements are from the west (left) going
east and south (bottom) going north.


Location (cm)
East North


6


6.5

27.0
27.6
11.9
8.6
17.5
42.5
4.0
5.0
11.0
19.2
38.7
10.7
13.5
22.0
28.4
38.1
6.5
10.7
19.2
22.5
25.7
36.5
39.2
42.3
45.5
24.4
35.3
3.5
5.5
9.5
23.9
36.2
38.9
49.0
46.5
46.6
8.5


Sheet


3.6

0.3
7.3
0.3
7.2
10.7
16.8
3.2
2.1
18.7
19.0
9.6
15.6
11.4
8.8
9.6
15.6
5.3
11.5
6.4
3.4
9.5
17.0
18.7
7.2
15.0
9.4
8.5
16.3
8.4
10.6
17.1
0.5
13.4
8.6
14.4
19.0
4.4


These errors were discovered through the digitizing process after the soil
maps were compiled.


Old Symbol



27

52
61
4
57
11
28
4
4
4
4
8
4
4
61
61
5
8
61
61
61
61
61
61
61
11
54
69
52
28
28
20
61
61
28
34
61
61


New Symbol



22

82
51.
7
53
12
22
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
24
24
7
7
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
12
51
14
82
55
55
35
24
24
35
71
24
24


13

14
15



19





24

25

29
31


35
37
38
40
41

43


48
49
52






3


How to Use This Soil Survey


General Soil Map

The general soil map, which is the color map preceding the detailed soil maps, shows the survey area divided
into groups of associated soils called general soil map units. This map is useful in planning the use and
management of large areas.


To find information about your area of interest, locate that area on the map,
identify the name of the map unit in the area on the color-coded map
legend, then refer to the section General Soil Map Units for a
general description of the soils in your area.


Detailed Soil Maps

The detailed soil maps follow the
general soil map. These maps
can be useful in planning the use
and management of small areas.

To find information about your
area of interest, locate that area
on the Index to Map Sheets,
which precedes the soil maps.
Note the number of the map
sheet and turn to that sheet.

Locate your area of interest on
the map sheet. Note the map
units symbols that are in that
area. Turn to the Contents, which
lists the map units by symbol and
name and shows the page where
each map unit is described.


1E r 17 3 58-- 2 -
INDEX TO MAP SHEETS


_ I
MAP SHEmo ET



MAP SHEET


AREA OF INTEREST
NOTE: Map unit symbols in a soil
survey may consist only of numbers or
letters, or they may be a combination
ot numbers and letters.


MAP SHEET


The Contents shows which table has data on a specific land use for each detailed soil map unit. Also see the
Contents for sections of this publication that may address your specific needs.


P



















This soil survey is a publication of the National Cooperative Soil Survey, a joint effort
of the United States Department of Agriculture and other Federal agencies, State
agencies including the Agricultural Experiment Stations, and local agencies. The
Natural Resources Conservation Service (formerly the Soil Conservation Service) has
leadership for the Federal part of the National Cooperative Soil Survey.
Major fieldwork for this soil survey was completed in 1994. Soil names and
descriptions were approved in 1997. Delineations of soil map units that contain urban
land reflect photo imagery taken in fall of 1983 and spring of 1994. Unless otherwise
indicated, statements in this publication refer to conditions in the survey area in 1995.
This soil survey was made cooperatively by the Natural Resources Conservation
Service; the University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences,
Agricultural Experiment Stations, and Soil Science Department; and the Florida
Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Additional assistance was provided
by the Florida Department of Transportation. The survey is part of the technical
assistance furnished to the Duval Soil and Water Conservation District.
Soil maps in this survey may be copied without permission. Enlargement of these
maps, however, could cause misunderstanding of the detail of mapping. If enlarged,
maps do not show the small areas of contrasting soils that could have been shown at a
larger scale.
The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination in its
programs on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, disability,
political beliefs, and marital or familial status. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all
programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication
of program information (Braille, large print, audio tape, etc.) should contact USDA's
TARGET Center at (202) 720-2600 (voice and TDD).
To file a complaint, write the Secretary of Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture,
Washington, D.C., 20250 or call 1-800-245-6340 (voice) or (202) 720-1127 (TDD).
USDA is an equal employment opportunity employer.


Cover: Downtown section of the City of Jacksonville.The area is mapped as Urban land.


Additional information about the Nation's natural resources is available on the
Natural Resources Conservation Service home page on the World Wide Web. The
address is http://www.nrcs.usda.gov (click on 'Technical Resources").


I
















Contents


Cover ................................................ .......... ..... 1
How to Use This Soil Survey ................................ 3
Contents ............................................ .............. 5
Foreword ........................................... .............. 9
General Nature of the County ............................. 11
How This Survey Was Made ................................. 15
Use of Ground-Penetrating Radar .................... 16
Survey Procedures........................................... 16
General Soil Map Units......................................... 19
Soils on Dunes, on Rises, on Knolls, and in
Flatwoods .................................. ........... 19
1. Fripp-Corolla-Mandarin ............................ 19
2. Cornelia-Mandarin-Leon ............................ 20
3. Ortega-Kershaw-Penney .......................... 21
Soils on Flats, in Flatwoods, in Depressions,
on Rises, and on Knolls .............................22
4. Leon-Hurricane/Ridgewood-Ortega ............. 22
5. Leon-Boulogne-Evergreen/Wesconnett .......23
6. Pelham-Mascotte/Sapelo-Surrency .............25
Soils in Depressions, on Flats, on Flood Plains,
and in Tidal Marshes ................................ 26
7. Stockade-Surrency-Pamlico ........................ 27
8. Yulee-Yonges-Surrency ............................ 27
9. Tisonia-Maurepas ...................................... 28
Broad Land Use Considerations ......................... 28
Detailed Soil Map Units...................................... 31
2-Albany fine sand, 0 to 5 percent slopes ........ 32
6-Aquic Quartzipsamments, 0 to 2 percent
slopes .................................... ............ 32
7-Arents, nearly level ..................................... 32
9-Arents, sanitary landfill .............................. 33
10-Beaches, very frequently flooded .............. 33
12-Blanton fine sand, 0 to 6 percent slopes ..... 33
14-Boulogne fine sand, 0 to 2 percent
slopes .................................... ............ 33
18-Corolla fine sand, gently undulating to
rolling, rarely flooded................................ 34
19-Cornelia fine sand, 0 to 5 percent slopes .... 34
22-Evergreen-Wesconnett complex,
depressional, 0 to 2 percent slopes ............. 34
23-Fripp-Corolla, rarely flooded, complex,
gently undulating to hilly............................. 35
24-Hurricane and Ridgewood soils, 0 to 5
percent slopes .......................................... 36


25-Kershaw fine sand, 2 to 8 percent
slopes .................................... ........... .. 37
26-Kershaw fine sand, smoothed, 0 to 2
percent slopes .......................................... 37
29-Kureb fine sand, 2 to 8 percent slopes ........ 37
31-Kureb fine sand, rolling, 8 to 20 percent
slopes .................................... ........... .. 37
32-Leon fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes ......... 38
33-Leon fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes,
very frequently flooded............................. 39
35-Lynn Haven fine sand, 0 to 2 percent
slopes .................................... ........... .. 40
36-Mandarin fine sand, 0 to 2 percent
slopes .................................... ........... .. 40
38-Mascotte fine sand, 0 to 2 percent
slopes .................................... ............ 40
40-Maurepas muck, 0 to 1 percent slopes,
frequently flooded ................................ .... 41
42-Newhan-Corolla, rarely flooded, complex,
gently undulating to hilly, 2 to 20 percent
slopes .................................... ........... .. 41
44-Mascotte-Pelham complex, 0 to 2 percent
slopes .................................... ........... .. 41
46-Ortega fine sand, 0 to 5 percent slopes ...... 41
49-Pamlico muck, depressional, 0 to 1
percent slopes .......................................... 42
50-Pamlico muck, 0 to 2 percent slopes,
frequently flooded ................................ .... 42
51-Pelham fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes ..... 42
53-Penney fine sand, 0 to 5 percent slopes ..... 43
55- Pits ........................................ ........... .. 43
56-Pottsburg fine sand, 0 to 2 percent
slopes .................................... .......... .. 43
58-Pottsburg fine sand, high, 0 to 3 percent
slopes .................................... ............ 43
62-Rutlege mucky fine sand, 0 to 2 percent
slopes, frequently flooded .......................... 44
63-Sapelo fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes ...... 44
66-Surrency loamy fine sand, depressional,
0 to 2 percent slopes.................................. 44
67-Surrency loamy fine sand, 0 to 2 percent
slopes, frequently flooded .......................... 45
68-Tisonia mucky peat, 0 to 1 percent slopes,
very frequently flooded............................. 45




















69- Urban land ............................................. 45
71-Urban land-Leon-Boulogne complex, 0 to
2 percent slopes ........................................ 45
72-Urban land-Ortega-Kershaw complex,
0 to 8 percent slopes................................ 46
73-Urban land-Mascotte-Sapelo complex,
0 to 2 percent slopes.................................. 47
74-Pelham-Urban land complex, 0 to 2
percent slopes .......................................... 48
75-Urban land-Hurricane-Albany complex,
0 to 5 percent slopes................................ 48
78-Yonges fine sandy loam, 0 to 2 percent
slopes .................................... .......... .. 48
79-Yulee clay, 0 to 2 percent slopes,
frequently flooded ................................ .... 49
80-Goldhead, wet, and Lynn Haven soils,
2 to 5 percent slopes................................ 49
81-Stockade fine sandy loam, depressional,
0 to 2 percent slopes................................ 49
82-Pelham fine sand, depressional, 0 to 2
percent slopes .......................................... 50
86-Yulee clay, depressional, 0 to 2 percent
slopes .................................... .......... .. 50
87-Dorovan muck, depressional, 0 to 2
percent slopes .......................................... 50
88-Lynchburg fine sand, 0 to 2 percent
slopes ...................................... .......... .. 51
Use and Management of the Soils .................... 53
Crops and Pasture .......................................... 53
Prime Farmland .................................. .......... 55
Hydric Soils .................................... ........... 56
Relationships Between Soils and Native
Vegetation .................................. ........... 57
Woodland Management and Productivity ........... 59
Windbreaks and Environmental Plantings .......... 63
Recreation .................................... .......... .. 63
W wildlife Habitat ................................................ 64
Coastal Dune Management............................ 65
Engineering ................................... ............ 66
Soil Properties .................................. ............ 73
Engineering Index Properties ........................... 73
Physical and Chemical Properties .................... 74
Soil and Water Features ................................... 75
Physical, Chemical, and Mineralogical
Analyses of Selected Soils....................... 77


Engineering Index Test Data.............................. 79
Classification of the Soils .............................. ... 81
Soil Series and Their Morphology .................... .... 81
Albany Series .................................... .......... 81
Blanton Series ................................... ........... 82
Boulogne Series ................................... ......... 83
Cornelia Series................................................... 84
Corolla Series.................................... ......... 85
Dorovan Series ................................... .......... 86
Evergreen Series............................................. 86
Fripp Series ..................................... ........... 87
Goldhead Series ............................................. 87
Hurricane Series ............................................... 88
Kershaw Series ................................... .......... 89
Kureb Series .................................... .......... 89
Leon Series .................................... .......... 90
Lynchburg Series ............................................ 91
Lynn Haven Series ............................................ 92
Mandarin Series ................................................ 97
Mascotte Series ................................... ......... 97
Maurepas Series ............................................. 99
Newhan Series ................................... ........... 99
Ortega Series .................................................. 100
Pamlico Series ................................................ 100
Pelham Series ................................................ 101
Penney Series ................................................. 102
Pottsburg Series ............................................... 103
Ridgewood Series ............................................ 103
Rutlege Series................................................ 104
Sapelo Series ................................................. 105
Stockade Series ............................................... 106
Surrency Series............................................... 106
Tisonia Series ................................................. 107
W esconnett Series .......................................... 108
Yonges Series ................................................. 108
Yulee Series .................................................... 109
Formation of the Soils........................................ 111
Factors of Soil Formation ................................ 111
Processes of Horizon Differentiation .............. 113
Geomorphology ............................................... 113
References ......................................................... 119
Glossary ............................................................. 123
Tables ...................................... 133
Table 1.-Temperature and Precipitation .......... 134
Table 2.-Freeze Dates in Spring and Fall........ 135


















Table 3.-Growing Season ............................. 135
Table 4.-Available Construction Days ........... 136
Table 5.-Acreage and Proportionate Extent
of the Soils ............................................... 137
Table 6.-Land Capability and Yields per Acre
of Crops and Pasture ............................... 138
Table 7.-Comprehensive Hydric Soils List...... 141
Table 8.-Woodland Management and
Productivity ................................................ 150
Table 9.-Recreational Development ............. 154
Table 10.- W wildlife Habitat .............................. 159
Table 11.-Building Site Development .............. 163
Table 12.-Sanitary Facilities ........................ 168
Table 13.-Construction Materials .................. 173


Table 14.-Water Management ...................... 177
Table 15.-Engineering Index Properties ......... 184
Table 16.-Physical and Chemical Properties
of the Soils ............................................... 191
Table 17.-Soil and Water Features .............. 196
Table 18.-Physical Analysis of Selected
Soils ......................................................... 200
Table 19.-Chemical Analysis of Selected
Soils ......................................................... 207
Table 20.-Clay Mineralogy of Selected
Soils ......................................................... 213
Table 21 .-Engineering Index Test Data........... 216
Table 22.-Classification of the Soils................ 218


Issued 1998


7






9


Foreword


This soil survey contains information that affects land use planning in the City of
Jacksonville, Duval County. It contains predictions of soil behavior for selected land
uses. The survey also highlights soil limitations, improvements needed to overcome the
limitations, and the impact of selected land uses on the environment.
This soil survey is designed for many different users. Farmers, foresters, and
agronomists can use it to evaluate the potential of the soil and the management needed
for maximum food and fiber production. Planners, community officials, engineers,
developers, builders, and home buyers can use the survey to plan land use, select sites
for construction, and identify special practices needed to ensure proper performance.
Conservationists, teachers, students, and specialists in recreation, wildlife
management, waste disposal, and pollution control can use the survey to help them
understand, protect, and enhance the environment.
Various regulations of Federal, State, and local governments may impose special
restrictions on land use or land treatment. The information in this report is intended to
identify soil properties that are used in making various decisions for land use or land
treatment. Statements made in this report are intended to help the land users identify
and reduce the effects of soil limitations on various land uses. The landowner or user is
responsible for identifying and complying with existing laws and regulations.
Great differences in soil properties can occur within short distances. Some soils are
seasonally wet or subject to flooding. Some are too unstable to be used as a foundation
for buildings or roads. Clayey or wet soils are poorly suited to use as septic tank
absorption fields. A high water table makes a soil poorly suited to basements or
underground installations.
These and many other soil properties that affect land use are described in this soil
survey. Broad areas of soils are shown on the general soil map. The location of each
soil is shown on the detailed soil maps. Each soil in the survey area is described.
Information on specific uses is given for each soil. Help in using this publication and
additional information are available at the local office of the Natural Resources
Conservation Service or the Cooperative Extension Service.




T. Niles Glasgow
State Conservationist
Natural Resources Conservation Service




11


Soil Survey of

City of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida


By Frank C. Watts, Natural Resources Conservation Service

Fieldwork by Hershel D. Dollar, David Howell, Douglas L. Lewis, Leon T. Stem,
Elmer M. Ward, Carol A. Wettstein, Frank C. Watts, Francis Wilhelm, and
Howard Yamataki, Natural Resources Conservation Service

United States Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service,
in cooperation with
University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Agricultural
Experiment Stations, and Soil Science Department, and Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer Services


This soil survey updates the survey of the City of
Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida, published in 1978
(46). It provides additional information and has maps
of smaller scale. The soil boundaries have been
adjusted with reference to color infrared photography
and black-and-white photography taken prior to major
urbanization in the survey area.
The survey area is along the Atlantic Coast in the
northeastern section of the Florida Peninsula (fig. 1). It
is bordered on the north by Nassau County, on the
west by Baker County, on the south by Clay and St.
Johns Counties, and on the east by the Atlantic
Ocean. The Nassau River and Thomas Creek form
part of Duval County's northern boundary, and
Julington Creek forms part of its southern boundary.
Duval County has a land area of 496,948 acres, or
777 square miles. The total area, including areas of
water, is 544,500 acres, or 832 square miles. The
entire county, except for the municipalities of Baldwin,
Atlantic Beach, Neptune Beach, and Jacksonville
Beach, is included in the metropolitan government of
the City of Jacksonville. The county is about 32 miles
long from north to south and 39 miles from east to
west.
Elevation in the county ranges from sea level to
approximately 190 feet above sea level at the eastern
edge of the topographic feature Trail Ridge.


Figure 1.-Location of the City of Jacksonville, Duval County,
in Florida.


General Nature of the County
This section gives general information about the
survey area. It describes climate, seasonal high water
tables, history and development, natural resources,
agriculture, archaeology, and transportation facilities.





Soil Survey


Climate

Stephen M. Letro, meteorologist, United States Department of
Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration,
National Weather Service, helped prepare this section.
The climate in Duval County is characterized by
long, warm, humid summers and mild winters (53). It is
favorable for the production of crops, livestock, and
pine trees. The moderating influence of the Atlantic
Ocean and the Gulf Stream on temperature extremes
in summer and winter is pronounced along the coast.
It diminishes noticeably a few miles inland.
Climatic data presented in tables 1, 2, 3, and 4 are
based on records collected at the Jacksonville
International Airport (53). Table 1 gives data on
temperature and precipitation as recorded in the
period 1961 to 1990. Table 2 shows probable dates of
the first freeze in fall and the last freeze in spring.
Table 3 provides data on length of the growing season.
Available construction days are shown in table 4.
Growing degree days are shown in table 1. They
are equivalent to "heat units." During the month,
growing degree days accumulate by the amount that
the average temperature each day exceeds a base
temperature (40 degrees F).The normal monthly
accumulation is used to schedule single or successive
plantings of a crop between the last freeze in spring
and the first freeze in fall.
The average maximum temperature has little day-
to-day variation. In summer, the temperature can be
as high as 96 degrees F at least 1 day a month. In
winter, the minimum temperature varies considerably
from day to day, mainly because of periodic invasions
of cold, dry air moving southward from across the
continent. The highest recorded temperature during
the period 1941 to 1990 was 105 degrees, which
occurred in July 1942, and the lowest recorded
temperature was 7 degrees, which occurred in
January 1985.
In many areas, particularly near the ocean,
temperatures seldom drop below freezing. In areas
away from the coast, temperatures are freezing or
below freezing about 12 times a year. It is rare that the
temperature does not rise above 32 degrees F during
the day. There have been only five occasions that the
temperature remained below freezing. The most
notable occasion was on February 13, 1899, when the
maximum temperature for the day was only 27
degrees.
Rainfall is heaviest in summer. In an average year,
about 65 percent of the total annual precipitation falls
in June through October. The growing season for most
crops falls within this period. The remaining 35 percent


of precipitation is more or less evenly distributed
throughout the rest of the year.
In summer, most of the precipitation occurs along
the beaches before noon and occurs as afternoon or
evening showers and thundershowers in areas inland.
Sometimes, 2 to 3 inches of rain fall within an hour.
Day-long rains in summer are rare. Generally, they are
associated with tropical storms. Rainfall in fall, winter,
and spring is seldom as intense as in summer.
According to the National Weather Service at
Jacksonville International Airport, rainfall that is more
than 8 inches during a 24-hour period occurs in about
1 year out of 10. Hail falls occasionally during
thunderstorms, but hailstones generally are small and
seldom cause much damage.
The atmosphere is moist, and the average relative
humidity is about 75 percent.The humidity ranges
from about 90 percent in the early morning to about 55
percent in the afternoon.
Snowfall is rare. When it does occur, it generally
melts as soon as it reaches the ground. Since 1871,
snowfall has been recorded as 1.9 inches on February
12 and 13, 1899; 1.5 inches on February 13, 1958; 0.5
inch on March 1, 1986; and 0.8 inch on December 23,
1989.
Tropical storms can affect the survey area from
early June through mid-November. The chance of
winds reaching hurricane force, 74 miles per hour or
more, in the Jacksonville area is about 1 in 50. Most
hurricanes reaching the latitude of this area tend to
move parallel to the coastline, staying out at sea.
Others lose much force while moving over land before
reaching this area. The very heavy rains and flooding
associated with these storms can cause considerable
damage.
Extended periods of dry weather can occur in any
season but are most common in spring and fall. Dry
periods in April and May generally are shorter than
those in fall, but they are more serious because
temperatures are higher during these months and the
need for moisture is greater.
Prevailing winds are generally northeasterly in fall
and winter and southwesterly in spring and summer.
Average windspeed generally is slightly less than 9
miles per hour. It is 2 or 3 miles per hour higher in
early afternoon and is also slightly higher in spring
than in other seasons.
Available construction days (table 4) are based on
the number of days during which the temperature
does not fall below 32 degrees F and precipitation
does not exceed 0.10 inch. The average number of
these days per year is 271 (including weekends). The
best months for construction are March, April, May,





City of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida


October, and November. These months have an
average of 25 or 26 available days each. The least
favorable months are January and February, which
have an average of 19 available days each. In any
given year, there is a 99 percent chance that there will
be at least 252 available construction days and a 50
percent chance that there will be more than 278 of
these days.

Seasonal High Water Tables

The seasonal high water table is the level at which
free water stands in an unlined borehole for a
significant period of time (more than a few weeks)
during the seasonally wettest time of the year. In Duval
County, the seasonally wettest times of the year
typically are from January through March and from
June through October. These periods correspond to
the seasonally highest periods of rainfall. There is
typically more rainfall in summer than in winter, but,
because there is more evapotranspiration in summer
than in winter, the two seasons have similar seasonal
high water tables. Typically, the driest time of the year
is from November through December. This period
corresponds to the seasonally lowest period of rainfall.
The second driest time of the year is typically from
April through May. During this period, rainfall rates are
typically higher than those in November and
December but lower than those during winter and
summer and evapotranspiration rates are much higher.
Soil series have a range of seasonal high water tables.
Generally, the seasonal high water is shallowest at the
lower elevations and deepest at the higher elevations.

History and Development
Dena E. Snodgrass, historian, helped prepare this section.
Indians lived in the area of present-day Florida for
thousands of years before the first European explorers
arrived (28).The main Indian groups were the
Timucua, Apalachee, Ais, Tekesta, and Calusa. The
Timucua Indians, which consisted of 15 different
tribes, occupied the survey area (16). The Timucuan
Indians had a favored crossing place along the
present-day St. Johns River. They called this place
Wacca Pilatka, meaning the Place of the Cows
Crossing.
The first Europeans to arrive in the survey area
were Spanish and French explorers. In 1513, Juan
Ponce de Leon landed on the coast of present-day
northeastern Florida and was credited with its
discovery (29). He named the land La Florida for
Pascua Florida, Spain's Feast of the Flowers at Easter.


In 1564, French Huguenots built Fort La Caroline on a
high bluff along the St. Johns River (54). The fort was
destroyed and rebuilt by the Spanish (17). The original
site of La Caroline was washed away after the river
channel was deepened and widened in the 1880's. A
model of the fort was built at the present-day site of
Fort Caroline National Memorial.
In 1763, Great Britain acquired Florida and began
developing the northern part of the territory. The British
changed the name of Wacca Pilatka to Cowford, which
later became Jacksonville. They widened the Indian
trail and developed it from south of St. Augustine to
Cowford and on into Georgia. England owned Florida
for 20 years. Florida was relinquished to Spain in
exchange for Havana, Cuba. In 1821, Florida became
a United States possession.
The first European settler on the site of present-day
Jacksonville was Robert Pritchard, who arrived in
1771. The Kingsley Plantation House was built in the
survey area in 1798 and is the only plantation house
still standing in northeastern Florida (10). In June
1822, about 250 settlers lived in the Cowford area.
Isaiah D. Hart is known as the founder of Jacksonville
because he headed the movement to get streets
surveyed and land donated. Jacksonville was named
for General Andrew Jackson. General Jackson served
briefly as the provisional governor of Florida after it
was ceded to the United States. In 1822, Duval County
was created from part of St. Johns County and
Jacksonville became the county seat. Duval County
was named for William P. Duval, the first territorial
governor of Florida. The City of Jacksonville was
incorporated in 1832. On August 8, 1967, residents in
the City of Jacksonville and Duval County voted to
eliminate the city and county governments and
establish one unified government. Jacksonville has
more land area than any other city in the United
States.
In 1828, the first steam sawmill in eastern Florida
was built along the Trout River and was supported by
the large amount of timber resources in the survey
area. Soon afterwards, a brick kiln and a small sugar
mill were built in the county. These businesses as well
as cotton production improved the county's economy.
The building industry was revolutionized because of
the supplies of lumber and brick. In 1835, the City of
Jacksonville's first bank and newspaper were
established. In 1850, there were seven sawmills along
the St. Johns River between downtown Jacksonville
and Mayport. Favored by its location near the Atlantic
Ocean and good access to a large agricultural and
timber region, Jacksonville became an important trade
center and deep water port. Steamboats began to use
the port for both local and out-of-state commerce. A





Soil Survey


stagecoach line was operated between Jacksonville
and Tallahassee in the 1850's. In 1858, a railroad was
built that connected St. Augustine to Tocoi, and in
March 1860, the railroad reached from Jacksonville to
Lake City, Florida. Street railway was first operating in
Jacksonville in 1881. The first electric lights appeared
in 1883. Jacksonville's first bridge across the St. Johns
River, the Acosta, was completed in 1921. Its first
airport opened in 1927.
When Florida became a state on March 3, 1845,
there were less than 1,000 people living in
Jacksonville, and in 1850, there were about 1,045. A
large town fire in 1854 and a yellow fever epidemic in
1857 reduced the population. By 1860, however, the
population was up to 2,118, and in 1870, it was three
times as large. Much of the City of Jacksonville was
destroyed during the Civil War. In 1900, Jacksonville
had a population of 28,429. Jacksonville continued to
grow in spite of a great fire which nearly leveled the
city in 1901 (4). The city is now a regional center for
rail, highway, and water transportation as well as a
center for financial and insurance institutions. The
population of Jacksonville was 304,029 in 1950;
455,211 in 1960; 528,865 in 1970; 571,003 in 1980;
and 672,971 in 1990.
Since the end of the Second World War, industrial
development in the survey area has greatly increased.
Machinery and transportation equipment, chemicals,
bedding, fabricated metals, and construction materials
are manufactured in the area. Timber and pulpwood
are major products. A large part of the population is
employed in construction, and many more people are
employed in the shipping industry located along
Jacksonville's waterfront. Community facilities have
expanded rapidly since 1968. All parts of the county
are adequately served by electric and telephone
facilities. Natural gas is available in many places.
The Duval Soil and Water Conservation District was
organized in 1953 to help landowners make the best
use of their land and to develop a more prosperous
and lasting agriculture.

Natural Resources

Heavy minerals have higher specific gravities than
quartz, or ordinary sand. The common heavy minerals
in Florida include aluminum silicates, epidote, garnet,
ilmenite, leucoxene, monazite, rutile, zircon, staurolite,
tourmaline, and xenotine (18). These minerals are
used to manufacture paint, cement, glass, electronics,
and porcelain.
Sand and clayey sand cover the surface of the
survey area to varying depths. Although they are
presently mined to a limited extent, they could


potentially be used as base material or fill material for
roads.
Soil is an important resource in Duval County. Soil
suitability for various uses generally is based on
evaluation of soil properties. Interpretations in this soil
survey show how these properties can affect the use
and management of soils.


Agriculture

Corn and vegetables were the first crops grown in
Duval County (35, 36). Sugar cane, rice, arrowroot,
potatoes, rye, and wheat were cultivated later. Cotton
and wool were produced for clothing. Lumbering was
an important business in the 1830's, but most of the
forest resources had been exhausted by the late
1910's. Citrus production started in the 1870's and
continued until the big freeze in the winter of 1895,
which killed most of the trees. The turpentine industry
in the county started in 1885. It began to decline in the
1920's. In 1879, the county had 1,939 acres of corn,
476 acres of sweet potatoes, 121 acres of sugar cane,
57 acres of cotton, 92 acres of rice, and 46 acres of
oats. The acreage of all crops, except potatoes,
decreased from 1899 to 1909. The acreage of all
crops, except sugarcane and dry peas, increased from
1909 to 1919. Most farmers raised cattle and hogs on
the open range, and some had dairies. In 1920, about
2.6 percent of the county was cultivated.
In 1992, Duval County had about 378 farms (55). In
1992, land classified as agricultural in the county
made up 281,039 acres, or about 56.6 percent of the
county. Of that total, 262,713 acres was woodland,
13,056 acres was cropland, and 5,270 acres was
pastureland. The average size of a farm was about
106 acres. The total acreage of farmland was 41,766.
In addition to dairy, poultry, and beef sales, farmers in
Duval County produce small amounts of corn and
tobacco. Forest land makes up 262,713 acres, or
about 52.9 percent of the county (38). It includes
public land, commercial and privately owned
woodland, and woodland owned by the forest industry.

Archeology
Lynn Nidy, field archaeologist, Florida Division of Archives and
History, helped prepare this section.

Soil properties undoubtedly influenced the selection
of settlement sites by humans. Factors such as
wetness, flooding, slope, permeability, and fertility for
crop production were important criteria in site
selection. The early inhabitants of the survey area had
a limited knowledge of soils and a limited ability to






City of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida


alter the soil and so had to use the soil primarily as it
was.
Inhabitants in the survey area were probably at one
time hunters and gatherers, that is, they did not plant
crops but gathered wild plants and hunted game. Even
their subsistence practices, however, were indirectly
influenced by soil distribution and its relationship to the
environment. Soils influence the kind and amount of
vegetation and the amount of available water and thus
indirectly influence the kind of wildlife that inhabit an
area.
Archeological site distribution in the survey area is
closely related to topography and soil distribution. The
topography in Duval County is mostly low and gentle
to flat and is composed of a series of ancient marine
terraces (15). The highest altitude, about 190 feet
above sea level, is in the extreme southwestern corner
of the county, along the eastern slope of the prominent
topographic feature known as Trail Ridge. Trail Ridge is
a remnant of the highest ancient marine terrace (the
Coharie Terrace) in the survey area. The terraces are
parallel to the present-day Atlantic shoreline and
become progressively higher in elevation from east to
west.
There are 36 large ceremonial sites recorded to
date in the county, 35 of which occur on moderately
well drained to excessively drained soils. Moderately
well drained to excessively drained soils, such as
Ortega, Kureb, Kershaw, Cornelia, and Blanton soils,
are located on the higher parts of individual marine
terraces. Of the total 150 archaeological sites
recognized in the county, only those directly related to
marine food acquisition are located on very poorly
drained soils, such as Tisonia and Maurepas soils.
Many of the soils related to marine food acquisition
have been modified by humans. Human inhabitation of
sites has actually created fertile soils. Sites in areas of
soils that were originally low, wet, poorly drained,
unproductive sandy soils were developed because of
easily exploited abundant food sources. Today,
because of midden accumulation, these areas are
higher than the surrounding areas. The soils are better
drained and more fertile. The areas are quite visible on
aerial photographs because of the different vegetation
in surrounding areas.
The relationship of the settlement of an area to
good farming lands is clearly indicated by the locations
of early plantations. Generally, the plantations were
located on prehistoric Indian sites. The Greenfield,
Fitzpatrick, Kingsley, and Houston Plantations are
examples.
The first European settlers in the survey area lived
on the high ridges along the south bank of the St.
Johns River and on the islands around the river's


mouth. The early settlements, except for sawmill
grants in the interior of the county, were on moderately
well drained to excessively drained soils.
An important exception to this settlement trend was
the settlement of an area on the northwestern bank of
the St. Johns River in the late 18th century. This
settlement, once known as Cowford, eventually
became the City of Jacksonville. Because the St.
Johns River is narrowest in this area, the area was a
popular fording point.

Transportation Facilities

Duval County is served by a good transportation
network. Interstate Highways 10, 95, and 295 and U.S.
Highways 1, 17, 23, and 90 traverse the county and
provide ready access to population centers within the
county and the state. In addition, Jacksonville is a rail
center and the headquarters of one of the major
railroads. A modern system of bridges crosses the St.
Johns, Broward, Trout, and Ortega Rivers in several
locations. Airline service, both commercial and private,
and rail and bus service are available. The Intercoastal
Waterway provides an inland water route through the
county. Blount Island, Dames Point, Eastport, and
downtown Jacksonville are deep water ports for
commercial ships. The U.S. Naval Station in Mayport
has a deep water basin where naval vessels dock.

How This Survey Was Made
This survey was made to provide information about
the soils and miscellaneous areas in the survey area.
The information includes a description of the soils and
miscellaneous areas and their location and a
discussion of their suitability, limitations, and
management for specified uses. Soil scientists
observed the steepness, length, and shape of the
slopes; the general pattern of drainage; and the kinds
of crops and native plants. They dug many holes to
study the soil profile, which is the sequence of natural
layers, or horizons, in a soil.The profile extends from
the surface down into the unconsolidated material in
which the soil formed.The unconsolidated material is
devoid of roots and other living organisms and has not
been changed by other biological activity.
The soils and miscellaneous areas in the survey
area are in an orderly pattern that is related to the
geology, landforms, relief, climate, and natural
vegetation of the area. Each kind of soil and
miscellaneous area is associated with a particular kind
of landform or with a segment of the landform. By
observing the soils and miscellaneous areas in the
survey area and relating their position to specific





Soil Survey


segments of the landform, a soil scientist develops a
concept or model of how they formed. Thus, during
mapping, this model enables the soil scientist to
predict with a considerable degree of accuracy the
kind of soil or miscellaneous area at a specific location
on the landscape.
Commonly, individual soils on the landscape merge
into one another as their characteristics gradually
change. To construct an accurate soil map, however,
soil scientists must determine the boundaries between
the soils. They can observe only a limited number of
soil profiles. Nevertheless, these observations,
supplemented by an understanding of the soil-
landscape relationship, are sufficient to verify
predictions of the kinds of soil in an area and to
determine the boundaries.
Soil scientists recorded the characteristics of the
soil profiles that they studied.They noted color,
texture, size and shape of soil aggregates, distribution
of plant roots, reaction, and other features that enable
them to identify the soils. After describing the soils and
determining their properties, the soil scientists
assigned the soils to taxonomic classes (units).
Taxonomic classes are concepts. Each taxonomic
class has a set of soil characteristics with precisely
defined limits. The classes are used as a basis for
comparison to classify soils systematically. Soil
taxonomy, the system of taxonomic classification used
in the United States, is based mainly on the kind and
character of soil properties and the arrangement of
horizons within the profile. After the soil scientists
classified and named the soils in the survey area, they
compared the individual soils with similar soils in the
same taxonomic class in other areas so that they
could confirm data and assemble additional data
based on experience and research.
While a soil survey is in progress, samples of some
of the soils in the area are generally collected for
laboratory analyses and for engineering tests. The
data from these analyses and tests and from field-
observed characteristics and soil properties are used
to predict behavior of the soils under different uses.
Interpretations are field tested through observation of
the soils in different uses under different levels of
management. Some interpretations are modified to fit
local conditions, and some new interpretations are
developed to meet local needs. Data are assembled
from other sources, such as research information,
production records, and field experience of specialists.
For example, data on crop yields under defined levels
of management are assembled from farm records and
from field or plot experiments on the same kinds of
soil.
Predictions about soil behavior are based not only


on soil properties but also on such variables as
climate and biological activity. Soil conditions are
predictable over long periods of time, but they are not
predictable from year to year. For example, soil
scientists can predict with a relatively high degree of
accuracy that a given soil will have a high water table
within certain depths in most years, but they cannot
assure that a high water table will be at a specific level
in the soil on a specific date.
After soil scientists located and identified the
significant natural bodies of soil in the survey area,
they drew the boundaries of these bodies on aerial
photographs and identified each as a specific map
unit. Aerial photographs show trees, buildings, fields,
roads, and rivers, all of which help in accurately
locating boundaries.
The descriptions, names, and delineations of the
soils in this survey area do not fully agree with those
of the soils in adjacent survey areas. Differences are
the result of a better knowledge of soils, modifications
in series concepts, or variations in the intensity of
mapping or in the extent of the soils in the survey
areas.

Use of Ground-Penetrating Radar

In Duval County, the results of a ground-penetrating
radar (GPR) system (12, 13, 21, 27) and hand
transects conducted in Nassau County were used to
document the variability of the soil in the detailed soil
map units. The geomorphology of Nassau County is
very similar to that of Duval County, and the counties
have many of the same map units.

Survey Procedures

This survey updates the soil survey of the City of
Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida, published in 1978
(46). It provides additional data and soil interpretations.
The scale of the maps in this soil survey is 1:24,000
whereas it was 1:20,000 in the 1978 soil survey.
Because more soil series have been established since
1978, the soils are shown in greater detail in this
survey.
The general procedures followed in making the
survey are described in the "National Soil Survey
Handbook" of the Natural Resources Conservation
Service and in the "Soil Survey Manual" (40, 51). The
maps and soil descriptions in the previous soil survey
were used as a reference.
Before the fieldwork began, black-and-white aerial
photographs taken in January 1952 at a scale of
1:20,000 and infrared photographs taken in the spring
of 1983 and the spring of 1984 at a scale of 1:24,000





Soil Survey


segments of the landform, a soil scientist develops a
concept or model of how they formed. Thus, during
mapping, this model enables the soil scientist to
predict with a considerable degree of accuracy the
kind of soil or miscellaneous area at a specific location
on the landscape.
Commonly, individual soils on the landscape merge
into one another as their characteristics gradually
change. To construct an accurate soil map, however,
soil scientists must determine the boundaries between
the soils. They can observe only a limited number of
soil profiles. Nevertheless, these observations,
supplemented by an understanding of the soil-
landscape relationship, are sufficient to verify
predictions of the kinds of soil in an area and to
determine the boundaries.
Soil scientists recorded the characteristics of the
soil profiles that they studied.They noted color,
texture, size and shape of soil aggregates, distribution
of plant roots, reaction, and other features that enable
them to identify the soils. After describing the soils and
determining their properties, the soil scientists
assigned the soils to taxonomic classes (units).
Taxonomic classes are concepts. Each taxonomic
class has a set of soil characteristics with precisely
defined limits. The classes are used as a basis for
comparison to classify soils systematically. Soil
taxonomy, the system of taxonomic classification used
in the United States, is based mainly on the kind and
character of soil properties and the arrangement of
horizons within the profile. After the soil scientists
classified and named the soils in the survey area, they
compared the individual soils with similar soils in the
same taxonomic class in other areas so that they
could confirm data and assemble additional data
based on experience and research.
While a soil survey is in progress, samples of some
of the soils in the area are generally collected for
laboratory analyses and for engineering tests. The
data from these analyses and tests and from field-
observed characteristics and soil properties are used
to predict behavior of the soils under different uses.
Interpretations are field tested through observation of
the soils in different uses under different levels of
management. Some interpretations are modified to fit
local conditions, and some new interpretations are
developed to meet local needs. Data are assembled
from other sources, such as research information,
production records, and field experience of specialists.
For example, data on crop yields under defined levels
of management are assembled from farm records and
from field or plot experiments on the same kinds of
soil.
Predictions about soil behavior are based not only


on soil properties but also on such variables as
climate and biological activity. Soil conditions are
predictable over long periods of time, but they are not
predictable from year to year. For example, soil
scientists can predict with a relatively high degree of
accuracy that a given soil will have a high water table
within certain depths in most years, but they cannot
assure that a high water table will be at a specific level
in the soil on a specific date.
After soil scientists located and identified the
significant natural bodies of soil in the survey area,
they drew the boundaries of these bodies on aerial
photographs and identified each as a specific map
unit. Aerial photographs show trees, buildings, fields,
roads, and rivers, all of which help in accurately
locating boundaries.
The descriptions, names, and delineations of the
soils in this survey area do not fully agree with those
of the soils in adjacent survey areas. Differences are
the result of a better knowledge of soils, modifications
in series concepts, or variations in the intensity of
mapping or in the extent of the soils in the survey
areas.

Use of Ground-Penetrating Radar

In Duval County, the results of a ground-penetrating
radar (GPR) system (12, 13, 21, 27) and hand
transects conducted in Nassau County were used to
document the variability of the soil in the detailed soil
map units. The geomorphology of Nassau County is
very similar to that of Duval County, and the counties
have many of the same map units.

Survey Procedures

This survey updates the soil survey of the City of
Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida, published in 1978
(46). It provides additional data and soil interpretations.
The scale of the maps in this soil survey is 1:24,000
whereas it was 1:20,000 in the 1978 soil survey.
Because more soil series have been established since
1978, the soils are shown in greater detail in this
survey.
The general procedures followed in making the
survey are described in the "National Soil Survey
Handbook" of the Natural Resources Conservation
Service and in the "Soil Survey Manual" (40, 51). The
maps and soil descriptions in the previous soil survey
were used as a reference.
Before the fieldwork began, black-and-white aerial
photographs taken in January 1952 at a scale of
1:20,000 and infrared photographs taken in the spring
of 1983 and the spring of 1984 at a scale of 1:24,000





City of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida


were studied. Soil scientists studied United States
Geological Survey topographic maps at a scale of
1:24,000 to relate land and image features.
Reconnaissance was made by vehicle before the
landscape was traversed on foot. Most areas required
remapping. The 1952 black-and-white photographs
show many areas supporting natural vegetation that
were later cleared and used for planted pine
plantations or urban development, or both. Landforms
are easier to differentiate in areas of natural
vegetation, and most soils can be correlated to certain
landforms. Areas of hydric soils can be seen using the
1983 and 1984 infrared photographs.


Several soils have been established since the
previous soil survey. For example, areas mapped as
Pottsburg soils in the 1978 survey include Pottsburg,
Pottsburg, high, and Hurricane soils in this soil survey
because soil boundary lines were adjusted throughout
the county. Traverses generally were made at intervals
of about 1/4 mile. They were made at closer intervals in
complex areas of high variability and at wider intervals
in less complex areas of low variability.
Chemical, physical, mineralogical, and engineering
test data from the 1978 soil survey and the soil
survey of Nassau County were used in this soil survey
(46, 50).






19


General Soil Map Units


The general soil map shows broad areas that have
a distinctive pattern of soils, relief, and drainage. Each
map unit on the general soil map is a unique natural
landscape. Typically, it consists of one or more major
soils or miscellaneous areas and some minor soils or
miscellaneous areas. It is named for the major soils or
miscellaneous areas. The components of one map unit
can occur in another but in a different pattern. A slash
separating two soil names in the name of a general
soil map unit indicates that areas of the two soils are
considered as a collective acreage.
The general soil map can be used to compare the
suitability of large areas for general land uses. Areas
of suitable soils can be identified on the map. Likewise,
areas where the soils are not suitable can be
identified.
Because of its small scale, the map is not suitable
for planning the management of a farm or field or for
selecting a site for a road or a building or other
structure. The soils in any one map unit differ from
place to place in slope, depth, drainage, and other
characteristics that affect management.

Soils on Dunes, on Rises, on Knolls, and
in Flatwoods

The three general soil map units in this group
consist of nearly level to sloping and gently undulating
to hilly, excessively drained to poorly drained soils that
are sandy to a depth of 80 inches or more.These map
units occur in the eastern part of the county and along
the St. Johns River.

1. Fripp-Corolla-Mandarin

Nearly level to hilly, excessively drained, moderately
well drained, and somewhat poorly drained, sandy
soils; in high landscape positions
The soils in this map unit are on dunes and in
flatwoods. The dunes are elongated, generally
oriented north to south along their long axis and
parallel to the ocean coast.The primary dunes are
adjacent to the ocean beach, and the relict beach
dunes are farther inland. The height of the dunes


ranges from 4 to 15 feet, and the slope generally is 8
to 100 feet or more in length. Slopes are concave and
convex. Individual areas of this map unit are elongated
and relatively small in size.
This map unit makes up about 1,985 acres, or 0.4
percent of the county. It is about 34 percent Fripp soils,
25 percent Corolla soils, 14 percent Mandarin soils,
and 27 percent soils of minor extent (fig. 2).
The Fripp soils are excessively drained, occur on
gently undulating to hilly dunes, and are vegetated
with trees. The surface layer is grayish brown fine sand
about 6 inches thick. The underlying material, to a
depth of 80 inches or more, is very pale brown fine
sand that contains horizontal bands of black heavy
minerals.
The Corolla soils are somewhat poorly drained and
moderately well drained, occur on gently undulating to
rolling dunes, are affected by salt spray in areas near
the Atlantic Ocean, and do not have trees. The surface
layer is very pale brown fine sand about 6 inches thick.
The underlying material, to a depth of 80 inches or
more, is fine sand that has common very pale brown
shell fragments and horizontal bands of black
minerals. The upper 20 inches of this material is pale
brown and light yellowish brown, and below this the
material is light gray.
The Mandarin soils are somewhat poorly drained
and occur in the slightly elevated, nearly level
flatwoods. These soils generally are west of the
beaches. The surface layer is dark gray fine sand
about 4 inches thick. The subsurface layer is fine sand
about 22 inches thick. It is light brownish gray in the
upper 4 inches and light gray in the lower 18 inches.
The subsoil is dark organic stained fine sand that
extends to a depth of 46 inches. The sand grains are
coated with organic matter. The subsoil is very dark
grayish brown between depths of 26 and 30 inches,
very dark brown between depths of 30 and 35 inches,
black between depths of 35 and 40 inches, and brown
between depths of 40 and 46 inches. Below this is light
gray fine sand 10 inches thick, white fine sand 6
inches thick, and grayish brown fine sand 11 inches
thick. Between depths of 73 and 80 inches is fine sand
that is weakly cemented, black, and coated with
organic matter.






19


General Soil Map Units


The general soil map shows broad areas that have
a distinctive pattern of soils, relief, and drainage. Each
map unit on the general soil map is a unique natural
landscape. Typically, it consists of one or more major
soils or miscellaneous areas and some minor soils or
miscellaneous areas. It is named for the major soils or
miscellaneous areas. The components of one map unit
can occur in another but in a different pattern. A slash
separating two soil names in the name of a general
soil map unit indicates that areas of the two soils are
considered as a collective acreage.
The general soil map can be used to compare the
suitability of large areas for general land uses. Areas
of suitable soils can be identified on the map. Likewise,
areas where the soils are not suitable can be
identified.
Because of its small scale, the map is not suitable
for planning the management of a farm or field or for
selecting a site for a road or a building or other
structure. The soils in any one map unit differ from
place to place in slope, depth, drainage, and other
characteristics that affect management.

Soils on Dunes, on Rises, on Knolls, and
in Flatwoods

The three general soil map units in this group
consist of nearly level to sloping and gently undulating
to hilly, excessively drained to poorly drained soils that
are sandy to a depth of 80 inches or more.These map
units occur in the eastern part of the county and along
the St. Johns River.

1. Fripp-Corolla-Mandarin

Nearly level to hilly, excessively drained, moderately
well drained, and somewhat poorly drained, sandy
soils; in high landscape positions
The soils in this map unit are on dunes and in
flatwoods. The dunes are elongated, generally
oriented north to south along their long axis and
parallel to the ocean coast.The primary dunes are
adjacent to the ocean beach, and the relict beach
dunes are farther inland. The height of the dunes


ranges from 4 to 15 feet, and the slope generally is 8
to 100 feet or more in length. Slopes are concave and
convex. Individual areas of this map unit are elongated
and relatively small in size.
This map unit makes up about 1,985 acres, or 0.4
percent of the county. It is about 34 percent Fripp soils,
25 percent Corolla soils, 14 percent Mandarin soils,
and 27 percent soils of minor extent (fig. 2).
The Fripp soils are excessively drained, occur on
gently undulating to hilly dunes, and are vegetated
with trees. The surface layer is grayish brown fine sand
about 6 inches thick. The underlying material, to a
depth of 80 inches or more, is very pale brown fine
sand that contains horizontal bands of black heavy
minerals.
The Corolla soils are somewhat poorly drained and
moderately well drained, occur on gently undulating to
rolling dunes, are affected by salt spray in areas near
the Atlantic Ocean, and do not have trees. The surface
layer is very pale brown fine sand about 6 inches thick.
The underlying material, to a depth of 80 inches or
more, is fine sand that has common very pale brown
shell fragments and horizontal bands of black
minerals. The upper 20 inches of this material is pale
brown and light yellowish brown, and below this the
material is light gray.
The Mandarin soils are somewhat poorly drained
and occur in the slightly elevated, nearly level
flatwoods. These soils generally are west of the
beaches. The surface layer is dark gray fine sand
about 4 inches thick. The subsurface layer is fine sand
about 22 inches thick. It is light brownish gray in the
upper 4 inches and light gray in the lower 18 inches.
The subsoil is dark organic stained fine sand that
extends to a depth of 46 inches. The sand grains are
coated with organic matter. The subsoil is very dark
grayish brown between depths of 26 and 30 inches,
very dark brown between depths of 30 and 35 inches,
black between depths of 35 and 40 inches, and brown
between depths of 40 and 46 inches. Below this is light
gray fine sand 10 inches thick, white fine sand 6
inches thick, and grayish brown fine sand 11 inches
thick. Between depths of 73 and 80 inches is fine sand
that is weakly cemented, black, and coated with
organic matter.






19


General Soil Map Units


The general soil map shows broad areas that have
a distinctive pattern of soils, relief, and drainage. Each
map unit on the general soil map is a unique natural
landscape. Typically, it consists of one or more major
soils or miscellaneous areas and some minor soils or
miscellaneous areas. It is named for the major soils or
miscellaneous areas. The components of one map unit
can occur in another but in a different pattern. A slash
separating two soil names in the name of a general
soil map unit indicates that areas of the two soils are
considered as a collective acreage.
The general soil map can be used to compare the
suitability of large areas for general land uses. Areas
of suitable soils can be identified on the map. Likewise,
areas where the soils are not suitable can be
identified.
Because of its small scale, the map is not suitable
for planning the management of a farm or field or for
selecting a site for a road or a building or other
structure. The soils in any one map unit differ from
place to place in slope, depth, drainage, and other
characteristics that affect management.

Soils on Dunes, on Rises, on Knolls, and
in Flatwoods

The three general soil map units in this group
consist of nearly level to sloping and gently undulating
to hilly, excessively drained to poorly drained soils that
are sandy to a depth of 80 inches or more.These map
units occur in the eastern part of the county and along
the St. Johns River.

1. Fripp-Corolla-Mandarin

Nearly level to hilly, excessively drained, moderately
well drained, and somewhat poorly drained, sandy
soils; in high landscape positions
The soils in this map unit are on dunes and in
flatwoods. The dunes are elongated, generally
oriented north to south along their long axis and
parallel to the ocean coast.The primary dunes are
adjacent to the ocean beach, and the relict beach
dunes are farther inland. The height of the dunes


ranges from 4 to 15 feet, and the slope generally is 8
to 100 feet or more in length. Slopes are concave and
convex. Individual areas of this map unit are elongated
and relatively small in size.
This map unit makes up about 1,985 acres, or 0.4
percent of the county. It is about 34 percent Fripp soils,
25 percent Corolla soils, 14 percent Mandarin soils,
and 27 percent soils of minor extent (fig. 2).
The Fripp soils are excessively drained, occur on
gently undulating to hilly dunes, and are vegetated
with trees. The surface layer is grayish brown fine sand
about 6 inches thick. The underlying material, to a
depth of 80 inches or more, is very pale brown fine
sand that contains horizontal bands of black heavy
minerals.
The Corolla soils are somewhat poorly drained and
moderately well drained, occur on gently undulating to
rolling dunes, are affected by salt spray in areas near
the Atlantic Ocean, and do not have trees. The surface
layer is very pale brown fine sand about 6 inches thick.
The underlying material, to a depth of 80 inches or
more, is fine sand that has common very pale brown
shell fragments and horizontal bands of black
minerals. The upper 20 inches of this material is pale
brown and light yellowish brown, and below this the
material is light gray.
The Mandarin soils are somewhat poorly drained
and occur in the slightly elevated, nearly level
flatwoods. These soils generally are west of the
beaches. The surface layer is dark gray fine sand
about 4 inches thick. The subsurface layer is fine sand
about 22 inches thick. It is light brownish gray in the
upper 4 inches and light gray in the lower 18 inches.
The subsoil is dark organic stained fine sand that
extends to a depth of 46 inches. The sand grains are
coated with organic matter. The subsoil is very dark
grayish brown between depths of 26 and 30 inches,
very dark brown between depths of 30 and 35 inches,
black between depths of 35 and 40 inches, and brown
between depths of 40 and 46 inches. Below this is light
gray fine sand 10 inches thick, white fine sand 6
inches thick, and grayish brown fine sand 11 inches
thick. Between depths of 73 and 80 inches is fine sand
that is weakly cemented, black, and coated with
organic matter.






Soil Survey


Figure 2.-Typical pattern of soils and parent material in an area of the Fripp-Corolla-Mandarin, Cornelia-Mandarin-Leon, and
Tisonia-Maurepas general soil map units.The soils of these map units support native vegetation.


Of minor extent in this map unit are Kureb, Leon,
Newhan, and Tisonia soils. Kureb and Newhan soils
are excessively drained. Kureb soils are on dunes and
rises. Newhan soils are on dunes, are affected by salt
spray, and do not have trees. Leon and Tisonia soils
are very poorly drained and in tidal marshes.
This map unit is located on Little Talbot Island and
supports native vegetation. The natural vegetation
consists of live oak and water oak. The understory
includes saw palmetto, yaupon, wiregrass, and
seaoats.

2. Cornelia-Mandarin-Leon

Nearly level and gently sloping, excessively drained
and somewhat poorly drained to very poorly drained,
sandy soils; in low to high landscape positions
The soils in this map unit are on rises and in
flatwoods. The map unit occurs on Talbot Island and
Fort George Island in the eastern part of the county.
This map unit makes up about 2,990 acres, or 0.6
percent of the county. It is about 31 percent Cornelia


soils, 25 percent Mandarin soils, 16 percent Leon
soils, and 28 percent soils of minor extent (fig. 2).
The Cornelia soils are somewhat excessively
drained and occur on nearly level and gently sloping
rises. The surface layer is very dark gray fine sand
about 7 inches thick. The subsurface layer is fine sand
about 32 inches thick. It is gray in the upper 6 inches
and white in the lower 26 inches. The subsoil extends
to a depth of 106 inches. It is dark organic stained fine
sand that is coated with organic matter. The subsoil is
dark reddish brown between depths of 39 and 53
inches, dark yellowish brown between depths of 53
and 73 inches, dark brown between depths of 73 and
92 inches, and reddish brown between depths of 92
and 106 inches.
The Mandarin soils are somewhat poorly drained
and occur in the nearly level, slightly elevated
flatwoods. The surface layer is dark gray fine sand
about 4 inches thick. The subsurface layer is fine sand
about 22 inches thick. It is light brownish gray in the
upper 4 inches and light gray in the lower 18 inches.
The subsoil extends to a depth of 46 inches. It is dark
organic stained fine sand. It is well coated with organic






City of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida


matter, except in the lower 6 inches. The subsoil is
very dark grayish brown between depths of 26 and 30
inches, very dark brown between depths of 30 and 35
inches, black between depths of 35 and 40 inches,
and brown between depths of 40 and 46 inches. Below
this is light gray fine sand 10 inches thick, white fine
sand 6 inches thick, and grayish brown fine sand 11
inches thick. Between depths of 73 and 80 inches is
black fine sand that is coated with organic matter.
The Leon soils are poorly drained and occur in
nearly level flatwoods. The surface layer is fine sand
about 8 inches thick. It is very dark gray in the upper 5
inches and dark gray in the lower 3 inches. The
subsurface layer is gray fine sand about 10 inches
thick. The subsoil extends to a depth of more. than 80
inches. It is dark organic stained fine sand. It is black
between depths of 18 and 26 inches, very dark gray
between depths of 26 and 37 inches, dark brown
between depths of 37 and 45 inches, and dark reddish
brown between depths of 45 and 80 inches.
Of minor extent in this map unit are Albany,
Evergreen, Hurricane, Lynn Haven, Kureb, Pottsburg,
Pottsburg, high, Ridgewood, Ortega, Tisonia, and
Wesconnett soils. Albany, Hurricane, Pottsburg, high,
Ridgewood, and Ortega soils are on rises and knolls.
Albany soils have a loamy subsoil. Ortega soils are
moderately well drained. Hurricane and Pottsburg soils
have a dark organic stained subsoil below a depth of
50 inches. Ridgewood and Ortega soils are sandy
throughout. Evergreen and Wesconnett soils are very
poorly drained and are in depressions. Lynn Haven
soils are poorly drained and are on flats. Kureb soils
are excessively drained and on dunes. Tisonia soils
are very poorly drained and in tidal marshes.
The soils in this map unit mainly support natural
vegetation. In some areas they have been used for
urban development. The natural vegetation consists of
slash pine, longleaf pine, water oak, and live oak. The
understory includes saw palmetto and pineland
threeawn.

3. Ortega-Kershaw-Penney

Nearly level to sloping, moderately well drained and
excessively drained, sandy soils; in high landscape
positions
The soils in this map unit are on rises and knolls.
The map unit is in the eastern part of the county and
near the St. Johns River. Individual mapped areas are
irregular in shape or elongated and are small to
relatively large in size.
This map unit makes up about 8,100 acres, or 1.6
percent of the county. It is about 32 percent Ortega


soils, 30 percent Kershaw soils, 11 percent Penney
soils, and 27 percent soils of minor extent.
The Ortega soils are moderately well drained and
occur on nearly level and gently sloping rises and
knolls. The surface layer is grayish brown fine sand
about 5 inches thick. Below this, to a depth of 48
inches, is very pale brown fine sand. The next layer is
fine sand that is white to a depth of 63 inches and very
pale brown sand between depths of 63 and 80 inches
or more.
The Kershaw soils are excessively drained and
occur on nearly level to sloping rises. The surface
layer is very dark gray fine sand about 3 inches thick.
The next layer extends to a depth of 51 inches. It is
light yellowish brown fine sand. Below this, to a depth
of 80 inches or more, is a layer of brownish yellow fine
sand.
The Penney soils are excessively drained and occur
on nearly level and gently sloping rises. The surface
layer is grayish brown fine sand about 5 inches thick.
The subsurface layer extends to a depth of 48 inches.
It is light yellowish brown and very pale brown fine
sand. The next layer extends to a depth of 80 inches or
more. It is very pale brown and white fine sand that
contains bands of strong brown loamy fine sand.
Of minor extent in this map unit are Albany, Blanton,
Boulogne, Evergreen, Goldhead, Hurricane, Leon,
Lynn Haven, Kureb, Mandarin, Maurepas, Pottsburg,
Pottsburg, high, Ridgewood, Rutlege, and Wesconnett
soils. Albany, Blanton, Hurricane, Kureb, Pottsburg,
high, and Ridgewood soils are on rises and knolls.
Albany and Blanton soils have a loamy subsoil. Albany
soils are somewhat poorly drained, and Blanton soils
are moderately well drained. Hurricane soils are
somewhat poorly drained and have a dark organic
stained subsoil below a depth of 50 inches. Kureb soils
are excessively drained, have an eluvial layer, have a
bright-colored subsoil, and are sandy throughout.
Pottsburg, high, soils are somewhat poorly drained
and have a deep, organic stained subsoil. Ridgewood
soils are somewhat poorly drained and are sandy
throughout. Boulogne, Leon, and Mandarin soils have
an upper, dark organic stained subsoil. Boulogne and
Leon soils are in flatwoods and are poorly drained.
Mandarin soils are in the slightly elevated flatwoods
and are somewhat poorly drained. Evergreen and
Wesconnett soils are very poorly drained and in
depressions. Lynn Haven soils are very poorly drained
and on flats and in seep areas on side slopes.
Goldhead soils are poorly drained and in seep areas
on side slopes. Maurepas and Rutlege soils are very
poorly drained and on flood plains. Pottsburg soils are
poorly drained and in flatwoods. They have a deep,
organic stained subsoil.






Soil Survey


In most areas the soils in this map unit are used for
urban development.
The natural vegetation consists of longleaf pine,
slash pine, turkey oak, bluejack oak, and live oak. The
understory includes American holly, saw palmetto,
pineland threeawn, and bluestem.

Soils on Flats, in Flatwoods, in
Depressions, on Rises, and on Knolls
The three general soil map units in this group
consist of nearly level and gently sloping, moderately
well drained to very poorly drained, sandy soils that
generally have a dark organic stained sandy subsoil
within a depth of 30 inches. Some of the soils have a
dark organic stained sandy subsoil below a depth of
30 inches, and some have a loamy subsoil that may
have a dark organic stained upper part. These map
units occur in areas throughout the county.

4. Leon-Hurricane/Ridgewood-Ortega

Nearly level and gently sloping, very poorly drained to
moderately well drained, sandy soils; in low to high
landscape positions
The soils in this map unit are in flatwoods that are
interspersed with rises and knolls. The map unit is
generally in the southeastern part of the county.
Individual mapped areas are generally elongated and
are small or medium in size.
This map unit makes up about 36,270 acres, or 7.3
percent of the county. It is about 21 percent Leon soils,
16 percent Hurricane and the similar Ridgewood soils,
10 percent Ortega soils, and 53 percent soils of minor
extent (fig. 3).
The Leon soils are poorly drained and occur in
nearly level flatwoods. The surface layer is fine sand
about 8 inches thick. It is very dark gray in the upper 5
inches and dark gray in the lower 3 inches.The
subsurface layer is gray fine sand about 10 inches
thick. The subsoil is dark organic stained fine sand that
is coated with organic matter. It extends to a depth of
more than 80 inches. Is is black between depths of 18
and 26 inches, very dark gray between depths of 26
and 37 inches, dark brown between depths of 37 and
45 inches, and dark reddish brown between depths of
45 and 80 inches.
The Hurricane soils are somewhat poorly drained
and occur on nearly level and gently sloping rises and
knolls. The surface layer is grayish brown fine sand
about 5 inches thick. The subsurface layer is fine sand.
It extends to a depth of about 68 inches. It is yellowish


brown in the upper part, light yellowish brown in the
next part, and light gray in the lower part. The subsoil
extends to a depth of 80 inches or more. It is dark
organic stained fine sand. It is dark brown in the upper
part and dark reddish brown in the lower part.
The Ridgewood soils are somewhat poorly drained
and occur on nearly level and gently sloping rises and
knolls. The surface layer is gray fine sand about 7
inches thick. The substratum extends to a depth of 80
inches or more. It is fine sand that is light yellowish
brown in the upper part and pale brown and light gray
in the lower part.
The Ortega soils are moderately well drained and
occur on nearly level and gently sloping rises and
knolls. The surface layer is grayish brown fine sand
about 5 inches thick. Below this, to a depth of 48
inches, is very pale brown fine sand. The next layer is
white fine sand 15 inches thick. Below this is a layer of
very pale brown fine sand that extends to a depth of
80 inches or more.
Of minor extent in this map unit are Albany, Blanton,
Boulogne, Dorovan, Evergreen, Lynn Haven, Kershaw,
Mandarin, Pamlico, Pottsburg, high, Ridgewood,
Rutlege, Surrency, Tisonia, and Wesconnett soils.
Albany, Blanton, Kershaw, Pottsburg, high, and
Ridgewood soils are on rises and knolls. Albany soils
are somewhat poorly drained. Blanton soils are
moderately well drained to somewhat excessively
drained. Albany and Blanton soils have a loamy
subsoil. Kershaw soils are excessively drained.
Ridgewood soils are somewhat poorly drained.
Kershaw and Ridgewood soils are sandy throughout.
Pottsburg, high, soils are somewhat poorly drained
and have an organic stained subsoil below a depth of
50 inches. Boulogne soils are poorly drained and in
flatwoods. They have an upper, weakly developed,
organic stained subsoil. Dorovan, Evergreen, Pamlico,
Surrency, and Wesconnett soils are poorly drained and
in depressions. Pamlico and Surrency soils also are on
flood plains. Lynn Haven soils are very poorly drained
and on flats. Mandarin soils are somewhat poorly
drained and in the slightly elevated flatwoods. They
have a dark organic stained subsoil within a depth of
30 inches. Rutlege soils are very poorly drained and
on flood plains. Tisonia soils are very poorly drained
and organic and are in tidal marshes.
The soils in this map unit are mainly used for urban
development. In some cleared areas they are used as
pasture. A small acreage is used as woodland.
The natural vegetation in the flatwoods consists of
slash pine and an understory of saw palmetto,
gallberry, and pineland threeawn.The natural
vegetation on the rises consists of longleaf pine, slash






Soil Survey


In most areas the soils in this map unit are used for
urban development.
The natural vegetation consists of longleaf pine,
slash pine, turkey oak, bluejack oak, and live oak. The
understory includes American holly, saw palmetto,
pineland threeawn, and bluestem.

Soils on Flats, in Flatwoods, in
Depressions, on Rises, and on Knolls
The three general soil map units in this group
consist of nearly level and gently sloping, moderately
well drained to very poorly drained, sandy soils that
generally have a dark organic stained sandy subsoil
within a depth of 30 inches. Some of the soils have a
dark organic stained sandy subsoil below a depth of
30 inches, and some have a loamy subsoil that may
have a dark organic stained upper part. These map
units occur in areas throughout the county.

4. Leon-Hurricane/Ridgewood-Ortega

Nearly level and gently sloping, very poorly drained to
moderately well drained, sandy soils; in low to high
landscape positions
The soils in this map unit are in flatwoods that are
interspersed with rises and knolls. The map unit is
generally in the southeastern part of the county.
Individual mapped areas are generally elongated and
are small or medium in size.
This map unit makes up about 36,270 acres, or 7.3
percent of the county. It is about 21 percent Leon soils,
16 percent Hurricane and the similar Ridgewood soils,
10 percent Ortega soils, and 53 percent soils of minor
extent (fig. 3).
The Leon soils are poorly drained and occur in
nearly level flatwoods. The surface layer is fine sand
about 8 inches thick. It is very dark gray in the upper 5
inches and dark gray in the lower 3 inches.The
subsurface layer is gray fine sand about 10 inches
thick. The subsoil is dark organic stained fine sand that
is coated with organic matter. It extends to a depth of
more than 80 inches. Is is black between depths of 18
and 26 inches, very dark gray between depths of 26
and 37 inches, dark brown between depths of 37 and
45 inches, and dark reddish brown between depths of
45 and 80 inches.
The Hurricane soils are somewhat poorly drained
and occur on nearly level and gently sloping rises and
knolls. The surface layer is grayish brown fine sand
about 5 inches thick. The subsurface layer is fine sand.
It extends to a depth of about 68 inches. It is yellowish


brown in the upper part, light yellowish brown in the
next part, and light gray in the lower part. The subsoil
extends to a depth of 80 inches or more. It is dark
organic stained fine sand. It is dark brown in the upper
part and dark reddish brown in the lower part.
The Ridgewood soils are somewhat poorly drained
and occur on nearly level and gently sloping rises and
knolls. The surface layer is gray fine sand about 7
inches thick. The substratum extends to a depth of 80
inches or more. It is fine sand that is light yellowish
brown in the upper part and pale brown and light gray
in the lower part.
The Ortega soils are moderately well drained and
occur on nearly level and gently sloping rises and
knolls. The surface layer is grayish brown fine sand
about 5 inches thick. Below this, to a depth of 48
inches, is very pale brown fine sand. The next layer is
white fine sand 15 inches thick. Below this is a layer of
very pale brown fine sand that extends to a depth of
80 inches or more.
Of minor extent in this map unit are Albany, Blanton,
Boulogne, Dorovan, Evergreen, Lynn Haven, Kershaw,
Mandarin, Pamlico, Pottsburg, high, Ridgewood,
Rutlege, Surrency, Tisonia, and Wesconnett soils.
Albany, Blanton, Kershaw, Pottsburg, high, and
Ridgewood soils are on rises and knolls. Albany soils
are somewhat poorly drained. Blanton soils are
moderately well drained to somewhat excessively
drained. Albany and Blanton soils have a loamy
subsoil. Kershaw soils are excessively drained.
Ridgewood soils are somewhat poorly drained.
Kershaw and Ridgewood soils are sandy throughout.
Pottsburg, high, soils are somewhat poorly drained
and have an organic stained subsoil below a depth of
50 inches. Boulogne soils are poorly drained and in
flatwoods. They have an upper, weakly developed,
organic stained subsoil. Dorovan, Evergreen, Pamlico,
Surrency, and Wesconnett soils are poorly drained and
in depressions. Pamlico and Surrency soils also are on
flood plains. Lynn Haven soils are very poorly drained
and on flats. Mandarin soils are somewhat poorly
drained and in the slightly elevated flatwoods. They
have a dark organic stained subsoil within a depth of
30 inches. Rutlege soils are very poorly drained and
on flood plains. Tisonia soils are very poorly drained
and organic and are in tidal marshes.
The soils in this map unit are mainly used for urban
development. In some cleared areas they are used as
pasture. A small acreage is used as woodland.
The natural vegetation in the flatwoods consists of
slash pine and an understory of saw palmetto,
gallberry, and pineland threeawn.The natural
vegetation on the rises consists of longleaf pine, slash





City of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida


Figure 3.-Typical pattern of soils and parent material in an area of the Leon-Hurricane/Ridgewood-Ortega general soil
map unit.This map unit is dominantly used for urban development.


pine, water oak, turkey oak, and live oak and an
understory of gallberry, pineland threeawn, and
bluestem.


5. Leon-Boulogne-Evergreen/
Wesconnett
Nearly level, poorly drained and very poorly drained
soils that are sandy throughout; in low landscape
positions
The soils in this map unit are in flatwoods that are
interspersed with depressions. The map unit is in the
eastern and western parts of the county. Individual
mapped areas vary in shape and size.
This map unit makes up about 212,050 acres, or
42.7 percent of the county. It is about 30 percent Leon


soils, 14 percent Boulogne soils, 12 percent Evergreen
and the similar Wesconnett soils, and 44 percent soils
of minor extent (fig. 4).
The Leon soils are poorly drained and occur in
nearly level flatwoods. The surface layer is fine sand
about 8 inches thick. It is very dark gray in the upper 5
inches and dark gray in the lower 3 inches. The
subsurface layer is gray fine sand about 10 inches
thick. The subsoil extends to a depth of more than 80
inches. It is dark organic stained fine sand that is
coated with organic matter. It is black between depths
of 18 and 26 inches, very dark gray between depths of
26 and 37 inches, dark brown between depths of 37
and 45 inches, and dark reddish brown between
depths of 45 and 80 inches.
The Boulogne soils are poorly drained and occur in
nearly level flatwoods. The surface layer is very dark


23





Soil Survey


Figure 4.-Typical pattern of soils and parent material in an area of the Leon-Boulogne-Evergreen/Wesconnett general
soil map unit. Soils of this map unit are dominantly used for the production of pine trees. In the eastern part of the
county, many areas are used for urban development.


gray fine sand about 6 inches thick. The upper 10
inches of the subsoil is weakly developed, dark
organic stained, brown fine sand that is coated with
organic matter. The next 15 inches is very pale brown
fine sand. The lower part of the subsoil, to a depth of
80 inches, is dark organic stained fine sand that is
coated with organic matter. This part is dark reddish
brown to a depth of 39 inches and black below this
depth.
The Evergreen soils are very poorly drained and
occur in nearly level depressions. The surface layer is
black muck in the upper part, black loamy fine sand in
the next part, and very dark gray fine sand in the lower
part. The subsurface layer extends to a depth of about


26 inches. It is light brownish gray fine sand. The
subsoil extends to a depth of about 80 inches. It is
dark organic stained. It is dark reddish brown loamy
fine sand in the upper part and dark reddish brown
fine sand in the lower part.
The Wesconnett soils are very poorly drained and
occur in nearly level depressions. The surface layer is
black fine sand about 2 inches thick. The upper part of
the subsoil, between depths of 2 and 32 inches, is fine
sand. This part is black in the upper 8 inches, dark
reddish brown in the next 16 inches, and dark brown in
the lower 6 inches. Below this is a layer of pale brown
fine sand about 12 inches thick. The lower part of the
subsoil, between depths of 44 and 80 inches, is fine


24







City of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida


sand.The sand grains are well coated with organic
matter. This part is reddish black in the upper 28
inches and very dusky red in the lower 8 inches.
Of minor extent in this map unit are Hurricane, Lynn
Haven, Mandarin, Ortega, Pamlico, Pottsburg,
Pottsburg, high, Ridgewood, Rutlege, Tisonia, and
Wesconnett soils. Hurricane, Ortega, Pottsburg, high,
and Ridgewood soils are on rises and knolls.
Hurricane, Pottsburg, high, and Ridgewood soils are
somewhat poorly drained. Ortega soils are moderately
well drained. Lynn Haven soils are very poorly drained
and on flats. Mandarin soils are in the slightly elevated
flatwoods and are somewhat poorly drained. Pamlico
soils are very poorly drained and on flood plains and in
depressions. Rutlege soils are very poorly drained and
on flood plains. Wesconnett soils are in depressions.
Pottsburg soils are poorly drained and in flatwoods.
They have a dark organic stained subsoil below a
depth of 50 inches. Tisonia soils are very poorly
drained and organic and are in tidal marshes.
The soils in this map unit are used as woodland. In
most cleared areas they are used as pasture. In some
areas they are used for urban development.
The natural vegetation in the flatwoods consists of
longleaf pine and slash pine and an understory of saw
palmetto, gallberry, pineland threeawn, and bluestem.
The natural vegetation in the depressions consists
dominantly of pond pine, cypress, red maple, and an
understory of wax myrtle, water-tolerant ferns,
grasses, and greenbrier.

6. Pelham-Mascotte/Sapelo-Surrency

Nearly level, poorly drained and very poorly drained
soils that are sandy in the upper part and loamy or
sandy in the lower part; in low landscape positions

The soils in this map unit are in flatwoods that are
interspersed with flats, depressions, and flood plains.
Areas of this map unit occur in the western and central
parts of the county. Individual mapped areas vary in
shape and size.
This map unit makes up about 152,065 acres, or
30.6 percent of the county. It is about 34 percent
Pelham soils, 32 percent Mascotte and the similar
Sapelo soils, 11 percent Surrency soils, and 23
percent soils of minor extent (fig. 5).
The Pelham soils are poorly drained and occur on
nearly level flats. The surface layer is very dark gray
fine sand about 6 inches thick. The subsurface layer is
fine sand about 15 inches thick. It is grayish brown in
the upper 8 inches and light gray in the lower 7 inches.


The subsoil is between depths of 21 and 80 inches. It
is light brownish gray fine sandy loam in the upper 5
inches, light brownish gray sandy clay loam in the next
34 inches, and light brownish gray fine sandy loam in
the lower part.
The Mascotte soils are poorly drained and occur in
nearly level flatwoods. The surface layer is black fine
sand about 5 inches thick. The subsurface layer is fine
sand about 10 inches thick. It is gray in the upper 3
inches and light brownish gray in the lower 7 inches.
The upper part of the subsoil is dark organic stained
loamy fine sand that is coated with organic matter.
This part is black in the upper 6 inches, very dusky red
in the next 2 inches, and dark reddish brown in the
lower 2 inches. Below this is a layer of light gray and
dark brown loamy fine sand about 3 inches thick. The
lower part of the subsoil, between depths of 28 and 58
inches, is coarsely mottled gray and yellowish red
sandy clay loam in the upper 18 inches and coarsely
mottled light gray, strong brown, and red fine sandy
loam in the lower 12 inches. Below this, to a depth of
80 inches, is gray fine sand.
The Sapelo soils are poorly drained and occur in
nearly level flatwoods. The surface layer is black and
dark gray fine sand about 6 inches thick. The
subsurface layer is light brownish gray fine sand about
23 inches thick. The upper part of the subsoil is dark
organic stained fine sand that is coated with organic
matter. It is black and dark reddish brown in the upper

15 inches, black, dark reddish brown, and very dusty
red in the next 2 inches, and dark brown in the lower 6
inches. Below this, to a depth of 56 inches, is a layer of
very pale brown fine sand.The lower part of the
subsoil, between depths of 56 and 80 inches or more,
is gray sandy clay loam in the upper 6 inches and gray
fine sandy loam in the lower 24 inches.
The Surrency soils are very poorly drained and
occur in nearly level depressions and on flood plains.
The surface layer is about 18 inches thick. It is black
loamy fine sand in the upper 14 inches and dark
brown fine sand in the lower 4 inches. The subsurface
layer is light brownish gray fine sand about 8 inches
thick. The subsoil occurs between depths of 26 and 70
inches. It is fine sandy loam. It is dark grayish brown in
the upper 12 inches, dark gray in the next 11 inches,
and greenish gray in the lower 21 inches. Below this,
to a depth of 80 inches or more, is greenish gray
sandy clay loam.
Of minor extent in this map unit are Albany,
Lynchburg, Pamlico, Stockade, Yonges, and Yulee
soils. Albany and Lynchburg soils are somewhat
poorly drained and are on rises and knolls. Pamlico
and Yulee soils are very poorly drained and are in


25







Soil Survey


Pelham


Figure 5.-Typical pattern of soils and parent material in an area of the Pelham-Mascotte/Sapelo-Surrency general soil map unit.
Soils of this map unit are dominantly used for the production of pine trees. In the central part of the county, many areas are
used for urban development.


depressions and on flood plains. Stockade soils are
very poorly drained and in depressions. Pamlico soils
are organic, Stockade soils have a loamy subsoil with
high base saturation, and Yulee soils are clayey.
Yonges soils are poorly drained and on flats. They
have a loamy subsoil within a depth of 20 inches.
The soils in this map unit generally are used for
woodland. In most cleared areas they are used as
pasture. In some areas they are used for urban
development.
The natural vegetation in the flatwoods consists of
mixed longleaf pine and slash pine and an understory
dominantly consisting of saw palmetto, gallberry,
pineland threeawn, and bluestem.The natural
vegetation in the depressions is cypress, pond pine,


red maple, ferns, and sweetgum and an understory of
wax myrtle, water-tolerant ferns, and grasses.


Soils in Depressions, on Flats, on Flood
Plains, and in Tidal Marshes

The three general soil map units in this group
consist of nearly level, poorly drained and very poorly
drained soils. Some of the soils have a clayey subsoil
within a depth of 20 inches, some are sandy and have
a loamy subsoil between depths of 20 and 40 inches,
some have an organic layer that is 40 to more than 50
inches thick, and some are saline or slightly saline,
organic soils. These map units occur in areas
throughout the county.


26





City of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida


7. Stockade-Surrency-Pamlico

Nearly level, very poorly drained soils that are sandy
or have organic materials in the upper part and are
loamy in the lower part; in low landscape positions
The soils in this map unit are in depressions in
flatwoods. They occur throughout the county. The soils
are ponded for long periods.
This map unit makes up about 27,333 acres, or 5.5
percent of the county. It is about 20 percent Stockade
soils, 18 percent Surrency soils, 15 percent Pamlico
soils, and 47 percent soils of minor extent.
The Stockade soils are very poorly drained and
occur in nearly level depressions. The surface layer is
black fine sandy loam about 12 inches thick. The
subsoil occurs between depths of 12 and 46 inches. It
is sandy clay loam. It is very dark gray in the upper 14
inches and dark gray in the lower 20 inches. Below
this, to a depth of 65 inches or more, is dark grayish
brown and light brownish gray fine sand.
The Surrency soils are very poorly drained and
occur in nearly level depressions and on flood plains.
The surface layer is about 18 inches thick. It is loamy
fine sand in the upper 14 inches and dark brown fine
sand in the lower 4 inches. The subsurface layer is
.light brownish gray fine sand about 8 inches thick. The
subsoil occurs between depths of 26 and 70 inches. It
is fine sandy loam. It is dark grayish brown in the
upper 12 inches, dark gray in the next 11 inches, and
greenish gray in the lower 21 inches. Below this, to a
depth of 80 inches or more, is greenish gray sandy
clay loam.
The Pamlico soils are very poorly drained and
occur in nearly level depressions and on flood plains.
The surface layer is black, well decomposed muck
about 6 inches thick. It overlies 24 inches of very
dusky red muck. Below this is a layer of dark brown
muck that extends to a depth of 35 inches. The next
layer is very dark grayish brown fine sand about 25
inches thick. Below this, to a depth of 80 inches or
more, is a layer of dark brown fine sand.
Of minor extent in this map unit are Boulogne,
Dorovan, Evergreen, Leon, Lynn Haven, Pelham,
Mascotte, Maurepas, Sapelo, and Wesconnett soils.
Boulogne, Leon, Mascotte, and Sapelo soils are
poorly drained and in flatwoods. Dorovan and
Maurepas soils are very poorly drained and organic
and are in depressions. Evergreen and Wesconnett
soils are very poorly drained and in depressions.
Evergreen soils have organic material 8 to 16 inches
thick. Lynn Haven soils are very poorly drained and on
flats. Evergreen, Lynn Haven, and Wesconnett soils
have a dark organic stained subsoil. Pelham soils are
poorly drained and on flats.


The soils in this map unit support natural
vegetation. They are used mainly as wildlife habitat.
The natural vegetation in the depressions and on the
flood plains consists of water tupelo, sweetgum, bay,
baldcypress, and pond pine.The understory includes
greenbrier, fetterbush, aster, and willow.


8. Yulee-Yonges-Surrency

Nearly level, poorly drained and very poorly drained
soils; in very low landscape positions

The soils in this map unit are in depressions, on
flats, and on flood plains. The map unit is in the central
and northern parts of the county. Individual mapped
areas are narrow and elongated.
This map unit makes up about 12,920 acres, or 2.6
percent of the county. It is about 47 percent Yulee
soils, 22 percent Yonges soils, 19 percent Surrency
soils, and 12 percent soils of minor extent.
The Yulee soils are very poorly drained and occur in
depressions and on flood plains. The surface layer is
black clay about 14 inches thick. The subsoil occurs
between depths of 14 and 66 inches. It is sandy clay. It
is very dark gray in the upper 14 inches and dark gray
in the lower part. The next layer is pale yellow sandy
clay loam that is about 9 inches thick. Below this, to a
depth of 80 inches or more, is coarsely mottled
greenish gray, dark greenish gray, and olive clay loam.
The Yonges soils are poorly drained and occur on
flats. The surface layer is very dark gray fine sandy
loam about 3 inches thick. The subsurface layer is gray
loamy fine sand about 3 inches thick. The subsoil
occurs between depths of 6 to 80 inches or more. It is
sandy clay loam. It is gray between depths of 6 and 25
inches, gray and dark gray between depths of 25 and
31 inches, gray, yellowish brown, and yellow between
depths of 31 and 55 inches, greenish gray between
depths of 55 and 65 inches, and mixed dark greenish
gray and light olive brown between depths of 65 and
80 inches.
The Surrency soils are very poorly drained and
occur in depressions and on flood plains. The surface
layer is about 18 inches thick. It is loamy fine sand in
the upper 14 inches and dark brown fine sand in the
lower 4 inches. The subsurface layer is light brownish
gray fine sand about 8 inches thick. The subsoil occurs
between depths of 26 and 70 inches. It is fine sandy
loam. It is dark grayish brown in the upper 12 inches,
dark gray in the next 11 inches, and greenish gray in
the lower 21 inches. Below this, to a depth of 80
inches or more, is greenish gray sandy clay loam.
Of minor extent in this map unit are Evergreen,
Lynchburg, Lynn Haven, Mascotte, Pelham, Pamlico,


27





City of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida


7. Stockade-Surrency-Pamlico

Nearly level, very poorly drained soils that are sandy
or have organic materials in the upper part and are
loamy in the lower part; in low landscape positions
The soils in this map unit are in depressions in
flatwoods. They occur throughout the county. The soils
are ponded for long periods.
This map unit makes up about 27,333 acres, or 5.5
percent of the county. It is about 20 percent Stockade
soils, 18 percent Surrency soils, 15 percent Pamlico
soils, and 47 percent soils of minor extent.
The Stockade soils are very poorly drained and
occur in nearly level depressions. The surface layer is
black fine sandy loam about 12 inches thick. The
subsoil occurs between depths of 12 and 46 inches. It
is sandy clay loam. It is very dark gray in the upper 14
inches and dark gray in the lower 20 inches. Below
this, to a depth of 65 inches or more, is dark grayish
brown and light brownish gray fine sand.
The Surrency soils are very poorly drained and
occur in nearly level depressions and on flood plains.
The surface layer is about 18 inches thick. It is loamy
fine sand in the upper 14 inches and dark brown fine
sand in the lower 4 inches. The subsurface layer is
.light brownish gray fine sand about 8 inches thick. The
subsoil occurs between depths of 26 and 70 inches. It
is fine sandy loam. It is dark grayish brown in the
upper 12 inches, dark gray in the next 11 inches, and
greenish gray in the lower 21 inches. Below this, to a
depth of 80 inches or more, is greenish gray sandy
clay loam.
The Pamlico soils are very poorly drained and
occur in nearly level depressions and on flood plains.
The surface layer is black, well decomposed muck
about 6 inches thick. It overlies 24 inches of very
dusky red muck. Below this is a layer of dark brown
muck that extends to a depth of 35 inches. The next
layer is very dark grayish brown fine sand about 25
inches thick. Below this, to a depth of 80 inches or
more, is a layer of dark brown fine sand.
Of minor extent in this map unit are Boulogne,
Dorovan, Evergreen, Leon, Lynn Haven, Pelham,
Mascotte, Maurepas, Sapelo, and Wesconnett soils.
Boulogne, Leon, Mascotte, and Sapelo soils are
poorly drained and in flatwoods. Dorovan and
Maurepas soils are very poorly drained and organic
and are in depressions. Evergreen and Wesconnett
soils are very poorly drained and in depressions.
Evergreen soils have organic material 8 to 16 inches
thick. Lynn Haven soils are very poorly drained and on
flats. Evergreen, Lynn Haven, and Wesconnett soils
have a dark organic stained subsoil. Pelham soils are
poorly drained and on flats.


The soils in this map unit support natural
vegetation. They are used mainly as wildlife habitat.
The natural vegetation in the depressions and on the
flood plains consists of water tupelo, sweetgum, bay,
baldcypress, and pond pine.The understory includes
greenbrier, fetterbush, aster, and willow.


8. Yulee-Yonges-Surrency

Nearly level, poorly drained and very poorly drained
soils; in very low landscape positions

The soils in this map unit are in depressions, on
flats, and on flood plains. The map unit is in the central
and northern parts of the county. Individual mapped
areas are narrow and elongated.
This map unit makes up about 12,920 acres, or 2.6
percent of the county. It is about 47 percent Yulee
soils, 22 percent Yonges soils, 19 percent Surrency
soils, and 12 percent soils of minor extent.
The Yulee soils are very poorly drained and occur in
depressions and on flood plains. The surface layer is
black clay about 14 inches thick. The subsoil occurs
between depths of 14 and 66 inches. It is sandy clay. It
is very dark gray in the upper 14 inches and dark gray
in the lower part. The next layer is pale yellow sandy
clay loam that is about 9 inches thick. Below this, to a
depth of 80 inches or more, is coarsely mottled
greenish gray, dark greenish gray, and olive clay loam.
The Yonges soils are poorly drained and occur on
flats. The surface layer is very dark gray fine sandy
loam about 3 inches thick. The subsurface layer is gray
loamy fine sand about 3 inches thick. The subsoil
occurs between depths of 6 to 80 inches or more. It is
sandy clay loam. It is gray between depths of 6 and 25
inches, gray and dark gray between depths of 25 and
31 inches, gray, yellowish brown, and yellow between
depths of 31 and 55 inches, greenish gray between
depths of 55 and 65 inches, and mixed dark greenish
gray and light olive brown between depths of 65 and
80 inches.
The Surrency soils are very poorly drained and
occur in depressions and on flood plains. The surface
layer is about 18 inches thick. It is loamy fine sand in
the upper 14 inches and dark brown fine sand in the
lower 4 inches. The subsurface layer is light brownish
gray fine sand about 8 inches thick. The subsoil occurs
between depths of 26 and 70 inches. It is fine sandy
loam. It is dark grayish brown in the upper 12 inches,
dark gray in the next 11 inches, and greenish gray in
the lower 21 inches. Below this, to a depth of 80
inches or more, is greenish gray sandy clay loam.
Of minor extent in this map unit are Evergreen,
Lynchburg, Lynn Haven, Mascotte, Pelham, Pamlico,


27






Soil Survey


Sapelo, Stockade, and Wesconnett soils. Evergreen,
Pamlico, Stockade, and Wesconnett soils are very
poorly drained and in depressions. Evergreen, Lynn
Haven, and Wesconnett soils have a dark organic
stained subsoil. Pamlico soils are organic. Stockade
soils have a loamy subsoil with high base saturation.
Lynchburg soils are somewhat poorly drained and on
rises and knolls. They have a loamy subsoil at a depth
of less than 20 inches. Lynn Haven soils are very
poorly drained and on flats. Mascotte and Sapelo soils
are poorly drained and in flatwoods. They have a dark
organic stained subsoil overlying loamy layers. Pelham
soils are poorly drained and on flats. They have a
loamy subsoil at a depth of 20 to 40 inches.
The soils in this map unit support natural
vegetation. The natural vegetation is dominantly
baldcypress, sweetgum, blackgum, water tupelo, water
oak, and pond pine.

9. Tisonia-Maurepas

Nearly level, very poorly drained, saline and slightly
saline, organic soils; in very low landscape positions
The soils in this map unit are in tidal marshes and
on flood plains. The map unit is in the eastern part of
the county. The tidal marshes are saline in most
places but are brackish in places adjacent to flood
plains. These soils are flooded daily.
This map unit makes up about 43,235 acres, or 8.7
percent of the county. It is about 79 percent Tisonia
soils, 10 percent Maurepas soils, and 11 percent soils
of minor extent (fig. 2).
The Tisonia soils are very poorly drained and occur
in tidal marshes. The surface layer is dark grayish
brown mucky peat about 18 inches thick. The
underlying material, to a depth of about 65 inches, is
dark olive gray clay.
The Maurepas soils are very poorly drained and
occur on flood plains that are influenced by tidal
action. The surface layer is dark reddish brown muck
about 55 inches thick. Below this is a layer of black
muck that extends to a depth of 80 inches or more.
Of minor extent in this map unit are Boulogne,
Leon, and Lynn Haven soils. These soils have a dark
organic stained subsoil. Boulogne soils are poorly
drained and in flatwoods. The very poorly drained
Leon soils are in areas at the edges of tidal marshes.
The poorly drained Leon soils are in flatwoods. Lynn
Haven soils are very poorly drained and on flats.
The soils in this map unit mainly support natural
vegetation. They are mainly used as spawning areas
for many commercially important finfish and shellfish.


The natural vegetation consists of needlegrass rush
and sand cordgrass.

Broad Land Use Considerations
The soils in the survey area vary in their suitability
for major land uses. About 53 percent of the acreage
is used for the production of pine trees. Much of the
acreage in general soil map units 5 and 6 is used as
woodland.The high water table is the main limitation.
Because of wetness, the equipment limitations are
moderate or severe on the soils in these units.
Limitations can be overcome by harvesting only during
the drier periods or by using special equipment.
The soils in general soil map units 7, 8, and 9 are
frequently flooded or ponded, or both, mainly in winter
and summer. Flooding, ponding, and wetness are the
major limitations affecting the use of these soils.
Only a small acreage in Duval County is used for
pasture. The soils in general soil map units 4, 5, and 6
are best suited to the production of grasses. The soils
in general soil map units 1, 2, and 3 are generally
unsuited to the production of grasses because of
droughtiness.
Much of the county is developed for urban uses.
Generally, moderately well drained to excessively
drained soils are well suited for building site
development. Kershaw, Ortega, and Cornelia soils in
general soil map units 2, 3, and 4 are examples. In
most of the other map units, the high water table,
ponding, and the slope are the main management
concerns. Soils on flood plains and in depressions,
such as those in general soil map units 7, 8, and 9,
are generally unsuited for building site development
because of flooding and ponding.
The urbanized parts of the survey area have public
sewage disposal systems and some private sewage
disposal systems. Cornelia, Kershaw, Kureb, and
Penney soils are well suited to septic tank absorption
fields. The high water table is a major limitation for
soils in all of the general soil map units in the county
except general soil map unit 3. Alternative waste
disposal systems, such as mounded septic tank
absorption fields, can be used.
Limitations affecting the suitability of soils for
recreational uses vary depending on the intensity of
the expected use. The soils in general soil map units 7,
8, and 9 are very poorly suited to many recreational
uses because of flooding and ponding. All of the
general soil map units have soils that are suitable for
some recreational uses, such as paths and trails for
hiking or horseback riding. Small areas that are
suitable for intensive recreational uses generally occur






Soil Survey


Sapelo, Stockade, and Wesconnett soils. Evergreen,
Pamlico, Stockade, and Wesconnett soils are very
poorly drained and in depressions. Evergreen, Lynn
Haven, and Wesconnett soils have a dark organic
stained subsoil. Pamlico soils are organic. Stockade
soils have a loamy subsoil with high base saturation.
Lynchburg soils are somewhat poorly drained and on
rises and knolls. They have a loamy subsoil at a depth
of less than 20 inches. Lynn Haven soils are very
poorly drained and on flats. Mascotte and Sapelo soils
are poorly drained and in flatwoods. They have a dark
organic stained subsoil overlying loamy layers. Pelham
soils are poorly drained and on flats. They have a
loamy subsoil at a depth of 20 to 40 inches.
The soils in this map unit support natural
vegetation. The natural vegetation is dominantly
baldcypress, sweetgum, blackgum, water tupelo, water
oak, and pond pine.

9. Tisonia-Maurepas

Nearly level, very poorly drained, saline and slightly
saline, organic soils; in very low landscape positions
The soils in this map unit are in tidal marshes and
on flood plains. The map unit is in the eastern part of
the county. The tidal marshes are saline in most
places but are brackish in places adjacent to flood
plains. These soils are flooded daily.
This map unit makes up about 43,235 acres, or 8.7
percent of the county. It is about 79 percent Tisonia
soils, 10 percent Maurepas soils, and 11 percent soils
of minor extent (fig. 2).
The Tisonia soils are very poorly drained and occur
in tidal marshes. The surface layer is dark grayish
brown mucky peat about 18 inches thick. The
underlying material, to a depth of about 65 inches, is
dark olive gray clay.
The Maurepas soils are very poorly drained and
occur on flood plains that are influenced by tidal
action. The surface layer is dark reddish brown muck
about 55 inches thick. Below this is a layer of black
muck that extends to a depth of 80 inches or more.
Of minor extent in this map unit are Boulogne,
Leon, and Lynn Haven soils. These soils have a dark
organic stained subsoil. Boulogne soils are poorly
drained and in flatwoods. The very poorly drained
Leon soils are in areas at the edges of tidal marshes.
The poorly drained Leon soils are in flatwoods. Lynn
Haven soils are very poorly drained and on flats.
The soils in this map unit mainly support natural
vegetation. They are mainly used as spawning areas
for many commercially important finfish and shellfish.


The natural vegetation consists of needlegrass rush
and sand cordgrass.

Broad Land Use Considerations
The soils in the survey area vary in their suitability
for major land uses. About 53 percent of the acreage
is used for the production of pine trees. Much of the
acreage in general soil map units 5 and 6 is used as
woodland.The high water table is the main limitation.
Because of wetness, the equipment limitations are
moderate or severe on the soils in these units.
Limitations can be overcome by harvesting only during
the drier periods or by using special equipment.
The soils in general soil map units 7, 8, and 9 are
frequently flooded or ponded, or both, mainly in winter
and summer. Flooding, ponding, and wetness are the
major limitations affecting the use of these soils.
Only a small acreage in Duval County is used for
pasture. The soils in general soil map units 4, 5, and 6
are best suited to the production of grasses. The soils
in general soil map units 1, 2, and 3 are generally
unsuited to the production of grasses because of
droughtiness.
Much of the county is developed for urban uses.
Generally, moderately well drained to excessively
drained soils are well suited for building site
development. Kershaw, Ortega, and Cornelia soils in
general soil map units 2, 3, and 4 are examples. In
most of the other map units, the high water table,
ponding, and the slope are the main management
concerns. Soils on flood plains and in depressions,
such as those in general soil map units 7, 8, and 9,
are generally unsuited for building site development
because of flooding and ponding.
The urbanized parts of the survey area have public
sewage disposal systems and some private sewage
disposal systems. Cornelia, Kershaw, Kureb, and
Penney soils are well suited to septic tank absorption
fields. The high water table is a major limitation for
soils in all of the general soil map units in the county
except general soil map unit 3. Alternative waste
disposal systems, such as mounded septic tank
absorption fields, can be used.
Limitations affecting the suitability of soils for
recreational uses vary depending on the intensity of
the expected use. The soils in general soil map units 7,
8, and 9 are very poorly suited to many recreational
uses because of flooding and ponding. All of the
general soil map units have soils that are suitable for
some recreational uses, such as paths and trails for
hiking or horseback riding. Small areas that are
suitable for intensive recreational uses generally occur







City of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida


in general soil map units that otherwise have severe
limitations.
The suitability of soils for wildlife habitat generally is
good in areas throughout the county. All of the general
soil map units have soils that are generally well suited


to habitat for openland wildlife or woodland wildlife, or
both. Areas in general soil map units 7, 8, and 9 and
scattered areas in general soil map units 2, 3, 4, 5,
and 6 are suited to habitat for wetland wildlife.









31


Detailed Soil Map Units


The map units delineated on the detailed maps
represent the soils or miscellaneous areas in the
survey area. The map unit descriptions in this section,
along with the maps, can be used to determine the
suitability and potential of a unit for specific uses. They
also can be used to plan the management needed for
those uses. More information about each map unit is
given under the heading "Use and Management of the
Soils."
A map unit delineation on a map represents an area
dominated by one or more major kinds of soil or
miscellaneous areas. A map unit is identified and
named according to the taxonomic classification of the
dominant soils or miscellaneous areas. Within a
taxonomic class there are precisely defined limits for
the properties of the soils. On the landscape, however,
the soils and miscellaneous areas are natural
phenomena, and they have the characteristic
variability of all natural phenomena. Thus, the range of
some observed properties may extend beyond the
limits defined for a taxonomic class. Areas of soils of a
single taxonomic class rarely, if ever, can be mapped
without including areas of other taxonomic classes.
Consequently, every map unit is made up of the soils
or miscellaneous areas for which it is named and
some "included" areas that belong to other taxonomic
classes.
Most included soils have properties similar to those
of the dominant soil or soils in the map unit, and thus
they do not affect use and management. These are
called noncontrasting, or similar, inclusions. They may
or may not be mentioned in the map unit description.
Other included soils and miscellaneous areas,
however, have properties and behavioral
characteristics divergent enough to affect use or to
require different management. These are called
contrasting, or dissimilar, inclusions. They generally
are in small areas and could not be mapped
separately because of the scale used. Some small
areas of strongly contrasting soils or miscellaneous
areas are identified by a special symbol on the maps.
The included areas of contrasting soils or
miscellaneous areas are mentioned in the map unit
descriptions. A few included areas may not have been


observed, and consequently they are not mentioned in
the descriptions, especially where the pattern was so
complex that it was impractical to make enough
observations to identify all the soils and miscellaneous
areas on the landscape.
The presence of included areas in a map unit in no
way diminishes the usefulness or accuracy of the data.
The objective of mapping is not to delineate pure
taxonomic classes but rather to separate the
landscape into landforms or landform segments that
have similar use and management requirements. The
delineation of such segments on the map provides
sufficient information for the development of resource
plans, but if intensive use of small areas is planned,
onsite investigation is needed to define and locate the
soils and miscellaneous areas.
An identifying symbol precedes the map unit name
in the map unit descriptions. Each description includes
general facts about the unit.
Soils that have profiles that are almost alike make
up a soil series. Except for differences in texture of the
surface layer, all the soils of a series have major
horizons that are similar in composition, thickness,
and arrangement.
Soils of one series can differ in texture of the
surface layer, slope, susceptibiliy to flooding or
ponding, salinity, depth to high water table, and other
characteristics that affect their use. On the basis of
such differences, a soil series is divided into soil
phases. Most of the areas shown on the detailed soil
maps are phases of soil series. The name of a soil
phase commonly indicates a feature that affects use
or management. For example, Mascotte fine sand, 0 to
2 percent slopes, is a phase of the Mascotte series.
Some map units are made up of two or more major
soils or miscellaneous areas.These map units are
complexes or undifferentiated groups.
A complex consists of two or more soils or
miscellaneous areas in such an intricate pattern or in
such small areas that they cannot be shown
separately on the maps. The pattern and proportion of
the soils or miscellaneous areas are somewhat similar
in all areas. Evergreen-Wesconnett complex,
depressional, 0 to 2 percent slopes, is an example.





Soil Survey


An undifferentiated group is made up of two or
more soils or miscellaneous areas that could be
mapped individually but are mapped as one unit
because similar interpretations can be made for use
and management. The pattern and proportion of the
soils or miscellaneous areas in a mapped area are not
uniform. An area can be made up of only one of the
major soils or miscellaneous areas, or it can be made
up of all of them. Hurricane and Ridgewood soils, 0 to
5 percent slopes, is an undifferentiated group in this
survey area.
This survey includes miscellaneous areas. Such
areas have little or no soil material and support little or
no vegetation. Pits is an example.
Detailed map unit composition was determined by
the subjective judgement method. Subjective
judgement implies that 3 to 30 or more arbitrarily
selected observations and less than 10 randomly
selected observations are used to subjectively
formulate map unit composition. The project staff relies
mainly on impressions from field experience.
Table 5 gives the acreage and proportionate extent
of each map unit. Other tables (see "Contents") give
properties of the soils and the limitations, capabilities,
and potentials for many uses. The Glossary defines
many of the terms used in describing the soils or
miscellaneous areas.


2-Albany fine sand, 0 to 5 percent slopes

Composition
Albany soil and similar components: 85 to 92 percent
Contrasting components: 8 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Rises and knolls
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Somewhat poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex
Size of areas: 3 to 50 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Blanton soils, which are moderately well drained and
on landforms similar to those of the Albany soil
* Mascotte soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Pelham soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Sapelo soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods


Similar:
* Hurricane soils that are on landforms similar to
those of the Albany soil
* Soils that have a loamy subsoil within a depth of 40
inches and are on landforms similar to those of the
Albany soil

6-Aquic Quartzipsamments, 0 to 2
percent slopes

Composition
Aquic Quartzipsamments and similar components: 85
to 90 percent
Contrasting components: 10 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Rises and knolls
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Somewhat poorly drained or
moderately well drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 3 to 100 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Soils that contain shell fragments or rocks and are
on landforms similar to those of the major soils
Similar:
* Soils that are covered with less that 2 feet of fill and
are on landforms similar to those of the major soils

7-Arents, nearly level

Composition
Arents and similar components: 90 to 95 percent
Contrasting components: 5 to 10 percent
Setting
Landform: Flatwoods
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Poorly drained
Parent material: Loamy and sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 20 to 120 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Soils that have shell fragments, rocks, or muck and
are on landforms similar to those of the Arents


32





Soil Survey


An undifferentiated group is made up of two or
more soils or miscellaneous areas that could be
mapped individually but are mapped as one unit
because similar interpretations can be made for use
and management. The pattern and proportion of the
soils or miscellaneous areas in a mapped area are not
uniform. An area can be made up of only one of the
major soils or miscellaneous areas, or it can be made
up of all of them. Hurricane and Ridgewood soils, 0 to
5 percent slopes, is an undifferentiated group in this
survey area.
This survey includes miscellaneous areas. Such
areas have little or no soil material and support little or
no vegetation. Pits is an example.
Detailed map unit composition was determined by
the subjective judgement method. Subjective
judgement implies that 3 to 30 or more arbitrarily
selected observations and less than 10 randomly
selected observations are used to subjectively
formulate map unit composition. The project staff relies
mainly on impressions from field experience.
Table 5 gives the acreage and proportionate extent
of each map unit. Other tables (see "Contents") give
properties of the soils and the limitations, capabilities,
and potentials for many uses. The Glossary defines
many of the terms used in describing the soils or
miscellaneous areas.


2-Albany fine sand, 0 to 5 percent slopes

Composition
Albany soil and similar components: 85 to 92 percent
Contrasting components: 8 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Rises and knolls
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Somewhat poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex
Size of areas: 3 to 50 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Blanton soils, which are moderately well drained and
on landforms similar to those of the Albany soil
* Mascotte soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Pelham soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Sapelo soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods


Similar:
* Hurricane soils that are on landforms similar to
those of the Albany soil
* Soils that have a loamy subsoil within a depth of 40
inches and are on landforms similar to those of the
Albany soil

6-Aquic Quartzipsamments, 0 to 2
percent slopes

Composition
Aquic Quartzipsamments and similar components: 85
to 90 percent
Contrasting components: 10 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Rises and knolls
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Somewhat poorly drained or
moderately well drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 3 to 100 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Soils that contain shell fragments or rocks and are
on landforms similar to those of the major soils
Similar:
* Soils that are covered with less that 2 feet of fill and
are on landforms similar to those of the major soils

7-Arents, nearly level

Composition
Arents and similar components: 90 to 95 percent
Contrasting components: 5 to 10 percent
Setting
Landform: Flatwoods
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Poorly drained
Parent material: Loamy and sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 20 to 120 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Soils that have shell fragments, rocks, or muck and
are on landforms similar to those of the Arents


32





City of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida


Similar:
* Arents that do not have refuse and are on similar
landforms

9-Arents, sanitary landfill

Composition
Arents and similar components: 90 to 95 percent
Contrasting components: 5 to 10 percent

Setting
Landform: Flatwoods and flats
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Somewhat poorly drained or
moderately well drained
Parent material: Loamy and sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 20 to 120 acres

Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Soils that have shell fragments, rocks, or muck and
are on landforms similar to those of the Arents
Similar:
* Arents that do not have refuse and are on similar
landforms

10-Beaches, very frequently flooded

Composition
Beaches: 95 to 100
Contrasting components: 0 to 5 percent

Setting
Landform: Beaches
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Poorly drained or very poorly
drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex
Size of areas: 200 to 600 acres

Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Corolla soils, which are somewhat poorly drained or
moderately well drained and are on low dunes


12-Blanton fine sand, 0 to 6 percent
slopes
Composition
Blanton soil and similar components: 85 to 99 percent
Contrasting components: 1 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Rises and knolls
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Moderately well drained to
somewhat excessively drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex
Size of areas: 3 to 80 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Albany soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and are on rises and knolls
* Boulogne soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Goldhead soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Mascotte soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Pelham soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
* Ortega soils, which are moderately well drained, do
not have a loamy subsoil, and are on elevated rises
and knolls
* Penney soils, which are excessively drained and on
rises and knolls
* Sapelo soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Surrency soils, which are very poorly drained and on
flood plains
Similar:
* Soils that are similar to the Blanton soil and have a
high water table at a depth of 30 to 42 inches

14-Boulogne fine sand, 0 to 2 percent
slopes
Composition
Boulogne soil and similar components: 95 to 100
percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 5 percent

Setting
Landform: Flatwoods


33





City of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida


Similar:
* Arents that do not have refuse and are on similar
landforms

9-Arents, sanitary landfill

Composition
Arents and similar components: 90 to 95 percent
Contrasting components: 5 to 10 percent

Setting
Landform: Flatwoods and flats
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Somewhat poorly drained or
moderately well drained
Parent material: Loamy and sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 20 to 120 acres

Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Soils that have shell fragments, rocks, or muck and
are on landforms similar to those of the Arents
Similar:
* Arents that do not have refuse and are on similar
landforms

10-Beaches, very frequently flooded

Composition
Beaches: 95 to 100
Contrasting components: 0 to 5 percent

Setting
Landform: Beaches
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Poorly drained or very poorly
drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex
Size of areas: 200 to 600 acres

Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Corolla soils, which are somewhat poorly drained or
moderately well drained and are on low dunes


12-Blanton fine sand, 0 to 6 percent
slopes
Composition
Blanton soil and similar components: 85 to 99 percent
Contrasting components: 1 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Rises and knolls
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Moderately well drained to
somewhat excessively drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex
Size of areas: 3 to 80 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Albany soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and are on rises and knolls
* Boulogne soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Goldhead soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Mascotte soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Pelham soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
* Ortega soils, which are moderately well drained, do
not have a loamy subsoil, and are on elevated rises
and knolls
* Penney soils, which are excessively drained and on
rises and knolls
* Sapelo soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Surrency soils, which are very poorly drained and on
flood plains
Similar:
* Soils that are similar to the Blanton soil and have a
high water table at a depth of 30 to 42 inches

14-Boulogne fine sand, 0 to 2 percent
slopes
Composition
Boulogne soil and similar components: 95 to 100
percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 5 percent

Setting
Landform: Flatwoods


33





City of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida


Similar:
* Arents that do not have refuse and are on similar
landforms

9-Arents, sanitary landfill

Composition
Arents and similar components: 90 to 95 percent
Contrasting components: 5 to 10 percent

Setting
Landform: Flatwoods and flats
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Somewhat poorly drained or
moderately well drained
Parent material: Loamy and sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 20 to 120 acres

Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Soils that have shell fragments, rocks, or muck and
are on landforms similar to those of the Arents
Similar:
* Arents that do not have refuse and are on similar
landforms

10-Beaches, very frequently flooded

Composition
Beaches: 95 to 100
Contrasting components: 0 to 5 percent

Setting
Landform: Beaches
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Poorly drained or very poorly
drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex
Size of areas: 200 to 600 acres

Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Corolla soils, which are somewhat poorly drained or
moderately well drained and are on low dunes


12-Blanton fine sand, 0 to 6 percent
slopes
Composition
Blanton soil and similar components: 85 to 99 percent
Contrasting components: 1 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Rises and knolls
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Moderately well drained to
somewhat excessively drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex
Size of areas: 3 to 80 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Albany soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and are on rises and knolls
* Boulogne soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Goldhead soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Mascotte soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Pelham soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
* Ortega soils, which are moderately well drained, do
not have a loamy subsoil, and are on elevated rises
and knolls
* Penney soils, which are excessively drained and on
rises and knolls
* Sapelo soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Surrency soils, which are very poorly drained and on
flood plains
Similar:
* Soils that are similar to the Blanton soil and have a
high water table at a depth of 30 to 42 inches

14-Boulogne fine sand, 0 to 2 percent
slopes
Composition
Boulogne soil and similar components: 95 to 100
percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 5 percent

Setting
Landform: Flatwoods


33





City of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida


Similar:
* Arents that do not have refuse and are on similar
landforms

9-Arents, sanitary landfill

Composition
Arents and similar components: 90 to 95 percent
Contrasting components: 5 to 10 percent

Setting
Landform: Flatwoods and flats
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Somewhat poorly drained or
moderately well drained
Parent material: Loamy and sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 20 to 120 acres

Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Soils that have shell fragments, rocks, or muck and
are on landforms similar to those of the Arents
Similar:
* Arents that do not have refuse and are on similar
landforms

10-Beaches, very frequently flooded

Composition
Beaches: 95 to 100
Contrasting components: 0 to 5 percent

Setting
Landform: Beaches
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Poorly drained or very poorly
drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex
Size of areas: 200 to 600 acres

Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Corolla soils, which are somewhat poorly drained or
moderately well drained and are on low dunes


12-Blanton fine sand, 0 to 6 percent
slopes
Composition
Blanton soil and similar components: 85 to 99 percent
Contrasting components: 1 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Rises and knolls
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Moderately well drained to
somewhat excessively drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex
Size of areas: 3 to 80 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Albany soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and are on rises and knolls
* Boulogne soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Goldhead soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Mascotte soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Pelham soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
* Ortega soils, which are moderately well drained, do
not have a loamy subsoil, and are on elevated rises
and knolls
* Penney soils, which are excessively drained and on
rises and knolls
* Sapelo soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Surrency soils, which are very poorly drained and on
flood plains
Similar:
* Soils that are similar to the Blanton soil and have a
high water table at a depth of 30 to 42 inches

14-Boulogne fine sand, 0 to 2 percent
slopes
Composition
Boulogne soil and similar components: 95 to 100
percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 5 percent

Setting
Landform: Flatwoods


33






Soil Survey


Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 3 to 50 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Lynn Haven soils, which are very poorly drained and
on flats
* Pottsburg, high, soils, which are somewhat poorly
drained and on rises and knolls
* Wesconnett soils, which are very poorly drained and
in depressional areas
Similar:
* Leon soils, which are poorly drained and on
landforms similar to those of the Boulogne soil
* Pottsburg soils, which are poorly drained and on
landforms similar to those of the Boulogne soil
* Soils that have a layer of loamy fine sand or fine
sandy loam above the lower, organic stained subsoil
and are on landforms similar to those of the Boulogne
soil

18-Corolla fine sand, gently undulating
to rolling, rarely flooded

Composition
Corolla soil and similar components: 85 to 100 percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Dunes affected by salt spray near the
Atlantic Ocean
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Somewhat poorly drained or
moderately well drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex or concave
Size of areas: 3 to 500 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Beaches
* Newhan soils, which are excessively drained and
are not vegetated with trees on the higher dunes
* Fripp soils, which are excessively drained and
support trees on the higher dunes
Similar:
* Soils that have a high water table at a depth of 42 to
72 inches and are on landforms similar to those of the
Corolla soil


19-Cornelia fine sand, 0 to 5 percent
slopes

Composition
Cornelia soil and similar components: 85 to 91 percent
Contrasting components: 9 to 15 percent

Setting
Landform: Rises
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Excessively drained
Parent material: Marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex
Size of areas: 3 to 50 acres

Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Leon soils, which are poorly drained in flatwoods
and very poorly drained in tidal marshes
* Mandarin soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and in flatwoods
* Ortega soils, which are moderately well drained and
on rises and knolls
Similar:
* Soils that have a dark organic stained subsoil at a
depth of 30 to 50 inches and are on landforms similar
to those of the Cornelia soil
* Soils that have a high water table at a depth of 42 to
72 inches and are on landforms similar to those of the
Cornelia soil


22-Evergreen-Wesconnett complex,
depressional, 0 to 2 percent slopes

Composition
Evergreen soil and similar components: 63 to 65
percent
Wesconnett soil and similar components: 33 to 35
percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 4 percent

Setting
Landform: Depressions (fig. 6)
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained
Parent material: Decomposed organic materials
underlain by thick sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 3 to 125 acres


34






Soil Survey


Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 3 to 50 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Lynn Haven soils, which are very poorly drained and
on flats
* Pottsburg, high, soils, which are somewhat poorly
drained and on rises and knolls
* Wesconnett soils, which are very poorly drained and
in depressional areas
Similar:
* Leon soils, which are poorly drained and on
landforms similar to those of the Boulogne soil
* Pottsburg soils, which are poorly drained and on
landforms similar to those of the Boulogne soil
* Soils that have a layer of loamy fine sand or fine
sandy loam above the lower, organic stained subsoil
and are on landforms similar to those of the Boulogne
soil

18-Corolla fine sand, gently undulating
to rolling, rarely flooded

Composition
Corolla soil and similar components: 85 to 100 percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Dunes affected by salt spray near the
Atlantic Ocean
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Somewhat poorly drained or
moderately well drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex or concave
Size of areas: 3 to 500 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Beaches
* Newhan soils, which are excessively drained and
are not vegetated with trees on the higher dunes
* Fripp soils, which are excessively drained and
support trees on the higher dunes
Similar:
* Soils that have a high water table at a depth of 42 to
72 inches and are on landforms similar to those of the
Corolla soil


19-Cornelia fine sand, 0 to 5 percent
slopes

Composition
Cornelia soil and similar components: 85 to 91 percent
Contrasting components: 9 to 15 percent

Setting
Landform: Rises
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Excessively drained
Parent material: Marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex
Size of areas: 3 to 50 acres

Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Leon soils, which are poorly drained in flatwoods
and very poorly drained in tidal marshes
* Mandarin soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and in flatwoods
* Ortega soils, which are moderately well drained and
on rises and knolls
Similar:
* Soils that have a dark organic stained subsoil at a
depth of 30 to 50 inches and are on landforms similar
to those of the Cornelia soil
* Soils that have a high water table at a depth of 42 to
72 inches and are on landforms similar to those of the
Cornelia soil


22-Evergreen-Wesconnett complex,
depressional, 0 to 2 percent slopes

Composition
Evergreen soil and similar components: 63 to 65
percent
Wesconnett soil and similar components: 33 to 35
percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 4 percent

Setting
Landform: Depressions (fig. 6)
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained
Parent material: Decomposed organic materials
underlain by thick sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 3 to 125 acres


34






Soil Survey


Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 3 to 50 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Lynn Haven soils, which are very poorly drained and
on flats
* Pottsburg, high, soils, which are somewhat poorly
drained and on rises and knolls
* Wesconnett soils, which are very poorly drained and
in depressional areas
Similar:
* Leon soils, which are poorly drained and on
landforms similar to those of the Boulogne soil
* Pottsburg soils, which are poorly drained and on
landforms similar to those of the Boulogne soil
* Soils that have a layer of loamy fine sand or fine
sandy loam above the lower, organic stained subsoil
and are on landforms similar to those of the Boulogne
soil

18-Corolla fine sand, gently undulating
to rolling, rarely flooded

Composition
Corolla soil and similar components: 85 to 100 percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Dunes affected by salt spray near the
Atlantic Ocean
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Somewhat poorly drained or
moderately well drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex or concave
Size of areas: 3 to 500 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Beaches
* Newhan soils, which are excessively drained and
are not vegetated with trees on the higher dunes
* Fripp soils, which are excessively drained and
support trees on the higher dunes
Similar:
* Soils that have a high water table at a depth of 42 to
72 inches and are on landforms similar to those of the
Corolla soil


19-Cornelia fine sand, 0 to 5 percent
slopes

Composition
Cornelia soil and similar components: 85 to 91 percent
Contrasting components: 9 to 15 percent

Setting
Landform: Rises
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Excessively drained
Parent material: Marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex
Size of areas: 3 to 50 acres

Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Leon soils, which are poorly drained in flatwoods
and very poorly drained in tidal marshes
* Mandarin soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and in flatwoods
* Ortega soils, which are moderately well drained and
on rises and knolls
Similar:
* Soils that have a dark organic stained subsoil at a
depth of 30 to 50 inches and are on landforms similar
to those of the Cornelia soil
* Soils that have a high water table at a depth of 42 to
72 inches and are on landforms similar to those of the
Cornelia soil


22-Evergreen-Wesconnett complex,
depressional, 0 to 2 percent slopes

Composition
Evergreen soil and similar components: 63 to 65
percent
Wesconnett soil and similar components: 33 to 35
percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 4 percent

Setting
Landform: Depressions (fig. 6)
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained
Parent material: Decomposed organic materials
underlain by thick sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 3 to 125 acres


34





35


City of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida


Figure 6.-An area of Evergreen-Wesconnett complex, depressional, 0 to 2 percent slopes, in the foreground. An area of Leon fine
sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes, is in the flatwoods in the background.


Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Lynn Haven soils on flats
* Leon soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Pamlico soils, which are organic and in depressions
* Pottsburg soils, which are poorly drained and on
flats
Similar:
* Leon soils that have muck 0 to 8 inches thick and
are on landforms similar to those of the Evergreen and
Wesconnett soils
* Lynn Haven soils that have muck 0 to 8 inches thick
and are on landforms similar to those of the Evergreen
and Wesconnett soils


23-Fripp-Corolla, rarely flooded,
complex, gently undulating to hilly

Composition
Fripp soil and similar components: 73 to 75 percent
Corolla soil and similar components: 23 to 25 percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 4 percent
Setting
Landform: Dunes (fig. 7)
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Somewhat poorly drained to
excessively drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex or concave
Size of areas: 5 to 300 acres






36


Soil Survey


Figure 7.-A landscape of Beaches, an area of Fripp-Corolla, rarely flooded, complex, gently undulating to hilly, and Urban land.


Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Boulogne soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Leon soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Lynn Haven soils, which are very poorly drained and
on flats
* Mandarin soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and in flatwoods
* Pottsburg soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Ortega soils, which are moderately well drained and
on landforms similar to those of the Fripp and Corolla
soils
Similar:
* Pottsburg, high, soils, which are somewhat poorly
drained and on landforms similar to those of the Fripp
and Corolla soils
* Newhan soils, which do not support trees and are on
landforms similar to those of the Fripp and Corolla
soils


24-Hurricane and Ridgewood soils, 0 to
5 percent slopes

Composition
Hurricane soil and similar components: 53 to 60
percent
Ridgewood soil and similar components: 33 to 40
percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 14 percent
Setting
Landform: Rises and knolls
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Somewhat poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex
Size of areas: 3 to 150 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
Boulogne soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods





City of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida


* Leon soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Lynn Haven soils, which are very poorly drained and
on flats
* Mandarin soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and in flatwoods
* Pottsburg soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Ortega soils, which are moderately well drained and
on landforms similar to those of the Hurricane and
Ridgewood soils
Similar:
* Pottsburg, high, soils, which are somewhat poorly
drained and on landforms similar to those of the
Hurricane and Ridgewood soils

25-Kershaw fine sand, 2 to 8 percent
slopes
Composition
Kershaw soil and similar components: 92 to 100
percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 8 percent
Setting
Landform: Rises
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Excessively drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex
Size of areas: 3 to 50 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Blanton soils, which are moderately well drained and
on rises and knolls
* Ortega soils, which are moderately well drained and
on rises and knolls
Similar:
* Penney soils, which have lamellae and are on
landforms similar to those of the Kershaw soil
* Kureb soils, which have an eluvial layer and are on
landforms similar to those of the Kershaw soil

26-Kershaw fine sand, smoothed, 0 to 2
percent slopes

Composition
Kershaw soil and similar components: 92 to 100
percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 8 percent


Setting
Landform: Rises leveled by mining operations (fig. 8)
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Excessively drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex or concave
Size of areas: 30 to 500 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Ortega soils, which are moderately well drained and
on landforms similar to those of the Kershaw soil
Similar:
* Penney soils, which have lamellae and are on
landforms similar to those of the Kershaw soil

29-Kureb fine sand, 2 to 8 percent
slopes

Composition
Kureb soil and similar components: 85 to 100 percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Rises and dunes
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Excessively drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex or concave
Size of areas: 3 to 50 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Cornelia soils, which have a dark organic stained
subsoil and are on landforms similar to those of the
Kureb soil
* Mandarin soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and in the slightly elevated flatwoods
* Ortega soils, which are moderately well drained and
on landforms similar to those of the Kureb soil
Similar:
* Kershaw soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Kureb soil

31-Kureb fine sand, rolling, 8 to 20
percent slopes

Composition
Kureb soil and similar components: 85 to 91 percent
Contrasting components: 9 to 15 percent


37





City of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida


* Leon soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Lynn Haven soils, which are very poorly drained and
on flats
* Mandarin soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and in flatwoods
* Pottsburg soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Ortega soils, which are moderately well drained and
on landforms similar to those of the Hurricane and
Ridgewood soils
Similar:
* Pottsburg, high, soils, which are somewhat poorly
drained and on landforms similar to those of the
Hurricane and Ridgewood soils

25-Kershaw fine sand, 2 to 8 percent
slopes
Composition
Kershaw soil and similar components: 92 to 100
percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 8 percent
Setting
Landform: Rises
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Excessively drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex
Size of areas: 3 to 50 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Blanton soils, which are moderately well drained and
on rises and knolls
* Ortega soils, which are moderately well drained and
on rises and knolls
Similar:
* Penney soils, which have lamellae and are on
landforms similar to those of the Kershaw soil
* Kureb soils, which have an eluvial layer and are on
landforms similar to those of the Kershaw soil

26-Kershaw fine sand, smoothed, 0 to 2
percent slopes

Composition
Kershaw soil and similar components: 92 to 100
percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 8 percent


Setting
Landform: Rises leveled by mining operations (fig. 8)
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Excessively drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex or concave
Size of areas: 30 to 500 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Ortega soils, which are moderately well drained and
on landforms similar to those of the Kershaw soil
Similar:
* Penney soils, which have lamellae and are on
landforms similar to those of the Kershaw soil

29-Kureb fine sand, 2 to 8 percent
slopes

Composition
Kureb soil and similar components: 85 to 100 percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Rises and dunes
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Excessively drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex or concave
Size of areas: 3 to 50 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Cornelia soils, which have a dark organic stained
subsoil and are on landforms similar to those of the
Kureb soil
* Mandarin soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and in the slightly elevated flatwoods
* Ortega soils, which are moderately well drained and
on landforms similar to those of the Kureb soil
Similar:
* Kershaw soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Kureb soil

31-Kureb fine sand, rolling, 8 to 20
percent slopes

Composition
Kureb soil and similar components: 85 to 91 percent
Contrasting components: 9 to 15 percent


37





City of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida


* Leon soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Lynn Haven soils, which are very poorly drained and
on flats
* Mandarin soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and in flatwoods
* Pottsburg soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Ortega soils, which are moderately well drained and
on landforms similar to those of the Hurricane and
Ridgewood soils
Similar:
* Pottsburg, high, soils, which are somewhat poorly
drained and on landforms similar to those of the
Hurricane and Ridgewood soils

25-Kershaw fine sand, 2 to 8 percent
slopes
Composition
Kershaw soil and similar components: 92 to 100
percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 8 percent
Setting
Landform: Rises
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Excessively drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex
Size of areas: 3 to 50 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Blanton soils, which are moderately well drained and
on rises and knolls
* Ortega soils, which are moderately well drained and
on rises and knolls
Similar:
* Penney soils, which have lamellae and are on
landforms similar to those of the Kershaw soil
* Kureb soils, which have an eluvial layer and are on
landforms similar to those of the Kershaw soil

26-Kershaw fine sand, smoothed, 0 to 2
percent slopes

Composition
Kershaw soil and similar components: 92 to 100
percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 8 percent


Setting
Landform: Rises leveled by mining operations (fig. 8)
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Excessively drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex or concave
Size of areas: 30 to 500 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Ortega soils, which are moderately well drained and
on landforms similar to those of the Kershaw soil
Similar:
* Penney soils, which have lamellae and are on
landforms similar to those of the Kershaw soil

29-Kureb fine sand, 2 to 8 percent
slopes

Composition
Kureb soil and similar components: 85 to 100 percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Rises and dunes
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Excessively drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex or concave
Size of areas: 3 to 50 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Cornelia soils, which have a dark organic stained
subsoil and are on landforms similar to those of the
Kureb soil
* Mandarin soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and in the slightly elevated flatwoods
* Ortega soils, which are moderately well drained and
on landforms similar to those of the Kureb soil
Similar:
* Kershaw soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Kureb soil

31-Kureb fine sand, rolling, 8 to 20
percent slopes

Composition
Kureb soil and similar components: 85 to 91 percent
Contrasting components: 9 to 15 percent


37





City of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida


* Leon soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Lynn Haven soils, which are very poorly drained and
on flats
* Mandarin soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and in flatwoods
* Pottsburg soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Ortega soils, which are moderately well drained and
on landforms similar to those of the Hurricane and
Ridgewood soils
Similar:
* Pottsburg, high, soils, which are somewhat poorly
drained and on landforms similar to those of the
Hurricane and Ridgewood soils

25-Kershaw fine sand, 2 to 8 percent
slopes
Composition
Kershaw soil and similar components: 92 to 100
percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 8 percent
Setting
Landform: Rises
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Excessively drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex
Size of areas: 3 to 50 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Blanton soils, which are moderately well drained and
on rises and knolls
* Ortega soils, which are moderately well drained and
on rises and knolls
Similar:
* Penney soils, which have lamellae and are on
landforms similar to those of the Kershaw soil
* Kureb soils, which have an eluvial layer and are on
landforms similar to those of the Kershaw soil

26-Kershaw fine sand, smoothed, 0 to 2
percent slopes

Composition
Kershaw soil and similar components: 92 to 100
percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 8 percent


Setting
Landform: Rises leveled by mining operations (fig. 8)
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Excessively drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex or concave
Size of areas: 30 to 500 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Ortega soils, which are moderately well drained and
on landforms similar to those of the Kershaw soil
Similar:
* Penney soils, which have lamellae and are on
landforms similar to those of the Kershaw soil

29-Kureb fine sand, 2 to 8 percent
slopes

Composition
Kureb soil and similar components: 85 to 100 percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Rises and dunes
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Excessively drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex or concave
Size of areas: 3 to 50 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Cornelia soils, which have a dark organic stained
subsoil and are on landforms similar to those of the
Kureb soil
* Mandarin soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and in the slightly elevated flatwoods
* Ortega soils, which are moderately well drained and
on landforms similar to those of the Kureb soil
Similar:
* Kershaw soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Kureb soil

31-Kureb fine sand, rolling, 8 to 20
percent slopes

Composition
Kureb soil and similar components: 85 to 91 percent
Contrasting components: 9 to 15 percent


37






Soil Survey


.--* ,b --.' ,-:. .--o-,

U^.*,^ . _., ."j
ac q a fu. dr r ,
--'. C. ,_ ;dr,.-


Figure 8-An area of ershaw fine sand, smoothed, 0 to 2 percent slopes, that has been mined for minerals.


Setting
Landform: Side slopes
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Excessively drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Concave or convex
Size of areas: 10 to 500 acres

Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Mandarin soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and on landforms similar to those of the Kureb soil
* Ortega soils, which are moderately well drained and
on landforms similar to those of the Kureb soil
* Ridgewood soils, which are somewhat poorly
drained and on landforms similar to those of the Kureb
soil
Similar:
* Kershaw soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Kureb soil
* Soils that are similar to the Kureb soil, are


moderately well drained, and are on landforms similar
to those of the Kureb soil

32-Leon fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes

Composition
Leon soil and similar components: 89 to 98 percent
Contrasting components: 2 to 11 percent
Setting
Landform: Flatwoods
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Poorly drained (fig. 9)
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 3 to 75 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Evergreen soils, which are very poorly drained and
in depressions


i- ,~1ICp -~d~~

s's.





City of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida


* Lynn Haven soils, which are very poorly drained and
on flats
* Pottsburg, high, soils, which are somewhat poorly
drained and on rises and knolls
* Sapelo soils, which have a loamy subsoil and are on
landforms similar to those of the Leon soil
* Wesconnett soils, which are very poorly drained and
in depressions
Similar:
* Boulogne soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Leon soil
* Pottsburg soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Leon soil
* Soils that are on landforms similar to those of the
Leon soil and that have a black or very dark gray
surface layer that is more than 8 inches thick and has
resulted from bedding practices
* Soils that have thin layers of loamy fine sand or fine


sandy loam above the lower subsoil and are on
landforms similar to those of the Leon soil


33-Leon fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes,
very frequently flooded

Composition
Leon soil: 88 to 100 percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 12 percent
Setting
Landform:Tidal marshes
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 3 to 50 acres


Figure 9.-A storm retention pond in an area of urban development on Leon fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes.


39





Soil Survey


Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Arents, which are poorly drained and on flats
* Leon soils that are poorly drained and in flatwoods
* Tisonia soils, which are very poorly drained and in
tidal marshes

35-Lynn Haven fine sand, 0 to 2 percent
slopes
Composition
Lynn Haven soil and similar components: 85 to 100
percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Flats
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 3 to 75 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Boulogne soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Evergreen soils, which are in depressions
* Leon soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Wesconnett soils, which are in depressions
Similar:
* Pottsburg soils, which are poorly drained and on
landforms similar to those of the Lynn Haven soil
* Wesconnett soils, which are very poorly drained,
have organic material less than 8 inches thick, and are
in landscape positions similar to those of the Lynn
Haven soil
* Soils that have organic material less than 8 inches
thick, are similar to the Lynn Haven soil, and are on
similar landforms
* Soils that are similar to the Lynn Haven soil, have a
black and very dark gray surface layer that is less than
8 inches thick, and have a weakly developed, dark
organic stained subsoil

36-Mandarin fine sand, 0 to 2 percent
slopes
Composition
Mandarin soil: 85 to 93 percent
Contrasting components: 7 to 15 percent


Setting
Landform: Slightly elevated flatwoods
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Somewhat poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex
Size of areas: 3 to 100 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Cornelia soils, which are excessively drained and on
rises and knolls
* Hurricane soils, which are on rises and knolls
* Leon soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Ridgewood soils, which are on rises and knolls


38-Mascotte fine sand, 0 to 2 percent
slopes

Composition
Mascotte soil and similar components: 86 to 96
percent
Contrasting components: 4 to 14 percent
Setting
Landform: Flatwoods
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 3 to 60 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Albany soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and on rises and knolls
* Pelham soils, which are on low flats
* Surrency soils, which are very poorly drained and in
depressions and on flood plains
* Yonges soils, which are on flats
Similar:
* Sapelo soils, which are on landforms similar to those
of the Mascotte soil
* Soils that are on landforms similar to those of the
Mascotte soil and that have a black or very dark gray
surface layer that is more than 8 inches thick and that
has resulted from bedding practices
* Soils that have a dark subsoil underlying the surface
layer and are on landforms similar to those of the
Mascotte soil


40





Soil Survey


Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Arents, which are poorly drained and on flats
* Leon soils that are poorly drained and in flatwoods
* Tisonia soils, which are very poorly drained and in
tidal marshes

35-Lynn Haven fine sand, 0 to 2 percent
slopes
Composition
Lynn Haven soil and similar components: 85 to 100
percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Flats
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 3 to 75 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Boulogne soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Evergreen soils, which are in depressions
* Leon soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Wesconnett soils, which are in depressions
Similar:
* Pottsburg soils, which are poorly drained and on
landforms similar to those of the Lynn Haven soil
* Wesconnett soils, which are very poorly drained,
have organic material less than 8 inches thick, and are
in landscape positions similar to those of the Lynn
Haven soil
* Soils that have organic material less than 8 inches
thick, are similar to the Lynn Haven soil, and are on
similar landforms
* Soils that are similar to the Lynn Haven soil, have a
black and very dark gray surface layer that is less than
8 inches thick, and have a weakly developed, dark
organic stained subsoil

36-Mandarin fine sand, 0 to 2 percent
slopes
Composition
Mandarin soil: 85 to 93 percent
Contrasting components: 7 to 15 percent


Setting
Landform: Slightly elevated flatwoods
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Somewhat poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex
Size of areas: 3 to 100 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Cornelia soils, which are excessively drained and on
rises and knolls
* Hurricane soils, which are on rises and knolls
* Leon soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Ridgewood soils, which are on rises and knolls


38-Mascotte fine sand, 0 to 2 percent
slopes

Composition
Mascotte soil and similar components: 86 to 96
percent
Contrasting components: 4 to 14 percent
Setting
Landform: Flatwoods
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 3 to 60 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Albany soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and on rises and knolls
* Pelham soils, which are on low flats
* Surrency soils, which are very poorly drained and in
depressions and on flood plains
* Yonges soils, which are on flats
Similar:
* Sapelo soils, which are on landforms similar to those
of the Mascotte soil
* Soils that are on landforms similar to those of the
Mascotte soil and that have a black or very dark gray
surface layer that is more than 8 inches thick and that
has resulted from bedding practices
* Soils that have a dark subsoil underlying the surface
layer and are on landforms similar to those of the
Mascotte soil


40





Soil Survey


Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Arents, which are poorly drained and on flats
* Leon soils that are poorly drained and in flatwoods
* Tisonia soils, which are very poorly drained and in
tidal marshes

35-Lynn Haven fine sand, 0 to 2 percent
slopes
Composition
Lynn Haven soil and similar components: 85 to 100
percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Flats
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 3 to 75 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Boulogne soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Evergreen soils, which are in depressions
* Leon soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Wesconnett soils, which are in depressions
Similar:
* Pottsburg soils, which are poorly drained and on
landforms similar to those of the Lynn Haven soil
* Wesconnett soils, which are very poorly drained,
have organic material less than 8 inches thick, and are
in landscape positions similar to those of the Lynn
Haven soil
* Soils that have organic material less than 8 inches
thick, are similar to the Lynn Haven soil, and are on
similar landforms
* Soils that are similar to the Lynn Haven soil, have a
black and very dark gray surface layer that is less than
8 inches thick, and have a weakly developed, dark
organic stained subsoil

36-Mandarin fine sand, 0 to 2 percent
slopes
Composition
Mandarin soil: 85 to 93 percent
Contrasting components: 7 to 15 percent


Setting
Landform: Slightly elevated flatwoods
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Somewhat poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex
Size of areas: 3 to 100 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Cornelia soils, which are excessively drained and on
rises and knolls
* Hurricane soils, which are on rises and knolls
* Leon soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Ridgewood soils, which are on rises and knolls


38-Mascotte fine sand, 0 to 2 percent
slopes

Composition
Mascotte soil and similar components: 86 to 96
percent
Contrasting components: 4 to 14 percent
Setting
Landform: Flatwoods
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 3 to 60 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Albany soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and on rises and knolls
* Pelham soils, which are on low flats
* Surrency soils, which are very poorly drained and in
depressions and on flood plains
* Yonges soils, which are on flats
Similar:
* Sapelo soils, which are on landforms similar to those
of the Mascotte soil
* Soils that are on landforms similar to those of the
Mascotte soil and that have a black or very dark gray
surface layer that is more than 8 inches thick and that
has resulted from bedding practices
* Soils that have a dark subsoil underlying the surface
layer and are on landforms similar to those of the
Mascotte soil


40






City of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida


40-Maurepas muck, 0 to 1 percent
slopes, frequently flooded

Composition
Maurepas soil and similar components: 85 to 95
percent
Contrasting components: 5 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Flood plains influenced by tidal action
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage:Very poorly drained
Parent material: Decomposed organic material
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 3 to 100 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Lynn Haven soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Maurepas soil
* Rutlege soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Maurepas soil
* Tisonia soils, which are in tidal marshes
Similar:
* Pamlico soils, which are organic, are nonsaline, and
are on landforms similar to those of the Maurepas soil
* Soils that have organic material less than 51 inches
thick and are on landforms similar to those of the
Maurepas soil

42-Newhan-Corolla, rarely flooded,
complex, gently undulating to hilly, 2
to 20 percent slopes

Composition
Newhan soil and similar components: 77 to 78 percent
Corolla soil and similar components: 21 to 22 percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 2 percent
Setting
Landform: Dunes
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Somewhat poorly drained to
excessively drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex or concave
Size of areas: 5 to 300 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Beaches


Similar:
* Fripp soils, which are on landforms similar to those
of the Newhan and Corolla soils

44-Mascotte-Pelham complex, 0 to 2
percent slopes

Composition
Mascotte soil and similar components: 62 to 68
percent
Pelham soil and similar components: 18 to 31 percent
Contrasting components: 1 to 10 percent
Setting
Landform: Flatwoods
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 3 to 60 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Surrency soils, which are very poorly drained and in
depressions
Similar:
* Sapelo soils, which are on landforms similar to those
of the Mascotte and Pelham soils
* Soils that have a weakly developed, organic stained
subsoil directly underneath the surface layer and are
on landforms similar to those of the Mascotte and
Pelham soils
* Soils that have a loamy subsoil below a depth of 40
inches and are on landforms similar to those of the
Mascotte and Pelham soils

46-Ortega fine sand, 0 to 5 percent
slopes

Composition
Ortega soil and similar components: 88 to 98 percent
Contrasting components: 2 to 12 percent

Setting
Landform: Rises and knolls
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Moderately well drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex
Size of areas: 3 to 85 acres


41






City of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida


40-Maurepas muck, 0 to 1 percent
slopes, frequently flooded

Composition
Maurepas soil and similar components: 85 to 95
percent
Contrasting components: 5 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Flood plains influenced by tidal action
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage:Very poorly drained
Parent material: Decomposed organic material
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 3 to 100 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Lynn Haven soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Maurepas soil
* Rutlege soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Maurepas soil
* Tisonia soils, which are in tidal marshes
Similar:
* Pamlico soils, which are organic, are nonsaline, and
are on landforms similar to those of the Maurepas soil
* Soils that have organic material less than 51 inches
thick and are on landforms similar to those of the
Maurepas soil

42-Newhan-Corolla, rarely flooded,
complex, gently undulating to hilly, 2
to 20 percent slopes

Composition
Newhan soil and similar components: 77 to 78 percent
Corolla soil and similar components: 21 to 22 percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 2 percent
Setting
Landform: Dunes
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Somewhat poorly drained to
excessively drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex or concave
Size of areas: 5 to 300 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Beaches


Similar:
* Fripp soils, which are on landforms similar to those
of the Newhan and Corolla soils

44-Mascotte-Pelham complex, 0 to 2
percent slopes

Composition
Mascotte soil and similar components: 62 to 68
percent
Pelham soil and similar components: 18 to 31 percent
Contrasting components: 1 to 10 percent
Setting
Landform: Flatwoods
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 3 to 60 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Surrency soils, which are very poorly drained and in
depressions
Similar:
* Sapelo soils, which are on landforms similar to those
of the Mascotte and Pelham soils
* Soils that have a weakly developed, organic stained
subsoil directly underneath the surface layer and are
on landforms similar to those of the Mascotte and
Pelham soils
* Soils that have a loamy subsoil below a depth of 40
inches and are on landforms similar to those of the
Mascotte and Pelham soils

46-Ortega fine sand, 0 to 5 percent
slopes

Composition
Ortega soil and similar components: 88 to 98 percent
Contrasting components: 2 to 12 percent

Setting
Landform: Rises and knolls
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Moderately well drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex
Size of areas: 3 to 85 acres


41






City of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida


40-Maurepas muck, 0 to 1 percent
slopes, frequently flooded

Composition
Maurepas soil and similar components: 85 to 95
percent
Contrasting components: 5 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Flood plains influenced by tidal action
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage:Very poorly drained
Parent material: Decomposed organic material
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 3 to 100 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Lynn Haven soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Maurepas soil
* Rutlege soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Maurepas soil
* Tisonia soils, which are in tidal marshes
Similar:
* Pamlico soils, which are organic, are nonsaline, and
are on landforms similar to those of the Maurepas soil
* Soils that have organic material less than 51 inches
thick and are on landforms similar to those of the
Maurepas soil

42-Newhan-Corolla, rarely flooded,
complex, gently undulating to hilly, 2
to 20 percent slopes

Composition
Newhan soil and similar components: 77 to 78 percent
Corolla soil and similar components: 21 to 22 percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 2 percent
Setting
Landform: Dunes
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Somewhat poorly drained to
excessively drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex or concave
Size of areas: 5 to 300 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Beaches


Similar:
* Fripp soils, which are on landforms similar to those
of the Newhan and Corolla soils

44-Mascotte-Pelham complex, 0 to 2
percent slopes

Composition
Mascotte soil and similar components: 62 to 68
percent
Pelham soil and similar components: 18 to 31 percent
Contrasting components: 1 to 10 percent
Setting
Landform: Flatwoods
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 3 to 60 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Surrency soils, which are very poorly drained and in
depressions
Similar:
* Sapelo soils, which are on landforms similar to those
of the Mascotte and Pelham soils
* Soils that have a weakly developed, organic stained
subsoil directly underneath the surface layer and are
on landforms similar to those of the Mascotte and
Pelham soils
* Soils that have a loamy subsoil below a depth of 40
inches and are on landforms similar to those of the
Mascotte and Pelham soils

46-Ortega fine sand, 0 to 5 percent
slopes

Composition
Ortega soil and similar components: 88 to 98 percent
Contrasting components: 2 to 12 percent

Setting
Landform: Rises and knolls
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Moderately well drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex
Size of areas: 3 to 85 acres


41






City of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida


40-Maurepas muck, 0 to 1 percent
slopes, frequently flooded

Composition
Maurepas soil and similar components: 85 to 95
percent
Contrasting components: 5 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Flood plains influenced by tidal action
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage:Very poorly drained
Parent material: Decomposed organic material
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 3 to 100 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Lynn Haven soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Maurepas soil
* Rutlege soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Maurepas soil
* Tisonia soils, which are in tidal marshes
Similar:
* Pamlico soils, which are organic, are nonsaline, and
are on landforms similar to those of the Maurepas soil
* Soils that have organic material less than 51 inches
thick and are on landforms similar to those of the
Maurepas soil

42-Newhan-Corolla, rarely flooded,
complex, gently undulating to hilly, 2
to 20 percent slopes

Composition
Newhan soil and similar components: 77 to 78 percent
Corolla soil and similar components: 21 to 22 percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 2 percent
Setting
Landform: Dunes
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Somewhat poorly drained to
excessively drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex or concave
Size of areas: 5 to 300 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Beaches


Similar:
* Fripp soils, which are on landforms similar to those
of the Newhan and Corolla soils

44-Mascotte-Pelham complex, 0 to 2
percent slopes

Composition
Mascotte soil and similar components: 62 to 68
percent
Pelham soil and similar components: 18 to 31 percent
Contrasting components: 1 to 10 percent
Setting
Landform: Flatwoods
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 3 to 60 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Surrency soils, which are very poorly drained and in
depressions
Similar:
* Sapelo soils, which are on landforms similar to those
of the Mascotte and Pelham soils
* Soils that have a weakly developed, organic stained
subsoil directly underneath the surface layer and are
on landforms similar to those of the Mascotte and
Pelham soils
* Soils that have a loamy subsoil below a depth of 40
inches and are on landforms similar to those of the
Mascotte and Pelham soils

46-Ortega fine sand, 0 to 5 percent
slopes

Composition
Ortega soil and similar components: 88 to 98 percent
Contrasting components: 2 to 12 percent

Setting
Landform: Rises and knolls
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Moderately well drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex
Size of areas: 3 to 85 acres


41





Soil Survey


Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Albany soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and on landforms similar to those of the Ortega soil
* Hurricane soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and on landforms similar to those of the Ortega soil
* Kershaw soils, which are excessively drained and on
landforms similar to those of the Ortega soil
* Ridgewood soils, which are somewhat poorly
drained and on landforms similar to those of the
Ortega soil
Similar:
* Soils that have a dark organic stained subsoil within
a depth of 80 inches and are on landforms similar to
those of the Ortega soil


49-Pamlico muck, depressional, 0 to 1
percent slopes

Composition
Pamlico soil and similar components: 85 to 97 percent
Contrasting components: 3 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Depressions
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained
Parent material: Decomposed organic materials
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 3 to 100 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Evergreen soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Pamlico soil
* Lynn Haven soils, which are on flats
* Pelham soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
* Surrency soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Pamlico soil
Similar:
* Dorovan soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Pamlico soil

50-Pamlico muck, 0 to 2 percent slopes,
frequently flooded

Composition
Pamlico soil and similar components: 85 to 97 percent
Contrasting components: 3 to 15 percent


Setting
Landform: Flood plains
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained
Parent material: Decomposed organic materials
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 3 to 100 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Evergreen soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Pamlico soil
* Lynn Haven soils, which are on flats
* Pelham soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
* Surrency soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Pamlico soil
* Maurepas soils, which are on flood plains influenced
by tidal action
Similar:
* Dorovan soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Pamlico soil

51-Pelham fine sand, 0 to 2 percent
slopes
Composition
Pelham soil and similar components: 90 to 96 percent
Contrasting components: 4 to 10 percent
Setting
Landform: Flats
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 3 to 150 acres

Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Albany soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and on rises and knolls
* Lynchburg soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and on rises and knolls
* Mascotte soils, which are in flatwoods
* Sapelo soils, which are in flatwoods
* Surrency soils, which are very poorly drained and in
depressions or on flood plains
* Yonges soils, which are on flats
Similar:
* Soils that have a loamy subsoil below a depth of 40
inches and are on landforms similar to those of the
Pelham soil


42





Soil Survey


Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Albany soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and on landforms similar to those of the Ortega soil
* Hurricane soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and on landforms similar to those of the Ortega soil
* Kershaw soils, which are excessively drained and on
landforms similar to those of the Ortega soil
* Ridgewood soils, which are somewhat poorly
drained and on landforms similar to those of the
Ortega soil
Similar:
* Soils that have a dark organic stained subsoil within
a depth of 80 inches and are on landforms similar to
those of the Ortega soil


49-Pamlico muck, depressional, 0 to 1
percent slopes

Composition
Pamlico soil and similar components: 85 to 97 percent
Contrasting components: 3 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Depressions
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained
Parent material: Decomposed organic materials
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 3 to 100 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Evergreen soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Pamlico soil
* Lynn Haven soils, which are on flats
* Pelham soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
* Surrency soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Pamlico soil
Similar:
* Dorovan soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Pamlico soil

50-Pamlico muck, 0 to 2 percent slopes,
frequently flooded

Composition
Pamlico soil and similar components: 85 to 97 percent
Contrasting components: 3 to 15 percent


Setting
Landform: Flood plains
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained
Parent material: Decomposed organic materials
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 3 to 100 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Evergreen soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Pamlico soil
* Lynn Haven soils, which are on flats
* Pelham soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
* Surrency soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Pamlico soil
* Maurepas soils, which are on flood plains influenced
by tidal action
Similar:
* Dorovan soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Pamlico soil

51-Pelham fine sand, 0 to 2 percent
slopes
Composition
Pelham soil and similar components: 90 to 96 percent
Contrasting components: 4 to 10 percent
Setting
Landform: Flats
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 3 to 150 acres

Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Albany soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and on rises and knolls
* Lynchburg soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and on rises and knolls
* Mascotte soils, which are in flatwoods
* Sapelo soils, which are in flatwoods
* Surrency soils, which are very poorly drained and in
depressions or on flood plains
* Yonges soils, which are on flats
Similar:
* Soils that have a loamy subsoil below a depth of 40
inches and are on landforms similar to those of the
Pelham soil


42





Soil Survey


Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Albany soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and on landforms similar to those of the Ortega soil
* Hurricane soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and on landforms similar to those of the Ortega soil
* Kershaw soils, which are excessively drained and on
landforms similar to those of the Ortega soil
* Ridgewood soils, which are somewhat poorly
drained and on landforms similar to those of the
Ortega soil
Similar:
* Soils that have a dark organic stained subsoil within
a depth of 80 inches and are on landforms similar to
those of the Ortega soil


49-Pamlico muck, depressional, 0 to 1
percent slopes

Composition
Pamlico soil and similar components: 85 to 97 percent
Contrasting components: 3 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Depressions
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained
Parent material: Decomposed organic materials
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 3 to 100 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Evergreen soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Pamlico soil
* Lynn Haven soils, which are on flats
* Pelham soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
* Surrency soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Pamlico soil
Similar:
* Dorovan soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Pamlico soil

50-Pamlico muck, 0 to 2 percent slopes,
frequently flooded

Composition
Pamlico soil and similar components: 85 to 97 percent
Contrasting components: 3 to 15 percent


Setting
Landform: Flood plains
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained
Parent material: Decomposed organic materials
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 3 to 100 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Evergreen soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Pamlico soil
* Lynn Haven soils, which are on flats
* Pelham soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
* Surrency soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Pamlico soil
* Maurepas soils, which are on flood plains influenced
by tidal action
Similar:
* Dorovan soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Pamlico soil

51-Pelham fine sand, 0 to 2 percent
slopes
Composition
Pelham soil and similar components: 90 to 96 percent
Contrasting components: 4 to 10 percent
Setting
Landform: Flats
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 3 to 150 acres

Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Albany soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and on rises and knolls
* Lynchburg soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and on rises and knolls
* Mascotte soils, which are in flatwoods
* Sapelo soils, which are in flatwoods
* Surrency soils, which are very poorly drained and in
depressions or on flood plains
* Yonges soils, which are on flats
Similar:
* Soils that have a loamy subsoil below a depth of 40
inches and are on landforms similar to those of the
Pelham soil


42





City of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida


* Soils that are on landforms similar to those of the
Pelham soil and have a black and very dark gray
surface layer that is more than 10 inches thick and that
has resulted from bedding practices
* Soils that have a weakly developed, dark organic
stained subsoil directly underneath the surface layer
and that are on landforms similar to those of the
Pelham soil


53-Penney fine sand, 0 to 5 percent
slopes
Composition
Penney soil and similar components: 87 to 100
percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 13 percent
Setting
Landform: Rises
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Excessively drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex
Size of areas: 3 to 120 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Blanton soils, which are moderately well drained and
on rises and knolls
* Hurricane soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and on rises and knolls
* Ortega soils, which are moderately well drained and
on rises and knolls
* Ridgewood soils, which are somewhat poorly
drained and on rises and knolls
Similar:
* Kershaw soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Penney soil

55-Pits
Composition
Pits and similar components: 99 percent
Contrasting components: 1 percent
Setting
Landform: Borrow pits
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained or poorly
drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 5 to 50 acres


Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Pits in depressions on similar landforms
* Areas of water
Similar:
* Pits on low flats on similar landforms


56-Pottsburg fine sand, 0 to 2 percent
slopes

Composition
Pottsburg soil and similar components: 88 to 93
percent
Contrasting components: 7 to 12 percent
Setting
Landform: Flatwoods
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 3 to 15 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Evergreen soils, which are very poorly drained and
in depressions
* Hurricane soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and on rises and knolls
* Lynn Haven soils, which are very poorly drained and
on flats
* Mandarin soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and in flatwoods
* Pottsburg, high, soils, which are somewhat poorly
drained and on rises and knolls
* Wesconnett soils, which are very poorly drained and
in depressions
Similar:
* Boulogne soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Pottsburg soil
* Leon soils, which are on landforms similar to those
of the Pottsburg soil

58-Pottsburg fine sand, high, 0 to 3
percent slopes

Composition
Pottsburg soil: 88 to 93 percent
Contrasting components: 7 to 12 percent


43





City of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida


* Soils that are on landforms similar to those of the
Pelham soil and have a black and very dark gray
surface layer that is more than 10 inches thick and that
has resulted from bedding practices
* Soils that have a weakly developed, dark organic
stained subsoil directly underneath the surface layer
and that are on landforms similar to those of the
Pelham soil


53-Penney fine sand, 0 to 5 percent
slopes
Composition
Penney soil and similar components: 87 to 100
percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 13 percent
Setting
Landform: Rises
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Excessively drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex
Size of areas: 3 to 120 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Blanton soils, which are moderately well drained and
on rises and knolls
* Hurricane soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and on rises and knolls
* Ortega soils, which are moderately well drained and
on rises and knolls
* Ridgewood soils, which are somewhat poorly
drained and on rises and knolls
Similar:
* Kershaw soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Penney soil

55-Pits
Composition
Pits and similar components: 99 percent
Contrasting components: 1 percent
Setting
Landform: Borrow pits
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained or poorly
drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 5 to 50 acres


Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Pits in depressions on similar landforms
* Areas of water
Similar:
* Pits on low flats on similar landforms


56-Pottsburg fine sand, 0 to 2 percent
slopes

Composition
Pottsburg soil and similar components: 88 to 93
percent
Contrasting components: 7 to 12 percent
Setting
Landform: Flatwoods
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 3 to 15 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Evergreen soils, which are very poorly drained and
in depressions
* Hurricane soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and on rises and knolls
* Lynn Haven soils, which are very poorly drained and
on flats
* Mandarin soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and in flatwoods
* Pottsburg, high, soils, which are somewhat poorly
drained and on rises and knolls
* Wesconnett soils, which are very poorly drained and
in depressions
Similar:
* Boulogne soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Pottsburg soil
* Leon soils, which are on landforms similar to those
of the Pottsburg soil

58-Pottsburg fine sand, high, 0 to 3
percent slopes

Composition
Pottsburg soil: 88 to 93 percent
Contrasting components: 7 to 12 percent


43





City of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida


* Soils that are on landforms similar to those of the
Pelham soil and have a black and very dark gray
surface layer that is more than 10 inches thick and that
has resulted from bedding practices
* Soils that have a weakly developed, dark organic
stained subsoil directly underneath the surface layer
and that are on landforms similar to those of the
Pelham soil


53-Penney fine sand, 0 to 5 percent
slopes
Composition
Penney soil and similar components: 87 to 100
percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 13 percent
Setting
Landform: Rises
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Excessively drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex
Size of areas: 3 to 120 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Blanton soils, which are moderately well drained and
on rises and knolls
* Hurricane soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and on rises and knolls
* Ortega soils, which are moderately well drained and
on rises and knolls
* Ridgewood soils, which are somewhat poorly
drained and on rises and knolls
Similar:
* Kershaw soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Penney soil

55-Pits
Composition
Pits and similar components: 99 percent
Contrasting components: 1 percent
Setting
Landform: Borrow pits
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained or poorly
drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 5 to 50 acres


Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Pits in depressions on similar landforms
* Areas of water
Similar:
* Pits on low flats on similar landforms


56-Pottsburg fine sand, 0 to 2 percent
slopes

Composition
Pottsburg soil and similar components: 88 to 93
percent
Contrasting components: 7 to 12 percent
Setting
Landform: Flatwoods
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 3 to 15 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Evergreen soils, which are very poorly drained and
in depressions
* Hurricane soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and on rises and knolls
* Lynn Haven soils, which are very poorly drained and
on flats
* Mandarin soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and in flatwoods
* Pottsburg, high, soils, which are somewhat poorly
drained and on rises and knolls
* Wesconnett soils, which are very poorly drained and
in depressions
Similar:
* Boulogne soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Pottsburg soil
* Leon soils, which are on landforms similar to those
of the Pottsburg soil

58-Pottsburg fine sand, high, 0 to 3
percent slopes

Composition
Pottsburg soil: 88 to 93 percent
Contrasting components: 7 to 12 percent


43





City of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida


* Soils that are on landforms similar to those of the
Pelham soil and have a black and very dark gray
surface layer that is more than 10 inches thick and that
has resulted from bedding practices
* Soils that have a weakly developed, dark organic
stained subsoil directly underneath the surface layer
and that are on landforms similar to those of the
Pelham soil


53-Penney fine sand, 0 to 5 percent
slopes
Composition
Penney soil and similar components: 87 to 100
percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 13 percent
Setting
Landform: Rises
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Excessively drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex
Size of areas: 3 to 120 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Blanton soils, which are moderately well drained and
on rises and knolls
* Hurricane soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and on rises and knolls
* Ortega soils, which are moderately well drained and
on rises and knolls
* Ridgewood soils, which are somewhat poorly
drained and on rises and knolls
Similar:
* Kershaw soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Penney soil

55-Pits
Composition
Pits and similar components: 99 percent
Contrasting components: 1 percent
Setting
Landform: Borrow pits
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained or poorly
drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 5 to 50 acres


Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Pits in depressions on similar landforms
* Areas of water
Similar:
* Pits on low flats on similar landforms


56-Pottsburg fine sand, 0 to 2 percent
slopes

Composition
Pottsburg soil and similar components: 88 to 93
percent
Contrasting components: 7 to 12 percent
Setting
Landform: Flatwoods
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 3 to 15 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Evergreen soils, which are very poorly drained and
in depressions
* Hurricane soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and on rises and knolls
* Lynn Haven soils, which are very poorly drained and
on flats
* Mandarin soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and in flatwoods
* Pottsburg, high, soils, which are somewhat poorly
drained and on rises and knolls
* Wesconnett soils, which are very poorly drained and
in depressions
Similar:
* Boulogne soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Pottsburg soil
* Leon soils, which are on landforms similar to those
of the Pottsburg soil

58-Pottsburg fine sand, high, 0 to 3
percent slopes

Composition
Pottsburg soil: 88 to 93 percent
Contrasting components: 7 to 12 percent


43





Soil Survey


Setting
Landform: Rises and knolls
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Somewhat poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex
Size of areas: 3 to 150 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Boulogne soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Hurricane soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Pottsburg, high, soil
* Leon soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Pottsburg soils that are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Ridgewood soils, which are on rises and knolls

62-Rutlege mucky fine sand, 0 to 2
percent slopes, frequently flooded

Composition
Rutlege soil and similar components: 85 to 100
percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Flood plains
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 3 to 100 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Boulogne soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Evergreen soils, which are poorly drained and in
depressions
* Lynn Haven soils, which are on flats
* Surrency soils, which are on flood plains
Similar:
* Soils that are covered by less that 8 inches of
organic material and are on landforms similar to those
of the Rutlege soil
* Soils that have a dark surface layer less than 10
inches thick and are on landforms similar to those of
the Rutlege soil


63-Sapelo fine sand, 0 to 2 percent
slopes
Composition
Sapelo soil and similar components: 85 to 95 percent
Contrasting components: 5 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Flatwoods
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 3 to 80 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Albany soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and are on rises and knolls
* Pelham soils, which are on flats
* Surrency soils, which are very poorly drained and in
depressions or on flood plains
* Yonges soils, which are on flats
Similar:
* Mascotte soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Sapelo soil

66-Surrency loamy fine sand,
depressional, 0 to 2 percent slopes

Composition
Surrency soil and similar components: 85 to 100
percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Depressions
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy sediments
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 3 to 80 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Lynn Haven soils, which are on flats
* Pamlico soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Surrency soil
* Pelham soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
* Stockade soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Surrency soil
* Yonges soils, which are poorly drained and on flats


44





Soil Survey


Setting
Landform: Rises and knolls
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Somewhat poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex
Size of areas: 3 to 150 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Boulogne soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Hurricane soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Pottsburg, high, soil
* Leon soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Pottsburg soils that are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Ridgewood soils, which are on rises and knolls

62-Rutlege mucky fine sand, 0 to 2
percent slopes, frequently flooded

Composition
Rutlege soil and similar components: 85 to 100
percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Flood plains
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 3 to 100 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Boulogne soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Evergreen soils, which are poorly drained and in
depressions
* Lynn Haven soils, which are on flats
* Surrency soils, which are on flood plains
Similar:
* Soils that are covered by less that 8 inches of
organic material and are on landforms similar to those
of the Rutlege soil
* Soils that have a dark surface layer less than 10
inches thick and are on landforms similar to those of
the Rutlege soil


63-Sapelo fine sand, 0 to 2 percent
slopes
Composition
Sapelo soil and similar components: 85 to 95 percent
Contrasting components: 5 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Flatwoods
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 3 to 80 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Albany soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and are on rises and knolls
* Pelham soils, which are on flats
* Surrency soils, which are very poorly drained and in
depressions or on flood plains
* Yonges soils, which are on flats
Similar:
* Mascotte soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Sapelo soil

66-Surrency loamy fine sand,
depressional, 0 to 2 percent slopes

Composition
Surrency soil and similar components: 85 to 100
percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Depressions
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy sediments
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 3 to 80 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Lynn Haven soils, which are on flats
* Pamlico soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Surrency soil
* Pelham soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
* Stockade soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Surrency soil
* Yonges soils, which are poorly drained and on flats


44





Soil Survey


Setting
Landform: Rises and knolls
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Somewhat poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex
Size of areas: 3 to 150 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Boulogne soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Hurricane soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Pottsburg, high, soil
* Leon soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Pottsburg soils that are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Ridgewood soils, which are on rises and knolls

62-Rutlege mucky fine sand, 0 to 2
percent slopes, frequently flooded

Composition
Rutlege soil and similar components: 85 to 100
percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Flood plains
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 3 to 100 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Boulogne soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Evergreen soils, which are poorly drained and in
depressions
* Lynn Haven soils, which are on flats
* Surrency soils, which are on flood plains
Similar:
* Soils that are covered by less that 8 inches of
organic material and are on landforms similar to those
of the Rutlege soil
* Soils that have a dark surface layer less than 10
inches thick and are on landforms similar to those of
the Rutlege soil


63-Sapelo fine sand, 0 to 2 percent
slopes
Composition
Sapelo soil and similar components: 85 to 95 percent
Contrasting components: 5 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Flatwoods
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 3 to 80 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Albany soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and are on rises and knolls
* Pelham soils, which are on flats
* Surrency soils, which are very poorly drained and in
depressions or on flood plains
* Yonges soils, which are on flats
Similar:
* Mascotte soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Sapelo soil

66-Surrency loamy fine sand,
depressional, 0 to 2 percent slopes

Composition
Surrency soil and similar components: 85 to 100
percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Depressions
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy sediments
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 3 to 80 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Lynn Haven soils, which are on flats
* Pamlico soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Surrency soil
* Pelham soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
* Stockade soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Surrency soil
* Yonges soils, which are poorly drained and on flats


44





City of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida


Similar:
* Pelham soils, which are poorly drained and in
depressions
* Soils that have a loamy subsoil within a depth of 20
inches and are on landforms similar to those of the
Surrency soil


67-Surrency loamy fine sand, 0 to 2
percent slopes, frequently flooded
Composition
Surrency soil and similar components: 86 to 97
percent
Contrasting components: 3 to 14 percent
Setting
Landform: Flood plains
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy sediments
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 3 to 100 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Lynn Haven soils, which are on flats
* Pamlico soils, which are organic and on landforms
similar to those of the Surrency soil
* Pelham soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
* Yonges soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
Similar:
* Soils that have less that 8 inches of organic material
on the surface and are on landforms similar to those of
the Surrency soil
* Soils that have a loamy subsoil at a depth of more
than 40 inches and are on landforms similar to those
of the Surrency soil
* Soils that have a sandy substratum within a depth of
60 inches and are on landforms similar to those of the
Surrency soil
* Soils that have a loamy subsoil that is 6 to 20 inches
thick and are on landforms similar to those of the
Surrency soil
* Soils that do not have a dark surface layer and are
on landforms similar to those of the Surrency soil


68-Tisonia mucky peat, 0 to 1 percent
slopes, very frequently flooded
Composition
Tisonia soil and similar components: 95 to 100 percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 5 percent


Setting
Landform: Tidal marshes (fig. 10)
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained
Parent material: Partly decomposed organic materials
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 10 to 1,000 acres or more
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Boulogne soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Leon soils that are tidal and in tidal marshes
* Maurepas soils, which are on flood plains
Similar:
* Soils that are on landforms similar to those of the
Tisonia soil and that have silty and clayey materials
containing considerable amounts of very fine sand in
some places


69-Urban land

Composition
Urban land and similar components: 90 to 100 percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 10 percent
Setting
Landform: Flats, flatwoods, rises, and knolls (fig. 11)
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Variable, depending on associated
soils
Parent material: Sandy and loamy sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 20 to 500 acres

Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Adjoining soils, which are mainly on contrasting
landforms
Similar:
* Arents, which are nearly level and on similar
landforms


71-Urban land-Leon-Boulogne complex,
0 to 2 percent slopes

Composition
Urban land and similar components: 35 to 40 percent
Leon soil and similar components: 30 to 35 percent


45





City of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida


Similar:
* Pelham soils, which are poorly drained and in
depressions
* Soils that have a loamy subsoil within a depth of 20
inches and are on landforms similar to those of the
Surrency soil


67-Surrency loamy fine sand, 0 to 2
percent slopes, frequently flooded
Composition
Surrency soil and similar components: 86 to 97
percent
Contrasting components: 3 to 14 percent
Setting
Landform: Flood plains
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy sediments
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 3 to 100 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Lynn Haven soils, which are on flats
* Pamlico soils, which are organic and on landforms
similar to those of the Surrency soil
* Pelham soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
* Yonges soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
Similar:
* Soils that have less that 8 inches of organic material
on the surface and are on landforms similar to those of
the Surrency soil
* Soils that have a loamy subsoil at a depth of more
than 40 inches and are on landforms similar to those
of the Surrency soil
* Soils that have a sandy substratum within a depth of
60 inches and are on landforms similar to those of the
Surrency soil
* Soils that have a loamy subsoil that is 6 to 20 inches
thick and are on landforms similar to those of the
Surrency soil
* Soils that do not have a dark surface layer and are
on landforms similar to those of the Surrency soil


68-Tisonia mucky peat, 0 to 1 percent
slopes, very frequently flooded
Composition
Tisonia soil and similar components: 95 to 100 percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 5 percent


Setting
Landform: Tidal marshes (fig. 10)
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained
Parent material: Partly decomposed organic materials
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 10 to 1,000 acres or more
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Boulogne soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Leon soils that are tidal and in tidal marshes
* Maurepas soils, which are on flood plains
Similar:
* Soils that are on landforms similar to those of the
Tisonia soil and that have silty and clayey materials
containing considerable amounts of very fine sand in
some places


69-Urban land

Composition
Urban land and similar components: 90 to 100 percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 10 percent
Setting
Landform: Flats, flatwoods, rises, and knolls (fig. 11)
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Variable, depending on associated
soils
Parent material: Sandy and loamy sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 20 to 500 acres

Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Adjoining soils, which are mainly on contrasting
landforms
Similar:
* Arents, which are nearly level and on similar
landforms


71-Urban land-Leon-Boulogne complex,
0 to 2 percent slopes

Composition
Urban land and similar components: 35 to 40 percent
Leon soil and similar components: 30 to 35 percent


45





City of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida


Similar:
* Pelham soils, which are poorly drained and in
depressions
* Soils that have a loamy subsoil within a depth of 20
inches and are on landforms similar to those of the
Surrency soil


67-Surrency loamy fine sand, 0 to 2
percent slopes, frequently flooded
Composition
Surrency soil and similar components: 86 to 97
percent
Contrasting components: 3 to 14 percent
Setting
Landform: Flood plains
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy sediments
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 3 to 100 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Lynn Haven soils, which are on flats
* Pamlico soils, which are organic and on landforms
similar to those of the Surrency soil
* Pelham soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
* Yonges soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
Similar:
* Soils that have less that 8 inches of organic material
on the surface and are on landforms similar to those of
the Surrency soil
* Soils that have a loamy subsoil at a depth of more
than 40 inches and are on landforms similar to those
of the Surrency soil
* Soils that have a sandy substratum within a depth of
60 inches and are on landforms similar to those of the
Surrency soil
* Soils that have a loamy subsoil that is 6 to 20 inches
thick and are on landforms similar to those of the
Surrency soil
* Soils that do not have a dark surface layer and are
on landforms similar to those of the Surrency soil


68-Tisonia mucky peat, 0 to 1 percent
slopes, very frequently flooded
Composition
Tisonia soil and similar components: 95 to 100 percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 5 percent


Setting
Landform: Tidal marshes (fig. 10)
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained
Parent material: Partly decomposed organic materials
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 10 to 1,000 acres or more
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Boulogne soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Leon soils that are tidal and in tidal marshes
* Maurepas soils, which are on flood plains
Similar:
* Soils that are on landforms similar to those of the
Tisonia soil and that have silty and clayey materials
containing considerable amounts of very fine sand in
some places


69-Urban land

Composition
Urban land and similar components: 90 to 100 percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 10 percent
Setting
Landform: Flats, flatwoods, rises, and knolls (fig. 11)
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Variable, depending on associated
soils
Parent material: Sandy and loamy sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 20 to 500 acres

Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Adjoining soils, which are mainly on contrasting
landforms
Similar:
* Arents, which are nearly level and on similar
landforms


71-Urban land-Leon-Boulogne complex,
0 to 2 percent slopes

Composition
Urban land and similar components: 35 to 40 percent
Leon soil and similar components: 30 to 35 percent


45





City of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida


Similar:
* Pelham soils, which are poorly drained and in
depressions
* Soils that have a loamy subsoil within a depth of 20
inches and are on landforms similar to those of the
Surrency soil


67-Surrency loamy fine sand, 0 to 2
percent slopes, frequently flooded
Composition
Surrency soil and similar components: 86 to 97
percent
Contrasting components: 3 to 14 percent
Setting
Landform: Flood plains
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy sediments
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 3 to 100 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Lynn Haven soils, which are on flats
* Pamlico soils, which are organic and on landforms
similar to those of the Surrency soil
* Pelham soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
* Yonges soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
Similar:
* Soils that have less that 8 inches of organic material
on the surface and are on landforms similar to those of
the Surrency soil
* Soils that have a loamy subsoil at a depth of more
than 40 inches and are on landforms similar to those
of the Surrency soil
* Soils that have a sandy substratum within a depth of
60 inches and are on landforms similar to those of the
Surrency soil
* Soils that have a loamy subsoil that is 6 to 20 inches
thick and are on landforms similar to those of the
Surrency soil
* Soils that do not have a dark surface layer and are
on landforms similar to those of the Surrency soil


68-Tisonia mucky peat, 0 to 1 percent
slopes, very frequently flooded
Composition
Tisonia soil and similar components: 95 to 100 percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 5 percent


Setting
Landform: Tidal marshes (fig. 10)
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained
Parent material: Partly decomposed organic materials
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 10 to 1,000 acres or more
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Boulogne soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Leon soils that are tidal and in tidal marshes
* Maurepas soils, which are on flood plains
Similar:
* Soils that are on landforms similar to those of the
Tisonia soil and that have silty and clayey materials
containing considerable amounts of very fine sand in
some places


69-Urban land

Composition
Urban land and similar components: 90 to 100 percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 10 percent
Setting
Landform: Flats, flatwoods, rises, and knolls (fig. 11)
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Variable, depending on associated
soils
Parent material: Sandy and loamy sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 20 to 500 acres

Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Adjoining soils, which are mainly on contrasting
landforms
Similar:
* Arents, which are nearly level and on similar
landforms


71-Urban land-Leon-Boulogne complex,
0 to 2 percent slopes

Composition
Urban land and similar components: 35 to 40 percent
Leon soil and similar components: 30 to 35 percent


45





Soil Survey


Figure 10.-A landscape ofTisonia mucky peat, 0 to 1 percent slopes, very frequently flooded. An area of Leon fine sand, 0 to 2
percent slopes, very frequently flooded, is in the background. Tidal flats at low tide are in the foreground.


Boulogne soil and similar components: 20 to 25
percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Flatwoods
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 10 to 500 acres or more
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Evergreen soils, which are very poorly drained and
in depressions
* Lynn Haven soils, which are very poorly drained and
on flats
* Pottsburg, high, soils, which are somewhat poorly
drained and on rises and knolls


* Rutlege soils, which are very poorly drained and on
flood plains
* Wesconnett soils, which are very poorly drained and
in depressions
Similar:
* Arents, which are nearly level and on landforms
similar to those of the major components
* Pottsburg soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the major components

72-Urban land-Ortega-Kershaw complex,
0 to 8 percent slopes

Composition
Urban land and similar components: 35 to 40 percent
Ortega soil and similar components: 30 to 35 percent
Kershaw soil and similar components: 20 to 25 percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 15 percent





City of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida


Setting

Landform: Elevated, narrow to broad rises and knolls
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Moderately well drained to
excessively drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy sediments
Shape of areas: Elongated or irregularly oval
Size of areas: 20 to 500 acres or more

Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Hurricane soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and on rises and knolls
* Ridgewood soils, which are somewhat poorly
drained and on rises and knolls


Similar:
* Kureb soils, which are on landforms similar to those
of the major components
* Penney soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the major components


73-Urban land-Mascotte-Sapelo
complex, 0 to 2 percent slopes

Composition
Urban land and similar components: 35 to 40 percent
Mascotte soil and similar components: 30 to 35
percent
Sapelo soil and similar components: 20 to 25 percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 15 percent


Figure 11.-The intersection of Interstate Highways 10 and 95 in an area of Urban land. The Pelham-Mascotte/Sapelo-Surrency
general soil map unit is in the background.


47





Soil Survey


Setting
Landform: Flatwoods
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 10 to 500 acres or more

Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Albany soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and on rises and knolls
* Pelham soils, which are on flats
* Surrency soils, which are very poorly drained and
are in depressions and on flood plains
Similar:
* Arents, which are nearly level and on landforms
similar to those of the major components


74-Pelham-Urban land complex, 0 to 2
percent slopes

Composition
Pelham soil and similar components: 50 to 60 percent
Urban land and similar components: 35 to 40 percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Flats
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 10 to 500 acres or more

Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Albany soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and on rises and knolls
* Mascotte soils, which are in flatwoods
* Sapelo soils, which are in flatwoods
* Surrency soils, which are very poorly drained and in
depressions and on flood plains
Similar:
* Soils that have a loamy subsoil below a depth of 40
inches and are on landforms similar to those of the
major components
* Arents, which are nearly level and on landforms
similar to those of the major components


75-Urban land-Hurricane-Albany
complex, 0 to 5 percent slopes

Composition
Urban land and similar components: 35 to 40 percent
Hurricane soil and similar components: 30 to 35
percent
Albany soil and similar components: 20 to 25 percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Rises and knolls
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Somewhat poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 10 to 200 acres or more
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Blanton soils, which are moderately well drained and
on landforms similar to those of the major components
* Leon soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
* Lynn Haven soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Mascotte soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Ortega soils, which are moderately well drained and
on landforms similar to those of the major components
* Pottsburg soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Soils that are similar to Pottsburg soils, do not have
a deep, dark organic stained subsoil, and are on
landforms similar to those of the major components
* Ridgewood soils that are on landforms similar to
those of the major components
* Rutlege soils, which are very poorly drained and on
flood plains
* Sapelo soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
Similar:
* Pottsburg, high, soils, which are on landforms similar
to those of the major components
* Arents, which are nearly level and on landforms
similar to those of the major components

78-Yonges fine sandy loam, 0 to 2
percent slopes
Composition
Yonges soil and similar components: 85 to 89 percent
Contrasting components: 11 to 15 percent





Soil Survey


Setting
Landform: Flatwoods
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 10 to 500 acres or more

Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Albany soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and on rises and knolls
* Pelham soils, which are on flats
* Surrency soils, which are very poorly drained and
are in depressions and on flood plains
Similar:
* Arents, which are nearly level and on landforms
similar to those of the major components


74-Pelham-Urban land complex, 0 to 2
percent slopes

Composition
Pelham soil and similar components: 50 to 60 percent
Urban land and similar components: 35 to 40 percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Flats
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 10 to 500 acres or more

Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Albany soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and on rises and knolls
* Mascotte soils, which are in flatwoods
* Sapelo soils, which are in flatwoods
* Surrency soils, which are very poorly drained and in
depressions and on flood plains
Similar:
* Soils that have a loamy subsoil below a depth of 40
inches and are on landforms similar to those of the
major components
* Arents, which are nearly level and on landforms
similar to those of the major components


75-Urban land-Hurricane-Albany
complex, 0 to 5 percent slopes

Composition
Urban land and similar components: 35 to 40 percent
Hurricane soil and similar components: 30 to 35
percent
Albany soil and similar components: 20 to 25 percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Rises and knolls
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Somewhat poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 10 to 200 acres or more
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Blanton soils, which are moderately well drained and
on landforms similar to those of the major components
* Leon soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
* Lynn Haven soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Mascotte soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Ortega soils, which are moderately well drained and
on landforms similar to those of the major components
* Pottsburg soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Soils that are similar to Pottsburg soils, do not have
a deep, dark organic stained subsoil, and are on
landforms similar to those of the major components
* Ridgewood soils that are on landforms similar to
those of the major components
* Rutlege soils, which are very poorly drained and on
flood plains
* Sapelo soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
Similar:
* Pottsburg, high, soils, which are on landforms similar
to those of the major components
* Arents, which are nearly level and on landforms
similar to those of the major components

78-Yonges fine sandy loam, 0 to 2
percent slopes
Composition
Yonges soil and similar components: 85 to 89 percent
Contrasting components: 11 to 15 percent





Soil Survey


Setting
Landform: Flatwoods
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 10 to 500 acres or more

Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Albany soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and on rises and knolls
* Pelham soils, which are on flats
* Surrency soils, which are very poorly drained and
are in depressions and on flood plains
Similar:
* Arents, which are nearly level and on landforms
similar to those of the major components


74-Pelham-Urban land complex, 0 to 2
percent slopes

Composition
Pelham soil and similar components: 50 to 60 percent
Urban land and similar components: 35 to 40 percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Flats
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 10 to 500 acres or more

Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Albany soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and on rises and knolls
* Mascotte soils, which are in flatwoods
* Sapelo soils, which are in flatwoods
* Surrency soils, which are very poorly drained and in
depressions and on flood plains
Similar:
* Soils that have a loamy subsoil below a depth of 40
inches and are on landforms similar to those of the
major components
* Arents, which are nearly level and on landforms
similar to those of the major components


75-Urban land-Hurricane-Albany
complex, 0 to 5 percent slopes

Composition
Urban land and similar components: 35 to 40 percent
Hurricane soil and similar components: 30 to 35
percent
Albany soil and similar components: 20 to 25 percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Rises and knolls
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Somewhat poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 10 to 200 acres or more
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Blanton soils, which are moderately well drained and
on landforms similar to those of the major components
* Leon soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
* Lynn Haven soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Mascotte soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Ortega soils, which are moderately well drained and
on landforms similar to those of the major components
* Pottsburg soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Soils that are similar to Pottsburg soils, do not have
a deep, dark organic stained subsoil, and are on
landforms similar to those of the major components
* Ridgewood soils that are on landforms similar to
those of the major components
* Rutlege soils, which are very poorly drained and on
flood plains
* Sapelo soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
Similar:
* Pottsburg, high, soils, which are on landforms similar
to those of the major components
* Arents, which are nearly level and on landforms
similar to those of the major components

78-Yonges fine sandy loam, 0 to 2
percent slopes
Composition
Yonges soil and similar components: 85 to 89 percent
Contrasting components: 11 to 15 percent





City of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida


Setting
Landform: Flats
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Poorly drained
Parent material: Loamy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 3 to 350 acres

Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Lynchburg soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and on rises and knolls
* Pelham soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Yonges soil
* Yulee soils, which are very poorly drained and in
depressions and on flood plains
Similar:
* Soils that are sandy clay in the upper part of the
subsoil and are on landforms similar to those of the
Yonges soil


79-Yulee clay, 0 to 2 percent slopes,
frequently flooded

Composition
Yulee soil and similar components: 89 to 99 percent
Contrasting components: 1 to 11 percent

Setting
Landform: Flood plains
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained
Parent material: Loamy and clayey sediments
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 50 to 500 acres

Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Surrency soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Yulee soil
* Yonges soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
Similar:
* Soils that have less than 8 inches of organic material
on the surface and are on landforms similar to those of
the Yulee soil
* Soils that have a subsoil of sandy clay loam and are
on landforms similar to those of the Yulee soil


80-Goldhead, wet, and Lynn Haven soils,
2 to 5 percent slopes

Composition
Goldhead soil and similar components: 50 to 55
percent
Lynn Haven soil and similar components: 35 to 45
percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Seep areas on side slopes
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Goldhead-poorly drained; Lynn
Haven-very poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy sediments
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 3 to 75 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Albany soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and on rises and knolls
* Boulogne soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Mascotte soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Sapelo soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Surrency soils, which are very poorly drained and on
flood plains
Similar:
* Soils that have a loamy subsoil below a depth of 40
inches and are on landforms similar to those of the
Goldhead soil

81-Stockade fine sandy loam,
depressional, 0 to 2 percent slopes

Composition
Stockade soil and similar components: 86 to 97
percent
Contrasting components: 3 to 14 percent
Setting
Landform: Depressions
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy sediments


49





City of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida


Setting
Landform: Flats
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Poorly drained
Parent material: Loamy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 3 to 350 acres

Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Lynchburg soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and on rises and knolls
* Pelham soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Yonges soil
* Yulee soils, which are very poorly drained and in
depressions and on flood plains
Similar:
* Soils that are sandy clay in the upper part of the
subsoil and are on landforms similar to those of the
Yonges soil


79-Yulee clay, 0 to 2 percent slopes,
frequently flooded

Composition
Yulee soil and similar components: 89 to 99 percent
Contrasting components: 1 to 11 percent

Setting
Landform: Flood plains
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained
Parent material: Loamy and clayey sediments
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 50 to 500 acres

Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Surrency soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Yulee soil
* Yonges soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
Similar:
* Soils that have less than 8 inches of organic material
on the surface and are on landforms similar to those of
the Yulee soil
* Soils that have a subsoil of sandy clay loam and are
on landforms similar to those of the Yulee soil


80-Goldhead, wet, and Lynn Haven soils,
2 to 5 percent slopes

Composition
Goldhead soil and similar components: 50 to 55
percent
Lynn Haven soil and similar components: 35 to 45
percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Seep areas on side slopes
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Goldhead-poorly drained; Lynn
Haven-very poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy sediments
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 3 to 75 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Albany soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and on rises and knolls
* Boulogne soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Mascotte soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Sapelo soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Surrency soils, which are very poorly drained and on
flood plains
Similar:
* Soils that have a loamy subsoil below a depth of 40
inches and are on landforms similar to those of the
Goldhead soil

81-Stockade fine sandy loam,
depressional, 0 to 2 percent slopes

Composition
Stockade soil and similar components: 86 to 97
percent
Contrasting components: 3 to 14 percent
Setting
Landform: Depressions
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy sediments


49





City of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida


Setting
Landform: Flats
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Poorly drained
Parent material: Loamy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Linear
Size of areas: 3 to 350 acres

Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Lynchburg soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and on rises and knolls
* Pelham soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Yonges soil
* Yulee soils, which are very poorly drained and in
depressions and on flood plains
Similar:
* Soils that are sandy clay in the upper part of the
subsoil and are on landforms similar to those of the
Yonges soil


79-Yulee clay, 0 to 2 percent slopes,
frequently flooded

Composition
Yulee soil and similar components: 89 to 99 percent
Contrasting components: 1 to 11 percent

Setting
Landform: Flood plains
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained
Parent material: Loamy and clayey sediments
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 50 to 500 acres

Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Surrency soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Yulee soil
* Yonges soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
Similar:
* Soils that have less than 8 inches of organic material
on the surface and are on landforms similar to those of
the Yulee soil
* Soils that have a subsoil of sandy clay loam and are
on landforms similar to those of the Yulee soil


80-Goldhead, wet, and Lynn Haven soils,
2 to 5 percent slopes

Composition
Goldhead soil and similar components: 50 to 55
percent
Lynn Haven soil and similar components: 35 to 45
percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Seep areas on side slopes
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Goldhead-poorly drained; Lynn
Haven-very poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy sediments
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 3 to 75 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Albany soils, which are somewhat poorly drained
and on rises and knolls
* Boulogne soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Mascotte soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Sapelo soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Surrency soils, which are very poorly drained and on
flood plains
Similar:
* Soils that have a loamy subsoil below a depth of 40
inches and are on landforms similar to those of the
Goldhead soil

81-Stockade fine sandy loam,
depressional, 0 to 2 percent slopes

Composition
Stockade soil and similar components: 86 to 97
percent
Contrasting components: 3 to 14 percent
Setting
Landform: Depressions
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy sediments


49





Soil Survey


Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 3 to 100 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Lynn Haven soils, which are on flats
* Pelham soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
* Yonges soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
* Yulee soils, which are on landforms similar to those
of the Stockade soil
Similar:
* Soils that have less than 8 inches of organic material
on the surface and are on landforms similar to those of
the Stockade soil

82-Pelham fine sand, depressional, 0 to
2 percent slopes

Composition
Pelham soil and similar components: 90 to 96 percent
Contrasting components: 4 to 10 percent
Setting
Landform: Depressions
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy sediments
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 3 to 150 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Pelham soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
* Yonges soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
Similar:
* Soils that have less than 8 inches of organic material
on the surface and are on landforms similar to those of
the Pelham soil
* Surrency soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Pelham soil

86-Yulee clay, depressional, 0 to 2
percent slopes
Composition
Yulee soil and similar components: 85 to 100 percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Depressions


Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained
Parent material: Loamy and clayey sediments
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 3 to 25 acres

Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Pelham soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
* Stockade soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Yulee soil
* Yonges soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
Similar:
* Soils that have a subsoil that extends to a depth of
more than 60 inches and that are on landforms similar
to those of the Yulee soil
* Soils that have organic material less than 8 inches
thick and are on landforms similar to those of the Yulee
soil


87-Dorovan muck, depressional, 0 to 2
percent slopes

Composition
Dorovan soil and similar components: 85 to 97 percent
Contrasting components: 3 to 15 percent

Setting
Landform: Depressions
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained
Parent material: Decomposed organic materials
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 3 to 100 acres

Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Evergreen soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Dorovan soil
* Lynn Haven soils, which are on flats
* Surrency soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Dorovan soil
* Wesconnett soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Dorovan soil

Similar:
* Pamlico soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Dorovan soil


50





Soil Survey


Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 3 to 100 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Lynn Haven soils, which are on flats
* Pelham soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
* Yonges soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
* Yulee soils, which are on landforms similar to those
of the Stockade soil
Similar:
* Soils that have less than 8 inches of organic material
on the surface and are on landforms similar to those of
the Stockade soil

82-Pelham fine sand, depressional, 0 to
2 percent slopes

Composition
Pelham soil and similar components: 90 to 96 percent
Contrasting components: 4 to 10 percent
Setting
Landform: Depressions
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy sediments
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 3 to 150 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Pelham soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
* Yonges soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
Similar:
* Soils that have less than 8 inches of organic material
on the surface and are on landforms similar to those of
the Pelham soil
* Surrency soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Pelham soil

86-Yulee clay, depressional, 0 to 2
percent slopes
Composition
Yulee soil and similar components: 85 to 100 percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Depressions


Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained
Parent material: Loamy and clayey sediments
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 3 to 25 acres

Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Pelham soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
* Stockade soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Yulee soil
* Yonges soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
Similar:
* Soils that have a subsoil that extends to a depth of
more than 60 inches and that are on landforms similar
to those of the Yulee soil
* Soils that have organic material less than 8 inches
thick and are on landforms similar to those of the Yulee
soil


87-Dorovan muck, depressional, 0 to 2
percent slopes

Composition
Dorovan soil and similar components: 85 to 97 percent
Contrasting components: 3 to 15 percent

Setting
Landform: Depressions
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained
Parent material: Decomposed organic materials
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 3 to 100 acres

Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Evergreen soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Dorovan soil
* Lynn Haven soils, which are on flats
* Surrency soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Dorovan soil
* Wesconnett soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Dorovan soil

Similar:
* Pamlico soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Dorovan soil


50





Soil Survey


Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 3 to 100 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Lynn Haven soils, which are on flats
* Pelham soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
* Yonges soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
* Yulee soils, which are on landforms similar to those
of the Stockade soil
Similar:
* Soils that have less than 8 inches of organic material
on the surface and are on landforms similar to those of
the Stockade soil

82-Pelham fine sand, depressional, 0 to
2 percent slopes

Composition
Pelham soil and similar components: 90 to 96 percent
Contrasting components: 4 to 10 percent
Setting
Landform: Depressions
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained
Parent material: Sandy and loamy sediments
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 3 to 150 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Pelham soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
* Yonges soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
Similar:
* Soils that have less than 8 inches of organic material
on the surface and are on landforms similar to those of
the Pelham soil
* Surrency soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Pelham soil

86-Yulee clay, depressional, 0 to 2
percent slopes
Composition
Yulee soil and similar components: 85 to 100 percent
Contrasting components: 0 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Depressions


Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained
Parent material: Loamy and clayey sediments
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 3 to 25 acres

Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Pelham soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
* Stockade soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Yulee soil
* Yonges soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
Similar:
* Soils that have a subsoil that extends to a depth of
more than 60 inches and that are on landforms similar
to those of the Yulee soil
* Soils that have organic material less than 8 inches
thick and are on landforms similar to those of the Yulee
soil


87-Dorovan muck, depressional, 0 to 2
percent slopes

Composition
Dorovan soil and similar components: 85 to 97 percent
Contrasting components: 3 to 15 percent

Setting
Landform: Depressions
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Very poorly drained
Parent material: Decomposed organic materials
Shape of areas: Concave
Size of areas: 3 to 100 acres

Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Evergreen soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Dorovan soil
* Lynn Haven soils, which are on flats
* Surrency soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Dorovan soil
* Wesconnett soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Dorovan soil

Similar:
* Pamlico soils, which are on landforms similar to
those of the Dorovan soil


50





City of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida


88-Lynchburg fine sand, 0 to 2 percent
slopes

Composition
Lynchburg soil: 85 to 97 percent
Contrasting components: 3 to 15 percent
Setting
Landform: Rises and knolls
Landscape: Lower Coastal Plain
Natural drainage: Somewhat poorly drained


Parent material: Sandy and loamy marine sediments
Shape of areas: Convex
Size of areas: 3 to 60 acres
Minor Components
Contrasting:
* Mascotte soils, which are poorly drained and in
flatwoods
* Pelham soils, which are poorly drained and on flats
* Surrency soils, which are very poorly drained and in
depressions and on flood plains
* Yonges soils, which are poorly drained and on flats


51
















Use and Management of the Soils


This soil survey is an inventory and evaluation of
the soils in the survey area. It can be used to adjust
land uses to the limitations and potentials of natural
resources and the environment. Also, it can help to
prevent soil-related failures in land uses.
In preparing a soil survey, soil scientists,
conservationists, engineers, and others collect
extensive field data about the nature and behavioral
characteristics of the soils. They collect data on
erosion, droughtiness, flooding, and other factors that
affect various soil uses and management. Field
experience and collected data on soil properties and
performance are used as a basis for predicting soil
behavior.
Information in this section can be used to plan the
use and management of soils for crops and pasture;
as woodland; as sites for buildings, sanitary facilities,
highways and other transportation systems, and parks
and other recreational facilities; and for wildlife habitat.
It can be used to identify the potentials and limitations
of each soil for specific land uses and to help prevent
construction failures caused by unfavorable soil
properties.
Planners and others using soil survey information
can evaluate the effect of specific land uses on
productivity and on the environment in all or part of the
survey area. The survey can help planners to maintain
or create a land use pattern in harmony with the
natural soil.
Contractors can use this survey to locate sources
of sand and gravel, roadfill, and topsoil. They can use
it to identify areas where bedrock, wetness, or very
firm soil layers can cause difficulty in excavation.
Health officials, highway officials, engineers, and
others may also find this survey useful. The survey
can help them plan the safe disposal of wastes and
locate sites for pavements, sidewalks, campgrounds,
playgrounds, lawns, and trees and shrubs.

Crops and Pasture
Allen L. Moore, district conservationist, and E. Norman Porter,
resource conservationist, Natural Resources Conservation
Service, helped prepare this section.
General management needed for crops and pasture


is suggested in this section. The crops or pasture
plants best suited to the soils are identified, the
system of land capability classification used by the
Natural Resources Conservation Service is explained,
the estimated yields of the main crops and hay and
pasture plants are listed for each soil, and prime
farmland is described.
Planners of management systems for individual
fields or farms should consider the detailed
information given in the description of each soil under
the heading "Detailed Soil Map Units" and in the
tables. Specific information can be obtained from the
local office of the Natural Resources Conservation
Service or the Cooperative Extension Service.
Federal and State regulations require that any area
designated as wetlands cannot be altered without prior
approval. Contact the local office of the Natural
Resources Conservation Service for identification of
hydric soils and potential wetlands.
More than 18,326 acres in Duval County is used for
crops and pasture. About 5,270 acres is used for
permanent pasture, and more than 13,056 acres is
used for crops such as corn and grain sorghum. The
acreage of crops and pasture has been gradually
decreasing as more and more land is used for urban
development.
Soil erosion is not a major problem on the cropland
and pastureland in the county. Soil blowing can be a
hazard on the better drained sandy soils and on the
more poorly drained sandy soils that have been
artificially drained. It can damage crops in a few hours
if the wind is strong and the soil is dry and bare of
vegetation or surface mulch. Soil blowing can be
reduced by maintaining a vegetative cover or surface
mulch; by planting windbreaks of adapted plant
species, such as pine, red cedar, and myrtle; and by
planting properly spaced, temporary strips of seasonal
small grain at a right angle to the damaging wind.
Soil drainage is a major management concern on
most of the acreage used for crops and pasture in the
county. It is a problem on the poorly drained Boulogne,
Leon, Pelham, Mascotte, Pottsburg, Sapelo, and
Yonges soils. Albany, Blanton, Cornelia, Hurricane,
Kershaw, Kureb, Mandarin, Ortega, and Ridgewood
soils have good natural drainage and tend to dry out
















Use and Management of the Soils


This soil survey is an inventory and evaluation of
the soils in the survey area. It can be used to adjust
land uses to the limitations and potentials of natural
resources and the environment. Also, it can help to
prevent soil-related failures in land uses.
In preparing a soil survey, soil scientists,
conservationists, engineers, and others collect
extensive field data about the nature and behavioral
characteristics of the soils. They collect data on
erosion, droughtiness, flooding, and other factors that
affect various soil uses and management. Field
experience and collected data on soil properties and
performance are used as a basis for predicting soil
behavior.
Information in this section can be used to plan the
use and management of soils for crops and pasture;
as woodland; as sites for buildings, sanitary facilities,
highways and other transportation systems, and parks
and other recreational facilities; and for wildlife habitat.
It can be used to identify the potentials and limitations
of each soil for specific land uses and to help prevent
construction failures caused by unfavorable soil
properties.
Planners and others using soil survey information
can evaluate the effect of specific land uses on
productivity and on the environment in all or part of the
survey area. The survey can help planners to maintain
or create a land use pattern in harmony with the
natural soil.
Contractors can use this survey to locate sources
of sand and gravel, roadfill, and topsoil. They can use
it to identify areas where bedrock, wetness, or very
firm soil layers can cause difficulty in excavation.
Health officials, highway officials, engineers, and
others may also find this survey useful. The survey
can help them plan the safe disposal of wastes and
locate sites for pavements, sidewalks, campgrounds,
playgrounds, lawns, and trees and shrubs.

Crops and Pasture
Allen L. Moore, district conservationist, and E. Norman Porter,
resource conservationist, Natural Resources Conservation
Service, helped prepare this section.
General management needed for crops and pasture


is suggested in this section. The crops or pasture
plants best suited to the soils are identified, the
system of land capability classification used by the
Natural Resources Conservation Service is explained,
the estimated yields of the main crops and hay and
pasture plants are listed for each soil, and prime
farmland is described.
Planners of management systems for individual
fields or farms should consider the detailed
information given in the description of each soil under
the heading "Detailed Soil Map Units" and in the
tables. Specific information can be obtained from the
local office of the Natural Resources Conservation
Service or the Cooperative Extension Service.
Federal and State regulations require that any area
designated as wetlands cannot be altered without prior
approval. Contact the local office of the Natural
Resources Conservation Service for identification of
hydric soils and potential wetlands.
More than 18,326 acres in Duval County is used for
crops and pasture. About 5,270 acres is used for
permanent pasture, and more than 13,056 acres is
used for crops such as corn and grain sorghum. The
acreage of crops and pasture has been gradually
decreasing as more and more land is used for urban
development.
Soil erosion is not a major problem on the cropland
and pastureland in the county. Soil blowing can be a
hazard on the better drained sandy soils and on the
more poorly drained sandy soils that have been
artificially drained. It can damage crops in a few hours
if the wind is strong and the soil is dry and bare of
vegetation or surface mulch. Soil blowing can be
reduced by maintaining a vegetative cover or surface
mulch; by planting windbreaks of adapted plant
species, such as pine, red cedar, and myrtle; and by
planting properly spaced, temporary strips of seasonal
small grain at a right angle to the damaging wind.
Soil drainage is a major management concern on
most of the acreage used for crops and pasture in the
county. It is a problem on the poorly drained Boulogne,
Leon, Pelham, Mascotte, Pottsburg, Sapelo, and
Yonges soils. Albany, Blanton, Cornelia, Hurricane,
Kershaw, Kureb, Mandarin, Ortega, and Ridgewood
soils have good natural drainage and tend to dry out






Soil Survey


quickly after rains. Irrigation is needed for crop
production on these soils during periods of low rainfall.
Soil fertility is naturally low in most soils in the
county. Most of the soils are naturally acid. The
addition of lime and fertilizer should be based on the
results of soil tests, on the needs of the crop, and on
the expected level of yields. The Cooperative
Extension Service can help in determining the kind
and amount of fertilizer and lime to apply.
Field crops grown in the county include corn and
grain sorghum, which are used as feed for dairy cattle.
The latest information about specialty crops can be
obtained at the local office of the Natural Resources
Conservation Service or the Cooperative Extension
Service.
Most of the farm income in the county is derived
from livestock enterprises, mainly dairy farms. On
most dairies the forage produced is supplemented by
corn or grain sorghum silage.
The main pasture plants in the county are improved
bermudagrass and bahiagrass. Excess grass is
harvested as hay and is either sold or is used as
winter feed for livestock. Millet, sorghum, and
sudangrass hybrids are grown during the summer for
green chop or are used for grazing.
In areas of similar climate and topography,
differences in the kind and amount of forage that the
pasture can produce are closely related to the kind of
soil. Pasture management is based on the relationship
among soils, pasture plants, lime and fertilizer, and
grazing systems. Yields can be increased by adding
lime and fertilizer and by including grass-legume
mixtures in the cropping system.
Yields per Acre
The average yields per acre that can be expected
of the principal crops under a high level of
management are shown in table 6. In any given year,
yields may be higher or lower than those indicated in
the table because of variations in rainfall and other
climatic factors. The land capability classification of
each map unit also is shown in the table.
The yields are based mainly on the experience and
records of farmers, conservationists, and extension
agents. Available yield data from nearby counties and
results of field trials and demonstrations are also
considered.
The management needed to obtain the indicated
yields of the various crops depends on the kind of soil
and the crop. Management can include drainage,
erosion control, and protection from flooding; the
proper planting and seeding rates; suitable high-
yielding crop varieties; appropriate and timely tillage;


control of weeds, plant diseases, and harmful insects;
favorable soil reaction and optimum levels of nitrogen,
phosphorus, potassium, and trace elements for each
crop; effective use of crop residue, barnyard manure,
and green manure crops; and harvesting that ensures
the smallest possible loss.
A high level of management includes maintaining
proper soil reaction and fertility levels as indicated by
standard soil tests. The application rate of nitrogen for
corn on soils that have a yield potential of 125 to 150
bushels per acre should be 140 to 160 pounds per
acre. If the yield potential for corn is 100 bushels per
acre or less, a rate of 100 to 120 pounds of nitrogen
per acre should be used. The application of nitrogen in
excess of that required for potential yields generally is
not recommended. The excess nitrogen fertilizer that
is not utilized by the crop is an unnecessary expense
and causes a hazard of water pollution. If corn or
cotton is grown after the harvest of soybeans or
peanuts, nitrogen rates can be reduced by about 20 to
30 pounds per acre. Because nitrogen can be readily
leached from sandy soils, applications may be needed
on these soils more than once during the growing
season.
The estimated yields reflect the productive capacity
of each soil for each of the principal crops. Yields are
likely to increase as new production technology is
developed. The productivity of a given soil compared
with that of other soils, however, is not likely to
change.
Crops other than those shown in table 6 are grown
in the survey area, but estimated yields are not listed
because the acreage of such crops is small. The local
office of the Natural Resources Conservation Service
or of the Cooperative Extension Service can provide
information about the management and productivity of
the soils for those crops.
Land Capability Classification
Land capability classification shows, in a general
way, the suitability of soils for most kinds of field crops.
Crops that require special management are excluded.
The soils are grouped according to their limitations for
field crops, the risk of damage if they are used for
crops, and the way they respond to management. The
criteria used in grouping the soils do not include major
and generally expensive landforming that would
change slope, depth, or other characteristics of the
soils, nor do they include possible but unlikely major
reclamation projects. Capability classification is not a
substitute for interpretations designed to show
suitability and limitations of groups of soils for
woodland and for engineering purposes.


54





City of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida


In the capability system, soils are generally grouped
at three levels-capability class, subclass, and unit
(44). Only class and subclass are used in this survey.
Capability classes, the broadest groups, are
designated by numerals I through VIII. The numerals
indicate progressively greater limitations and narrower
choices for practical use. The classes are defined as
follows:
Class I soils have few limitations that restrict their
use.
Class II soils have moderate limitations that reduce
the choice of plants or that require moderate
conservation practices.
Class III soils have severe limitations that reduce
the choice of plants or that require special
conservation practices, or both.
Class IV soils have very severe limitations that
reduce the choice of plants or that require very careful
management, or both.
Class V soils are not likely to erode but have other
limitations, impractical to remove, that limit their use.
Class VI soils have severe limitations that make
them generally unsuitable for cultivation.
Class VII soils have very severe limitations that
make them unsuitable for cultivation.
Class VIII soils and miscellaneous areas have
limitations that nearly preclude their use for
commercial crop production.
Capability subclasses are soil groups within one
class. They are designated by adding a small letter, e,
w, s, or c, to the class numeral, for example, lie. The
letter e shows that the main hazard is the risk of
erosion unless close-growing plant cover is
maintained; shows that water in or on the soil
interferes with plant growth or cultivation (in some soils
the wetness can be partly corrected by artificial
drainage); s shows that the soil is limited mainly
because it is shallow, drought, or stony; and c, used
in only some parts of the United States, shows that the
chief limitation is climate that is very cold or very dry.
In class I there are no subclasses because the soils
of this class have few limitations. Class V contains only
the subclasses indicated by w, s, or c because the
soils in class V are subject to little or no erosion. They
have other limitations that restrict their use to pasture,
woodland, wildlife habitat, or recreation.
The capability classification of each map unit is
given in the yields table.
Grazing Lands
Sid S. Brantly, range conservationist, National Resources
Conservation Service, helped prepare this section.

Grazing lands of Duval County are comprised of
tame pasture (which is primarily bahiagrass or


bermudagrass) and grazeable woodland (which
supports native grasses, forbs, and legumes that can
be used for livestock or wildlife forage). An estimated
5,270 acres of tame pasture and 1,470 acres of
grazeable woodland provide food and habitat for an
estimated 15,000 head of cattle and countless
numbers of wildlife. Many of the smaller private tracts
are fenced and provide livestock grazing. Many of the
larger wooded tracts that are owned by timber
companies are not fenced, and the forage produced is
not utilized.
The understory is an integral part of the woodland
plant community. Some woodland, if well managed,
can produce enough understory vegetation to support
grazing by optimum numbers of livestock or wildlife, or
both, without incurring damage to the trees. In areas of
grazeable woodland, grazing is compatible with timber
management if grazing is controlled or managed so
that timber and forage resources are maintained or
enhanced. Prescribed burning and commercial
thinning are examples of management practices.
Forage production on grazeable woodland varies
according to the kind of grazeable woodland, the
amount of shade cast by the canopy, the accumulation
of fallen needles, the influence of time and intensity of
grazing on the grasses and forage, and the number,
size, spacing, and method of site preparation for tree
plantings. Because the production and availability of
forage are directly related to tree canopy, the different
age classes of trees cause a wide variation in forage
production among individual tracts.
The pastureland in Duval County provides the
components of habitat needed by several wildlife
species. It also provides filtration and storage for some
of the county's freshwater supplies. Bahiagrass and
bermudagrass are managed on much of the
pastureland in the county. Sound management plans
for pastureland typically include maintaining proper
stubble height, controlling weeds, fertilizing, applying
lime, and developing a planned grazing system. The
stubble height of bahiagrass is successfully managed
at about 2 inches. Short grazing periods of this grass
should by followed by 3- to 4-week rest periods. The
stubble height of bermudagrass is best managed at
about 4 inches. Grazing periods of this grass should
be followed by 4- to 6-week rest periods.

Prime Farmland

Prime farmland is one of several kinds of important
farmland defined by the U.S. Department of
Agriculture. It is of major importance in meeting the
Nation's short- and long-range needs for food and
fiber. Because the supply of high-quality farmland is


55





Soil Survey


limited, the U.S. Department of Agriculture recognizes
that responsible levels of government, as well as
individuals, should encourage and facilitate the wise
use of our Nation's prime farmland.
Prime farmland, as defined by the U.S. Department
of Agriculture, is land that has the best combination of
physical and chemical characteristics for producing
food, feed, forage, fiber, and oilseed crops and is
available for these uses. It could be cultivated land,
pastureland, forest land, or other land, but it is not
urban or built-up land or water areas. The soil qualities,
growing season, and moisture supply are those
needed for the soil to economically produce sustained
high yields of crops when proper management,
including water management, and acceptable farming
methods are applied. Generally, prime farmland has
an adequate and dependable supply of moisture from
precipitation or irrigation, a favorable temperature and
growing season, acceptable acidity or alkalinity, an
acceptable content of salt and sodium, and few or no
rocks. It is permeable to water and air. It is not
excessively erodible or saturated with water for long
periods, and it either is not frequently flooded during
the growing season or is protected from flooding. The
slope ranges mainly from 0 to 6 percent. More detailed
information about the criteria for prime farmland is
available at the local office of the Natural Resources
Conservation Service.
About 284 acres in the survey area, or less than 0.1
percent of the total acreage, meets the soil
requirements for prime farmland. Most areas of this
land are in the northwestern part of the county, mainly
in general soil map unit 6, which is described under
the heading "General Soil Map Units."This prime
farmland is used as woodland.
The map unit in the survey area that is considered
prime farmland is Lynchburg fine sand, 0 to 2 percent
slopes. This determination does not constitute a
recommendation for a particular land use. Measures
used to overcome a hazard or limitation, such as
flooding, wetness, and droughtiness, may be needed.
Onsite evaluation is needed to determine whether or
not the hazard or limitation has been overcome by
corrective measures. The extent of the map unit is
shown in table 5. The location is shown on the detailed
soil maps.

Hydric Soils

In this section, hydric soils are defined and
described and the hydric soil map units in the soil
survey are indicated.


The three essential characteristics of wetlands are
hydrophytic vegetation, hydric soils, and wetland
hydrology (11, 14, 41). Areas identified as wetlands
must meet criteria for each of the characteristics.
Undrained hydric soils that have natural vegetation
support a dominant population of ecological wetland
plant species. Hydric soils that have been converted to
other uses are capable of being restored to wetlands.
Hydric soils are defined by the National Technical
Committee for Hydric Soils (NTCHS) as soils that
formed under conditions of saturation, flooding, or
ponding long enough during the growing season to
develop anaerobic conditions in the upper part of the
profile. These soils are either saturated or inundated
long enough during the growing season to support the
growth and reproduction of hydrophytic vegetation.
The NTCHS definition identifies general soil
properties that are associated with wetness. To
determine whether a specific soil is a hydric or
nonhydric soil, however, more specific information,
such as information about the depth and duration of
the water table, is needed. Criteria which identify the
estimated soil properties that are unique to hydric soils
have been established (42). These criteria are used to
identify a phase of a soil series that normally is
associated with wetlands. The criteria are selected
estimated soil properties, which are are described in
"Soil Taxonomy" (45), the "National Soil Survey
Handbook" (40), and the "Soil Survey Manual" (51).
If soils are wet enough for a long enough period to
be considered hydric, they should exhibit certain
properties that can be easily observed in the field.
These visible properties are indicators of hydric soils.
The indicators that can be used to make onsite
determinations of hydric soils in Duval County are
specified in "Field Indicators of Hydric Soils in the
United States" (39).
Hydric soils are identified by examining and
describing the soil to a depth of about 20 inches. The
determination of an appropriate indicator may require
a greater depth. Soil scientists excavate and describe
the soils deep enough to understand the
redoximorphic processes. After completing the soil
description, soil scientists can compare the soil
features required by each indicator and the conditions
observed in the soil and determine which indicators
occur. The soil can be identified as a hydric soil if one
or more of the approved indicators occur.
This survey can be used to locate probable areas of
hydric soils.Table 7 indicates which components and
inclusions of the map units meet the definition of
hydric soils and also have at least one of the hydric
soil indicators. This list can help to plan land uses, but


56






City of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida


onsite investigation is needed to determine the
occurrence of hydric soils on a specific site.
Map units consisting of hydric soils may have small
areas, or inclusions, of nonhydric soils in the higher
positions on the landform, and map units consisting of
nonhydric soils may have inclusions of hydric soils in
the lower positions on the landform.

Relationships Between Soils and Native
Vegetation
John F. Vance, Jr., biologist, Natural Resources Conservation
Service, helped prepare this section

The concept of an ecological community is based
on the awareness that a soil type commonly supports
a specific vegetative community and that this
community provides the habitat needed by specific
wildlife species.
Vegetative communities form easily recognizable
units on the landscape. Even with no botanical
training, an observer can distinguish between pine
flatwoods and pine-turkey oak sandhills; between
hardwood hammocks and cypress swamps; and
between mangrove swamps and salt marshes.
Some plants grow only under a very narrow range
of conditions, but many plants can survive under a
wide range of conditions. Individual plants that have
high tolerance levels may grow in many different
communities and on a variety of soil types. When
describing ecological communities, plant scientists
study the patterns of vegetative occurrence, including
kinds of species, relative abundance, the stage of
plant succession, dominant species, landscape
position, and soil types where the pattern occurs. A
recognizable pattern of vegetation is typically on a
small group of soil types that have common
characteristics. Through many years of field
observation during soil surveys, the Natural
Resources Conservation Service has determined
which vegetative communities commonly occur on
which soils throughout Florida. This information is
summarized in a booklet called "26 Ecological
Communities of Florida" (48).
In this section, the vegetative communities
occurring on individual map units during the climax
state of plant succession are described. The plants
named are those common under relatively natural
conditions; however, human activities (such as
management of pine plantations, agriculture,
urbanization, and fire prevention) may have altered a
community on a specific site and should be taken into
consideration.


North Florida Coastal Strand
This community dominantly consists of sand live
oak, live oak, and cabbage-palm. Common shrubs are
marshelder, saw palmetto, Spanish bayonet, yaupon,
and red bay. Common herbaceous plants and vines
include blanketflower, fiddleleaf morning-glory,
largeleaf pennywort, sea purslane, greenbriers, and
wild grape. Common grasses and grasslike plants
include bitter panicum, gulf bluestem, marshhay
cordgrass, sandbur, seaoats, paspalum, seashore
panicum, low panicum, and seashore saltgrass. The
map units that support the North Florida Coastal
Strand Ecological Community in Duval County are:
10 Beaches, very frequently flooded
18 Corolla fine sand, gently undulating to rolling,
rarely flooded
23 Fripp-Corolla, rarely flooded, complex, gently
undulating to hilly
42 Newhan-Corolla, rarely flooded, complex,
gently undulating to hilly, 2 to 20 percent
slopes
Sand Pine Scrub
This community dominantly consists of bluejack
oak, Chapman oak, myrtle oak, sand live oak, and
sand pine. Common shrubs include dwarf huckleberry,
gopher apple, pricklypear, and saw palmetto. Common
herbaceous plants and vines are grassleaf
goldenaster, deermoss, and greenbrier. Common
grasses are yellow indiangrass and low panicum. The
map units that support the Sand Pine Scrub
Ecological Community in Duval County are:


29
31


Kureb fine sand, 2 to 8 percent slopes
Kureb fine sand, rolling, 8 to 20 percent
slopes


Longleaf Pine-Turkey Oak Hill
This community dominantly consists of longleaf
pine, turkey oak, bluejack oak, and post oak. Common
shrubs include Adam's-needle, coontie, coralbean,
shining sumac, and yaupon. Pricklypear, partridge
pea, blazingstar, elephant's-foot, grassleaf goldaster,
yellow indiangrass, and dropseed are common. The
map units that support the Longleaf Pine-Turkey Oak
Hill Ecological Community in Duval County are:


12
19
24

25
46
53


Blanton fine sand, 0 to 6 percent slopes
Cornelia fine sand, 0 to 5 percent slopes
Hurricane and Ridgewood soils, 0 to 5
percent slopes
Kershaw fine sand, 2 to 8 percent slopes
Ortega fine sand, 0 to 5 percent slopes
Penney fine sand, 0 to 5 percent slopes


57





Soil Survey


North Florida Flatwoods
This community dominantly consists of slash pine,
live oak, and sand live oak on the slightly higher ridges
and has an understory of saw palmetto, gallberry, and
grasses. Scattered water oak and laurel oak and
several species of blueberry and waxmyrtle are also
common. Chalky bluestem, broomsedge bluestem,
lopsided indiangrass, low panicum, and wiregrass are
the most common grasses. Other common plants
include grassleaf goldaster, blackberry, brackenfern,
deer tongue, gayfeather, milkworts, and a variety of
seed-producing legumes. The map units that support
the North Florida Flatwoods Ecological Community in
Duval County are:


14
32
36
38
44

51
56
58

63
88


Boulogne fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes
Leon fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes
Mandarin fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes
Mascotte fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes
Mascotte-Pelham complex, 0 to 2 percent
slopes
Pelham fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes
Pottsburg fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes
Pottsburg fine sand, high, 0 to 3 percent
slopes
Sapelo fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes
Lynchburg fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes


Upland Hardwood Hammocks
This community dominantly consists of black
cherry, eastern hophornbeam, flowering dogwood,
hawthorns, laurel oak, laurelcherry, live oak, loblolly
pine, longleaf pine, slash pine, pignut hickory, southern
magnolia, sweetgum, and water oak and has an
understory of American beautyberry, arrowwood,
sparkleberry, and waxmyrtle. Low panicum and
switchgrass are the common grasses. Other common
plants are aster, cat greenbrier, common greenbrier,
crossvine, partridge pea, poison ivy, ragweed, Spanish
moss, Virginia creeper, wild grape, yellow jessamine,
dotted horsemint, and blackberry. The map unit that
supports the Upland Hardwood Hammocks Ecological
Community in Duval County is:
2 Albany fine sand, 0 to 5 percent slopes
Wetland Hardwood Hammocks
This community dominantly consists of cabbage-
palm, hawthorns, laurel oak, live oak, red bay, red
maple, sweetbay, sweetgum, water oak, and magnolia.
Common shrubs include waxmyrtle, witchhazel, and
saw palmetto. Common herbaceous plants and vines
include cinnamon fern, crossvine, royal fern, Spanish
moss, Virginia creeper, wild grape, and yellow
jessamine. Longleaf uniola and low panicum are the


common grasses. The map unit that supports the
Wetland Hardwood Hammocks Ecological Community
in Duval County is:
78 Yonges fine sandy loam, 0 to 2 percent slopes
Cypress Swamp
This community dominantly consists of
baldcypress, blackgum, Coastal Plain willow,
pondcypress, and red maple. Common shrubs are
common buttonbush and waxmyrtle. Common
herbaceous plants and vines include cinnamon fern,
fall-flowering ixia, laurel greenbrier, pickerelweed, royal
fern, Spanish moss, and sphagnum moss.
Maidencane and narrowleaf sawgrass are common
grasses and grasslike plants. The map units that
support the Cypress Swamp Ecological Community in
Duval County are:
22 Evergreen-Wesconnett complex,
depressional, 0 to 2 percent slopes
82 Pelham fine sand, depressional, 0 to 2 percent
slopes
Salt Marshes
This community dominantly consists of grasses and
grasslike plants, such as big cordgrass, black
needlerush, gulf cordgrass, marshhay cordgrass,
Olney bulrush, and seashore dropseed. Seablite and
sea purslane are common herbaceous plants and
vines. The map units that support the Salt Marshes
Ecological Community in Duval County are:
33 Leon fine sand, tidal, 0 to 2 percent slopes,
very frequently flooded
68 Tisonia mucky peat, 0 to 1 percent slopes,
very frequently flooded

Swamp Hardwoods
This community dominantly consists of blackgum,
red maple, Ogeechee lime, cypress, and bay trees.
Common shrubs include fetterbush, Virginia willow,
buttonbush, and waxmyrtle. Common herbaceous
plants and vines include wild grape, greenbriers, and
poison ivy. Maidencane, cinnamon fern, and
sphagnum moss are also common. The map units that
support the Swamp Hardwoods Ecological Community
in Duval County are:
40 Maurepas muck, 0 to 1 percent slopes,
frequently flooded
49 Pamlico muck, depressional, 0 to 1 percent
slopes
50 Pamlico muck, 0 to 2 percent slopes,
frequently flooded


58





City of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida


62 Rutlege mucky fine sand, 0 to 2 percent
slopes, frequently flooded
66 Surrency loamy fine sand, depressional, 0 to 2
percent slopes
67 Surrency loamy fine sand, 0 to 2 percent
slopes, frequently flooded
79 Yulee clay, 0 to 2 percent slopes, frequently
flooded
81 Stockade fine sandy loam, depressional, 0 to
2 percent slopes
86 Yulee clay, depressional, 0 to 2 percent slopes
87 Dorovan muck, depressional, 0 to 2 percent
slopes

Shrub Bogs-Bay Swamps
This community dominantly consists of a dense
mass of evergreen shrubby vegetation. This vegetation
is mainly large gallberry, fetterbush, myrtle-leaved
holly, swamp cyrilla, greenbriers, sweet pepperbush,
and sweetbay. Scattered slash pine or pond pine, or
both, also occur. Cinnamon fern, maidencane, and
sphagnum moss commonly grow in open areas. Shrub
bogs dominantly consist of dense masses of
evergreen shrubby vegetation that rarely is more than
25 feet in height. Bay swamps are forested wetlands
that dominantly consist of one or two species of
evergreen trees. A bay swamp is considered a climax
community with mature trees, while a shrub bog is in
the earlier stages of plant succession. Periodic fires
help to keep some of the plants in the shrub bog or
subclimax stage, especially swamp titi. The shrubs
have many stems and thick foliage and commonly
appear impenetrable. The map units that support the
Shrub Bogs-Bay Swamps Ecological Community in
Duval County are:


35
80


Lynn Haven fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes
Goldhead, wet, and Lynn Haven soils, 2 to 5
percent slopes


Additional information on planning windbrea,. and
screens and planting and caring for trees and shrubs
can be obtained from local office of the Natural
Resources Conservation Service or the Cooperative
Extension Service or from a commercial nursery.

Woodland Management and Productivity

Scott Crosby, county forester, Florida Division of Forestry,
helped prepare this section.

About 262,713 acres, or nearly 48 percent of Duval
County, is forest land (34). Forestry has played an
important economic role in the county's growth. In the
early years of the settlement of Duval County, longleaf


pine dominated the better drained areas and slash
pine dominated the wet flatwoods. Longleaf pine was
the only tree that could withstand the fires set by the
settlers to clear woodland for grazing. Baldcypress,
pondcypress, black tupelo, sweetgum, red maple, and
various bays were the main trees on the river flood
plains and in areas along ponds, drainageways, and
swamps.
Harvesting timber, collecting pine gum resin, and
cutting railroad crossties provided many jobs to county
residents at one time. Past timber harvesting practices
by private landowners and some current practices,
however, have failed to allow the adequate
regeneration of commercially important species. In
addition, because burning methods are used less
often, undesirable hardwoods now dominate the
woods in some areas and hinder the establishment
and growth of pine trees.
The soils and climate of Duval County are excellent
for the management of southern pines (fig. 12). Slash
pine is the major commercial tree and is planted
throughout the county. Loblolly pine is planted to a
great extent on Lynchburg, Pelham, and Yonges soils
in the central part of the county. Natural stands of
longleaf pine are scattered throughout the county in
areas of Albany, Blanton, Hurricane, Kershaw, Ortega,
Penney, and Ridgewood soils. Applying nitrogen,
phosphorus, and potassium during planting operations
encourages excellent growth response. Loblolly pine
and slash pine grow best if adequate amounts of
phosphorus are applied. Additional applications of
fertilizer at midrotation should be based on a soil test
or tissue analysis. Timber management consists
mainly of clearcutting and intensive site preparation
(fig. 13). The thinning of pine stands for the growth of
residual saw timber and for salvage purposes is
practiced on a small scale in the survey area.
Prescribed burning is very important for removing
slash during site preparation, for reducing the hazard
of wildfires in established stands, and for promoting
the growth of grasses and forbs that provide food or
cover for cattle and a diversity of wildlife.
On the poorly drained soils in most of Duval County,
management practices help to overcome seedling
mortality, equipment limitations, and plant competition.
The use of equipment is severely restricted during wet
periods. Using tracks or flotation tires on planting and
harvesting machinery and scheduling harvesting and
planting operations during dry periods help to
overcome equipment limitations, minimize soil
compaction, and minimize root damage during
thinning operations. Under proper management, trees
can be harvested during the wetter periods. Plant
competition from heavy brush and hardwood sprouting


59






Soil Survey


Figure 12.-An area of Leon fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes, in the flatwoods.This soil is suited to the production of pine trees.


can severely affect seedling survival rates and growth.
Site preparation, such as chopping and bedding or
double-bedding, helps to establish seedlings, reduces
seedling mortality, and increases early growth of the
seedlings. Bedding should not block natural drainage.
Because of the hazard of erosion, construction of
access roads, logging activities, and site preparation
should be avoided in streambeds and adjacent areas.
Cut tree limbs and tops should be kept clear of the
stream channel because they can block streamflow.
During harvesting operations, stream crossings should
be avoided if possible. Culverts and bridges may be
needed. The use of herbicides for chemical site
preparation, either for natural or artificial regeneration,
and for the control of woody competition in established
pine stands is becoming more widespread in the
survey area. The use of herbicides for site preparation
offers several advantages over traditional mechanical
methods, including increased control of competing
vegetation at a lower cost, a reduction in soil erosion,
and prevention of soil compaction. The proper use of
forestry herbicides can reduce long-term costs for the


landowner by controlling hardwood resprouting and
thereby increasing site productivity.
The demand for timber is expected to continue to
be high far into the next century. The timber market
has helped many landowners to continue growing and
managing their woodland for maximum production. To
make the most of an investment in timber, decisions
about which trees to plant should be based on
evaluations of soil productivity and the quality of the
final products. Physical soil characteristics indicate
productivity. The most important characteristic that
affects production capacity is the ability of the soil to
provide adequate moisture. Other factors include the
thickness of the surface layer and its content of
organic matter, the natural supply of nutrients, texture
and consistency of the soil material, aeration, internal
drainage capability, and depth to the high water table.
A well managed stand of trees helps to prevent soil
deterioration and conserve soil and water. One
important function of trees is to protect the soil.
Erosion is not a major concern in most of Duval
County, but tree cover also allows more moisture to





City of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida


enter the soil by reducing the impact of rainfall on the
soil and thus affects ground-water supplies.
There are plentiful markets for local wood
producers. Six pulpmills are located within a 60-mile
radius of Duval County. Chip-n-saw logs, poletimber,
and veneer timber are aggressively marketed. There
are several timber buyers and loggers, and more than
20 companies serve the survey area. The market for
cypress saw timber is growing. Most cypress is sold
locally for fencing and rough lumber, and the residual
material is sold for mulch.
Managing habitat for woodland wildlife is an
important recreational and economic concern in the
survey area. Current forestry practices, such as
clearcutting and burning, are beneficial in the
production of wildlife food and cover. Deer, turkey, feral
hogs, and quail are the main game species in the
county.


Cary State Forest consists of 3,400 acres in the
western part of the county along the Nassau-Duval
County line. This area is managed under a multiple-
use concept. Educational activities, timber production,
recreation, and wildlife habitat are the main
management considerations. The forest has an
environmental education pavilion, a primitive campsite,
a fire tower, and a ranger residence. Environmental
education classes for students in Nassau and Duval
Counties are conducted year-round. Timber
management practices include thinning, prescribed
burning, natural pine reproduction, and some tree
planting. Diversity is a key element to management.
Soils vary in their ability to produce trees. Depth,
fertility, texture, and the available water capacity
influence tree growth. Elevation, aspect, and climate
determine the kinds of trees that can grow on a site.
The available water capacity and depth of the root


i L


Figure 13.-An area of Mascotte-Pelham complex, 0 to 2 percent slopes, that is bedded for pine trees.





Soil Survey


zone are major influences on tree growth. This soil
survey can be used by woodland managers planning
ways to increase the productivity of forest land. Some
soils respond better to fertilization than others, and
some are more susceptible to erosion after roads are
built and timber is harvested. Some soils require
special efforts for reforestation.
Individuals own thousands of acres of poorly
stocked woodland throughout Duval County.
Information about individual soils and site selection
can help landowners make decisions that are
necessary for increased productivity (43). More
detailed information on woodland management can be
obtained at the local office of the Natural Resources
Conservation Service, the Florida Division of Forestry,
or the Cooperative Extension Service.
Table 8 can be used by woodland owners or forest
managers in planning the use of soils for wood crops.
Only those soils suitable for wood crops are listed. The
table lists the ordination symbol for each soil. Soils
assigned the same ordination symbol require the
same general management and have about the same
potential productivity.
The first part of the ordination symbol, a number,
indicates the potential productivity of the soils for an
indicator tree species. The number indicates the
volume, in cubic feet per acre per year, which the
indicator species can produce in a pure stand under
natural conditions. The number 1 indicates low
potential productivity; 2 or 3, moderate; 4 or 5,
moderately high; 6 to 8, high; 9 to 11, very high; and
12 to 39, extremely high. The second part of the
symbol, a letter, indicates the major kind of soil
limitation. The letter R indicates steep slopes; X,
stoniness or rockiness; W, excess water in or on the
soil; T, toxic substances in the soil; D, restricted rooting
depth; C, clay in the upper part of the soil; S, sandy
texture; F, a high content of rock fragments in the soil;
L, low strength; and N, snowpack. The letter A
indicates that limitations or restrictions are
insignificant. If a soil has more than one limitation, the
priority is as follows: R, X, W, T, D, C, S, F, L, and N.
In table 8, slight, moderate, and severe indicate the
degree of the major soil limitations to be considered in
management.
Equipment limitation reflects the characteristics and
conditions of the soil that restrict use of the equipment
generally needed in woodland management or
harvesting. The chief characteristics and conditions
considered in the ratings are slope, stones on the
surface, rock outcrops, soil wetness, and texture of the
surface layer. A rating of slight indicates that under
normal conditions the kind of equipment and season
of use are not significantly restricted by soil factors.


Soil wetness can restrict equipment use, but the wet
period does not exceed 1 month. A rating of moderate
indicates that equipment use is moderately restricted
because of one or more soil factors. If the soil is wet,
the wetness restricts equipment use for a period of 1
to 3 months. A rating of severe indicates that
equipment use is severely restricted either as to the
kind of equipment that can be used or the season of
use. If the soil is wet, the wetness restricts equipment
use for more than 3 months.
Seedling mortality refers to the death of naturally
occurring or planted tree seedlings, as influenced by
the kinds of soil, soil wetness, or topographic
conditions. The factors used in rating the soils for
seedling mortality are texture of the surface layer,
depth to a high water table and the length of the period
when the water table is high, rock fragments in the
surface layer, effective rooting depth, and slope
aspect. A rating of slight indicates that seedling
mortality is not likely to be a problem under normal
conditions. Expected mortality is less than 25 percent.
A rating of moderate indicates that some problems
from seedling mortality can be expected. Extra
precautions are advisable. Expected mortality is 25 to
50 percent. A rating of severe indicates that seedling
mortality is a serious problem. Extra precautions are
important. Replanting may be necessary. Expected
mortality is more than 50 percent.
Plant competition ratings indicate the degree to
which undesirable species are expected to invade and
grow when openings are made in the tree canopy.The
main factors that affect plant competition are depth to
the water table and the available water capacity. A
rating of slight indicates that competition from
undesirable plants is not likely to prevent natural
regeneration or suppress the more desirable species.
Planted seedlings can become established without
undue competition. A rating of moderate indicates that
competition may delay the establishment of desirable
species. Competition may hamper stand development,
but it will not prevent the eventual development of fully
stocked stands. A rating of severe indicates that
competition can be expected to prevent regeneration
unless precautionary measures are applied.
The potential productivity of merchantable or
common trees on a soil is expressed as a site quality,
a site index, a volume number, and a productivity
number (5, 7, 25, 37, 49). The site index is the average
height, in feet, that dominant and codominant trees of
a given species attain in a specified number of years.
The site index applies to fully stocked, even-aged,
unmanaged stands. Commonly grown trees are those
that woodland managers generally favor in
intermediate or improvement cuttings. They are


62





City of Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida


selected on the basis of growth rate, quality, value,
and marketability.
The volume is the yield likely to be produced by the
most important trees, expressed in cubic feet per acre
per year.
The site quality applies to fully stocked, even-aged,
managed pine plantations. If a plantation is more than
10 years old, site quality curves for slash pine and
loblolly pine can be used to estimate plantation site
quality on a 25-year basis. Site index curves with a
base age of 50 are available for sand pine and
second-growth natural longleaf pine. Since longleaf
pine is most commonly managed for sawtimber
products, all values for longleaf pine are based on site
index.
The productivity is the yield likely to be produced by
the most important trees, expressed in cords per acre
per year. Production figures are based on a stocking of
400 even-aged trees per acre and a 4-inch top outside
bark measurement. If a plantation of longleaf pine at
age 25 has a site quality of 70, the expected yield is
3,870 cubic feet per acre. If 1 rough cord is equal to
about 92.5 cubic feet, then the expected yield is 42
cords per acre. If intensive forest management
practices are applied, wood fiber production may be
significantly greater than the production of natural
stands.
The first species listed under common trees for a
soil is the indicator species for that soil. It generally is
the most common and most productive species on the
soil and is the one that determines the ordination
class.
Trees to plant are those that are suitable for
commercial wood production.

Windbreaks and Environmental Plantings

Windbreaks protect livestock, buildings, and yards
from wind and snow. They also protect fruit trees and
gardens, and they furnish habitat for wildlife. Several
rows of low- and high-growing broadleaf and
coniferous trees and shrubs provide the most
protection.
Field windbreaks are narrow plantings made at right
angles to the prevailing wind and at specific intervals
across the field. The interval depends on the erodibility
of the soil. Field windbreaks protect cropland and
crops from wind, help to keep snow on the fields, and
provide food and cover for wildlife.
Environmental plantings help to beautify and screen
houses and other buildings and to abate noise. The
plants, mostly evergreen shrubs and trees, are closely
spaced. To ensure plant survival, a healthy planting


stock of suitable species should be planted properly
on a well prepared site and maintained in good
condition.
Additional information on planning windbreaks and
screens and planting and caring for trees and shrubs
can be obtained from the local office of the Natural
Resources Conservation Service or the Cooperative
Extension Service or from a commercial nursery.

Recreation

Recreational development in Duval County is
considerably important and has high potential.
Recreational areas include beaches, National
monuments, State and city parks, campgrounds, golf
courses, swimming pools, tennis courts, riding stables,
zoos, fishing areas, boating areas, football and
baseball stadiums, theaters, museums, and suburban
neighborhood playgrounds.
Recreational activities are typically located around
the many miles of coastal beaches and the large
expanses of inland waters, such as the Broward,
Ceder, Nassau, Ortega, Trout, and St. Johns Rivers;
Dunn, Julington, and Thomas Creeks; and the
Intracoastal Waterway. The beaches attract many
visitors, and surfing is popular. Boating, waterskiing,
and fishing are popular on all of the inland rivers and
creeks and on the Intracoastal Waterway. Deep sea
fishing is popular. Large acreages of woodland are
used by private hunting clubs.
The soils of the survey area are rated in table 9
according to the limitations that affect their suitability
for recreation. The ratings are based on restrictive soil
features, such as wetness, slope, and texture of the
surface layer. Susceptibility to flooding is considered.
Not considered in the ratings, but important in
evaluating a site, are the location and accessibility of
the area, the size and shape of the area and its scenic
quality, vegetation, access to water, potential water
impoundment sites, and access to public sewer lines.
The capacity of the soil to absorb septic tank effluent
and the ability of the soil to support vegetation are also
important. Soils that are subject to flooding are limited
for recreational uses by the duration and intensity of
flooding and the season when flooding occurs. In
planning recreational facilities, onsite assessment of
the height, duration, intensity, and frequency of
flooding is essential.
In table 9, the degree of soil limitation is expressed
as slight, moderate, or severe. Slight means that soil
properties are generally favorable and that limitations
are minor and easily overcome. Moderate means that
limitations can be overcome or alleviated by planning,


63




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