• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Waking
 The journey
 The sea
 Spades and sand
 Willie in bed
 A donkey ride
 A rainy day
 Rough weather
 A row on the water
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Willie and Lucy at the sea-side : for very little children
Title: Willie and Lucy at the sea-side
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00025368/00001
 Material Information
Title: Willie and Lucy at the sea-side for very little children
Physical Description: 96 p., 4 leaves of plates : col. ill. ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Giberne, Agnes, 1845-1939
Religious Tract Society (Great Britain) ( Publisher )
William Clowes and Sons ( Printer )
Kronheim & Co ( Lithographer )
Key & Whiting ( Binder )
Publisher: Religious Tract Society
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: W. Clowes and Sons
Publication Date: 1868
Copyright Date: 1868
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Family -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Prayer -- Christianity -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Obedience -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Seafaring life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Key & Whiting -- Binders' tickets (Binding) -- 1868   ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1868
Genre: Binders' tickets (Binding)   ( rbbin )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by A.G. i.e. Agnes Giberne.
General Note: Illustrations lithographed by Kronheim & Co.
General Note: Bound by Key & Whiting.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00025368
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAB7502
notis - ALH0625
oclc - 38056731
alephbibnum - 002230277

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter 1
        Front Matter 2
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece 1
        Frontispiece 2
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Waking
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    The journey
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    The sea
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Spades and sand
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 34a
        Page 34b
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Willie in bed
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
    A donkey ride
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 60a
        Page 60b
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
    A rainy day
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
    Rough weather
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
    A row on the water
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 90a
        Page 90b
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
    Back Cover
        Page 99
        Page 100
    Spine
        Page 101
Full Text

















































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WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE



SEA-SIDE.




FOR VERY LITTLE CHILDREN.




By A. G.







LONDON:
THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY;
56, PATERNOSTER ROW; 65, ST. PAUL'S CHURCHYARD;
AND 164, PICCADILLY.

















































































I ORDfON; rINRlTEfl b W. CLOWTS AMDf SO.", STAMFTORDf STARM
AND CHAR2'G CROSS&









WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE


SEA-SIDE.


WAKING.
" WAKE up! wake up! Master Willie."
Willie Gray rubbed his eyes, and
sat up in the bed. Then he lay down
again, and hid his face in the pillow.
I'm so sleepy, nurse. I don't
want to get up yet."
Not get up yet, Master Willie,
with the sun shining, and the birds
singing like this ? See;" and she drew
the curtains aside, letting a bright
sunbeam stream on his rosy face and
tumbled hair-" it would be a shame
to sleep any longer."






4 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.
Willie's eyes were open by this
time, and nurse added, You forget, I
think, where we are all going to-day."
"To the sea-side !" said Willie,
clapping his hands, and wide awake
at last. Oh, nurse, are we really
going ?"
To be sure we are, Master Willie,
and a long journey we have before us
too, while you are lying there and
wanting to go to sleep. There is no
time to be lost. Come, jump up, and
dress as fast as you can. Why, Miss
Lucy is twice as quick as you."
This made Willie jump out of bed,
and set to work in good earnest.
With nurse's help he was very soon
dressed, and then he knelt down to
say his morning prayer, asking God
to forgive his sins, to make him one






WAKING. 5
of Jesus Christ's little lambs, and to
bless his dear papa and mamma and
little sister. Willie had been taught
to say his prayers slowly and gravely,
and to think all the time of what he
was saying. He knew that if he
looked about the room, and thought
of other things, he could not hope
that God would hear him.
This morning his mind was so full
of the journey that he found it very
hard to attend to what he was saying,
but he kept his eyes shut, and tried
not to let such thoughts come into
his head. Then he stood up, and
said his pretty morning hymn, and
nurse read to him a few easy verses in
the Bible, and then Willie gave her a
kiss, and ran out of the room.
Such a bustle the house was in!






6 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.
Boxes were standing, packed and
corded, in the hall, and there was
papa at a side table, very busy over a


great basket, which he was filling
with buns, and biscuits, and cold
chicken, all to be eaten on the way.






WAKING. 7
Little Lucy, Willie's sister, who was
only five years old, stood looking on
very gravely. She was a year younger
than Willie, and Willie always felt as if
he were a great deal older than she was.
Lucy, isn't it nice ?" he said to
her. Don't you think the journey
will be fun ? I do."
"No, I don't like it," said Lucy,
shaking her head. Nurse says there
will be a great noise."
Oh, but a noise won't hurt you,
Lucy. It will be so nice to go on-
on-faster than you can think. I
want so much to see the train. You
need not be afraid of it, Lucy. I'll
take care of you."
"But you are not big enough," said
Lucy, with a sigh, and Mr. Gray
stopped for a moment in his work of





8 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.
packing, to look down and ask-
"What is the matter, my little girl ?"
"She's afraid of the train, papa,"
said Willie. "But she needn't be.
I'll take care of her."
"You!" said Mr. Gray, with a little
smile.
I'm six years old, papa," said
Willie, holding up his head, and wish-
ing very much that he were taller.
Mr. Gray had a bag of biscuits in
his hand, which he was just going to
stow away in the basket. But he put
it down for a minute, and patted
Willie's head.
I have no doubt you will do the
best you can, my boy. But if papa
and mamma and Lucy had no one to
take care of them except their little
Willie, I don't think they could feel






WAKING.


very happy at going such a long
journey."
You can take care of yourself,
papa," said Willie, rather surprised,
and Lucy said the same.
No, Lucy, papa can't take care of
himself," said Mr. Gray, looking down
gravely at the two little faces. "Papa
is much bigger and stronger than
either Willie or Lucy, but still he is
not big enough or strong enough
to take care of himself. Willie can
tell me who can take care of us all."
God can, papa," said Willie softly.
"Yes, Willie, and we must ask God
to watch over us on our journey, and
all the time we are away from home."
And when we come back too," said
Willie gravely.
"Quite right, Willie. We should






10 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.
never be happy to pass a single day,
without feeling that we have prayed
God to guard us and watch over us,
for Jesus Christ's sake. And my little
Lucy need have no fears about the
journey. Willie might wish to take
care of her, and might not be able,
but God is able and willing too."
Willie and Lucy stood looking on
in silence for a few minutes, while Mr.
Gray began again to pack the basket.
Presently he shut down the lid, and
tied it tight with a piece of string.
"Now, Willie, will you run and see
if mamma is in the parlour, and tell
her I am ready for breakfast as soon
as she can give it to us."
Willie ran off, and found his mamma
waiting, so he came back to tell his
papa. Then he went again to the






THE JOURNEY. 11
parlour, and rang the bell for family
prayers, and put out the large Bible,
After prayers they all had breakfast,
and a little later started in a fly for
the station.


THE JOURNEY.
ME. and Mrs. Gray, with Willie, Lucy,
and nurse, stood on the platform at
the station, waiting for the train to
come up. Lucy clung tight to nurse's
hand, almost wishing herself at home
again, and too much afraid of all the
noise and bustle to feel very happy.
Willie tried to cheer her up, but she
only hid her face in nurse's dress, and
then Willie grew a little cross, and
told her she was "very silly."






12 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.
"Hush, hush, Willie," said Mrs. Gray
gently. Lucy is not silly, but she is
a very little girl, and does not know
any better. Another time she will














not mind the train, but now it is all
new to her, and it frightens her."
It doesn't frighten me, mamma."






THE JOURNEY.


No, because you are older than
Lucy, and you are a boy too. Boys
never ought to be cowards, and I
hope some day Lucy will not be one
either. See here comes the train."
Brave as Willie thought himself, he
could not help stepping close up to his
mother's side, when there was a shrill
whistle, and the great train rushed up,
with its snorting puffing engine, going
slower and slower till it quite stopped.
Mr. Gray took Lucy in his arms,
and Mrs. Gray gave Willie her hand,
and in another minute they were all
seated safely in the train. They
hardly had to wait at all, before there
was another whistle and they moved
off, gently at first but more quickly
every moment.
Willie looked out of the window






14 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.
for some time, and could hardly help
laughing to see all the fields and
houses and trees looking just as if
they were running away. After a
while he grew rather tired of the win-
dow, and began glancing about the in-
side of the carriage where they were-
at the seats, the lamp, the old gentle-
man in the corner, and the two ladies
near him. He was rather puzzled to
think what the lamp could be for, and
was just going to ask his mamma,
when there was a loud sharp whistle,
a rushing noise, and they were in
perfect darkness, except for the glim-
mer of light from the roof.
Willie was half afraid, but he felt
his mother's hand on his shoulder, and
he could see a smile on her face,
though the noise was too great to






THE JOURINE3Y.


allow of talking. Mr. Gray leaned
forward, and said very loud,-
This is a tunnel," and Willie made
up his mind to ask by-and-bye what
it all meant.
When they came out again into
daylight, poor little Lucy was crying
in nurse's arms, so Mrs. Gray took
her on her lap, and gave her a biscuit.
Then Willie had a game of bo-peep
with her, but at this the old gentleman
in the corner looked very cross, and
said something about "noisy tiresome
children !" to the lady by his side.
Mrs. Gray told Willie not to laugh
quite so loud, and Willie did as he
was told, but he thought the old
gentleman as tiresome as the old
gentleman had thought him.
"I'll ask mamma why he should






16 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.
mind my laughing," he thought.
"That's two things I want to know."
By-and-bye they stopped at a sta-
tion, and Willie thought this a good
time to ask the first of his questions.
"Papa," he said, what is a tunnel ?"
"Did you ever see a hill, Willie ?"
asked Mr. Gray.
Oh, yes, papa-numbers of hills."
"Not so very many, my boy. Still
you know what a hill is. Now sup-
pose I wanted to make a railroad from
my house to Mr. Brown's, how should
I manage when I came to Heath
Hill ?"
"Make the train go round, papa,"
said Willie.
But that would take it so far out
of the way. Think of some other
plan."






THE JOURNEY.


Could'nt the train go over the
hill ?" asked Willie.
No, uphill will not do. The path
must be nearly if not quite level-that
is, flat-for the train. Heath Hill is
very steep."
Is a tunnel made under the ground,
then ?" asked Willie slowly.
"That is right, Willie. You have
found it out now. I should make a
tunnel under the hill for the train to
go through. Do you not call that a
good plan ?"
"I do not know. It makes such a
noise, papa," said Willie, rather gravely.
"Who was it that I heard this
morning, saying, Oh, a noise won't
hurt you, Lucy'? You are not so brave
now as then, Willie."
"Yes, papa-I'm not afraid," said
C






18 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.
Willie, sitting up straight. "I won't
mind the tunnel next time at all. I
did not this time so much as Lucy."
Lucy is too young to know any
better yet. But you are old enough
to learn what a tunnel is, and not to
be timid about it."
"Are people never hurt in a tunnel ?"
asked Willie.
"Sometimes they are. And some-
times people are hurt when they are
driving, and sometimes when they are
walking, and sometimes when they
are sitting quite quiet in the house. No
one can be hurt anywhere, unless it is
the will of God; and if it is, then we
shall be hurt wherever we are."
Then no one ought to be afraid,"
said Willie.
"No one, Willie, who can feel that






THE JOURNEY.


God is his Father and will take care
of him."
The train was now moving on again,
but the cross gentleman and the two
ladies were gone, so Mr. and Mrs.
Gray, and Willie, and Lucy, and nurse
were alone. Willie could not help
saying:
"I am glad he has gone, mamma.
He didn't like to see me playing."
He did not like to hear my little
boy's noisy laugh," said Mrs. Gray,
with a smile.
But, mamma, I wasn't near him."
"Near enough to disturb him in
his reading, I suppose. Always try,
Willie, not to disturb grown-up people
by talking and laughing too loud when
they are busy. If you do they will
be sorry to see you come, and glad to






20 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.
see you go. You would not like
that ?"
"No, I should like them to be glad
to see me, mamma."
So they will be, Willie, if you are a
gentle polite boy, and think more of
what other people like than of what
you like yourself. Noisy, rude, tire-
some children are always in the way."
But you don't mind my laughing,
mamma ?"
Not unless I am busy, then I like to
be quiet. Perhaps the old gentleman
in the corner was busy. At any rate
you should always be quiet when you
are asked, Willie. Don't forget that,
dear."
I'll try not, mamma," said Willie,
rather gravely.






THE SEA.


THE SEA.
"HERE we are, Willie! Now for the
sea! How fresh and salt the air
feels!"
"Lucy is asleep, papa," said Willie,
rubbing his own eyes, and trying to
look very wide awake.
"Some one else has been asleep,
too, I think," said Mr. Gray, smiling.
"Never mind, you will feel lively
enough after a good night's rest. It
has been a long journey, and you will
be glad of your tea, and your bed."
They were now stopping at the
station. Mr. Gray stepped out, and
lifted Willie and Lucy upon the plat-
form. Then he made a porter bring






22 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.
their boxes into the road, and put
them on a fly, while they all got
inside.
"Now, Willie, look out," said Mr.
Gray, as they drove off; and Willie did
look out. He had never yet seen the
sea, and he could not at all fancy what
it was like. By-and-bye he saw a
gleam of blue between some houses,
and clapped his hands.
"Oh, papa was that the sea ?"
"That was the sea, Willie. There
it is again. You did not look in time.,
did you ? But we shall drive along
the parade in front of it in a minute,
and then you will see it plainly. Here
we come! Now look out !"
Willie looked again, and at last said
with a little sigh:
"It's very pretty and blue, papa,





THE SEA.


and very big. I think if it wasn't so
big it would look like our pond at
home."
You will not think so, Willie, when
you have seen it with great waves
dashing about, and the spray flying in
the wind. It is very still to-day. But
you will soon change your mind about
its being only like a pond."
"Shall I find any shells on the
shore ?" asked Willie.
"I hope so. Shells are almost
always seen on sandy shores. You
must dig holes in the sand too, and
make hills and towers and all kinds of
things."
"But I don't know what to dig with,
papa.
We will soon manage about that,"
said Mr. Gray, with a smile. Do






24 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.
you think we could find a spade in
the shops for those little fingers ?"
"A spade! Oh, thank you, papa.
Like what Rogers uses ?"
Not quite so large as that, and it
must be of wood. Lucy shall have
one too."
A small one," said Willie, looking
down at Lucy's tiny hands.
Yes-smaller than yours. Nurse
will take you out on the shore, and
sit and work while you dig, and I
hope you will be very happy. Now
we must get out. This is to be our
home while we are at the sea-side."
Willie looked up at the house. It
was not facing the sea, but was
some little way up a side street.
There was a small garden in front,
up which Willie ran the moment






THE SEA.


he was out of the fly. Then he
waited for his mamma, and she
took his hand, and led him upstairs
to the sitting-room, where the tea-
things were laid out. Hats and
bonnets were taken off, and sleepy
little Lucy woke quite up over her
milk and bread and butter. Willie
thought he had never been so hungry
in his life, and it was a long time
before he had done his tea.
Then Lucy was taken off to bed,
that she might be quite rested and
fresh in the morning. Willie begged
hard to go on the shore, and Mr. Gray
said he would take him for a little
while. So Willie fetched his cap, and
they went out,. down the street, across
the parade, and then over the soft
crisp sand.






26 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.
Willie ran and jumped about, and
hunted for shells, and almost shouted
aloud with glee. The tide was now
coming in, and the water was less
smooth than before. Bright dancing
waves rolled up, and broke on the
beach, and Willie stood close at the
water's edge, jumping back just in
time to escape a wetting. Once or
twice he was very nearly caught.
There were not many shells to be
seen, but he found a few, and put
them into his pocket to give to Lucy.
Like a kind little boy, he thought that
as he had had the pleasure of the first
walk, Lucy should have the pleasure
of the first shells. -
Well, Willie, it is time to think of
going home now," said Mr. Gray, at
last, and Willie came up at once.






THE SEA.


" What do you think of the sea now ?
Is it no better than a pond ?
"Oh, papa, a great great deal. It
isn't a bit like a pond now. I never
saw such waves !"
These are very small waves,
Willie. Perhaps some day before we
leave, you may see some really large
ones. Now we must go home, for it
is time that little boys should be in
bed after such a long journey. In the
morning I hope you will have a nice
game on the shore."
Willie gave a wistful look up into
his father's face, and Mr. Gray saw
what he was thinking of.
You will want the spades, will you
not ? We must see what we can do.
Now take one more look at the sea,
and then we must leave the beach."






28 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.
Willie did so, and turned away with
a sigh of delight, as he said:
"Papa, I think the sea is the best
thing in all the world !"
"Wait till you have seen all the
world, my boy, before you decide.
But I quite agree with you in thinking
it a most grand and lovely sight. I
have never yet seen anything that I
could enjoy more."
"And only think, papa-a month
or six weeks here," said Willie, as they
walked over the parade. Such a nice
long time! I do hope it will be
fine."
"Very likely it will much of the
time. Sometimes of course we must
expect rain, and then I hope you will
bear it with good-temper, and amuse
yourself indoors as well as you can.






SPADES AND SAND.


Here we are at the house. Now
good-night, and run upstairs to nurse."
Willie did so, and was soon ready
for bed. Lucy was asleep, so he kept
the shells to give her in the morning,
and in a little while he too was asleep
and dreaming of the sea.



SPADES AND SAND.
NEXT morning Willie gave Lucy the
shells he had found, and she was very
much pleased with them indeed. She
jumped out of her bed, and gave him
a kiss, and thanked him over and over
again, saying-
"How kind of you, Willie But
don't you want them ?"






30 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.
"No, I would rather you should
have them, Lucy. And we will try
to find some more to-day."
Breakfast time soon came, and when
the meal was over nurse told Willie
to get his cap, and then to keep quiet
while she dressed Lucy, for they were
going out on the shore. Willie found it
very hard to stand still, while he was so
happy; but he knew that if he jumped
about Lucy would want to do the same,
so he only walked to the window and
stood there, swinging his cap, and
begging nurse to make great haste."
At last they left the house, and
Lucy held nurse's hand tight, and
looked shy and timid as she always
did in new places; but Willie wanted
to scamper about, and did not like
being called back by nurse.






SPADES AND SAND.


"I am sure I shan't lose myself,
nurse," he said, and I won't get into
mischief. Let me run along the
parade, or down on the sands. Are
we not going on the shore ?"
"In a few minutes," nurse replied.
"And don't run so far away again,
Master Willie, or I shall be losing
sight of you."
"But if you did I could find my
way home," said Willie, feeling a little
bit inclined to be cross at not being
allowed to run as far as he liked.
"But what do you think your mam-
ma would say if I went home without
you ?" asked nurse. No, no, Master
Willie, you must be a good boy, and
do as you are told, or I shall have to
hold your hand and make you walk
by my side. Here we are at the






32 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.


shop. Do you think you
choose two nice spades?"
Willie looked up with
clapped his hands.


"' 0 nurse! how
going to have them
say so ?"


kind!
now?


can help me

a smile, and


Are we
Did papa


-, V_






SPADES AND SAND.


Yes, and here is the money," said
nurse. Then she told the shopwoman
to show them some wooden spades,
and very soon two were chosen and
paid for, a small one for Lucy,
and a rather larger one for Willie.
How grand Willie felt as they walked
towards the beach, and he swung his
spade about! Nurse told him to carry
it gently, but he forgot once or twice,
and at length nearly knocked a little
boy with it. Then nurse almost
took it away from him, but Willie
begged her to try him once more, and
said he would be very careful, so she
gave him one more trial. This time
he did not forget, and as he did not
swing it again nurse let him carry it
all the way. When they reached the
beach she sat down on the sands, and
D






34 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.
took out her work. Willie and Lucy
began digging holes near her, and try-
ing which could dig the deepest. Of
course Willie was the strongest, and
made the largest hole, so he came and
helped Lucy to make hers bigger.
"May we go down close to the
water, nurse ?" asked Willie after a
time.
If you will not get into any mis-
chief," said nurse. "And Miss Lucy
too ? Well, you must take great care
of her, and both of you must come
back to me in a moment if I call you.
I can't sit down there, for the sand is
too flat and not dry enough, and I
must get on with my work, for your
mamma wants it done. But you may
go if you like, only be very steady and
careful."




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SPADES AND SAND.


Willie took Lucy's hand, and they
ran down the beach, till they were
close to the rippling waves, which
rolled up and broke upon the wet
sparkling sand. Willie began digging
again, and was pleased to see his hole
fill with water. Lucy tried to help
him, but she could not manage her
spade very well, and sometimes she
knocked the sand into the hole, instead
of taking it out. Willie bore it once or
twice without a word, and then he
asked her to take more care. Lucy tried,
but again her spade slipped, and down
went a lump of wet sand into Willie's
nice large hole. Willie began to grow
angry.
Lucy, you tiresome girl!" he cried.
"I won't dig with you at all, if you spoil
my holes like that. Look what you






36 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.
have done !" and he stamped his foot
on the ground. "How can you be so
stupid ?"
Poor little Lucy's eyes filled with
tears, and her cheeks flushed, as
she dropped the spade and stepped
back. Willie did not mean to
frighten her; but he still felt too
vexed to say he was sorry for his
unkind words, so he only turned his
back to her, and began throwing
stones into the sea.
"Willie, I didn't mean to do it,"
said Lucy at last, in her soft timid
voice.
You should take care," said Willie,
turning round to her again. "You
spoil my holes when you knock the
sand about like that."
"I won't do it again," said Lucy






SPADES AND SAND. 37
in a trembling voice, and with a
little sob. "Please don't be angry,
Willie."
How could Willie be angry any
longer before that gentle little face.
He walked up to her, and gave her a
kiss.
There! you're a dear little thing,
and I'm a cross boy, Lucy. I won't
scold you any more now. You shall
dig as much as you like, only don't
throw sand into this one great
hole, because I want it to be very
big."
"I can't dig," said Lucy sadly. "I
don't know how, Willie. I'll look at
you.
Well, I'll tell you what, Lucy; we
won't dig any more holes, but we'll
make a great high hill of sand, and






38 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.
then I'll stand on it while the water
comes up all round me. Won't that
be nice?"
Lucy looked bright again, and in a
minute they were hard at work, piling
up the sand and throwing on fresh
spades-full, till it really was a very
large heap to have been made by such
little people. Nurse came down to
see what they were about, and she
was glad to find them so happy; but
Lucy was growing tired and hot, so
she took her back with her to sit
quiet. Willie told nurse what he
was making his hill for, but she shook
her head.
No, that won't do, Master Willie.
I shall have you tumbling into the
water."
"But indeed, nurse, I can quite





SPADES AND SAND.


well jump to shore again, when tne
water is all round it," said Willie.
No, I can't have you do it, Master
Willie. The water is coming in so
fast that it would be round you
before you knew what you were
about; and suppose you should jump
into the water instead of on dry land !"
Nurse went away as she spoke,
taking Lucy with her. Willie stood
in no happy mood, gazing at the hill
which had cost him so much trouble,
and feeling not a little cross. "It's too
bad," he said to himself. "Nurse
treats me as if I were a little baby,
and she forgets how old I am. It
would be so nice to stand on the top,
and see the water come all round me.
I wish mamma were out here. I am
sure she would let me do it."






40 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.
What a silly little boy Willie was, to
make himself so cross about what he
could not do, instead of being happy
about what he could do. He stood
and looked at the hill, watching the
water creeping higher, and the little
waves breaking against it; and every
moment the longing grew stronger to
stand if but for one moment on the top.
It couldn't do any harm," he said
again. Oh, Willie! no harm when
nurse told you not to do it! "I
could easily jump there and back," he
thought, and I wouldn't stay there.
It looks just like a little island when
the water runs up all round it like
that. Nurse thinks I can't do any-
thing. I have a great mind just to try.
Nurse isn't looking, nor Lucy either."
All this passed through Willie's






SPADES AND SAND. 41
mind a great deal faster than it can be
written down. What a pity it was that
Willie should allow himself to look on
so long, and to wish so much for what
he knew he ought not to do. He did
not think of asking help from God, who
is always willing to give it; and little
Willie had no strength in himself to
conquer the naughty wishes that were
tempting him to do wrong.
He looked again to see if nurse saw
him, but she was busy with her work,
and Lucy's back was turned. Willie
still paused a moment, and then the
desire became too strong to be over-
come.
He gave a leap and reached the top
of the little mound, meaning to jump
back in a moment. But it had been
thrown up very loosely, and the






42 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.
waves had even now soaked in be-
neath, and washed away part of the
sides, and the soft wet sand gave way
in an instant under Willie's feet.




'' - - --- ---=- "' I '- "










Down he went, and splash!-he fell on
his face into the middle of the next
wave that came dancing up.






WILLIE IN BED.


WILLIE IN BED.
WHAT a shriek Willie gave! Poor
nurse was startled, indeed, to hear it,
and still more to see Willie going
down with such a splash into the
water. She jumped up, and ran down
the beach as fast as she could, while
poor Lucy came crying after her. By
the time they reached the water's
edge, Willie had managed to struggle
to his hands and feet, and to scramble
back to shore.
Very wretched he looked, dripping
with water from head to foot, and with
tears of mingled alarm at his fall, and
fear of nurse's anger, running down
his cheeks.






44 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.
Oh, Master Willie!" was all nurse
said. "I thought I could trust you to
do as you were told. You must come
home now as fast as you can, and take
off your wet things. I don't know
what your mamma will say."
Willie began to sob; but nurse hur-
ried him up the beach and towards
the house, while the water ran from
his clothes, making little puddles on
the parade and the road; and people
turned in great surprise to look at the
wet tearful little boy, and to wonder
what was the matter.
Mrs. Gray was not in the house,
rather to Willie's relief, for he dreaded
her hearing all that had passed.
Nurse took him upstairs, and after
pulling off his soaking clothes made
him get into bed. Willie did not like






WILLIE IN BED.


this at all, and begged hard that he
might sit up, but nurse would not
allow it.
No,. Master Willie," she said. "If
it was not your own fault I would
let you put on your best things;
but now it is all through your being
so naughty as to do what I said
you must not, you must lie in bed
till your things are dry. Now,
Master Willie, if you cry and make
a noise, I shall have to punish you
by keeping you there longer still,"
she added. "You should be a wise
boy, and show you are sorry for being
so naughty, by being now as good
and quiet as you can."
It's so hard to lie in bed," sobbed
Willie. I don't like it at all, nurse. It
is so unkind of you."





46 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.
I don't wish to seem unkind, Master
Willie," said nurse gravely. "But
when you don't obey me, I must
punish you for it. You know very
well that your mamma will say I am
quite right. It would be no real kind-
ness to pass it over, and treat you as
if you had been a good little boy."
But Willie felt cross and angry with
himself, and therefore with every one
else besides. He rolled about in the
bed, and sobbed aloud, until nurse left
the room, hoping he would be more
quiet alone.
When there was no one to hear
him, Willie did not care to go on
crying, and he quite left off, until there
was a step outside the door, and Mrs.
Gray came in. Then the tears began
to fall again.






WILLIE IN BED.


"Willie! Willie! I am sorry to hear
this of you," she said, sitting down on
the bed, and speaking sadly. "I did
hope my little boy could at least be
trusted to do what he was told."
"It is so unkind of nurse to put me
to bed," sobbed Willie.
"No, Willie, not unkind. Nurse is
never unkind. She was quite right
to punish you for such conduct."
I didn't mean any harm, mamma.
I thought the sand was quite strong."
Willie," said Mrs. Gray, what had
nurse told you only five minutes
before ?"
Willie twisted his face away, and
almost hid it in the pillow.
Nurse thinks I can't do anything,
mamma. I'm not a little baby now!"
No, but I am afraid you are likely






48 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.
to become something much worse,
Willie, if this is the way you mean to
behave," said Mrs. Gray, so sadly, that
Willie could not help looking at her.
Were those tears in her eyes? Willie
could not quite bear that, and he
jumped up and put his arm round his
mother's neck.
"Mamma, I didn't mean to make
you sorry. I'll try not to do it again."
"Indeed, Willie, I hope it is the
last time I shall hear of such a thing.
You have grieved me very much this
morning."
"I am sorry, mamma," said Willie.
If you are really sorry, Willie dear,
you know that I am quite ready to
forgive you. But there is One whose
pardon you ought to ask, even before
mine.






WILLIE IN BED.


Willie hung his head.
I know, mamma," he said, in a low
voice.
And will you do it, Willie ?" asked
Mrs. Gray gently. May I hope that
my little boy will indeed ask God to
forgive him for Jesus Christ's sake,
and to keep him from such naughty
conduct in the future."
I'll try, mamma," said Willie softly.
Mrs. Gray kissed him, and then
went on :-
Now, Willie, I want to ask you
one or two questions. Did you really
think this morning that you-a little
boy of six-could judge better than
nurse of what you ought or ought not
to do ?"
Willie's face grew red, and he hung
his head again.






50 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.
I don't know, mamma. I thought
I was big enough to take care of
myself. Nurse always fancies that I
can't do things."
"You see now, Willie, that nurse
knew better than you did. If you
had done as she told you, you might
have been playing out on the sands all
this time, instead of lying here in bed."
"Yes, mamma," was all Willie
could say, for he felt very tearful at
the thought of the bright sunny
shore and sparkling waves.
I daresay, Willie, that you thought
it a rather grand thing to do what you
were told not to do. You felt very
big and old, did you not ?-almost too
old to obey nurse."
Willie blushed scarlet, for Mrs. Gray
had just guessed his thoughts.






WILLIE IN BED.


Well, Willie, I do not think you
ever made a greater mistake in your
life. You will find when you grow
older that the best and greatest and
wisest men in the world are almost
always those who are the most ready
to obey when it is right."
"Shall I, mamma ?" asked Willie.
"Indeed you will, dear. And, Willie,
when the Lord Jesus Christ was a
little child, he did not think himself
too wise or too old to obey his mother
and Joseph. And yet they were only
a poor carpenter and his wife, and
knew very little, while he was the
Son of God, and knew more than
any one in the whole world. Can
you tell me a verse which I showed
you last Sunday, proving that he did
obey them ?"






52 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.
Willie thought a minute, and then
said:
Wasn't it after he had been in the
temple, mamma, and the Bible says,
' He was subject to them ?'"
Quite right, Willie. I am glad you
do not forget. You can tell me what
' subject to them' means ?"
He did what they told him," said
Willie.
"Yes, Willie. And yet, though
only a child of twelve years old, he
could answer and perplex all the grave
learned doctors, and amaze them with,
his wisdom. If ever a child might
have thought himself too old and too
wise to obey his parents, surely the
Lord Jesus might have done so."
He was so good," said Willie,
slowly.






WILLIE IN BED. 53
"Yes, Willie, he was so good and
holy, too humble and meek for any
such thing. Willie, will you try and
take the Lord Jesus Christ for your
pattern ?-try and act like him ?"
"I don't know how," said Willie
gravely.
"Not know how?" said Mrs. Gray
gently. "Willie, there is only one way
in which you can do it, and that is to
become one of his little lambs. The
only way is to go to him, and ask him to
wash away all your sins in his precious
blood, and to give you a new heart,
and to make you meek, and gentle,
and loving, like himself. You are
a very little boy, but you are not too
young to serve the Lord Jesus Christ."
"I don't know how," said Willie
again, in a low voice.






54 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.
"There are many ways, Willie,
in which even a little boy like you
may serve him. By always do-
ing what you are told, and by be-
ing kind and gentle to all, and by
giving up your own will for the sake
of others, and by striving to honour
him in your conduct. If it is all done
out of love to Jesus, then you are
serving him, but not if it comes only
from the love of praise or the fear of
blame."
I should like to be good, mamma,"
said Willie.
"So should I like to see you so,
Willie. You know that no one in the
world is ever truly good, or ever has
been so, except the Lord Jesus. But I
cannot tell you how happy it would
make me to know that my little boy






WILLIE IN BED.


was indeed one of his little lambs.
Jesus is so ready to receive little
children, Willie. He will never cast.
out one of them that come to him.
And his promise is that those who
seek him early shall find him. You
can tell me the verse I mean."
"' I love them that love me, and
those that seek me early shall find
me,'" said Willie.
"Right, dear. Try not to forget
that, Willie. I must leave you now,
for I am wanted in the drawing-room.
But I hope that when nurse comes in,
you will tell her you are sorry for
having done what she told you not
to do."
"I'll tell her, mamma," said Willie
rather slowly, and Mrs. Gray kissed
him.


55






56 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.
I am sure you feel sorry for it now,
Willie. If it is a little hard to tell
nurse so, you must not mind, for it is
the right thing to do."
Mamma, I always do what you
and papa tell me," said Willie.
"1 hope you do, Willie. What do
you mean, dear? What is it you want
to say ?"
"Nurse isn't the same," said Willie,
blushing and half afraid.
"Not the same, Willie Not when
papa and I have chosen her to take
care of you, and trust you with her ?
Did you not know it was my wish
that you should obey her ? Have I
never told you to do so ?"
Willie hung his head.
"If you do not obey nurse it is the
same as not obeying me, Willie," said






WILLIE IN BED. 57
Mrs. Gray. "I hope you will not
forget this again."
I'm sorry," said Willie, raising his
face. "I'll tell her so, mamma, and
I'll try never to do it again."
With God's help, Willie," said Mrs.
Gray gently, and after giving him one
more kiss she left the room.
Nurse came in soon after, with the
now dry clothes in her arms, and
Willie did not forget his promise. He
felt much more happy when nurse
kissed him, and told him she quite
forgave him.






58 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.


A DONKEY RIDE.
"WHo wants a ride on a donkey to-
day ?" asked Mr. Gray one morning,
about a week after their journey to
the sea-side.
Oh papa !" Oh papa !" cried
Willie and Lucy at once.
What, both of you ? How are we
to find so many donkeys, do you
think ?"
Oh papa, may we really have a
ride ?" asked Willie. "How kind of
you !"
"Would you like it better than
digging in the sand? Because you
know you can't dig when you are
perched up on the donkey's back,"






A DONKEY RIDE.


said papa, looking very funny; and
Willie and Lucy laughed.
Oh, we'll leave our spades behind,
papa," said Willie. Won't it be nice,
Lucy ? But will Lucy be able to
ride ?"
"Yes, we must find her a donkey
with a nice high saddle-a saddle
with sides and a back, so that she
cannot well fall off."
Lucy was soon dressed, and she
and Willie went down to the beach
with Mr. Gray. A great many
donkeys stood there; and a great
many boys were taking care of them.
Each seemed very eager for his
donkeys to be taken, and they called
out so loud, and crowded round so
close, that Willie was half afraid, and
Lucy clung closely to papa's hand.






60 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.
But Mr. Gray soon fixed on two nice
clean-looking donkeys, lifted up Lucy,
helped Willie to mount, and in a
minute more they were off.
Lucy looked grave, and held her
papa's hand, as he walked by her
side, but Willie was not a bit afraid.
He jogged up and down, trying to
make his donkey go faster.
Papa, mayn't I have a real gallop ?"
he asked. "The donkey won't go
fast."
Gallop, my boy! I don't think
you would keep your seat long, if you
tried a gallop. This is the first ride
you have ever had, you know."
Oh, papa, I should keep my seat
I am quite sure. I saw a little boy
just now, hardly bigger than Lucy,
and he was going quite fast."




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A DONKEY RIDE.


I dare say he had often been out
riding before, Willie."
Willie's face looked rather cloudy,
and he said, half to himself-
"I'm sure I shouldn't fall off."
"Willie," said Mr. Gray in a quiet
tone, did you ever hear of a little
boy who was quite certain he could
jump upon a sand mound that he
had made, when his nurse told him
not."
Willie grew rather red.
"Well, papa, I won't say, I'm sure,"
he said, after a pause. "But won't
you let me go a little faster, and I'll
try not to fall off."
"That is right, Willie," said Mr.
Gray, with a smile. I like to see a
little boy who can allow that he has
been in the wrong or made a mistake.






62 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.
Yes, you may go faster if you like,
but hold on tight."
A stroke from the donkey-boy's
stick made the donkey start off at a
trot. Willie soon felt that he was
not quite so sure of his seat as he had
fancied, and he was glad he had not
tried to gallop. Soon the donkey
went more slowly again, and then Mr.
Gray and Lucy came up. Willie asked
his papa where they were going.
Do you see those rocks, Willie, on
the shore-low dark rocks, down to
the water's edge ?"
I see, papa. Are they pretty
rocks ?"
"Not very. That dark colour is
from the sea-weeds which grow over
them. But I want to find some sea-
anemones to show you."






A DONKEY RIDE. 63
"An-em-o-nes," said Willie slowly.
"I don't know what they are, papa.
Are they alive, and do they live on
the rocks?"
"Both. They are living creatures,
and they fasten themselves to rocks,
where they stay and catch food with
what you would call their feelers."
"Like the feelers of a butterfly?"
asked Willie.
No, the feelers of a sea-anemone
are soft and fleshy, and there are a
great many of them. Sometimes they
are of lovely colours, and when they
are opened out the anemone looks
like a bright flower in the water."
Oh, how pretty, papa! I hope we
shall see one."
I am afraid we shall not find any
here with very bright colours, Willie,






64 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.
and now the tide is low they will
very likely be all shut up. But we
will do our best."
Soon the rocks were reached, and
Mr. Gray lifted Lucy and Willie to
the ground. Mr. Gray held Lucy's
hand, and led her on the rocks, while









he told Willie to take care that he
did not slip on the wet slimy sea-
weeds. He soon found a small
anemone, and called Willie to see it,






A DONKEY RIDE.


but it was shut up, and Willie thought
it very ugly. Then Willie found a
crab, and he took hold of it, but it
pinched his fingers, and he let it fall,
with a cry.
"What is the matter, Willie ?" asked
Mr. Gray.












"Only a nasty crab, papa," said
Willie, squeezing his finger. "He
s






66 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.
gave me a pinch when I took him
up.
Ah, you must take care how you
handle crabs. See, here is a fine
large one. Look how he runs."
"He goes sideways," said Willie.
"I've seen the little wee crabs do that
on the sand. I'm glad I didn't take
up that one. He is so big that he
would have pinched me very hard.
Oh, papa, what is this ? May I take
it up, or will it hurt me ? Is it alive ?"
Yes, but it will not hurt you. It
is called a star-fish."
Willie and Lucy both felt the rough
pink skin, which was as hard and
stiff as leather, and Willie asked how
it could walk, with five legs sticking
out all round."
Those are not legs," said Mr. Gray.






A DONKEY RIDE.


"They are called rays. The legs, or
rather the feet, are on the rays, and
are very small indeed."
"What a funny thing it is," said
Willie.
There are many strange creatures
found in the sea, Willie. God has
made as many wonderful things in
the sea as on land. Do you know
there is one kind of star-fish, which,
when you touch it, seems to go into
a passion and throws off its rays."
Willie and Lucy both laughed at
the idea of the little star-fish throwing
off his rays, and Willie said-
It would be very funny, I think,
if Lucy and I were to throw off our
arms and legs when we are angry."
"Worse than funny, Willie, for it
would be very wrong if such a thing






68 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.
could be," said Mr. Gray. "It is
always wrong for little boys and girls
to be angry. But the star-fish does
not know any better, and cannot
learn. Now look into this pool, and
tell me what you can see."
"Fish, papa-oh! what dear -little
fishes !" cried Willie. "And what are
those ?-are they fish too ?"
"No, they are prawns," said Mr.
Gray. Did you never hear of
prawns ?"
Oh yes, I've seen them in the
shops," said Willie, and they are like
big shrimps. But I thought they
were red."
When they are cooked," said Mr.
Gray, laughing. "And so are crabs
and lobsters. But you don't find them
ready cooked on the sea-shore."






A DONKEY RIDE.


Willie grew as red as the boiled
prawns, at his own mistake.
"Never mind, Willie," said his papa
kindly. A little boy who has never
been to the sea before, cannot of
course know such things. You will
be wiser now. I think it is time to
return to the donkeys, and to go
home. Perhaps some day we. will
come here again, and stay longer."
"I am glad we have been," said
Willie. "I shan't forget what we
have seen. Some crabs, and some
prawns, and some fishes, and a star-
fish, and a sea-anemone."






70 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.


A RAINY DAY.
OH, mamma, a rainy day! I'm so
sorry," sighed Willie.
"Well, Willie, I don't think we
must complain. One day of rain
after nearly a month of fine weather,
is not so very bad."
But we are going home in a few
days, and perhaps it will rain all the
time," said Willie in a very dismal
voice.
"Not at all likely, Willie. I dare-
say it will be quite fine again in a
day or two. It may even clear up
this evening. Come, don't waste
time in gazing out of the window.
That will do you no good."






A RAINY DAY.


"I have nothing to do, mamma."
"Nothing to do! Where is that
nice book papa gave you ?"
I have read it all through,
mamma."
"Suppose you draw me a picture
then. Here is a pencil, and a piece
of paper."
Willie slowly sat down, and made
a few listless strokes, then threw the
pencil on the table, with a yawn.
I don't know what to draw,
mamma, I wish it would stop
raining.
Wishing won't do much good.
Draw a picture of a little boy riding
along on a donkey, or digging in the
sand, or bathing in the sea."
Oh, I can't, mamma. I don't
know how to draw."






72 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.
Come, Willie, don't be pettish. I
shall begin to think you have had too
much fun and play, and want to go
home again."
"I don't want to go home, mamma,"
said Willie, looking very downcast.
"I should like to stay at the sea-
side."
"Indeed, Willie, I should be sorry
for you to do so much longer, if you
cannot bear a single wet day here with
good-temper. At home you can be
happy enough when it rains."
My toys and books are all there,
mamma."
Poor little boy! Well, suppose
you come and hold this skein of wool
for me while I wind it. That will be
useful, at all events."
Willie did as he was asked, but he






A RAINY DAY. 73
did not look any brighter. For a
minute or two Mrs. Gray wound in
silence, and then she asked in a
cheerful tone-
What has Lucy been doing all
the morning ?"
"Playing, mamma."
"Don't you think she would have
been much more happy, Willie, if she
had spent her time in gazing out of the
window, longing for the rain to stop ?"
She doesn't mind staying in doors
so much as I do," said Willie, hanging
his head, and looking very much as
if he wanted to cry.
"Because, I suppose, she has been
too busy to think about it. What a
pity you have not been the same.
Take care; you are letting my skein
slip off your hand. Now you must





74 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.
hold it quite tight while I undo this
knot. That is right. What do you
think papa said to me this morning?"
"I don't know, mamma."
"He was so glad to see the rain
come at last."
Willie looked as if he thought such
a remark very strange, to say the
least. Glad to see the rain!
"You don't know why, do you?
Rain is very much wanted just now
in England. There has been so little
that the grass is getting parched and
dry, and if we were without it much
longer the harvest this year would be
a very bad one."
I don't like the rain," said Willie,
in a low tone.
"Not for its own sake, perhaps;
but for the sake of the poor, you





A RAINY DAY.


ought to be glad to see it, Willie. It
seems very hard to you to be kept in
for one day, when you want to go
out. But how do you think you
would feel, if you were a poor little
ragged boy, and knew that unless the
rain fell the corn would not grow,
and bread would be so dear all the
winter that you must expect to be
often half-starved."
"I shouldn't like it," said Willie.
"Are little boys often half-starved ?"
"Very often, when their fathers
and mothers have not enough money
to buy all the food they want. And
the more the bread costs, the less
they can buy."
"Does it cost more when there
isn't much rain ?" asked Willie.
Of course it does, Willie. You know






76 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.
that corn, like grass and plants, can-
not grow without water, and if it has
not enough it is poor and stunted,
and gives only a small supply of flour
to make bread. Then there is less
bread than usual, and people have to
pay more for it. We have not had
rain now for a long time, and only a
day or two ago we heard that some
farmers were very anxious about
their corn. They were afraid that a
great deal of it would be quite spoiled."
"Do they want much rain, mamma?"
asked Willie, in a very sober tone.
"Not a very great deal, I dare
say. But this nice steady down-pour
is just what they wish for. There is
one more reason why I never like to
see little boys or girls pettish and
cross about the weather. You know






A RAINY DAY. 77
who sends the rain, or makes it fine,
Willie ?"
"Yes, mamma," said Willie.
"God sends it, Willie, and therefore
it must be right, and the best weather
we could have. Even when we can-
not see that it is so, we ought to be-
lieve it."
Willie gave a sigh.
"I won't be cross any more,
mamma. I'll draw a picture when
the skein is done, and then I'll go
and have a game with Lucy. She
asked me to play, and I wouldn't."
"That is right, Willie. I am glad
to see a bright face again. For your
sake I hope the rain will not go on
long,-not longer than is needed to
make the corn grow."






78 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.


ROUGH WEATHER.
IT rained all that day, and nearly all
the next. Towards evening it stopped,
but the wind was blowing hard, and
Willie could catch a glimpse of the
sea from his window, looking dark
and rough, instead of blue and calm.
He longed very much to go down on
the shore, but so long as the rain
lasted Mrs. Gray said he must stay
indoors. When it stopped his papa
said to him-
"Now, Willie, we will go out for
half-an-hour. Ask nurse to wrap you
up well, and we will have a little
ramble."
Willie ran away in great glee, and






ROUGH WEATHER.


soon came back quite ready. Lucy
wanted to go too, but the wind was
too strong and the ground too wet for
her, so Willie went alone with his papa.
As they walked down the street and
across the parade, Willie could hear
the noise of the sea growing louder
and louder. And when at last they
stood on the shore he held his
father's hand, almost afraid of the
sight before him. The wind blew
hard and whistled in his ears, and
the great waves rolled up and dashed
down upon the shore, with such a
noise that he could hardly hear his
father's voice. He thought at first
that it was raining hard, and asked if
he should put up his umbrella, but
Mr. Gray shook his head, and said-
" No, it is only the spray."






80 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.
Then Willie saw that it was no-
thing but the spray, blown by the
wind from the breaking waves. A
great many sea-weeds lay on the
beach, and Willie found one very
long piece of ribbon-sea-weed, which
trailed on the ground, even when he
held it up as high as he could in the
air.
"May I take it home, and show it
to Lucy, papa ?" he asked.
If you like," said Mr. Gray. I
dare say Lucy will like to see it.
There comes a great wave, Willie !"
"It is such a nice noise," said
Willie, jumping up and down.
" Oh, look at that wave! I do wonder
the sea doesn't wash away all the
sand."
"I am not surprised at your won-






ROUGH WEATHER. 81
der, Willie. But it is God's will that
the weak soft sand should keep back
the strong fierce sea. When we get
home, if you will remind me, I will


show you in the thirty-fourth chapter
of Job, how God says that He has set
bars and doors to the sea, and has
said, 'Hitherto shalt thou come, but
G






82 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.
no further ; and here shall thy proud
waves be stayed.' But for that we
might indeed expect to see the sand
very soon washed away. You see it
is the door that God has set to keep
the sea in its place."
Willie and his papa stayed a little
while longer, and then went home.
Willie then gave Lucy the long
piece of sea-weed, much to her de-
light.
What a great long one it is," said
Lucy, holding it up. "It is wider
than my pink sash."
"Lucy, I wish you had seen the
waves," said Willie. Such big ones!
Nurse, have you ever seen such great
waves ?"
"Ever seen them, Master Willie?
Indeed I have seen much larger ones






ROUGH WEATHER.


than ever you have, and what's more,
I have been on them."
"Oh nurse !" and Willie came up
close to her. Have you really been
on the sea ? Was it very nice ? Do
tell me about it."
"It is very nice in fine weather,
Master Willie, and I shouldn't mind
it in rough weather if I wasn't sea-
sick. Before I came to live with your
mamma, I was with a lady who went
abroad-out of England, that is-and
I went with her."
"Did you go to France?" asked
Willie.
Yes, we went to France. And it
was very nice in going, for the sun
was shining, and it was as pleasant as
could be. But in coming back we
had rough weather. The wind blew






84 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.
very hard, and the ship went up and
down, and the waves dashed over the
deck."
Oh, nurse, were you wet through ?"
"We were not on deck, Master
Willie. It was too rough for any one
to stay there except the sailors, and
perhaps some of the gentlemen. I
was very sick and ill, and I lay down
on a couch just under the sky-
light."
I don't know what a sky-light is,"
said Willie.
It's a window in the roof, Master
Willie, like that which lights the hall
at home, only this was in the roof of
the cabin. Well, I lay under it, and
all at once a great wave dashed over
the deck, broke one of the panes, and
down poured a stream of water upon






ROUGH WEATHER. 85
me. I had to be pulled out of the
way, for I was too ill to stand up-
right."
Oh, nurse, how funny!" said Willie,
laughing.
I did not think it at all funny at
the time, Master Willie," said nurse.
"But I should like to go on the
water very much," said Willie. I
shall ask papa if he won't take me."
What, on those great waves,
Master Willie ?"
"No, but when it is quiet again,
nurse. It would be such fun. I dare
say he will."
Willie ran off as he spoke, and
found his papa in the parlour. Mr.
Gray was busy writing a letter, so,
like a polite little boy, Willie waited
till he had done, and then said-






86 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.
"Papa, may I speak now ?"
"In a moment, my boy. I must
just direct this. That is right. Now,
what do you want ?"
"Papa, I want to know if you will
take me on the water-I mean, if you
don't mind."
On the sea. I am afraid mamma
would not quite approve of that to-
day."
I don't mean to-day, but when the
sea is smooth," said Willie. "Nurse
has been on the water, papa. She
went to France."
"Yes, but that was in a steamer.
I am afraid you must be content with
a rowing-boat. We will try if we can
manage it before we return home.
Only we must wait for fine calm
weather."






A ROW ON THE WATER. 87
Willie thanked his papa warmly,
and ran back to nurse, to tell her
what Mr. Gray had said.



A ROW ON THE WATER.

THE rain did not go on many days,
but the wind did, and the sea was
much too rough for any boating.
Even Willie, much as he longed for
it, could not deny that those great
tumbling tossing waves were not
quite what he would choose.
But people do have to go some-
times, papa, even when it is rough,"
he said one day.
Often, Willie, and if it were our
duty now I would go at once and






88 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.
take you. But to put ourselves into
danger merely for the sake of pleasure
would be wrong."
"Would there be danger ?" asked
Willie.
Not much, perhaps; but there
might be danger to a small boat.
And I love my little boy too well
to wish to run even a small risk
with him when there is no real
reason."
I wish we had gone on the sea
when it was so fine," sighed Willie.
But we did not, Willie, and it can-
not be helped now, so it is of no use
sighing about it," said Mr. Gray, with
a smile.
Only, papa, we are going home
in a week, and I am so afraid it will
be rough all the time."






A ROW ON THE WATER. 89
Not very likely, I hope. I expect
to see a change in a day or two."
Mr. Gray was right, except that
the change was rather longer in
coming than he said. It was not till
two days before their return home
that Willie, on looking out of his
window in the morning, saw a
smooth calm blue sea again. He ran
downstairs as soon as he was dressed,
crying-
Mamma, mamma, it is quite fine
to day! May we go on the water ?"
"I hope so, Willie. We shall see
what papa says."
"I do hope he will take us, mamma.
I was so afraid we shouldn't have the
sea smooth in time. Oh, there he is,"
and Willie ran to meet Mr. Gray in the
passage. "Papa, will it do to-day ?"






90 WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEA-SIDE.
The answer was just what Willie
wanted, and Willie was so happy
that he could hardly sit still or eat
his breakfast. When the afternoon
came they all went down to the beach
together. Mr. Gray chose a pretty
little rowing-boat, and Willie was
very much pleased to see that the
name painted on its side was The
Lucy." Mr. Gray then helped in
Mrs. Gray and nurse, lifted in Willie
and Lucy, stepped in himself, and
then they were off.
The boat glided smoothly through
the water, and Willie thought it very
nice indeed. First he sat still, look-
ing about him. Then he leaned over
the side, dipping his hands into the
fresh cool water. The sea was
covered with ripples, and sometimes




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