• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 The fox and the goat
 The frog and the ox
 The man and the goose
 The lion and other beasts
 The dove and the ant
 The fox without a tail
 The butterfly and the snail
 The wolf and the crane
 The frog and the rat
 The fighting cock and eagle
 The diamond and the loadstone
 The bear and the bees
 The frogs desiring a king
 The fox and the boar
 The vine and the goat
 The discontented horse
 The mountain in labour
 The fox and the stork
 The horse and the stag
 The lion wounded
 The ass in the lion's skin
 Jupiter and the farmer
 The vain jackdaw
 The viper and the file
 The wolf and the lamb
 The old bullfinch and young...
 The mouse and the weasel
 The old hound
 The charger and the ass
 The colt and the farmer
 The lark and her young ones
 The fox and the crow
 The peacock's complaint
 The stag in the ox-stall
 The wind and the sun
 The travellers and the bear
 The dog and the shadow
 The hermit and the bear
 The shepherd's boy and the...
 The fawn and her mother
 The tortoise and the eagle
 The brother and sister
 The shepherd's dog and the...
 The covetous man
 The hare and the tortoise
 The hog and the acorns
 The country mouse and the city...
 The cat and the mice
 The kid and the wolf
 The council of horses
 The ass and the little dog
 The lion and the four bulls
 The leopard and the fox
 The warrior wolf
 The belly and the members
 The cur, the horse, and the shepherd's...
 The jackdaw and the eagle
 The ass and the lion hunting
 The wolf in sheep's clothing
 The two bees
 The turkey and the ant
 The dog and the wolf
 The satyr and the traveller
 The barley-mow and the dunghil...
 The sheep-biter and shepherd
 The stag at the pool
 The old swallows and the young...
 The waggoner and the butterfly
 The lion, the bear, and the...
 The fox and the grapes
 The hare and many friends
 The cock and the fox
 The lion and the mouse
 The trumpeter taken prisoner
 The mouse and the elephant
 The husbandman and his sons
 The bald knight
 The dog in the manger
 The old man and death
 The old hen and young cock
 Mercury and the woodman
 The wolf and the kid
 The old man and his sons
 The brook and the fountain
 The mice in council
 The fox in the well
 The horse and the wolf
 The two springs
 The countryman and the raven
 The fox and the bramble
 Hercules and the carter
 The boys and the frogs
 The cock and the jewel
 The nightingale and the glow-w...
 The fox and the sick lion
 The lion, the fox, and the...
 The one-eyed doe
 The fox, the raven, and the...
 The two pots
 The two frogs
 The fox and the mask
 The cat, the cock, and the young...
 The mice and the trap
 The chameleon
 The wolf, the fox, and the ass
 The boy and the butterfly
 The crow and the pitcher
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Favourite fables, in prose and verse
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00025366/00001
 Material Information
Title: Favourite fables, in prose and verse
Physical Description: 150, 2 p., 24 leaves of plates : ill. ; 21 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Weir, Harrison, 1824-1906 ( Illustrator )
Greenaway, John, 1816-1890 ( Engraver )
Griffith and Farran ( Publisher )
Wertheimer, Lea and Co ( Printer )
Butterworth and Heath ( Engraver )
Publisher: Griffith and Farran
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: Wertheimer, Lea and Co.
Publication Date: 1870
 Subjects
Subject: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1870   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1870   ( lcsh )
Fables -- 1870   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1870   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1870
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Fables   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: with twenty-four illustrations from drawings by Harrison Weir.
General Note: Illustrations engraved by Greenaway and Butterworth and Heath.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements follow text.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00025366
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002226104
notis - ALG6387
oclc - 07570870
 Related Items
Other version: Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
        Page iv
        Page v
        Page vi
    List of Illustrations
        Page vii
    The fox and the goat
        Page 1
    The frog and the ox
        Page 2
    The man and the goose
        Page 3
    The lion and other beasts
        Page 4
    The dove and the ant
        Page 5
    The fox without a tail
        Page 6
        Page 6a
    The butterfly and the snail
        Page 7
        Page 8
    The wolf and the crane
        Page 9
    The frog and the rat
        Page 10
        Page 11
    The fighting cock and eagle
        Page 12
        Page 12a
    The diamond and the loadstone
        Page 13
        Page 14
    The bear and the bees
        Page 15
    The frogs desiring a king
        Page 16
    The fox and the boar
        Page 17
    The vine and the goat
        Page 18
        Page 18a
    The discontented horse
        Page 19
        Page 20
    The mountain in labour
        Page 21
    The fox and the stork
        Page 21
        Page 22
    The horse and the stag
        Page 23
    The lion wounded
        Page 24
        Page 24a
    The ass in the lion's skin
        Page 25
    Jupiter and the farmer
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    The vain jackdaw
        Page 28
    The viper and the file
        Page 29
    The wolf and the lamb
        Page 30
        Page 30a
    The old bullfinch and young birds
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    The mouse and the weasel
        Page 34
    The old hound
        Page 35
    The charger and the ass
        Page 36
        Page 36a
    The colt and the farmer
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
    The lark and her young ones
        Page 40
        Page 41
    The fox and the crow
        Page 42
        Page 42a
    The peacock's complaint
        Page 43
    The stag in the ox-stall
        Page 44
        Page 45
    The wind and the sun
        Page 46
    The travellers and the bear
        Page 47
    The dog and the shadow
        Page 48
        Page 48a
    The hermit and the bear
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
    The shepherd's boy and the wolf
        Page 53
    The fawn and her mother
        Page 54
        Page 54a
    The tortoise and the eagle
        Page 55
    The brother and sister
        Page 56
    The shepherd's dog and the wolf
        Page 57
        Page 58
    The covetous man
        Page 59
    The hare and the tortoise
        Page 60
        Page 60a
    The hog and the acorns
        Page 61
    The country mouse and the city mouse
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    The cat and the mice
        Page 65
    The kid and the wolf
        Page 66
        Page 66a
    The council of horses
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
    The ass and the little dog
        Page 70
        Page 69
    The lion and the four bulls
        Page 71
    The leopard and the fox
        Page 72
        Page 72a
    The warrior wolf
        Page 73
    The belly and the members
        Page 74
        Page 75
    The cur, the horse, and the shepherd's dog
        Page 76
        Page 77
    The jackdaw and the eagle
        Page 78
        Page 78a
    The ass and the lion hunting
        Page 79
    The wolf in sheep's clothing
        Page 80
    The two bees
        Page 81
    The turkey and the ant
        Page 82
        Page 83
    The dog and the wolf
        Page 84
        Page 84a
        Page 85
    The satyr and the traveller
        Page 86
    The barley-mow and the dunghill
        Page 87
    The sheep-biter and shepherd
        Page 88
        Page 89
    The stag at the pool
        Page 90
        Page 90a
    The old swallows and the young birds
        Page 91
        Page 92
    The waggoner and the butterfly
        Page 93
        Page 94
    The lion, the bear, and the fox
        Page 95
    The fox and the grapes
        Page 96
        Page 96a
    The hare and many friends
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
    The cock and the fox
        Page 100
        Page 101
    The lion and the mouse
        Page 102
        Page 102a
    The trumpeter taken prisoner
        Page 103
    The mouse and the elephant
        Page 104
        Page 105
    The husbandman and his sons
        Page 106
    The bald knight
        Page 107
    The dog in the manger
        Page 108
        Page 108a
    The old man and death
        Page 108
        Page 109
    The old hen and young cock
        Page 110
        Page 111
    Mercury and the woodman
        Page 112
        Page 113
    The wolf and the kid
        Page 114
        Page 114a
    The old man and his sons
        Page 114
        Page 115
    The brook and the fountain
        Page 116
    The mice in council
        Page 117
        Page 118
    The fox in the well
        Page 119
    The horse and the wolf
        Page 120
        Page 120a
    The two springs
        Page 120
        Page 121
    The countryman and the raven
        Page 122
    The fox and the bramble
        Page 123
    Hercules and the carter
        Page 124
    The boys and the frogs
        Page 125
    The cock and the jewel
        Page 126
        Page 126a
    The nightingale and the glow-worm
        Page 127
    The fox and the sick lion
        Page 128
        Page 129
    The lion, the fox, and the geese
        Page 130
        Page 131
    The one-eyed doe
        Page 132
        Page 132a
    The fox, the raven, and the dove
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
    The two pots
        Page 136
    The two frogs
        Page 137
    The fox and the mask
        Page 138
        Page 138a
    The cat, the cock, and the young mouse
        Page 138
        Page 139
    The mice and the trap
        Page 140
    The chameleon
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
    The wolf, the fox, and the ass
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
    The boy and the butterfly
        Page 148
    The crow and the pitcher
        Page 149
        Page 150
    Advertising
        Page 151
        Page 152
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text














































"*


.....................








































































THE FROG AND THE OX.










FAVOURITE FABLES,








ITH TWENTY-FOURO ILLUSTRATIONS

FROM DRAWINGS

3 Y GARRISON /EIFP


JUSTICE.


LONDON:
GRIFFITH AND FARRAN,
(SUCCESSORS TO NEWBERY AND HARRIS),
CORNER OF ST. PAUL'S CHURCHYARD.
MI)CCCLXX.























































LONDON:

PRINTED BY WERTHEIMER, LEA AND CO.,
FINSBURY CIRCUS.















CONTENTS.


PAGE
THE FOX AND THE GOAT ... ... .. I
THE FROG AND THE OX ... ... ... ... 2
THE MAN AND HIS GOOSE ... ... ... ... 3
THE LION AND OTHER BEASTS ... ... ... 4
THE DOVE AND THE ANT ... ... ... ... 5
THE FOX WITHOUT A TAIL ... ... ... ... 6
THE BUTTERFLY AND THE SNAIL ... ... ... 7
THE WOLF AND THE CRANE ... ... ... .. 9
THE FROG AND THE RAT ... ... ... ... Io
THE FIGHTING COCK AND EAGLE ... ... ... 12
THE DIAMOND AND THE LOADSTONE ... ... 13
THE BEAR AND THE BEES ... ... ... ... 15
THE FROGS DESIRING A KING ... ... ... 16
THE FOX AND THE BOAR ... ... .. 17
THE VINE AND THE GOAT ... ... ... ... 18
THE DISCONTENTED HORSE ... ... ... ... 19
THE MOUNTAIN IN LABOUR ... ... ... ... 21
THE FOX AND THE STORK ... ... ... ... 21
THE HORSE AND THE STAG ... ... ... ... 23
THE LION WOUNDED ... ... ... ... ... 24
THE ASS IN THE LION'S SKIN ... ... ... 25
JUPITER AND THE FARMER ... ... ... ... 25
THE VAIN JACKDAW ... ... ... ... .,. 28


FABLE
I.
II.


IV.
V.
VI.
VII.
VIII.
IX.
X.
XI.
XII.
XIII.
XIV.
XV.
XVI.
XVII.
XVIII.
XIX.
XX.
XXI.
XXII.
XXIII.
XXIII.











CONTENTS.


FABLE
XXIV.
XXV.
XXVI.
XXVII.
XXVIII.
XXIX.
XXX.
XXXI.
XXXII.
XXXIII.
XXXIV.
XXXV.
XXXVI.
XXXVII.
XXXVIII.
XXXIX.
XL.
XLI.
XLII.
XLIII.
XLIV.
XLV.
XLVI.
XLVII.
XLVIII.
XLIX.
L.
LI.
LII.


THE
THE
THE
THE
THE
THE
THE
THE
THE
THE
THE
THE
THE
THE
THE
THE
THE
THE
THE
THE
THE
THE
THE


THE COUNTRY MOUSE AND THE
THE CAT AND THE MICE ...
THE KID AND THE WOLF ...
THE COUNCIL OF HORSES ...
THE ASS AND THE LITTLE DOG
THE LION AND THE FOUR BULL:


VIPER AND THE FILE ...
WOLF AND THE LAMB ... .
OLD BULLFINCH AND YOUNG BIRDS
MOUSE AND THE WEASEL ...
OLD HOUND ......
CHARGER AND THE ASS ... .
COLT AND THE FARMER ... .
LARK AND HER YOUNG ONES ...
FOX AND THE CROW ...
PEACOCK'S COMPLAINT ...
STAG IN THE Ox-STALL... .
WIND AND THE SUN ...
TRAVELLERS AND THE BEAR ...
DOG AND THE SHADOW ... .
HERMIT AND THE BEAR ... .
SHEPHERD'S BOY AND THE WOLF
FAWN AND HER MOTHER ...
TORTOISE AND THE EAGLE ...
BROTHER AND SISTER ...
SHEPHERD'S DOG AND WOLF ...
COVETOUS MAN ... ...
HARE AND THE TORTOISE ...
HOG AND THE ACORNS ... .


CITY MOUSE ... 62
... ... ... 65
... ... 66
... ... ... 66
... ... ... 69
S ... ... ... 7


PAGE
... 29
... 30
... ... 3

34
... .. 35
... ... 36
.. ... 37
... ... 40
... ... 42
... ... 43
... ... 44
... ... 46
... ... 47
... ... 48
... ... 49
... .. 53
.. .. 54
... ... 55
... ... 56
... ... 57
... .. 59
... ... 6
... ... 61









CONTENTS. V
FABLE PAGE
LIII. THE LEOPARD AND THE FOX ... ... ... ... 72
LIV. THE WARRIOR WOLF ... ... ... ... ... 73
LV. THE BELLY AND THE MEMBERS ... ... ** 74
LVI. THE CUR, THE HORSE, AND THE SHEPHERD'S DOG ... 76
LVII. THE JACKDAW AND THE EAGLE ... ... ... 78
LVIII. THE ASS AND THE LION HUNTING ... ... ... 79
LIX. THE WOLF IN SHEEP'S CLOTHING ... ... ... 80
LX. THE Two BEES... ... ... ... ... ... 81
LXI. THE TURKEY AND THE ANT ... ... ... ... 82
LXII. THE DOG AND THE WOLF ... ... ... ... 84
LXIII. THE SATYR AND THE TRAVELLER ... ... ... 86
LXIV. THE BARLEYMOW AND THE DUNGHILL ... ... 87
LXV. THE SHEEP-BITER AND SHEPHERD ... ... ... 88
LXVI. THE STAG AT THE POOL ... ... ... ... 90
LXVII. THE OLD SWALLOWS AND THE YOUNG BIRDS ... 91
LXVIII. THE WAGGONER AND THE BUTTERFLY ... ... 93
LXIX. THE LION, THE BEAR AND THE FOX... ... ... 95
LXX. THE FOX AND THE GRAPES ... ... ... ... 96
LXXI. THE HARE AND MANY FRIENDS ... ... ... 97
LXXII. THE COCK AND THE FOX ... ... ... ... 100
LXXIII. THE LION AND THE MOUSE ... ... ... ... 102
LXXIV. THE TRUMPETER TAKEN PRISONER ... ... ... 103
LXXV. THE MOUSE AND THE ELEPHANT ... ... ... 104
LXXVI. THE HUSBANDMAN AND HIS SONS ... ... ... 106
LXXVII. THE BALD KNIGHT ... ... ... ... ... 107
LXXVIII. THE DOG IN THE MANGER ... ... ... ... 108
LXXIX. THE OLD MAN AND DEATH ... .. ... ... IO8
LXXX. THE OLD HEN AND YOUNG COCK ... ... ... IIO
LXXXI. MERCURY AND THE WOODMAN ... ... ... I12











CONTENTS.


FABLE
LXXXII.
LXXXIII.
LXXXIV.
LXXXV.
LXXXVI.
LXXXVII.
LXXXVIII.
LXXXIX.
XC.
XCI.
XCII.
XCIII.
XCIV.
XCV.
XCVI.
XCVII.
XCVIII.
XCIX.
C.
CI.
CII.
CIII.
CIV.
CV.
CVI.
CVIT.


THE
THE
THE
THE
THE
THE
THE
THE
THE


Two POTS ... ...
Two FROGS ... ...
Fox AND THE MASK ...
CAT, THE COCK, AND THE YOUNG
MICE AND THE TRAP .. ...
CHAMELEON ...
WOLF, THE FOX, AND THE ASS...
BOY AND THE BUTTERFLY ...
CROW AND THE PITCHER


THE WOLF AND THE KID ...
THE OLD MAN AND HIS SONS ...
THE BROOK AND THE FOUNTAIN ...
THE MICE IN COUNCIL
THE FOX IN THE WELL ...
THE HORSE AND THE WOLF ... .
THE TWO SPRINGS ... ...
THE COUNTRYMAN AND THE RAVEN ...
THE FOX AND THE BRAMBLE ... ..
HERCULES AND THE CARTER ... .
THE BOYS AND THE FROGS ... .
THE COCK AND THE JEWEL ... .
THE NIGHTINGALE AND THE GLOW-WORM
THE SICK LION ......
THE LION, THE FOX, AND THE GEESE
THE ONE-EYED DOE ... ...
THE FOX, THE RAVEN, AND THE DOVE


-o-


PAGE
... ... 14
... ... 14
... ... 116
xi6
... ... 117
... ... 119
... ... 120
... ... 120
... ... 22
... ... 23
124
... ... 124
12r)
... ... 26
... ... 127
... ... 128
... ... 130
... ... 32
... ... 33
... ... 136
137
... ... 138
OUSE ... 138
... ... T4o
141
144
... ... 48
... ... 49


M M

















LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.


I. THE FROG AND THE Ox (Frontisiece) ...

2. THE FOX WITHOUT A TAIL ...

3. THE FIGHTING COCK AND EAGLE ...

4. THE VINE AND THE GOAT ...
,. THE LION WOUNDED ...
6. THE WOLF AND THE LAMB ... ...

7. THE CHARGER AND THE ASS ... .
8. THE FOX AND THE CROW ...

9. THE DOG AND THE SHADOW ... ..
[o. THE FAWN AND HER MOTHER ...

SI. THE HARE AND THE TORTOISE ...
[2. THE KID AND THE WOLF ... ...

[3. THE LEOPARD AND THE FOX ...

14. THE JACKDAW AND THE EAGLE ... .
15. THE DOG AND THE WOLF ...
16. THE STAG AT THE POOL ... ...

[7. THE FOX AND THE GRAPES ...
[8. THE LION AND THE MOUSE
[9. THE DOG IN THE MANGER ...
20. THE WOLF AND THE GOAT ...
21. THE HORSE AND THE WOLF ...

22. THE COCK AND THE JEWEL ...

23. THE ONE-EYED DOE ... ...
24. TIE FOX AND THE MASK ...


PAGE
2

6
... 12
... I8

... 24

30
... 30

36

.. 42
... 48

.. 54
... 6o
... 66

.. 72

...
... 84
... 9
. ... 96
. ... 102


S ... O114

.... 120
* .., 126

. ... 132

. ... 138


1


J


I













FAVOURITE FABLES.


FABLE I.

THE FOX AND THE GOAT.

N the extreme end of a
_-village a Fox one day
went to have a peep at a
hen-roost. He had the
S' bad luck to fall into a
well, where he swam first to
L this side, and then to that
side, but could not get out
with all his pains. At last,
O %) as chance would have it, a
poor Goat came to the same
place to seek for some drink.
" So ho! friend Fox," said he, "you quaff it off there at a
great rate: I hope by this time you have quenched your
thirst." "Thirst said the sly rogue; what I have found
here to drink is so clear, and so sweet, that I cannot take my








FA VO URITE FABLES.


fill of it; do, pray, come down, my dear, and have a taste of
it." With that, in plumped the Goat as he bade him; but
as soon as he was down, the Fox jumped on his horns, and
leaped out of the well in a trice; and as he went off, Good
bye, my wise friend," said he; "if you had as much brains
as you have beard, I should have been in the well still, and
you might have stood on the brink of it to laugh at me, as I
now do at you."

MORAL.

A rogue will give up the best friend he has to get out of
a scrape; so that we ought to know what a man is, that we
may judge how far we may trust to what he says.



FABLE II.

THE FROG AND THE OX.

AN old Frog, being wonderfully struck with the size and
majesty of an Ox that was grazing in the marshes, was
seized with the desire to expand herself to the same portly
magnitude. After puffing and swelling for some time,
"What think you," said she, to her young ones, "will this
do?" Far from it," said they. "Will this?" "By no








FA VOURITE FABLES.


means." "But this surely will?" "Nothing like it," they
replied. After many fruitless and ridiculous efforts to the
same purpose, the foolish Frog burst her skin, and miserably
expired upon the spot.

MORAL.

,To attempt what is out of our power, and to rival those
greater than ourselves, is sure to expose us to contempt and
ruin .,
-0-

FABLE III.

THE MAN AND HIS GOOSE.

A CERTAIN Man had a Goose, which laid him a golden
egg every day. But, not contented with this, which rather
increased than abated his avarice, he was resolved to kill the
Goose, and cut up her belly, so that he might come to the
inexhaustible treasure which he fancied she had within her,
without being obliged to wait for the slow production of a
single egg daily. He did so, and, to his great sorrow and
disappointment, found nothing within.

MORAL.
The man that hastes to become rich often finds that he has
only brought on ruin.








FA VOURITE FABLES.


FABLE IV.
THE LION AND OTHER BEASTS.
THE Bull, and several other beasts, were ambitious of the
honour of hunting with the Lion. His savage Majesty
graciously condescended to their desire; and it was agreed
that they should have an equal share in whatever might be
taken. They scour the forest, are unanimous in the pursuit,
and, after a long chase, pull down a noble stag. It was
divided with great dexterity by the Bull into four equal
parts; but just as he was going to secure his share-
"Hold!" says the Lion, "let no one presume to help
himself till he hath heard our just and reasonable claims. I
seize upon the first quarter by virtue of my prerogative; the
second I claim as due to my superior conduct and courage;
I cannot forego the third, on account of the necessities of
my den; and if anyone is inclined to dispute my right to the
fourth, let him speak." Awed by the majesty of his frown,
and the terror of his paws, they silently withdrew, resolving
never to hunt again but with their equals.

MORAL.
Be certain that those who have great power are honest
before you place yourselves in their hands, or you will be
deprived of your just rights.








FA VO URIZE FABLES.


FABLE V.

THE DOVE AND THE ANT.

THE Ant, compelled by thirst, went to drink in a clear,
purling rivulet; but the current, with its circling eddy,
snatched her away, and carried her down the stream. A
Dove, pitying her distressed condition, cropped a branch
from a neighboring tree and let it fall into the water, by
means of which the Ant saved herself and got ashore. Not
long after, a Fowler, having a design against the Dove,
planted his nets in due order, without the bird's observing
what he was about; which the Ant perceiving, just as he
was going to put his design into execution, she bit his heel,
and made him give so sudden a start, that the Dove took the
alarm, and flew away.

MORAL.
Kindness to others seldom fails of its reward; and none
is so weak that he may not be able in some fashion to repay
it. Let us show kindness without looking for a return, but a
blessing will surely follow.








FA VO URIT FABLES.


FABLE VI.

THE FOX WITHOUT A TAIL.

A Fox being caught in a steel trap by his tail, was glad
to compound for his escape with the loss of it; but on coming
abroad into the world, began to be so sensible of the dis-
grace such a defect would bring upon him, that he almost
wished he had died rather than left it behind him. However,
to make the best of a bad matter, he formed a project in his
head to call an assembly of the rest of the Foxes, and propose
it for their imitation as a fashion which would be very agree-
able and becoming. He did so, and made a long harangue
upon the unprofitableness of tails in general, and endeavoured
chiefly to show the awkwardness and inconvenience of a Fox's
tail in particular; adding that it would be both more graceful
and more expeditious to be altogether without them, and
that, for his part, what he had only imagined and conjectured
before, he now found by experience; for that he never enjoyed
himself so well, nor found himself so easy as he had done
since he cut off his tail. He said no more, but looked about
with a brisk air to see what proselytes he had gained; when
a sly old Fox in the company, who understood trap, answered

















m^


h,-


THE FOX WITHOUT A TAIL.


=Fi~~
-~-~-~--


X. a


e








FA VO URITE FABLES.


him, with a leer, "I believe you may have found a con-
veniency in parting with your tail; and when we are in the
same circumstances, perhaps we may do so too."

MORAL.

It is common for men to wish others reduced to their own
level, and we ought to guard against such advice as may
proceed from this principle.
-0-

FABLE VII.
THE BUTTERFLY AND THE SNAIL.
As in the sunshine of the morn,
A Butterfly, but newly born,
Sat proudly perking on a rose,
With pert conceit his bosom glows;
His wings, all glorious to behold,
Bedropt with azure, jet and gold,
Wide he displays; the spangled dew
Reflects his eyes, and various hue.

His now forgotten friend, a Snail,
Beneath his house, with slimy trail,
Crawls o'er the grass; whom, when he spies,
In wrath he to the gardener cries:








FA VO URITE FABLES.


What means yon peasant's daily toil,
From choaking weeds to rid the soil ?
Why wake you to the morning's care?
Why with new arts correct the year?
Why glows the peach with crimson hue?
And why the plum's inviting blue?
Were they to feast his taste designed,
That vermin, of voracious kind?
Crush, then, the slow, the pilfering race;
So purge thy garden from disgrace."

"What arrogance!" the Snail replied;
"How insolent is upstart pride!
Hadst thou not thus, with insult vain,
Provoked my patience to complain,
I had concealed thy meaner birth,
Nor traced thee to the scum of earth:
For, scarce nine suns have wak'd the hours,
To swell the fruit, and paint the flowers,
Since I thy humbler life surveyed,
In base, in sordid guise arrayed;
A hideous insect, vile, unclean,
You dragg'd a slow and noisome train;
And from your spider-bowels drew
Foul film, and spun the dirty clue.








FAVOURITE FABLES. 9

I own my humble life, good friend;
Snail was I born, and Snail shall end.
And what's a Butterfly? At best,
He's but a Caterpillar, dress'd;
And all thy race (a numerous seed)
Shall prove of Caterpillar breed."

MORAL.
All upstarts, insolent in place,
Remind us of their vulgar race.


FABLE VIII.

THE WOLF AND THE CRANE.
A WOLF, after too greedily devouring his prey, happened
to have a bone stick in his throat, which gave him so much
pain that he went howling up and down, and importuning
every creature he met to lend him a kind hand in order to
his relief; nay, he even promised a reward to anyone who
should undertake the operation with success. At last the
Crane, tempted with the lucre of the reward, and having first
made the Wolf confirm his promise with an oath, undertook
the business, and ventured his long neck into the rapacious
felon's throat.
In short, he plucked out the bone, and expected the pro-
mised gratuity; when the Wolf, turning his eyes disdainfully








FA VO URITE FABLES.


towards him, said, "I did not think you had been so un-
reasonable! Have I not suffered you safely to draw your
neck out of my jaws? And have you the conscience to
demand a further reward ?"

MORAL.

When we do good to bad men, we must not expect good
from them.


FABLE IX.

THE FROG AND THE RAT.

ONCE on a time, a foolish Frog,
Vain, proud, and stupid as a log,
Tired with the marsh, her native home,
Imprudently abroad would roam,
And fix her habitation where
She'd breathe at least a purer air.
She was resolved to change, that's poz;
Could she be worse than where she was ?

Away the silly creature leaps.
A Rat, who saw her lab'ring steps,
Cried out, "Where in this hurry, pray?
You certainly will go astray!"







FA VO URITE FABLES.


Ne'er fear; I quit that filthy bog,
Where I so long have croaked incog:
People of talents, sure, should thrive,
And not be buried thus alive.
But, pray (for I'm extremely dry),
Know you of any water nigh ?"

"None," said the Rat, "you'll reach to-day,
As you so slowly make your way.
Believe a friend, and take my word,
This jaunt of yours is quite absurd.
Go to your froggery again;
In your own element remain."
No: on the journey she was bent,
Her thirst increasing as she went;
For want of drink she scarce can hop,
And yet despairing of a drop:
Too late she moans her folly past;
She faints, she sinks, she breathes her last.



MORAL.

Vulgar minds will pay full dear,
When once they move beyond their sphere.








FA VOURITE FABLES.


FABLE X.

THE FIGHTING COCK AND EAGLE.

Two Cocks were fighting for the sovereignty of the dung-
hill, and one of them having got the better of the other, he
that was vanquished crept into a hole, and hid himself for
some time; but the victor flew up to an eminent place, clapt
his wings, and crowed out victory. An Eagle, who was
watching for his prey near the place, saw him, and, making a
swoop, trussed him up in his talons, and carried him off. The
Cock that had been beaten, perceiving this, soon quitted his
hole, and, shaking off all remembrance of his late disgrace,
gallanted the hens with all the intrepidity imaginable.


MORAL.

Before honour is humility. We must not be too much
elevated by prosperity lest we meet a grievous fall.

































THE FIGHTING COCK AND EAGLE.


rm"








FA VO URITE TABLES


FABLE XI.

THE DIAMOND AND THE LOADSTONE.

A DIAMOND, Of great beauty and lustre, observing, not
only many other gems of a lower class ranged together with
himself in the same cabinet, but a Loadstone likewise placed not
far from him, began to question the latter how he came there,
and what pretensions he had to be ranked among the precious
stones; he, who appeared to be no better than a mere flint,
a sorry, coarse, rusty-looking pebble, without any the least
shining quality to advance him to such an honour; and con-
cluded with desiring him to keep his distance, and pay a
proper respect to his superiors.
"I find," said the Loadstone, "you judge by external
appearances, and condemn without due examination; but I
will not act so ungenerously by you. I am willing to allow
you your due praise: you are a pretty bauble; I am mightily
delighted to see you glitter and sparkle; I look upon you
with pleasure and surprise; but I must be convinced you are
of some sort of use before I acknowledge that you have any
real merit, or treat you with that respect which you seem to
demand. With regard to myself, I confess my deficiency in







FA VO URITE FABLES.


outward beauty; but I may venture to say, that I make
amends by my intrinsic qualities. The great improvement
of navigation is entirely owing to me. By me the distant
parts of the world have been made known and are accessible
to each other; the remotest nations are connected together,
and all, as it were, united into one common society; by a
mutual intercourse they relieve one another's wants, and all
enjoy the several blessings peculiar to each. The world is
indebted to me for its wealth, its splendour, and its power;
and the arts and sciences are, in a great measure, obliged to
me for their improvements, and their continual increase. All
these blessings I am the origin of; .for by my aid it is that
man is enable to construct that valuable instrument, the
Mariner's Compass."


MORAL.

Let dazzling stones in splendour glare;
Utility's the gem for wear.








FA VO URITE FABLES.


FABLE XII.

THE BEAR AND THE BEES.

A BEAR happened to be stung by a Bee; and the pain
was so acute, that in the madness of revenge he ran into the
garden, and overturned the hive. This outrage provoked
their anger to such a degree that it brought the fury of the
whole swarm upon him. They attacked him with such
violence that his life was in danger, and it was with the
utmost difficulty that he made his escape, wounded from
head to tail. In this desperate condition, lamenting his
misfortunes, and licking his sores, he could not forbear
reflecting how much more advisable it had been to have
patiently borne one injury, than by an unprofitable resent-
ment to have provoked a thousand.


MORAL.

It is more prudent to acquiesce under an injury from a
single person, then by an act of vengeance to bring upon us
the resentment of a whole community.







FA VO URITE FABLES.


FABLE XIII.

THE FROGS DESIRING A KING.

THE Frogs, living an easy, free life everywhere among the
lakes and ponds, assembled together one day, in a very tumul-
tuous manner, and petitioned Jupiter to let them have a king,
who might inspect their morals, and make them live a little
honester. Jupiter, being at that time in pretty good humour,
was pleased to laugh heartily at their ridiculous request,
and, throwing a little log down into the pool, cried, "There
is a king for you!" The sudden splash which this made
by its fall into the water, at first terrified them so exceedingly
that they were afraid to come near it. But, in a little time,
seeing it lie still without moving, they ventured, by degrees,
to approach it; and at last, finding there was no danger,
they leaped upon it, and, in short, treated it as familiarly as
they pleased. But, not contented with so insipid a king as
this was, they sent their deputies to petition again for another
sort of one; for this they neither did nor could like. Upon
that he sent them a Stork, who, without any ceremony, fell
devouring and eating them up, one after another, as fast as
he could. Then they applied themselves privately to Mer-
cury, and got him to speak to Jupiter in their behalf, that he
would be so good as to bless them again with another king,








FA VO URITE FABLES.


or restore them to their former state. "No," says he;
"since it was their own choice, let the obstinate wretches
suffer the punishment due to their folly."

MORAL.
This fable teaches that it is better to be content with our
present condition, however bad we may think it, than, by
ambitious change, to risk making it worse.
-0-

FABLE XIV.

THE FOX AND THE BOAR.
THE Boar stood whetting his tusks against an old tree.
The Fox, who happened to come by at the same time, asked
him why he made those martial preparations of whetting his
teeth, since there was no enemy near, that he could perceive.
"That may be, Master Reynard," says the Boar, but we
should scour up our arms, while we have leisure, you know;
for, in time of danger, we shall have something else to do."

MORAL.
It is well to have preparations made for all emergencies,
that when we are placed in any difficult position we may be
calm and self-possessed. These preparations are best made
in times of leisure.








S8 FA VO URITE FABLES.




FABLE XV.

THE VINE AND THE GOAT.

A GOAT having taken shelter from the heat of the sun
under the broad leaves of a shady-spreading vine, began to
crop and eat them; by this means, the branches being put
into a rustling motion, he drew the eyes of some hunters who
were passing that way, and, seeing the vine stir, thought some
wild beast had taken covert there; they shot their arrows at a
venture, and killed the Goat, who, before he expired, uttered
his dying words to this purpose: "Ah I suffer justly for my
ingratitude, who could not forbear doing an injury to the
vine that had so kindly afforded me shelter."


MORAL.

Ingratitude is a great crime, and from which we should
seek earnestly to be preserved. He that is capable of in-
juring his benefactor, what would he scruple to do towards
another?







































































THE VINE AND THE GOAT.







FA VO URITE FABLES.


FABLE XVI.

THE DISCONTENTED HORSE.

As JUPITER once was receiving petitions
From birds and from beasts of all ranks and conditions;
With an eye full of fire, and mane quite erect,
Which, I'm sorry to say, shewed but little respect,
The Horse went as near as he dared to the throne,
And thus made his donkey-like sentiments known:

For beauty of symmetry, fleetness, and force,
It is said that all animals yield to the Horse;
While my spirit I feel, and my figure I view
In the brook, I'm inclined to believe it is true;
But still, mighty Jupiter, still, by your aid,
In my form might some further improvements be made.
To run is my duty, and swifter and stronger
I surely should go, were my legs to be longer:
And as man always places a seat on my back,
I should have been made with a saddle or sack;
It had saved him much trouble, on journies departing,
And I had been constantly ready for starting."








FA VO URITE FABLES.


Great Jupiter smiled (for he laughed at the brute,
As he saw more of folly than vice in his suit),
And striking the earth with omnipotent force,
A Camel rose up near the terrified Horse:
He trembled-he started-his mane shook with fright,
And he staggered half round, as preparing for flight.

Behold!" exclaimed Jove, there an animal stands
With both your improvements at once to your hands:
His legs are much longer; the hump on his back
Well answers the purpose of saddle or sack:
Of your shapes, tell me, which is more finished and trim ?
Speak out, silly Horse, would you wish to be him?"

The Horse looked abashed, and had nothing to say
And Jove, with reproaches, thus sent him away:
" Begone, till you gratefully feel and express
Your thanks for the blessings and gifts you possess.
The Camel, though plain, is mild, useful, and good;
You are handsome, but proud, discontented and rude."








FA VO URIZE FABLES.


FABLE XVII.

THE MOUNTAIN IN LABOUR.

A RUMOUR once prevailed that a neighboring mountain
was in labour; it was affirmed that she had been heard to
utter prodigious groans; and a general expectation had been
raised that some extraordinary birth was at hand.
Multitudes flocked in much eagerness to be witnesses of
the wonderful event, one expecting her to be delivered of a
giant, another of some enormous monster, and all were in
earnest expectation of something grand and astonishing;
when, after waiting with great impatience a considerable
time, behold, out crept a MousE.

MORAL.

To raise uncommon expectations renders an ordinary
event ridiculous.
--0---

FABLE XVIII.
THE FOX AND THE STORK.
THE Fox, though in general more inclined to roguery
than wit, had once a strong inclination to play the wag with
his neighbour the Stork. He accordingly invited her to
dinner in due form. But when she came to the table, the








FA VO URIZE FABLES.


FABLE XVII.

THE MOUNTAIN IN LABOUR.

A RUMOUR once prevailed that a neighboring mountain
was in labour; it was affirmed that she had been heard to
utter prodigious groans; and a general expectation had been
raised that some extraordinary birth was at hand.
Multitudes flocked in much eagerness to be witnesses of
the wonderful event, one expecting her to be delivered of a
giant, another of some enormous monster, and all were in
earnest expectation of something grand and astonishing;
when, after waiting with great impatience a considerable
time, behold, out crept a MousE.

MORAL.

To raise uncommon expectations renders an ordinary
event ridiculous.
--0---

FABLE XVIII.
THE FOX AND THE STORK.
THE Fox, though in general more inclined to roguery
than wit, had once a strong inclination to play the wag with
his neighbour the Stork. He accordingly invited her to
dinner in due form. But when she came to the table, the








FAVOURITE FABLES.


Stork found it consisted entirely of different soups, served in
broad, shallow dishes, so that she could only dip the end of
her bill in them, but could not possibly satisfy her hunger.
The Fox lapped them up very readily, and every now and
then addressing himself to his guest, desired to know how
she liked her entertainment, hoped that everything was to
her liking, and protested he was very sorry to see her eat so
sparingly.
The Stork, perceiving she was jested with, took no notice,
but pretended to like every dish extremely; and, at parting,
pressed the Fox so earnestly to return her visit that he could
not, in civility, refuse.
The day arrived, and he repaired to his appointment.
But, to his great dismay, he found the dinner was composed of
minced meat, served up in long, narrow-necked bottles; so
that he was only tantalized with the sight of what it was
impossible for him to taste. The Stork thrust in her long
bill, and helped herself very plentifully; then, turning to
Reynard, who was eagerly licking the outside of a jar where
some sauce had been spilled, "I am very glad," said she,
smiling, "that you appear to have so good an appetite. I
hope you will make as hearty a dinner at my table as I did
the other day at yours." The Fox hung down his head, and
looked very much displeased. Nay, nay!" said the Stork;
" don't pretend to be out of humour about the matter; they
that cannot take a jest should never make one.







FAVOURIZE FABLES.


FABLE XIX.

THE HORSE AND THE STAG.

THE Stag, with his sharp horns, got the better of the
Horse, and drove him clear out of the pasture where they
used to feed together. So the latter craved the assistance of
man, and, in order to receive the benefit of it, suffered him
to put a bridle into his mouth, and a saddle upon his back.
By this means he entirely defeated his enemy, but was
mightily disappointed when, upon returning thanks, and
desiring to be dismissed, he received this answer: "No; I
never knew before how useful a drudge you were; now I
have found out what you are good for, you may depend upon
it, I will keep you to it."


MORAL.

Help yourself, if you can do so; but at any rate, before
you seek the assistance of a powerful man, b6 sure that the
help he gives you will be disinterested, or you may find that
in helping you he may put you under obligations fatal to
liberty.








FA VO URITE FABLES.


FABLE XX.

THE LION WOUNDED.

A MAN, who was very skilful with his bow, went up into
the forest to hunt. At his approach, there was a great con-
sternation and rout among the wild beasts, the Lion alone
showing any determination to fight. Stop," said the
Archer to him, "and await my messenger, who has some-
what to say to you." With that, he sent an arrow after the
Lion, and wounded him in the side. The Lion, smarting
with anguish, fled into the depths of the forest; but a Fox,
seeing him run, bade him take courage, and face his enemy.
"No," said the Lion, "you will not persuade me to that;
for if the messenger he sends is so sharp, what must be the
power of him who sends it ?"


MORAL.

It is better to yield to a superior force than foolishly brave
its power.

























































THE LION WOUNDED.


=-7 -72-- BT- ~ -








FA VO URITE FABLES.


FABLE XXI.

THE ASS IN THE LION'S SKIN.

AN Ass, finding a Lion's. skin, disguised himself with it,
and ranged about the forest, putting all the beasts that saw
him into bodily fear. After he had diverted himself thus for
some time, he met a Fox, and, being desirous to frighten
him too, as well as the rest, he leapt at him with some fierce
ness, and endeavoured to imitate the roaring of the Lion.
"Your humble servant," says the Fox, if you had held
your tongue, I might have taken you for a Lion, as others
did; but now you bray I know who you are."

MORAL.
A silent man may pass for a wise man, but when we hear
him speak we are able to form an estimate of his value.
-0-

FABLE XXII.
JUPITER AND THE FARMER.
'Tis said, that Jove had once a farm to let,
And sent down Mercury, his common crier,
To make the most that he could get;
Or sell it to the highest buyer.








FA VO URITE FABLES.


FABLE XXI.

THE ASS IN THE LION'S SKIN.

AN Ass, finding a Lion's. skin, disguised himself with it,
and ranged about the forest, putting all the beasts that saw
him into bodily fear. After he had diverted himself thus for
some time, he met a Fox, and, being desirous to frighten
him too, as well as the rest, he leapt at him with some fierce
ness, and endeavoured to imitate the roaring of the Lion.
"Your humble servant," says the Fox, if you had held
your tongue, I might have taken you for a Lion, as others
did; but now you bray I know who you are."

MORAL.
A silent man may pass for a wise man, but when we hear
him speak we are able to form an estimate of his value.
-0-

FABLE XXII.
JUPITER AND THE FARMER.
'Tis said, that Jove had once a farm to let,
And sent down Mercury, his common crier,
To make the most that he could get;
Or sell it to the highest buyer.







FA VO URITE FABLES.


To view the premises the people flocked:
And, as 'tis usual in such case,
Began to run them down apace;
The soil was poor, the farm ill stocked:
In short, a barren, miserable place,
Scarce worth th' expense to draw a lease.

One bolder, tho' not wiser than the rest,
Offered to pay in so much rent,
Provided he had Jove's consent
To guide the weather just as he thought best;
Or wet, or dry; or cold, or hot;
Whate'er he asked should be his lot;

To all which Jove gave a consenting nod.
The seasons now obsequious stand,
Quick to obey their lord's command,
And now the Farmer undertakes the god;
Now calls for sunshine, now for rains,
Dispels the clouds, the wind restrains;

But still confined within his farm alone,
He makes a climate all his own;
For when he sheds, or when he pours,
Refreshing dews, or soaking showers,







FAVOURITE FABLES.


His neighbours never share a drop;
So much the'better for their crop;
Each glebe a plenteous harvest yields;
Whilst our director spoils his fields.

Next year, he tries a different way;
New moulds the seasons, and directs again;
But all in vain:
His neighbour's grounds still thrive while his decay.

What does he do in this sad plight?
For once he acted right:
He to the god his fate bemoaned,
Asked pardon, and his folly owned.
Jove, like a tender master, fond to save,
His weakness pityed, and his fault forgave.


MORAL.

He, who presumes the ways of heaven to scan,
Is not a wise, nor yet a happy man:
In this firm truth securely we may rest,-
Whatever Providence ordains is best;
Had man the power, he'd work his own undoing ;
To grant his will would be to cause his ruin.








FA VO URITE FABLES.


FABLE XXIII.

THE VAIN JACKDAW.

A CERTAIN Jackdaw was so proud and ambitious that,
not contented to live within his own sphere, he picked up the
feathers which fell from the Peacocks, stuck them among his
own, and very confidently introduced himself into an assembly
of those beautiful birds. They soon found him out, stripped
him of his borrowed plumes, and falling upon him with their
sharp bills, punished him as his presumption deserved.
Upon this, full of grief and affliction, he returned to
his old companions, and would have flocked with them
again; but they, knowing his late life and conversation,
industriously avoided him, and refused to admit him into
their company; and one of them, at the same time, gave him
this serious reproof: "If, friend, you could have been con-
tented with your station, and had not disdained the rank
in which nature had placed you, you had not been used so
scurvily by those amongst whom you introduced yourself, nor
suffered the notorious slight which we now think ourselves
obliged to put upon you."








FA VO URITE FABLES. 29

MORAL.
Great evils arise from vanity; for when we try to place
ourselves in a position for which we are not fit, we are liable
to be laughed at, and, when we would return to our former
state, we find we have lost the esteem of our former friends.


FABLE XXIV.
THE VIPER AND THE FILE.
A VIPER, crawling into a smith's shop to seek for some-
thing to eat, cast her eyes upon a File, and darting upon it
in a moment, "Now I have you," said she, "and so you
may help yourself how you can; but you may take my word
for it that I shall make a fine meal of you before I think of
parting with you." Silly wretch !" said the File, as gruff
as could be, "you had much better be quiet, and let me
alone; for, if you gnaw for ever, you will get nothing but
your trouble for your pains. Make a meal of me, indeed!
why, I myself can bite the hardest iron in the shop; and if
you go on with your foolish nibbling I shall tear all the teeth
out of your spiteful head before you know where you are."

MORAL.
Take care that you never strive with those who are too
strong for you, nor do spiteful things, lest you suffer for it.








30 A VO URITE FABLES.



FABLE XXV.

THE WOLF AND THE LAMB.

ONE hot, sultry day, a Wolf and a Lamb happened to
come just at the same time to quench their thirst in the
stream of a clear, silver brook, that ran tumbling down the
side of a rocky mountain. The Wolf stood upon the higher
ground, and the Lamb at some distance from him down the
current. However, the Wolf, having a mind to pick a
quarrel with him, asked him what he meant by disturbing
the water, and making it so muddy that he could not drink,
and at the same time demanded satisfaction. The Lamb,
frightened at this threatening charge, told him, in a tone as
mild as possible, that, with humble submission, he could not
conceive how that could be, since the water which he drank
ran down from the Wolf to him, and therefore it could not be
disturbed so far up the stream. Be that as it will," replies
the Wolf, you are a rascal; and I have been told that you
treated me with ill-language behind my back about half a
year ago." "Upon my word," says the Lamb, "the time
you mention was before I was born. The Wolf finding it to
no purpose to argue any longer against truth, fell into a
great passion, snarling and foaming at the mouth, as if he


















































-I ~


THE WOLF AND THE LAMB.


i
;i ,, ,.I








FA VO URITE FABLES.


had been mad; and, drawing nearer to the Lamb, Sirrah,"
said he, if it was not you, it was your father, and that's all
one." So he seized the poor innocent, helpless thing, tore
it to pieces, and made a meal of it.


MORAL.

Bad men, who wish to quarrel, will always find a pretence;
if they can find no true grounds, they will resort to those
which are false.

-0-


FABLE XXVI.

THE OLD BULLFINCH AND YOUNG BIRDS.

IT chanced, that, on a winter's day,
But warm and bright, and calm as May,
The birds, conceiving a design
To forestall sweet St. Valentine,
In many an orchard, copse, and grove,
Assembled on affairs of love;
And with much twitter and much chatter,
Began to agitate the matter.







FA VOURITE FABLES.


At length, a Bullfinch, who could boast
More years and wisdom than the most,
Entreated, opening wide his beak,
A moment's liberty to speak;
And, silence publicly enjoined,
Delivered briefly thus his mind:


My friends, be cautious how ye treat
The subject upon which we meet;
I fear we shall have winter yet."


A Finch, whose tongue knew no control,
With golden wing, and satin poll,
A last year's bird, who ne'er had tried
What marriage means, thus pert replied:


Methinks, the gentleman," quoth she,
" Opposite, in the apple-tree,
By his good will, would keep us single,
'Till yonder heaven and earth shall mingle;
Or (which is likelier to befall)
'Till death exterminate us all.
I marry without more ado;
My dear Dick Redcap, what say you?"








FA VO URITE FABLES. ,

Dick heard; and tweedling, ogling, bridling,
Turning short round, strutting, and sidling,
Attested glad his approbation
Of an immediate conjugation.
Their sentiments so well expressed,
Influenced mightily the rest;
All pair'd, and each pair built a nest.

But though the birds were thus in haste,
The leaves came on not quite so fast;
And destiny, that sometimes bears
An aspect stern on man's affairs,
Not altogether smil'd on theirs.

The wind, that late breath'd gently forth,
Now shifted east, and east by north;
Bare trees and shrubs but ill, you know,
Could shelter them from rain or snow;
Stepping into their nests, they paddled,
Themselves were chill'd, their eggs were addled;
Soon every father bird, and mother,
Grew quarrelsome, and peck'd each other;
Parted without the least regret,
Except that they had ever met;
And learned in future to be wiser
Than to neglect a good adviser.
D








FA VO URITE FABLES.


MORAL.
Young folks, who think themselves so wise,
That old folks' counsel they despise,
Will find, when they too late repent,
Their folly prove their punishment.
-0-

FABLE XXVII.
THE MOUSE AND THE WEASEL.
A LITTLE starveling rogue of a Mouse had, with much
pushing application, made his way through a small hole in a
corn-basket, where he stuffed and crammed so plentifully,
that, when he would have retired the way he came, he found
himself too plump, with all his endeavours, to accomplish it.
A Weasel, who stood at some distance, and had been divert-
ing himself with beholding the vain efforts of the little fat
thing, called to him, and said, "Harkee, honest friend; if
you have a mind to make your escape, there is but one way
for it: contrive to grow as poor and lean as you were when
you entered, and then, perhaps, you may get off."

MORAL.
If evil habits have got a man into difficulties, there is no
surer way to extricate himself than, by God's help, to cast
those habits off.








FA VOURITE FABLES.


FABLE XXVIII.

THE OLD HOUND.

AN old Hound, who had been an excellent good one in
his time, and given his master great sport and satisfaction in
many a chase, at last, by the effect of years, became feeble
and unserviceable.
However, being in the field one day when the Stag was
almost run down, he happened to be the first that came in
with him, and seized him by one of his haunches; but his
decayed and broken teeth not being able to keep their hold,
the deer escaped and threw him quite out. Upon which his
master, being in a great passion, and going to strike him,
the honest old creature is said to have barked out this
apology. "Ah! do not strike your poor old servant; it is
not my heart and inclination, but my strength and speed that
fail me. If what I now am displeases you, pray don't forget
what I have been."


MORAL.


Past services should never be forgotten.








FAVOURITE FABLES.


FABLE XXIX.
THE CHARGER AND THE ASS
THE Horse, adorned with his great war-saddle, and champ-
ing his foaming bridle, came thundering along the way, and
made the mountains echo with his loud, shrill neighing. He
had not gone far before he overtook an Ass, who was labour-
ing under a heavy burthen, and moving slowly on in the
same track with himself. Immediately he called out to him,
in a haughty, imperious tone, and threatened to trample
him in the dirt, if he did not make way for him. The poor,
patient Ass, not daring to dispute the matter, quietly got out
of his way as fast as he could, and let him go by. Not long
after this, the same Horse, in an engagement with the enemy,
happened to be shot in the eye, which made him unfit for
show or any military business; so he was stript of his fine
ornaments, and sold to a carrier. The Ass, meeting him in
this forlorn condition, thought that now it was his time to
speak; and so, says he, "Heyday, friend, is it you? Well,
I always believed that pride of yours would one day have a
fall."
MORAL.
Pride and haughtiness are foreign to really great men.
Those who show it, when in their high estate, if the wheel of
fortune should change, instead of friendship or pity, will meet
with nothing but contempt.






































































THE CHARGER AND THE ASS.








FA VO URITE FABLES.


FABLE XXX.

THE COLT AND THE FARMER.

A COLT, for blood and mettled speed,
The choicest of the running breed,
Of youthful strength and beauty vain,
Refused subjection to the rein.

In vain the groom's officious skill
Opposed his pride, and checked his will;
In vain the master's forming care
Restrained with threats, or soothed with prayer:
Of freedom proud, and scorning man,
Wild o'er the spacious plain he ran.

Where'er luxuriant Nature spread
Her flowery carpet o'er the mead,
Or bubbling streams soft gliding pass
To cool and freshen up the grass,
Disdaining bounds, he cropped the blade,
And wantoned in the spoil he made.








FA VO URITE FABLES.


In plenty thus the summer passed;
Revolving winter came at last:
The trees no more a shelter yield;
The verdure withers from the field:
Perpetual snows invest the ground;
In icy chains the streams are bound:
Cold, nipping winds, and rattling hail,
His lank, unsheltered sides assail.

As round he cast his rueful eyes,
He saw the thatched-roof cottage rise:
The prospect touched his heart with cheer,
And promised kind deliverance near.
A stable, erst his scorn and hate,
Was now become his wished retreat;
His passion cool, his pride forgot,
A Farmer's welcome yard he sought.

The master saw his woful plight,
His limbs, that tottered with his weight,
And, friendly, to the stable led,
And saw him littered, dressed, and fed.
In slothful ease all night he lay;
The servants rose at break of day;
The market calls. Along the road
His back must bear the pond'rous load;







FA VO URITE FABLES.


In vain he struggles or complains,
Incessant blows reward his pains.
To-morrow varies but his toil:
Chained to the plough, he breaks the soil;
While scanty meals at night repay
The painful labours of the day.

Subdued by toil, with anguish rent,
His self-upbraidings found a vent.
"Wretch that I am !" he sighing said,
"By arrogance and folly led;
Had but my restive youth been brought
To learn the lesson nature taught,
Then had I, like my sires of yore,
The prize from every courser bore.
Now, lasting servitude's my lot,
My birth contemned, my speed forgot;
Doomed am I, for my pride, to bear
A living death from year to year."



MORAL.

He who disdains control, will only gain
A youth of pleasure for an age of pain.








FAVOURITE FABLES.


FABLE XXXI.
THE LARK AND HER YOUNG ONES.
A LARK, who had young ones in a field of corn almost
ripe, was under some fear lest the reapers should come to
reap it before her young brood was fledged and able to
remove from that place. She, therefore, upon flying abroad
to look for food, left this charge with them-to take notice
what they heard talked of in her absence, and tell her of it
when she came back again.
When she was gone, they heard the owner of the corn
call to his son : "Well," says he, "I think this corn is ripe
enough. I would have you go early to-morrow, and desire
our friends and neighbours to come and help us to reap it."
When the old Lark came home, the young ones fell a quiver-
ing and chirping round her, and told her what had happened,
begging her to remove them as fast as she could. The
mother bid them be easy: For," said she, "if the owner
depends on his friends and neighbours, I am pretty sure the
corn will not be reaped to-morrow."
Next day, she went out again, leaving the same orders as
before. The owner came, and staid, expecting his friends;
but the sun grew hot, and nothing was done, for not a soul
came to help them. Then says he to his son, "I perceive








FA VO URITE FABLES.


these friends of ours are not to be depended upon; so you
must go to your uncles and cousins, and tell them I desire
they would be here betimes to-morrow morning, to help us
to reap." Well, this the young ones, in a great fright,
reported also to their mother. If that be all," says she,
"do not be frightened, dear children; for kindred and rela-
tions are not so very forward to serve one another; but take
particular notice what you hear said next time, and be sure
you let me know it."
She went abroad next day, as usual; and the owner,
finding his relations as slack as the rest of his neighbours,
said to his son, "Harkee, George; get a couple of good
sickles ready against to-morrow morning, and we will even
reap the corn ourselves." When the young ones told their
mother this, "Then," said she, "we must be gone indeed;
for, when a man undertakes to do his business himself, it is
not so likely he will be disappointed." So she removed her
young ones at once, and the corn was reaped next day by
the good man and his son.


MORAL.

Never depend on the assistance of others. No business
is so sure to be done as that which a man sets about doing
himself.








FA VO RITE FABLES.


FABLE XXXII.
THE FOX AND THE CROW.
A CROW, having taken a piece of cheese out of a cottage
window, flew up with it into a high tree in order to eat it;
which the Fox observing, came and sat underneath, and
began to compliment the Crow upon the subject of her
beauty. "I protest," says he, "I never observed it before,
but your feathers are of a more delicate white than any that
ever I saw in my life Ah what a fine shape and graceful
turn of body is there! And I make no question but you
have a tolerable voice. If it is but as fine as your com-
plexion, I do not know a bird that can pretend to stand in
competition with you." The Crow foolishly believed all that
the Fox said was true; but, thinking the Fox a little dubious
as to her vocal powers, and having a mind to set him right
in that matter, opened her mouth, and, in the same instant,
let the cheese drop out of her mouth. This being what the
Fox wanted, he caught it up in a moment, and trotted away,
laughing to himself at the easy credulity of the Crow.

MORAL.
When anyone is flattered as possessing qualities he ought
to feel conscious he does not possess, let him beware lest the
flatterers wish either to deprive him of some solid good, or to
make him appear ridiculous in the eyes of others.













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THE FOX AND THE CROW


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FA VO URIIE FABLES.


FABLE XXXIII.

THE PEACOCK'S COMPLAINT.

THE Peacock presented a memorial to Juno, importing
how hardly he thought he was used, in not having so good a
voice as the Nightingale; how that bird was agreeable to
every ear that heard it, while he was laughed at for his ugly,
screaming noise, if he did but open his mouth.
The goddess, concerned at the uneasiness of her favourite
bird, answered him very kindly to this purpose:-" If the
Nightingale is blest with a fine voice, you have the advan-
tage ir point of beauty and size." Ah !" says he, "but
what avails my silent, unmeaning beauty, when I am so far
excelled in voice?"
The goddess dismissed him, bidding him consider that
the properties of every creature were appointed by the decree
of Fate; to him beauty, to the Eagle strength, to the Night-
ingale a voice of melody, to the Parrot the faculty of speech,
and to the Dove innocence; that each of these was contented
with his own peculiar quality; and, unless he wished to be
miserable, he must also learn to be equally satisfied.








FA VO URITE FA BLES.


MORAL.
The man who to his lot's resigned
True happiness is sure to find;
While envy ne'er can mend the ill,
But makes us feel it keener still.
-0-

FABLE XXXIV.
THE STAG IN THE OX-STALL.
A STAG, roused from his thick covert in the midst of the
forest, and driven hard by the hounds, made towards a farm-
house, and, seeing the door of an ox-stall open, entered
therein, and hid himself under a heap of straw. One of the
oxen, turning his head about, asked him what he meant by
venturing himself in such a place, where he was sure to meet
his doom. "Ah!" said the Stag, "if you will but be so
good as to favour me with your concealment, I hope I shall
do well enough; I intend to make off again the first
opportunity."
Well, he stayed there till towards night; in came the
ox-man with a bundle of fodder, and never saw him. In
short, all the servants of the farm came and went, and not
one of them suspected anything of the matter. Nay, the
bailiff himself came, according to form, and looked in, but
walked away, no wiser than the rest. Upon this the Stag,








FA VO URITE FABLES.


ready to jump out of his skin for joy, began to return thanks
to the good-natured Oxen, protesting that they were the
most obliging people he had ever met with in his life.
After he had done his compliments, one of them answered
him, gravely, "Indeed, we desire nothing more than to have
it in our power to contribute to your escape, but there is a
certain person you little think of who has a hundred eyes; if
he should happen to come, I would not give this straw for
your life."
In the meanwhile, home comes the master himself from a
neighbour's, where he had been invited to dinner; and,
because he had observed the cattle not look well of late, he
went up to the rack, and asked why they did not give them
more fodder; then, casting his eyes downward, Heydey!"
says he, "why so sparing of your litter? pray scatter a little
more here. And these cobwebs But I have spoken so
often that, unless I do it myself Thus, as he went on,
prying into everything, he chanced to look where the Stag's
horns lay sticking out of the straw; upon which he raised a
hue and cry, called his people about him, killed the Stag, and
made a prize of him.

MORAL.
For a work to be done thoroughly, it ought to be done by
oneself; the eye of a master is keener than that of a servant.








FA VO URITE FABLES.


FABLE XXXV.

THE WIND AND THE SUN.

A DISPUTE once arose betwixt the North Wind and the
Sun about the superiority of their power; and they agreed
to try their strength upon a traveller, which should be able to
get off his cloak first.
The North Wind began, and blew a very cold blast,
accompanied with a sharp, driving shower. But this, and
whatever else he could do, instead of making the man quit
his cloak, obliged him to gird it about his body as close as
possible.
Next came the Sun, who, breaking out from the thick,
watery cloud, drove away the cold vapours from the sky, and
darted his warm, sultry beams upon the head of the poor
weather-beaten traveller. The man, growing faint with the
heat, and unable to endure it any longer, first throws off his
heavy cloak, and then flies for protection to the shade of a
neighboring grove.

MORAL.

Soft and gentle means will often accomplish what force
and fury can never effect.








FA VO URITE FABLES.


FABLE XXXVI.
THE TRAVELLERS AND THE BEAR.
Two men, being about to travel through a forest together,
mutually promised to stand by each other in any danger they
should meet on the way. They had not gone far when a
Bear came rushing towards them out of a thicket; upon
which, one, being a light, nimble fellow, got up into a tree.
The other, falling flat upon his face, and holding his breath,
lay still, while the Bear came up and smelled at him; but
that creature, supposing him to be a dead carcass, went back
to the wood without doing him the least harm. When all
was over, the man who had climbed the tree came down
to his companion, and, with a pleasant smile, asked what
the Bear had said to him; For," says he, "I took notice
that he clapped his mouth very close to your ear." Why,"
replied the other, he charged me to take care, for the
future, not to put any confidence in such cowardly rascals as
you are,"
MORAL.
Nothing is more common than to hear people profess
friendship when there is no occasion for it; but he is a true
friend who is ready to assist us in the time of danger and
difficulty. Choose, therefore, friends whom you can depend
on for such a time, and greatly value them.








FA VO URITE FABLES


FABLE XXXVII.

THE DOG AND THE SHADOW.

A DOG, crossing a small rivulet, with a piece of flesh in his
mouth, which he had stolen from a butcher's shop, saw his own
shadow represented in the clear mirror of the limpid stream;
and, believing it to be another dog who was carrying another
piece of flesh, he could not forbear catching at it, but was so
far from getting anything by his greedy design, that he
dropped the piece he had in his mouth, which immediately
sank to the bottom, and was irrecoverably lost.



MORAL.

It is the just punishment of greediness to lose the
substance by grasping at the shadow; while the man who
would take what does not belong to him deserves to lose
what he has.








































































































THE DOG AND THE SHADOW.


_j
.-rY


s








FA VO URITE FABLES. 49



FABLE XXXVIII.

THE HERMIT AND THE BEAR.

ONCE on a time, a mountain Bear
Lived in a forest drear, with no Bears near him;
Fat, fierce, and sulky.
Nor man nor other, beast approached his lair;
His neighbours all despise, or hate, or fear him.
'Tis good to talk-to hold one's tongue-
Though either in excess be wrong:
Our hermit bulky,
So shaggy, sullen, taciturn, and rude,
Bear as he was, grew sick of solitude.

At the same time, by chance, retired
Far from the world, a man advanced in age,
But' stout and healthy.
Not with devotion's flame his heart was fired;
Not prayer and fasting occupied the sage;
Though on mankind he shut his door,
No vows of poverty he swore:
The wight was wealthy.
But by some treacherous friend, or fair, betrayed,
He lived with plants, and communed with his spade.
E








FA VO URITEI FABLES.


High priest of Flora you might call him;
Nor less was he the favourite of Pomona.
But one day, walking,
He found it dull; and should some ill befall him,
In his sweet paradise, he felt alone,-Ah!
For neither rose, nor pink, nor vine,
Except in such a lay as mine,
Are given to talking.
His head old Time had now long years heaped many on;
So he resolved to look for some companion.

On this important expedition-
But fearing his researches would be vain-
The sage departed:
Revolving deeply his forlorn condition,
He slowly mused along a narrow lane;
When on a sudden-unawares-
A nose met his :-it was the Bear's!
With fright he started.
Fear is a common feeling: he that wise is,
Although his fright be great, his fear disguises.

Prudence suggested-" Stand your ground;
'Tis hard to turn, and harder still to dash on."
Prudence prevails.
'Twixt kindred minds a sympathy is found
Which lights up oft at sight a tender passion,







FA VOURITE FABLES. 51

Where sexes are of different kind;
And oft 't will ties of friendship bind
Between two males:
These magic signs our hermits, at a glance, see:
Each found he strongly pleased the other's fancy.

Bruin at compliments was awkward,
But was not long his sentiments in telling-
Old man, I like you "
The man replied, Fair sir, you need not walk hard,
In half an hour you'll reach my humble dwelling.
I've milk, and various sorts of fruit,
If any should your palate suit,
Take what may strike you;
On me it will confer the highest pleasure
To spread before you all my garden's treasure."

On jogged the human Hermit with the Bear,
Like smoking Germans, few words interlarding;
Though little said,
Finding their tempers suited to a hair,
They grew firm friends before they reached the garden.
Each took his task, their moods the same,
One dug, the other hunted game,
And often sped;








FA VO URITE FABLES.


And Bruin, o'er his friend a strict watch keeping,
Chased off the flies that haunted him when sleeping.

One afternoon, as in the sun
The weary Hermit took his usual nap,
And at his post
The faithful Bear his daily work begun,
Giving full many a brush and gentle slap,
With a light whisp of herbs sweet-scented,
And thus the teasing flies prevented,
That buzzing host,
From fixing on his sleeping patron's visage,
Sunk in the deep repose so fit for his age.

One blue-bottle his care defied;
No place could please him but the old man's nose,
Quite unabashed.
The Bear, provoked, no means would leave untried;
At last, a vigorous, certain mode, he chose:
Extending wide his heavy paw,
And thrusting hard each crooked claw,
The fly was smashed:
But his poor patron's face, so roughly patted,
All streamed with blood, and smooth his nose was
flatted.








FA VO URITE FABLES.


The Bear sneaked off to humble distance,
Seeing the damage he had done his friend;
Who raged with smart.
But calling in philosophy's assistance,
Anger, he thought, his wounds would never mend,
So coolly said, Farewell, friend Bruin !
Since you have laid my face in ruin,
'Tis time to part."

MORAL.
All those must such mishaps expect to share,
Who, for a friend, think fit to take a Bear.
-0-
FABLE XXXIX.
THE SHEPHERD'S BOY AND THE WOLF.
A CERTAIN Shepherd's Boy, who kept sheep upon a
common, in sport and wantonness would often cry out,
"The Wolf! the Wolf!" By this means, he several times
drew the husbandmen in an adjoining field from their work;
who, finding themselves deluded, resolved for the future to
take no notice of his alarm. Soon after the Wolf came
indeed. The boy cried out in earnest; but no heed being
given to his cries, the sheep were devoured by the Wolf.

MORAL.
The notorious liar, besides the sin of the thing, will not
be believed when, by chance, he tells the truth.









FAVO URITE FABLES.


FABLE XL.

THE FAWN AND HER MOTHER.

A HIND was one day stamping with her foot, and bellowing
so loudly that the whole herd quaked for fear, when one of
her little Fawns, coming up to her, said, Mother, what is the
reason that you, who are so strong ,and bold at all other
times, if you do but hear the cry of the hounds, are so
afraid of them? "What you say is true," replied the Hind;
" though I know not how to account for it. I am, indeed,
vigorous and strong enough, and often resolve that nothing
shall ever dismay my courage; but, alas! I no sooner hear
the voice of a hound than all my spirits fail me, and I cannot
help making off as fast as my legs can carry me."


MORAL.

When we have done all, Nature will remain what she was.
There is no arguing a coward into courage.



























,r


*w.L


THE FAWN AND HER MOTHER.


' *-/


':rI-








FA VO URITE FABLES. 55




FABLE XLI.

THE TORTOISE AND THE EAGLE.

THE Tortoise, weary of his condition, by which he was
confined to creep upon the ground, and being ambitious to
have a prospect, and look about him, gave out that, if any
bird would take him up into the air, and show him the world,
he would reward him with the discovery of many precious
stones, which he knew were hidden in a certain part of the
earth.
The Eagle undertook to do as he desired, and, when he
had performed his commission, demanded the reward. But,
finding the Tortoise could not make good his words, he
stuck his talons into the softer parts of his body, and made
him a sacrifice to his revenge.


MORAL.

He that, to secure an advantage, deceives his friend by
an untruth, will surely suffer for it when he is detected.








FA VO URITE FABLES.


FABLE XLII.
THE BROTHER AND SISTER.
A CERTAIN Man had two children, a Son and a Daughter-
the Boy handsome enough, the Girl not quite so comely.
They were both very young, and happened one day to be
playing near the looking-glass, which stood on their mother's
toilet. The Boy, pleased with the novelty of the thing,
viewed himself for some time, and in a wanton, roguish
manner observed to the Girl how handsome he was. She
resented the insult, and ran immediately to her father, and,
with a great deal of aggravation, complained of her brother,
particularly for having acted so effeminate a part as to look
in a glass, and meddle with things which belong to women
only. The father, embracing them both with much tender-
ness and affection, told them that he should like to have
them both look in the glass every day; To the intent that
you," says he to the Boy, if you think that face of yours
handsome, may not disgrace and spoil it by an ugly temper
and a bad behaviour; and that you, added he, addressing
the Girl, may make up for the defects of your person by
the sweetness of your manners and the excellence of your
understanding."
MORAL.
A well-informed mind is better than a handsome person.








FA VO URITE FABLES.


FABLE XLIII.

THE SHEPHERD'S DOG AND THE WOLF.

A WOLF, with hunger fierce and bold,
Ravaged the plains, and thinned the fold;
Deep in the wood secure he lay,
The thefts of night regaled the day.
In vain the shepherd's wakeful care
Had spread the toils, and watched the snare;
In vain the Dog pursued his pace,
The fleeter robber mocked the chase.

As Lightfoot ranged the forest round,
By chance his foe's retreat he found:
"Let us awhile the war suspend,
And reason as from friend to friend."
" A truce !" replies the Wolf. 'Tis done.
The Dog the parley thus begun:-

How can that strong, intrepid mind
Attack a weak, defenceless kind?
Those jaws should prey on nobler food,
And drink the boar's and lion's blood;








-FA VO URITE FABLES.


Great souls with generous pity melt,
Which coward tyrants never felt.
How harmless is our fleecy care !
Be brave, and let thy mercy spare."

Friend," says the Wolf, "the matter weigh:
Nature designed us beasts of prey;
As such, when hunger finds a treat,
'Tis necessary Wolves should eat.
If, mindful of the bleating weal,
Thy bosom burn with real zeal,
Hence, and thy tyrant lord beseech;
To him repeat the moving speech.
A Wolf eats sheep but now and then;
Ten thousands are devoured by men."



MORAL.

An open foe may prove a curse,
But a pretended friend is worse.








FAVOURITE FABLES.


FABLE' XLIV.
THE COVETOUS MAN.
A POOR covetous wretch, who had scraped together a
good parcel of money, went and dug a hole in one of his
fields and hid it. The great pleasure of his life was to go
and look upon this treasure once a day at least; which one
of his servants observing, and guessing there was something
more than ordinary in the place, came at night, found it, and
carried it off. The next day, returning as usual to the scene
of his delight, and perceiving it had been stolen away from
him, he tore his hair for grief, and uttered the doleful com-
plaints of his despair to the woods and meadows. At last, a
neighbour of his, who knew his temper, overhearing him,
and being informed of the occasion of his sorrow, Cheer
up, man!" says he, "thou has lost nothing; there is the hole
for thee to go and peep at still; and if thou canst but fancy
thy money there, it will do just as well.

MORAL.
Money, well used, has its full value; but when allowed to
lie useless to others or to one's self, it possesses no more value
than a heap of oyster shells. Avarice is, therefore, a silly as
well as a sinful vice. Use your wealth in doing good, and
its highest value will be attained.








FA VO URITE FABLES.


FABLE XLV.

THE HARE AND THE TORTOISE.

A HARE twitted a Tortoise on account of his slowness,
and vainly boasted of her own great speed in running. Let
us make a match," replied the Tortoise: I'll run with you
five miles for five pounds, and the Fox yonder shall be the
umpire of the race." The Hare agreed, and away they both
started together. But the Hare, by reason of her exceeding
swiftness, outran the Tortoise to such a degree that she
made a jest of the matter, and, finding herself a little tired,
squatted in a tuft of fern that grew by the way, and took a
nap, thinking that, if the Tortoise went by, she could at any
time catch him up with all the ease imaginable. In the
meanwhile the Tortoise came jogging on, with a slow but
continued motion; and the Hare, out of a too great security
and confidence of victory, oversleeping herself, the Tortoise
arrived at the end of the race first.

MORAL.
Industry and application will, in most cases, do more than
quick and ready wit. The highest genius, without industry,
will generally fail of any great exploit.






P


THE HARE AND THE TORTOISE.








FA yO URITE FABLES.


FABLE XLVI.

THE HOG AND THE ACORNS.

ONE moonshiny night,
With a great appetite,
A Hog feasted on Acorns with all his might:
Quite pleased with his prize
Both in taste and in size,
While he ate he devoured the rest with his eyes.

You know, I'm in joke,
When I say that the oak,
Moved a bough to the grunter before she spoke;
But you know, too, in fable,
We feel ourselves able
To make anything speak-tree, flower, or table.

Said the Oak, looking big,
"I think, Mr. Pig,
You might thank me for sending you fruit from my twig;
But, you ill-behaved Hog!
You devour the prog,
And have no better manners, I think, than a dog."








FAVOURITE FABLES.


He replied, looking up,
Though not ceasing to sup,
Till the Acorns were eaten-ay, every cup-
I acknowledge, to you
My thanks would be due,
If from feelings of kindness my supper you threw.

"To-morrow, good dame,
Give my children the same,
And then you, with justice, may gratitude claim."


MORAL.

He merits no praise
To the end of his days,
Who to those who surround him no service conveys.

O-"

FABLE XLVII.

THE COUNTRY MOUSE AND THE CITY MOUSE.

AN honest, plain, sensible country Mouse is said to have
entertained at his hole one day a fine Mouse of the town.
Having formerly been playfellows together, they were old
acquaintances, which served as an apology for the visit.







FAVOURITE FABLES.


However, as master of the house, he thought himself obliged
to do the honours of it, in all respects, and to make as great
a stranger of his guest as he possibly could. In order to
this, he set before him a reserve of delicate grey pease and
bacon, a dish of fine oatmeal, some parings of new cheese,
and, to crown all with a dessert, a remnant of a charming
mellow apple.
In good manners, he forebore to eat any of it himself, lest
the stranger should not have enough; but, that he might
seem to bear the other company, sat and nibbled a piece of
wheaten straw very busily. At last, says the spark of the
town, "Old croney, give me leave to be a little free with
you. How can you bear to live in this nasty, dirty, melan-
choly hole here, with nothing but woods and meadows,
mountains and rivulets about you ? Do you not prefer the
busy world to the chirping of birds, and the splendour of a
court to the rude aspect of an uncultivated desert? Come,
take my word for it, you will find it a change for the better.
Stand not considering, but away this moment. Remember,
we are not immortal, and therefore have no time to lose.
Make sure of to-day, and spend it as agreeably as you can;
you know not what may happen to-morrow."
In short, these and such like arguments prevailed, and
his country friend was resolved to go to town that night.
So they both set out upon their journey, proposing to sneak








FAVOURITE FABLES.


in after the close of the evening. They did so, and about
midnight made their entry into a certain great house, where
there had been an extraordinary entertainment the day
before, and several tit-bits, which some of the servants had
purloined, were hid under a seat of a window. The country
guest was immediately placed in the midst of a rich Persian
carpet; and now it was the courtier's turn to entertain, who,
indeed, acquitted himself in that capacity with the utmost
readiness and address, changing the courses as elegantly,
and tasting everything first as judiciously, as any clerk of the
kitchen. The other sat and enjoyed himself like a delighted
epicure, tickled to the last degree with this new turn of his
affairs; when, on a sudden, a noise of somebody opening the
door made them start from their seats and scuttle in con-
fusion about the dining-room. Our country friend, in par-
ticular, was ready to die with fear at the barking of a huge
Mastiff or two, which opened their throats just about the
same time, and made the whole house echo.
At last, recovering himself, "Well," says he, "if this be
your town life, much good may you do with it give me my
poor, quiet hole again, with my homely but comfortable
grey pease."

MORAL.

Poverty and safety are preferable to luxury and danger.








FA VOURITE FABLES.


FABLE XLVIII.

THE CAT AND THE MICE.

A CERTAIN house was much infested with Mice; but at
last they got a Cat, who caught .and ate every day some of
them. The Mice, finding their numbers grow thin, consulted
what was best to be done for the preservation of the public
from the jaws of the devouring Cat. They debated and
came to this resolution, that no one should go down below
the upper shelf.
The Cat, observing the Mice no longer came down as
usual, hungry and disappointed of her prey, had recourse to
this stratagem:-She hung by her hind legs on a peg which
stuck in the wall, and made as if she had been dead, hoping
by this lure to entice the Mice to come down. She had not
been in this posture long before a cunning old Mouse peeped
over the edge of the shelf, and spoke thus:-" Ha! ha! my
good friend, are you there ? There you may be! I would
not trust myself with you, though your skin were stuffed with
straw."
MORAL.

They that are wise will never trust those a second time
who have deceived them once.









FA VO URITE FABLES.


FABLE XLIX.

THE KID AND THE WOLF.

A KID, being mounted upon the roof of a lofty shed, and
seeing a Wolf below, loaded him with all manner of re-
proaches. Upon which, the Wolf, looking up, replied, Do
not vaunt yourself, vain creature, and think you mortify me;
for I look upon this ill language as not coming from you,
but from the place that protects you."

MORAL.

To rail or give bad language is wrong at all times; but
when a man is protected by circumstances, it is cowardly, as
well as wrong. The man who then uses it becomes a fit
object of contempt to him that he reviles.
0--

FABLE L.

THE COUNCIL OF HORSES.

UPON a time, a neighing Steed,
Who grazed among a numerous breed,
With mutiny had fired the train,
And spread dissension through the plain.














i .~


THE KID AND THE WOLF.


i;I
i-
c









FA VO URITE FABLES.


FABLE XLIX.

THE KID AND THE WOLF.

A KID, being mounted upon the roof of a lofty shed, and
seeing a Wolf below, loaded him with all manner of re-
proaches. Upon which, the Wolf, looking up, replied, Do
not vaunt yourself, vain creature, and think you mortify me;
for I look upon this ill language as not coming from you,
but from the place that protects you."

MORAL.

To rail or give bad language is wrong at all times; but
when a man is protected by circumstances, it is cowardly, as
well as wrong. The man who then uses it becomes a fit
object of contempt to him that he reviles.
0--

FABLE L.

THE COUNCIL OF HORSES.

UPON a time, a neighing Steed,
Who grazed among a numerous breed,
With mutiny had fired the train,
And spread dissension through the plain.








FA VO URITE FABLES.


On matters that concerned the state
The council met in grand debate.
A Colt, whose eye-balls flamed with ire,
Elate with strength and youthful fire,
In haste stepped forth before the rest,
And thus the listening throng addressed:-

Good gods how abject is our race !
Condemned to slavery and disgrace!
Shall we our servitude retain,
Because our sires have borne the chain ?
Consider, friends, your strength and might;
'Tis conquest to assert your right.
How cumberous is the gilded coach !
The pride of man is our reproach.
Were we designed for daily toil,
To drag the ploughshare through the soil;
To sweat in harness through the road;
To groan beneath the carrier's load?
How feeble are the two-legged kind !
What force is in our nerves combined !
Shall, then, our nobler jaws submit
To foam and champ the galling bit?
Shall haughty men my back bestride?
Shall the sharp spur provoke my side?








FA VO URITE FABLES.


Forbid it, heavens! reject the rein,
Your shame, your infamy disdain.
Let him the Lion first control,
And still the Tiger's famished growl!
Let us, like them, our freedom claim;
And make him tremble at our name."

A general nod approved the cause,
And all the circle neighed applause;
When, lo! with grave and solemn pace,
A Steed advanced before the race,
With age and long experience wise;
Around he casts his thoughtful eyes,
And, to the murmurs of the train,
Thus spoke the Nestor of the plain:-

When I had health and strength, like you,
The toils of servitude I knew.
Now, grateful man rewards my pains,
And gives me all these wide domains.
At will I crop the year's increase;
My latter life is rest and peace.
I grant, to man we lend our pains,
And aid him to correct the plains.
But doth not he divide the care,
Through all the labours of the year?








FA VO URITE FABLES.


How many thousand structures rise,
To fence us from inclement skies!.
For us he bears the sultry day,
And stores up all our winter's hay.
He sows, he reaps the harvest gain;
We share the toil, and share the grain."

The tumult ceased. The Colt submitted;
And, like his ancestors, was bitted.


MORAL.

Since every creature is decreed
To aid each other's mutual need;
Submit with a contented mind
To act the part by heaven assigned.

-0--

FABLE LI.

THE ASS AND THE LITTLE DOG.

THE Ass, observing how great a favourite a little Dog
was with his master, how much caressed, and fondled, and
fed with good bits at every meal, and for no other reason, as








FA VO URITE FABLES.


he could perceive, but skipping and frisking about, wagging
his tail, and leaping up in his master's lap, was resolved
to imitate the same, and see whether such behaviour would
not procure him the same favours. Accordingly, the master
was no sooner come home from walking about his fields and
gardens, and was seated in his easy chair, than the Ass, who
observed him, came gamboling and braying towards him, in
a very awkward manner. The master could not help laughing
aloud at the odd sight. But the jest soon became earnest,
when he felt the rough salute of the fore-feet, as the Ass,
raising himself upon his hinder legs, pawed against his
breast with a most loving air, and would fain have jumped
into his lap. The good man, terrified at this outrageous
conduct, and unable to endure the weight of so heavy a
beast, cried out; upon which one of his servants, running
in with a good stick, and laying heartily upon the bones
of the poor Ass, soon convinced him that everyone who
desires it is not qualified to be a favourite.


MORAL.

All men have not the same gifts of pleasing. It will be
well, therefore, to keep in our own place; and, in that con-
dition of life, to do our duty. By which we shall be most
likely to give satisfaction.








FA VO URITE FABLES.


How many thousand structures rise,
To fence us from inclement skies!.
For us he bears the sultry day,
And stores up all our winter's hay.
He sows, he reaps the harvest gain;
We share the toil, and share the grain."

The tumult ceased. The Colt submitted;
And, like his ancestors, was bitted.


MORAL.

Since every creature is decreed
To aid each other's mutual need;
Submit with a contented mind
To act the part by heaven assigned.

-0--

FABLE LI.

THE ASS AND THE LITTLE DOG.

THE Ass, observing how great a favourite a little Dog
was with his master, how much caressed, and fondled, and
fed with good bits at every meal, and for no other reason, as








FAVO URITE FABLES.


FABLE LII.
THE LION AND THE FOUR BULLS.
FOUR Bulls, which had entered into a very strict friendship,
kept always near one another, and fed together. The Lion
often saw them, and as often wished to make one of them his
prey; but though he could easily have subdued any of them
singly, yet he was afraid to attack the whole when together,
knowing they would have been too hard for him; and, there-
fore, contented himself for the present with keeping at a
distance. At last, perceiving no attempt was to be made
upon them as long as their combination lasted, he took occa-
sion, by whispers and hints, to foment jealousies and raise
divisions among them.
This stratagem succeeded so well, that the Bulls grew
cold and reserved towards one another, which soon after
ripened into a downright hatred and aversion, and, at last,
ended in a total separation. The Lion had now obtained his
ends; and, as impossible as it was for him to hurt-them
while they were united, he found no difficulty, now they were
parted, to seize and devour every Bull of them, one after
another.
MORAL.
Union is strength. Jealousy and envy, especially when
fomented by whisperers, will destroy gradually the ties that
make us safe against enemies.








SFAVOURITE FABLES.


FABLE LIIL

THE LEOPARD AND THE FOX.

THE Leopard one day took it into his head to value himself
upon the great variety and beauty of his spots; and, truly,
he saw no reason why even the lion should take place of him,
since he could not show so beautiful a skin. As for the rest
of the wild beasts of the forests, he treated them all, without
distinction, in the most haughty and disdainful manner.
But the Fox, being among them, went up to him with a great
deal of spirit and resolution, and told him that he was mis-
taken in the value he was pleased to set upon himself, since
people of judgment were not used to form their opinion of
merit from an outside appearance, but by considering the
good qualities and endowments with which the mind was
stored within.


MORAL.

Haughty beauty is an ungraceful thing. True beauty is
always found in a setting of modesty, and then only appears
the bright jewel that it is.







































































THE LEOPARD AND THE FOX.








FA VO URITE FABLES.


FABLE LIV.

THE WARRIOR WOLF.

A YOUNG Wolf said aloud
To the listening crowd,
"I may well of my father's great courage be proud;
Wherever he came,
Flock, shepherd, or dame,
All trembled and fled at the sound of his name.
Did anyone spy
My papa coming by-
Two hundred or more-Oh! he made them all fly!
One day, by a blow,
He was conquered, I know;
But no wonder at last he should yield to a foe:
He yielded, poor fellow!
The conquering bellow
Resounds in my ears as my poor father's knell-Oh!"
A Fox then replied,
While, leering aside,
He laughed at his folly and vapouring pride:
My chattering youth,
Your nonsense, forsooth,
Is more like a funeral sermon than truth.








FA VO URITE FABLES.


Let history tell
How your old father fell;
And see if the narrative sounds as well.
Your folly surpasses,
Of monkeys all classes;
The beasts which he frightened, or conquered, were asses,
Except a few sheep,
When the shepherd, asleep,
The dog by his side for safety did keep.
Your father fell back,
Knocked down by a whack
From the very first bull that he dared to attack.
Away he'd have scoured,
But soon overpowered,
He lived like a thief, and he died like a coward."

-o- -

FABLE LV.

THE BELLY AND THE MEMBERSi.

IN former days, when the Belly and the other parts of the
body enjoyed the faculty of speech, and had separate views
and designs of their own; each part, it seems, in particular,
for himself, and in the name of the whole, took exception at




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