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 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Clever Hans
 Advertisement
 Back Cover






Title: Clever Hans
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00025342/00001
 Material Information
Title: Clever Hans
Physical Description: 23 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Grimm, Jacob, 1785-1863
Grimm, Wilhelm, 1786-1859
Lawson, John, fl. 1865-1909 ( Illustrator )
Thomas De La Rue & Company
Publisher: Thos. de la Rue & Co.
Place of Publication: London
Publication Date: [ca. 1880]
 Subjects
Subject: Fairy tales -- 1880   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1880   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1880
Genre: Fairy tales   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by the Brothers Grimm ; illustrated by J. Lawson.
General Note: Includes publisher's advertisement.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00025342
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001862336
oclc - 28876972
notis - AJT6803
 Related Items
Other version: Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
    Clever Hans
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Advertisement
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Back Cover
        Page 28
Full Text
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J**PRINTED BYTHOS. DE LA RUE AND CO.LONDON.The Baldwin LibraryHlnd


BY THEBROTHERS GRIMMILLUSTRATED BYJ. LAWSON."-,-* -,.r.- j ._. ., -- ... ..1 *,;,,I, ... ': I ,, ... r2"',- ""S.... "''-, ,,.,,,,, ..... i -.' "- "


~-'--I~-CLEVER HANS.H ANS had served his master faithfully for seven years,when he said to him, "Master, my time is out, and I shouldof all things like, to see my mother again; give me my wages."To this his master replied, "You have served me truly andfaithfully, therefore your wages shall be adequate to yourservice. Take this," giving Hans at the same time a lump ofgold as large as his head. Hans, much pleased, took hishandkerchief out of his pocket, tied the gold up in it, thenplaced it on his shoulder, and set out on his way home,- 2


, *'.')E~'l_.-.Tk :A i~nwn


As he trudged on, whistling, and occasionally shifting hisgold from one shoulder to the other, a horseman advanced,who, cheerful' and sprightly, trotted on upon a nice freshhorse.^i^^^;^^^^ r7t'^--- -, --4- .. ,, :.. ." ""Ah," said Hans aloud, "what a pleasant thing it is to"ride. It is like sitting on your chair: you never, hurt your feetwith the stones, you save your shoes, and arrive at yourjourney's end without knowing it."The horseman hearing this, stopped, and cried, "Well,Hans, why are you on foot?""I am obliged," replied he; "I am going home, andhave this great lump to carry. It is gold, it is true, but it isvery disagreeable for all that, for I cannot hold my headstraight, and it hurts my shoulder."4


"If you like," said the horseman, "we will exchange. Iwill give you my horse, and you shall give me your lump ofgold.""With all my heart," replied Hans; "but I tell you,beforehand, you must carry it yourself."The horseman alighted, assisted Hans to mount, gave himthe reins in his hand, and, after directing him how to urge hishorse with those magical words, "hopp, hopp," if he wishedto increase his speed, took up the lump of gold and pursuedhis way.5"' " -. -"*," '-., .-. ...


Hans was delighted when he found himself so free andindependent on the back of his steed. In a short time, desiringto improve his pace, he made a noise with his tongue, andcried, " Hopp, hopp," which had the effect of producing aquick trot; and, before Hans was able to look round, he wasthrown off, and lay in a ditch, which separated the high roadfrom the fields. The horse would have continued its coursewithout its rider, had it not been stopped by a farmer, whowas coming along the road driving a cow. Hans, in the meantime, collected his thoughts, and got up; but he was crossafter his tumble, and said to the farmer, "It is no joke ridingon horseback, when one has such a mare as this, whichplunges and throws you off, so that you might break yourneck. I shall never get on again. Your cow is the-nicestcreature; you can go comfortably behind .her, and are, besides,secure of milk, butter, and .cheese every day. What would Igive if I had such a cow?"6


ioi**!'. _...; .. .... ...... .. . .'* >1 1* j


7 .."Well," said the farmer, " I will do you a very greatfavour; I will give you this cow for your horse."The joy of Hans at hearing this proposal was delightfulto witness ; the farmer, however, flung himself on the horse,and rode rapidly offHans drove his cow quietly before him, thinking of thegood bargain he had made. "If I have only a morsel ofbread," said he, "and I can hardly want for that, I can eatmy butter and cheese with it as often as I please, and when Iam thirsty, I need only milk my cow. What more can Iwant ?". ~~8 /


Arriving at an inn, he stopped to rest, ate up entirely,with great satisfaction, all he had for dinner and supper, andspent his last copper coin on half a glass of beer. Then,driving on his cow, he advanced towards his mother's village.The heat was oppressive, as it was nearly noon, andHans was journeying over a heath of two or three miles inextent; his thirst, therefore, was excessive, so that his tongueclave to the roof of his mouth."ii"-, " I " ...


"I have a very pleasant resource," thought Hans; " I willmilk my cow, and refresh myself with the milk." With thesewords he fastened her to a dead tree, and, having no pail, heprepared to milk her into his leather cap. But his trouble wasin vain: not a drop would she give; and, to add to his sorrows,Hans being very awkward, the cow lost patience, and gave himsuch a kick on the head that he fell unconscious to the ground,and remained so for some time. Fortunately, a butcher, with ayoung pig in a wheelbarrow, came by at this time."What is the matter here?" cried he, as he helped Hansto come to himself, who, when able, told him all that hadoccurred. " Here," said the butcher, handing him his flask,"take a little, and you will feel better; your cow will nevergive any milk; she is old, and good for nothing but to drawa cart, or kill."10


PFI12;~


"Well, well," said Hans, stroking his head, "who wouldhave thought it? but it is a good thing to have such a beast,that one may kill when one likes, and have plenty of meat inthe house, only I do not particularly like cow beef; there is nogravy. If I had only such a young pig as yours! That isquite a different thing, and we should have sausages, too.""Well, Hans," said the butcher, "out of regard for you, Iwill change with you-you shall have my pig, and I will takeyour old cow.""A thousand thanks," said Hans, accepting the offer;accordingly, delivering the cow, the pig was taken out of thewheelbarrow, and the cord to which it was fastened deliveredinto his hand.Hans now went on, thinking how everything had prosperedaccording to his wish, for, if a misadventure overtook him,something instantly occurred to put him right again; and,before long, a young man, with a beautiful white goose underhis arm, joined him on the road. They greeted each other12


civilly, and Hans then began to relate how fortunate he hadbeen, and told him of the profitable exchange he had made.The young man, on his part, told him he was carrying thegoose to a christening feast." Feel it," said he, taking it by the wings, how heavy itis; it has been fatted for eight weeks, and whoever eats of itwhen roasted will have occasion to congratulate himself.""Yes," said Hans, feeling the weight, " it is heavy, butmy pig is a beauty."Upon this, the other looked round with a dubiousexpression, and shook his head."Listen," said he, "I fear your pig is not quite right. AsI passed through the village on my way here a pig had beenstolen out of the constable's sty, and I much fear it is the oneyou now have. People are looking for it in all directions, andit will be a bad affair for you if they catch you with the pig;the least you can expect is to be put in the blackhole."Poor Hans was in a terrible fright.13


A-i~;;; ixi I-.a ." ~"


"Oh, dear," said he, "pray help me out of this scrape.You will be able to do better than I. Pray take my pig, andgive me your goose."I shall risk something by so doing," ,was the reply;"however, I will not be the cause of your falling into anymisfortune." So, taking the cord in his hand, he drove the pigaway by a little by-path; while good Hans, freed from hisapprehensions, put the goose under his arm, and continued hisway home.-=-----S --~'I\!~ _~I..-~ 9T-----"When I come to consider," said the latter to himself, "Iam a great gainer by the exchange: first, a capital roast goose,and then the immense quantity of fat which it will provide uswith-goose'fat for our bread for three months! The beautifulwhite feathers, *too, will make me a pillow, so soft, that Ishall sleep on it without rocking. How pleased will mymother be!"15


nI -i'rsfsHaving arrived at the last village on his road, he foundthere a scissors-grinder with his apparatus, who was turning hisgrindstone and singing merrily. Hans stood for some timelooking at him; he then remarked:"You must be doing well, for you are very merry at yourgrinding, and sing away.""Yes," replied the grinder, "trade has a golden foundation,and a good grinder is a man who, whenever he puts his handin his pocket, is sure to find money there. But where didyou buy that beautiful goose?"16


"I did not buy it; I got it in exchange for my pig.""And your pig?""I took it in exchange for my cow.""And the cow ?"I got it instead of a horse.""And the horse?"" I got it from a man for a lump of gold.""And the lump of gold?""Oh; that was my wages for seven years' service." You seem to know how to help yourself on all occasions,"said the grinder; "but if gold should ever cease to grow inyour pocket, now is the time to make your fortune, if you area wise man."How is that to be done?" inquired Hans."You must become a grinder, like me, for which nothingis especially requisite except a grindstone; other things willcome of themselves. Now, here is one-a little worn, it istrue; but for that reason I shall ask you nothing more for itexcept your goose. Will you have it?"17


IsU8


"How can you doubt it?" replied Hans; "for I shall bethe happiest man upon the earth. If I always find moneywhen I put my hand in my pocket, what need I care?"With these words he handed over the goose to the grinder,and took the grindstone in exchange;- and the latter, pickingup an ordinary heavy stone lying near him, gave it, in addition,to Hans, saying, " Here is also another valuable stone that Iwill give you; you can knock upoh it, or hammer your oldnails straight. Take it, and be careful of it."S19-19


Hans took it as offered, and went with a light heartthrough the village. His eyes sparkled with joy, and he wasthe picture of content. "I must certainly have been bornfortunate," said he; "everything I wish for comes half-way tomeet me, like a Sunday child." These considerations, however,did not prevent his feeling very tired. He had been on hislegs ever since daybreak, and as he devoured all his store inthe joy of his heart upon exchanging his horse for the cow,hunger began to torment him keenly. His step graduallyslackened, and he was obliged to stop every moment to rest."- _-2020


JFJ"The weight of the stones, too, appeared to increase; and hecould not altogether repress the idea that he' should be ratherglad not to have to carry them just now. At a snail's pace,he reached a well in a field, and resolved to rest awhile, andrefresh himself with a draught of water; but, being careful notto injure his treasures of stones, he placed them gently on theedge of the well; then, seating himself close by them, hestooped to drink, and, in the act, he gave the stones a slightpush, and they both fell in.21


22


Hans saw them both reach the bottom; then, feeling quiterelieved, he fell on his knees and returned thanks, with tearsin his eyes, that this mercy likewise had been shown him, andthat he had been able to get rid of the heavy stones withouthaving occasion to reproach himself. " Such a fortunate manas I am could hardly be found!" said he; and, with joyfulheart, he sprang on his way, and, free from every burthen,in a short time he was clasped to his mother's heart.I-- I I- ---- -_> I23


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