How Jessie was lost

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Material Information

Title:
How Jessie was lost
Series Title:
Routledge's new sixpenny toy books
Physical Description:
8 leaves. : ;
Language:
English
Creator:
Evans, Edmund, 1826-1905 ( Engraver , Printer )
George Routledge and Sons ( Publisher )
Publisher:
George Routledge & Sons
Place of Publication:
London
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's poetry -- 1880   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1880   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1880
Genre:
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Includes publisher's advertisements.
General Note:
"Edmund Evans, engraver and printer" -back cover.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001801798
oclc - 27694067
notis - AJM5567
System ID:
UF00025048:00001

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Related Items:
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Full Text
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H OW J ESSIE WAS LOST>lA LITTLE girl lived in avery large city,In a house that was big, thatwas fine, that was high;(I always have thought it a verygreat pityThat we cannot teach childrenin London to fly,For the stairs are as windingS and long as my ditty,And the nursery 's always thenearest the sky).But this little girl Jessie hadlungs rather stronge--Than most little girls, for, topeople's surprise,She was able to cry so muchlouder and longerThan any small child of her ageor her size.The Baldwin LibraryUnivwiiN<a~~


In Kensington Gardens my Jessie went walking,With Nurse, and the baby, and Bessie the maid;They chatter'd like magpies, but what they were talkingS They knew very little, I 'm sadly afraid.I knowthis, as the Nurse was conversing with Bessie,- They forgot so entirely about their young charge,That, seizing the chance, off went little Miss Jessie,Upon finding herselflike a wild beast- at large.II IfIfi_* x.


She ran very quickly, betweenthe trees winding,As far from the Nurses as evershe could,And she thought to herself, butwithout at all minding,"Now I shall be lost, like theBabes in the Wood."i L--- I AT--J1-Wt~~;~i-= iz_-- ~M


The Park-keeper saw her, and thenSshe grew paler;He thought she was frightened be-cause she was lost;She thought with his thick stickhe meant to assail her,For a Park-keeper's really as badas a ghost.i' iK ~ ZT


N--Just then she fell down onsome very hard gravel,And wounded her hand, and her elbowmuch worse,And began to have doubts as to whetherher travelWas pleasant without either Bessie orNurse.i;- .~~zif~i- tn27


The Park-keeper led her quite kindly, and brought herTo his lodge, and there gave her a raspberry-drop;But in spite of all that he could do, and his daughter,She cried as if never intending to stop.In vain did the Keeper to soothe her endeavour,In vain did his daughters all give her a kiss;Her sobs became louder-they all said, "I neverIn all my life-never heardcrying like this !"/ Ng


A gentleman, taking a walk with a lady,Was strolling on slowly, enjoying theview,The grass all so green, and the path-way so shady,When they heard a peculiar noisethat they knew.It was made up of sobs, and of callingfor Bessie,And of crying, the loudest you everdid hear;And the lady exclaimed, "That cannever be Jessie !It is so like her crying-we 'll go andcsee, deatr."ri~! _,7 z


- -;-------'-~--------' mOh yes, it was Jessie, their ownlittle daughter,But how she got there, therewas no one to say;And thus having found her, be-fore they had sought her,S They forgot quite to scoldher for running away.~ sdown-


ew-R I NLN0 R


Full Text

PAGE 1

H OW J ESSIE WAS LOST>l A LITTLE girl lived in a very large city, In a house that was big, that was fine, that was high; (I always have thought it a very great pity That we cannot teach children in London to fly, For the stairs are as winding S and long as my ditty, And the nursery 's always the nearest the sky). But this little girl Jessie had lungs rather stronge-Than most little girls, for, to people's surprise, She was able to cry so much louder and longer Than any small child of her age or her size. The Baldwin Library Univwi iN


PAGE 1

--;-------'-~--------' m Oh yes, it was Jessie, their own little daughter, But how she got there, there was no one to say; And thus having found her, before they had sought her, S They forgot quite to scold her for running away. ~ sdown-



PAGE 1

A gentleman, taking a walk with a lady, Was strolling on slowly, enjoying the view, The grass all so green, and the pathway so shady, When they heard a peculiar noise that they knew. It was made up of sobs, and of calling for Bessie, And of crying, the loudest you ever did hear; And the lady exclaimed, "That can never be Jessie It is so like her crying-we 'll go andc see, deatr." ri ~! _,7 z



PAGE 1

ew -R I NLN0 R



PAGE 1

In Kensington Gardens my Jessie went walking, With Nurse, and the baby, and Bessie the maid; They chatter'd like magpies, but what they were talking S They knew very little, I 'm sadly afraid. I knowthis, as the Nurse was conversing with Bessie, -They forgot so entirely about their young charge, That, seizing the chance, off went little Miss Jessie, Upon finding herself like a wild beast -at large. II IfIf i_* x.



PAGE 1

The Park-keeper led her quite kindly, and brought her To his lodge, and there gave her a raspberry-drop; But in spite of all that he could do, and his daughter, She cried as if never intending to stop. In vain did the Keeper to soothe her endeavour, In vain did his daughters all give her a kiss; Her sobs became louder-they all said, "I never In all my life-never heard crying like this !" / Ng



PAGE 1

The Park-keeper saw her, and then Sshe grew paler; He thought she was frightened because she was lost; She thought with his thick stick he meant to assail her, For a Park-keeper's really as bad as a ghost. i' i K ~ ZT



PAGE 1

ti, r I 44 .... .... .... ...... .. .... ..... jv-......... .....



PAGE 1

N-Just then she fell down on some very hard gravel, And wounded her hand, and her elbow much worse, And began to have doubts as to whether her travel Was pleasant without either Bessie or Nurse. i;. ~~zif ~itn27



PAGE 1

She ran very quickly, between the trees winding, As far from the Nurses as ever she could, And she thought to herself, but without at all minding, "Now I shall be lost, like the Babes in the Wood." i L--I AT --J1 -Wt ~~;~i-= iz _-~M