Beauty and the beast

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Material Information

Title:
Beauty and the beast
Series Title:
Gordon Browne's series of old fairy tales
Physical Description:
30 p. : ;
Language:
English
Creator:
Browne, Gordon, 1858-1932 ( Illustrator )
Blackie & Son ( Publisher )
Publisher:
Blackie & Son
Place of Publication:
London
Glasgow
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Fairy tales -- 1880   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1880   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1880
Genre:
Fairy tales   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Scotland -- Glasgow
Scotland -- Edinburgh
Ireland -- Dublin

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Includes publisher's advertisement.
General Note:
Imprint also notes publisher's location in Edinburgh and Dublin.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001817656
oclc - 28010793
notis - AJP1602
System ID:
UF00025017:00001

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BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.-(p. 24.)
The Baldwin Library
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T was Tuesday afternoon ;:
lovely clear afternoon, #wi
a cloudless sky and a warm soft air. The
sun was preparing to go down behind the
wood, but he was in no hurry about it,
for he knew, the clever old fellow, that wh(e
he was once down he could no longer see th
pretty scene which he had been watchingo
the last hour. He had been staring down witi
his great golden eye into the tiny green mead
where stood the Whispering Tree, and watchiwg,
four children, Marigold, Peter, Jean, and Emanue
Philbert, who were all sitting on the soft bank
of greenest moss under the tree.
The jolly old sun thought he had never
seen four merrier-looking .
children, but he did not
know what kept them so quiet just then. I do know, however, and I will tell
you if you are quite sure you have been good all day.
(373) 3A


The fact is, the Tree was telling the children a story; a story which the
fairy who lived in its branches had told it only the night before. Would you
also like to hear the story? Listen, then, for this is it.
THE STORY OF BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.
"LONG, long ago, there lived in the kingdom of Rigdom Funnidos a rich
merchant who had three fair daughters. The eldest was tall and stately, the
second was slight and graceful, but the third was more beautiful than both the
others put together, or than any one else in the world. The eldest daughter was
4


called Superba, the second was called Gracilia, but the youngest was called
only Beauty, for there was no other name that was good enough for her. The
merchant was wealthy, as I said, and many suitors came to woo his fair daughters,
some for the girls' own sakes, and some for their father's gold. Superba
looked haughtily at her lovers, and said she would marry no one except a king.
'\
Gracilia laughed at hers, and told
them they might be fit for horse
boys but not for husbands; so they all went off in a huff and left the
S scornful maidens alone. But Beauty smiled so sweetly
on her suitors, and told them so gently that she could
Snot leave her dear father, that they only loved her the
Smore, and sat and
- w wept on all the fences
-d for miles around.
(373) 5 A 2


Now one day a terrible storm arose, and the wind blew three days
and three nights; and news was
brought to the merchant that all his
ships, which were on their way home
from the Indies, laden with gold-
dust, and spices, and ivory, and
cocoa-nuts, were lost, and that he was
a ruined man. He gave up his fine
house, and went with his three
daughters to a small cottage, where
they lived for some time in poverty.
Superba and Gracilia did nothing
but scold and storm and weep over their ill fortune but Beauty bared her
lovely arms, and tied a kerchief over her golden curls, and did all the work
of the house cheer-
fully and willingly.
When her suitors
heard of this, they
4 were more deeply in
love with her than
before, and they
brought her many
presents to help her
in her housekeeping,
which they left at
Sthe back door with
the greatest delicacy
and decorum."
"What sort of things did they bring to Beauty?" inquired Jean.
6


"They brought butter and artichokes," replied the Tree, "bees'-wax and
,1 young goslings, and the fruit of the fingo palm,
! l with many other things too numerous to mention.
One day, however, one of the suitors brought
something which was better than any of these
things, for he brought the news that some ships,
long delayed by storms and winds, had come into
port, and that several of the merchant's ships were
"among them. There was great gladness in
I' the little cottage. The merchant saddled
$ the old farm-horse, the only steed he now
- ..... possessed, and got ready to ride at once to
the great city to see for himself if the good news was true. He took an
affectionate leave of his daughters, and said, 'My dear children, if I find that
my ships are really safe I will bring you each a hand-
some present. Tell me, Superba, what do you most
wish for?'
'I wish for a ring,' said the
eldest daughter, 'with a diamond
as large as a pea in it.'
'If the ships have come,'
replied her father, 'a diamond
ring you shall have. And you,
Gracilia, what will best please
you?'
'A velvet gown,' said the 'V
second daughter, 'set about *
with pearls and rubies.
'If the ships have come, .
7


replied her father, 'a velvet gown you shall have. And now, my dear Beauty,'
he said, 'tell me what I shall bring to you?'
'My father,' replied Beauty, 'bring me back your own dear self safe and
sound, and I ask for nothing else.'
'Nay,' said the merchant, 'if I bring nothing for you, I bring nothing
for the others. Are you not my best and dearest child?'
Then the two elder sisters whispered angrily to Beauty, 'Ask for
something, or we shall lose our gifts, only because you are a fool.'
'Well,' said Beauty, 'if it must be so, my father, I pray you to bring
me a fair white rose, the fairest that you see in your journeying.'
The merchant promised, mounted his horse, and rode away.
On arriving at the great city he found that the news was really true.
There were his ships at anchor in the bay, safe and sound, and still holding in
their oaken sides the precious freight of gold-dust, ivory, spices and cocoa-nuts.
So now the merchant brought
his goods on shore, and sold them
at a very high price; for it
happened that the king's
daughter was to be
married the next day,
and the palace cooks
had been looking every-
where for cinnamon to
" flavour their spice-cakes,
and for gold-
dust to gild
them withal,
and for cocoa-nuts to make the cramjam pudding, without which no wedding-
feast may be celebrated in the kingdom of Rigdom Funnidos.
8


So by the end of the day our merchant found himself once more a rich
man, and he spent the whole evening at his inn, counting his broad gold pieces
V-i
and tying them up in bags. He kept out enough, however, to buy the
presents for his daughters, and the next morning he went to the great bazaar
and bought a ring with a diamond as big as a pea in it, and a velvet gown
set about with pearls and rubies. These were easily obtained, but when it
came to Beauty's present it was quite another matter. This was the day of
the royal wedding, and not a rose was to be had for love or money, as the
court gardeners had bought them all the day before.
After trying in vain to find one, the merchant was obliged to give up the
search and turn his horse's head towards home, for the day was now far spent,
and hasten as he might he could not reach his cottage home before nightfall.
He rode fast and he rode far, but the black shadows rode faster, and the way
grew darker and darker; at length in his haste he took a wrong turn in the
road, and was very soon completely lost in a deep forest. There was still
(373) 9 A3


enough daylight lingering in the west to show him that this was a very strange
forest indeed, very strange and very
frightful For all the trees seemed to
have human shapes. As he gazed
about him, in wonder that was fast
turning into terror, gaunt, withered
arms seemed to point and beckon to
him, hideous grinning faces peeped at
him from behind the knotted trunks;
"f they made ugly grimaces at him, and
i arms and hands waved in wild and
i threatening gestures. And all the lank arms beckoned, and
all the ugly heads nodded and tossed in one direc-
tion, as if to show him the way that he must take.
And now-hark! were those voices, mingling
with the rushing and roaring of the
wind? What were they saying?
'Forward! forward!' was that
it ? The merchant drew his
mantle closely about
him, for the long
'< arms of the trees
i now seemed to
stretch out skinny
hands to clutch at him;
- and clapping the spurs
to his steed he dashed
"forward at his utmost
speed.
10


Presently the trees began to open right and left before him. A long
avenue appeared, at the further end of which he saw brilliant lights gleaming.
As he drew near, behold! there stood a stately palace, in the midst of fair
0i
gardens and lawns. Every window was ablaze with light, as if for some great
feast, and the merchant, as he entered the courtyard, felt as if he had left
darkness and danger behind him.
Dismounting, he knocked at the great bronze door of the palace, which
swung back instantly without sound. He looked eagerly into the vast hall
which opened before him; but what was his amazement to see no living
creature. The marble walls were hung with rich tapestries, and costly furniture
and ornaments appeared on every side; but no human form was seen, no
human voice was heard. Suddenly he felt the touch of a hand! an invisible
11


hand, which took his own hand and led him gently across the threshold
sl.... -and through the hall. Stare as he
S i might, he could see no one; but invisible
i hands now took off his cap and mantle,
Sa and led him to a chair; and when one
pair of -so fthands had gently pressed
him down into it, another pair drew off
his heavy riding-boots and put upon his
T] feet fir-lined slippers, which fitted as if
they had been made for him. Then he
rose, and was led into a large banquet-
Shall, where a table was laid, decked with
Sgold and silver plate, snowy damask,
"i and sparkling glass. Seating him at
the table, the invisible hands served him
S most skilfully, pouring
out golden wine in ruby
glasses, and tempting
him every moment with some new and delicious
dish. When he had supped as well as he could "
in his amazement, he was led into another room,
where stood a softly-cushioned bed, with hangings
of crimson satin. The hands undressed
him, and assisted him to get into bed,
where they tucked him up, and handed
him a night-draught of hot spiced wine.
Wondering, and still wondering, and yet
again wondering, the merchant at length
fell asleep, and slept soundly till morning.
12


When he awoke the sun was shining brightly in through the crimson curtains,
and the invisible hands were busy brushing his
clothes and pouring perfumed water into a silver
basin. Rising at their silent invitation, the merchant
suffered himself to be dressed and led into the
banquet-hail, where a good breakfast was ready for
him. After this the hands led him into the court-
yard, where he found his horse standing, all
saddled and bridled, having evidently been
groomed and fed and well
taken care of. He thanked
his invisible hosts very warmly,
and mounting his horse pre- ,
pared to ride out of the
courtyard. But as he neared
the gate what should he see
but a climbing rose-bush growing over the wall
and covered with pure white roses, the loveliest \
that ever were seen. He thought of Beauty's
request for a white rose, and reining in his steed he reached up and plucked
the fairest blossom that grew within his reach. Instantly there came a crash,
as if a thunderbolt had burst over his head; and then he heard behind him
a frightful growl, as if an angry lion were about to spring upon him.
Turning round in great alarm he saw a most hideous and horrible Beast,
which stood glaring at him with eyes of fire, and gnashing its long gleaming
teeth.
'Wretch!' exclaimed the Beast in an angry tone, 'is it thus you repay
my hospitality! I have sheltered you from storm and wind, have fed and
lodged you, asking nothing in return; and now, ingrate that you are, you steal
13


my roses. Say your prayers and make your peace with Heaven, for this hour
you must die!'
The unhappy merchant fell on
his knees and begged for mercy.
He told the Beast about his fair
young daughter Beauty, who had
asked him to bring her a white
rose, and of his vain search for
roses in the great city. 'Alas!
"when I saw your flowers,' he said,
' I thought only of my promise
to my child, and plucked
the blossom without pausing to think whether it were right to do so. Have
mercy, my Lord Beast! Have mercy, and spare me! Truly, it seems but a
little sin to cost a man his life.'
The Beast seemed to reflect for a few minutes, then he said:
14


'On one condition, and one only, I will spare your life; and that condition
is that you will send me this fair maiden in your stead.'
'Never!' cried the merchant, 'never! I would rather die a thousand deaths
myself than give up my best-beloved child to so horrible a fate. Take your
revenge on me alone, Monster, for my daughter you shall not have.'
'Nevertheless,' said the Beast, 'take time to think about it. Go home,
and in a week you shall return here, prepared to forfeit either your daughter's
life or your own. Swear to do this, and you may go free.'
The merchant swore, and immediately the bronze gates of the courtyard
opened and suffered him to pass through, closing with a clang behind him.
With despair in his heart, the merchant rode towards his home, the Beast
having told him the way. When he arrived at the cottage his daughters came
,4,,
60-
running out to meet him, and welcomed him back. Superba received the diamond
ring with delight, and Gracilia was enchanted with her velvet gown; but when
15


the merchant gave the rose to his youngest daughter, the tears stood in his
eyes, and he said:
'Ah! Beauty, Beauty, your present has cost me more than both the others
put together.'
Beauty, in great alarm, asked the meaning of these strange words; but her
father refused to say anything more, and she was left to wonder.
The next morning when the merchant awoke in his peaceful home the
recollection of all his strange adventures seemed like a fearful dream. The
forest, with its clutching hands and grinning
faces, the palace, the invisible hands, the horrible
form of the Beast-he wondered if they had
really existed at all save in his imagination.
But when he saw the white rose blooming
in a slender silver vase, and carefully tended
by Beauty, a cold shudder ran through him,
and he fancied he heard a terrible voice saying:
'In one week!'
"It was only fancy, however, and as the days
_. passed he put off from one time to another the
--evil moment when he must tell his daughters of
the fate which awaited him.
At length the last day of the week came, and still the merchant had said
nothing. He tried to persuade himself that the Beast might have forgotten,
or might have relented towards him; at all events, could he be expected to
keep an oath which had been forced from him when in danger of his life?
was it right, merely because he had given his word, to leave his daughters
alone in the world, and give himself up to a horrible death?
In this way the poor merchant thought to himself, as he sat with his
children, on the evening of the last day of the week. Suddenly Gracilia cried:
16


'Ah! what a fearful cloud is that I see yonder! It is coming towards
us at lightning speed. What can it mean? and what is that frightful roaring
sound?' All started to their feet, and the next
S moment the room grew perfectly dark. A burst
of thunder shook
All the house, and
instantly a violent
Sstorm of wind
and rain raged
to overwhelm the frail cottage. The three maidens fell on their knees in
terror, but their father stood still, as if turned to stone, for at this moment a
loud and dreadful voice was heard above the howling of the storm, crying:
' Little loth,
Break'st thine oath,
Death with thee will keep his troth!'
Three times these words were repeated, then the storm and darkness passed
17
sss,.


away as if by magic, and left the four unhappy ones staring at each other, with
pale faces and beating hearts. Beauty now insisted upon knowing the meaning
of the words, and the merchant, feeling that he could no longer be silent, told
the whole story, and said that in the morning they must take their last farewell
of their unhappy father. But when Beauty heard that the Beast had offered
to take her instead of her father, she said:
'My father, I will go! Your life is most important, mine of little consequence.
Say no more, for I am resolved, and nothing can change me.'
The merchant would not hear of this for a long time; but Beauty was firm
in her resolve, and finally gained her point.
Early the next morning the merchant saddled the old horse, and taking
Beauty on a pillion behind
him, started on his way to-
wards the Beast's palace. He
was bowed down with sorrow,
and wept so bitterly that he
could hardly see the road;
but Beauty cheered and com-
forted him, and bade him keep
a good heart.
h 'I feel,' she said, 'as if
the Beast would spare my life.
Indeed, what good would it
do him to kill me? whereas,
if I lived I might be of use
Sto him in many ways.'
By noon they reached
': "the gates of the courtyard,
which swung open to receive them, and closed behind them with a ringing
18


sound. No one was to be seen in the courtyard, but the marble pavement
was strewn with white roses, and the invisible hands scattered fresh blossoms
before Beauty as she dismounted and moved toward the
palace. Over the great door, which stood invitingly open,
were garlands of roses, and the air was heavy with their
fragrance. As the maiden paused
on the threshold she heard a deep
voice, which said:
'Enter, Beauty, to thine own!
Thou art queen, and thou alone.'
She entered, followed by her
father. As before, the invisible
hands were ready to attend by
bringing them fur-lined robes and
embroidered slippers, and then by
conducting them to the banquet-
hall. They found the table spread
with every kind of dainty; and _
while they ate, soft music from
unseen instruments, harp and flute
and viol, sounded above them in
delightful harmony. The merchant was far too unhappy to have any appetite,
but he made a pretence of eating, to please his daughter. When the meal was
over, he embraced her many times, with tears and sobs.
'Alas! alas!' he cried. 'Must I indeed leave you, my best-loved child,
to be the prey of a horrible monster, who mocks his victims with pomp and
splendour before he destroys them?'
'Farewell, dear father!' said Beauty. 'Farewell! and try to think
19


cheerfully of me. I may fare much better than you dare to hope. And if
not, one can die but once, when all is said.'
So the maiden embraced her father for the last time, and saw him mount
his horse and ride slowly out of the court-
- yard, often turning to look back, with tears
S< on his sad face.
7_ When he was gone she was tempted
/ for a moment to sit down and weep with
dread; but the same deep voice she had
heard before sounded beside her, saying:
'Fear not, Beauty, fair and dear!
_ Love alone awaits thee here.'
The maiden took comfort at this,
and amused herself by wandering
through the splendid rooms which
opened on every side of the great hall.
When evening came the ever-attentive
hands led her into a bed-room, which
was more beautiful than any she had yet seen. The walls were all of looking-
glass, so that on every side she saw the reflection of her own lovely form.
The furniture was blue and silver, and in the centre of the room stood a silver
bed, with curtains of sky-blue velvet all sprinkled with pearls. When Beauty
lay down on this dainty couch the invisible music began to play, and softly,
softly lulled her to sleep."
" Oh! o-o-oh!" sighed Marigold, curling up her toes in ecstasy. "How
I wish I had been Beauty! Think of that lovely bed, Jean! and the looking-
glass walls! oh dear! How nice it would be to live in a fairy story!"
"When Beauty woke the next morning she rubbed her eyes and thought
20


she must be dreaming, when she saw the splendid room in which she lay. The
shining walls gave back the rays of the morning sun, which streamed softly
in through curtains of silver and rose coloured gauze, and glittered on the
r
NY,,
golden lilies of the coverlet. The invisible hands were busy about the room,
some sprinkling perfumes through the air with mops of rose-leaves, others filling
a huge marble bath with fragrant waters, while others again were laying out
delicate robes of lace and rose-coloured satin. Beauty rose, and after dressing,
found that the friendly hands were leading her into the banquet-hall, where she
was greeted by a burst of joyous music from the unseen musicians. As she sat
at table the deep voice which she had heard twice before spoke to her, saying:
'Beauty, you see now that you are sole mistress of this palace and all
it contains. Your father has given you a frightful account of me, no doubt;
and for that reason I shall remain invisible until you yourself are willing to
see me. Meantime let us be as good friends as we can.'
21


After this the Beast (for the Beast it was) began to talk in such a pleasant
sensible manner that Beauty became much interested in the conversation. After
breakfast she was led into a wonderful
garden full of the most charming roses
that ever were seen.
SAs Beauty entered,
all the rose-trees
- -bowed low, and the
-, `invisible hands scat-
i- tered pink, and crim-
? son, and snow-white petals
S before her, making a carpet
for her feet.
/ iB I'Here I shall leave you, Beauty,'
T-- said the Beast. 'Be happy, and re-
!l member that all you see is your own.
S'j -- With your permission, I will sup with
you this evening; but if you would
rather be alone, you have but to speak.'
. Beauty willingly agreed to the
request, and when the Beast had left
Sher she spent the day in exploring
the gardens and the palace, finding at each step something new and wonderful.
When evening came the Beast joined her at supper, and was again so agreeable
that she was sorry when it was time to say 'good-night.' The next day passed
in the same manner, the Beast becoming still more and more an amiable and
delightful companion. Finally, on the third day Beauty said, 'Dear Beast, I
fiow find such pleasure in your society that I am quite sure I shall not be at all
troubled by your ugliness. Therefore, I pray you, let me see you just as you are.'
22


'Alas! Beauty,' said the Beast, 'you know not what you ask. Still, I
cannot refuse your request, so I shall appear before you in the rose-garden in
my own dreadful shape.'
SBeauty, left alone once
more, half curious and
half afraid, sought the
rose-garden, where she
began to pluck clusters of
splendid crimson blossoms,
and fasten them on her
dress and in her golden
hair. Suddenly looking up
she saw a hideous form
approaching her, which
she knew must
be that of the
" Beast: a form so
S frightful, so very
" frightful, that
Beauty turned
pale, and could
not repress a
shudder. The Beast saw it, and sighing deeply said, 'I told you,
Beauty, that you knew not what you asked. It is best that I should remain
invisible.'
But Beauty looked up bravely and said, 'No, my dear Beast, I know
so well the charms of your mind and the goodness of your heart, that I can
well bear to look at you, ugly as you are. Remain, and let us speak no more
of this.'
23


Then the Beast began to talk so wisely and delightfully that Beauty soon
forgot the hideous form, and listened and replied with delight.
In this way Beauty passed several weeks at the palace of the Beast,
becoming more and more attached to her kind friend and host. One night,
however, she had a dream which made her very unhappy. She dreamed that
her father was lying at the point of death. She seemed to see him, pale and
haggard, lying on his bed; and she heard him say, 'I am dying because I have
no desire to live, since Beauty is gone, and I shall never see her again. Oh!
Beauty, oh! my child, was it indeed I who delivered thee over to thy fate?'
Beauty awoke from her sleep crying, 'Father! father! I come!' As soon as
morning came she hastened to the rose-garden, and impatiently awaited the
coming of the Beast. The moment that hideous but kind and gentle creature
appeared she ran to tell her dream, and to implore that she might go to her
dying father. 'Oh! good Beast! kind Beast!' she cried 'let me but go and nurse
him now, and I will return and serve you all the days of my life. Nay, gladly
will I give up my life itself, if so I may save my father's, or at least comfort his
last hours. Ah! have pity on me, unhappy maid that I am, and let me go!'
At these words the Beast
uttered a great cry and fell__
to the ground as one dead, __
lying motionless, with that __
grim and grisly head resting
on the crimson rose-leaves.
Beauty, in great alarm,
knelt beside it. She _
sprinkled drops of dew
over its face, by shaking
the masses of glowing blossoms that hung above them. In tones of agony she
besought the Beast not to add thus to her sorrow.
24


After some time the Beast recovered a little, and seemed to regain strength.
'Beauty,' said the voice she now knew so well, 'if I let you go, will you promise
to marry me when you return?'
Beauty shuddered and turned pale. 'Alas! dear Beast,' she said, 'ask
me anything but that. I will be your friend, your servant; but do not ask
me to marry you.'
'Say, at least, that you will think of it,' urged the Beast, 'and I will
let you go.'
'That I may safely promise,' said Beauty, 'so I give you my word.'
The Beast then said that in an hour a carriage should be ready to take
her to her father's house. 'I shall expect you to return when a week is
past,' he added; 'if you tarry longer, remember that you will be the cause
of my death.'
Beauty promised to return, and hastened to the palace to make ready for
her journey. In her mirror-lined room she found a beautiful travelling dress
of gray and silver laid out for her, and a purple velvet mantle lined with
ermine. The invisible hands assisted her to dress, brought her a delicate repast
of fruits and wine served on a golden salver, and in an hour's time led her out
into the great courtyard. Here she found a magnificent carriage, glittering with
gold and silver, with ivory wheels, and soft cushions of gold-coloured satin.
It was drawn by four superb black horses, with harness and trappings of beaten
gold. They pawed the ground and tossed their stately heads, impatient of
delay; but though they were evidently restrained by some powerful hand, no
driver was visible. The hands helped Beauty into the carriage, and as she
seated herself on the satin cushions she heard the deep voice of the Beast
saying:-
'Farewell, Beauty! woe is me!
Light and joy do go with thee.'
She would have replied, but at that moment the whip cracked, the horses
25


started and bore her swiftly on her way to her father's house. On arriving
Beauty sprang from the
h carriage, and scarcely wait-
Sing to greet her astonished
sisters, rushed up to the
Sroom where her father lay
Spale and suffering. The
Smaiden, throwing herself
1 5w, down beside him, and kiss-
ing his pale. brow, cried:
'Father, dear father! speak
to me. I am Beauty, your
own a thi save you.' The merchant opened
his sunken eyes, and when he saw his beloved child, life seemed to return to
him, and he clasped her to his heart with tears of joy.
In reply to the eager questions, Beauty now related all that had happened
to her in the Beast's palace; and her father became so much interested that
he forgot his pain and began to recover
from that moment. Superba and Gracilia
were heartily glad to see their sister, but
they could not help feeling envious when
they saw her magnificent attire, and the
radiant jewels which sparkled on her
neck and arms; but Beauty, with a
charming grace, drew off a necklace of
rubies and a splendid sapphire bracelet,
and begged her sisters to accept them
a's keepsakes from her, and to love her always. 'For,' she said, 'in a week
I must return to my kind friend the Beast, as I have promised.'
26


Her father and sisters cried out at this, and vowed that they would never
let her go again; but Beauty only smiled, and bade them make much of her
while they might.
She devoted herself to nursing her father, never leaving him day or night,
and was rewarded by seeing him improve a little each day, but the improve-
ment was very slow, and she became so absorbed in her cares that she forgot
to notice the days as they passed swiftly by. Her sisters said nothing, when
the last day of the week came, hoping that Beauty might forget her promise
to the Beast and stay with them always, for she took all care off their shoulders;
and the sick merchant thought of nothing but the joy of having his dearest
child with him once more.
One evening Beauty was bending over her father to smooth his pillow and
give him the soothing draught which should enable him to sleep and forget his
pain till morning, when she happened to rest her eyes on a large mirror which
hung against the wall. What was it she saw there? she turned pale, and
clasped her hands with a cry of terror. For in the glass she saw reflected the
rose-garden near the palace of the Beast; and under the fair rose-tree that she
loved best, stretched cold and pale on the mossy turf, lay the Beast itself.
At first, as Beauty gazed horror-stricken in the glass, the Beast seemed to be
without life or motion; but presently its pale lips moved, and Beauty fancied
she heard a faint voice saying:
'Beauty, farewell! by thee forsaken,
I sleep in death, no more to waken.'
The maiden sprang to her feet, and, after pressing a kiss on the brow of
her sleeping father, fled down the stairs and out of the door, and found the
golden carriage awaiting her. She sprang in, waving a hurried farewell to her
sisters; and cried to the invisible coachman:
'Oh! hasten! hasten! lest I be too late, and then I too must die.'
27


The four coal-black horses fairly flew along the road, and soon reached the
palace. Beauty hurried to the garden, where she saw a figure lying motionless
under the white rose-tree. She ran towards it, and found it was indeed the
unhappy Beast, apparently quite dead. Beauty burst into tears and cried:
'Oh! my Beast, my dear, kind Beast! come back to me! only open your
eyes and look kindly at me, and I will promise to marry you, for now I know
that I love you, and can never be happy without you.'
As she wept and mourned, suddenly a wonderful thing happened. The
lifeless figure sprang to its feet, and lo! all in a moment it was changed. The
hideous, frightful form of the Beast was gone, and in its place stood a young
man as beautiful as the morning. His eyes were dark and soft, his hair fell
in long curls of raven black, and he was dressed in a splendid suit of green
and gold, which glittered in the sun. Beauty shrank back in affright from this,
wonderful vision; but the young prince said:
'Fear not, my beloved Beauty! you have saved my life. And since you
learned to love me under the hideous form I was condemned to wear, can you
not learn to love me in my own shape?'
28


He then told Beauty that he had been changed into a Beast by a malicious
witch because he had refused to marry her ugly, one eyed, hump backed
daughter, and he was condemned to keep the frightful shape until a fair and
virtuous maiden should offer of her own free-will to marry him.
'And now, my Beauty,' he added, clasping her in his arms, 'your loving
heart has broken the spell, and I am a free man. Love and life are before
me, so let us forget the Beast and his troubles, and be happy together.'
They turned towards the palace. At that instant a burst of music was
heard. The doors of the palace opened, and a chorus of sweet voices sang:
41^'4
Welcome, Bellino noble prince,
And Beauty, fairest maid!
S And greater happiness be yours
S^i1 Than can be sung or said.'
The invisible hands scattered rosy blossoms before them, the joyous music
29
lil1''; *s ml,
VIS I *


sounded above them; and hand in hand, with happy and loving hearts,
Beauty and Bellino entered their palace."
"Oh!" said Jean, "is that all?"
"Ah!" sighed Marigold, "is it really finished? Dear Tree, what a lovely,
lovely story!"
"Tree," said Emanuel Philibert, looking up into the whispering green
curtain, "do you know where the prince's palace is?"
"Not exactly," replied the Tree; "my mistress, the fairy, knows. It is
somewhere beyond the sunset, on the other side of the purple cloud bank.
And now, children, go home to your supper. Come again on the next fine
afternoon and you shall hear another story."
"Yes, yes! indeed we will come!" cried all the children; and, Emanuel
Philibert leading the way, home they all went in the twilight.
30


VV
.- '.~~i :- ~"" 5~~
"THE FRIGHTFUL FORM WAS GONE, AND IN ITS PLACE STOOD A YOUNG MAN BEAUTIFUL AS THE MORNING."-(p. 28.)


B5, /_l E5 1,
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5- *5~ 8i ~ :y"A1~~~
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The four coal-black horses fairly flew along the road, and soon reached the
palace. Beauty hurried to the garden, where she saw a figure lying motionless

.7 . **-1s *

/ I \-













under the white rose-tree. She ran towards it, and found it was indeed the
unhappy Beast, apparently quite dead. Beauty burst into tears and cried:
'Oh! my Beast, my dear, kind Beast! come back to me! only open your
eyes and look kindly at me, and I will promise to marry you, for now I know
that I love you, and can never be happy without you.'
As she wept and mourned, suddenly a wonderful thing happened. The
lifeless figure sprang to its feet, and lo! all in a moment it was changed. The
hideous, frightful form of the Beast was gone, and in its place stood a young
man as beautiful as the morning. His eyes were dark and soft, his hair fell
in long curls of raven black, and he was dressed in a splendid suit of green
and gold, which glittered in the sun. Beauty shrank back in affright from this
wonderful vision; but the young prince said:
'Fear not, my beloved Beauty! you have saved my life. And since you
learned to love me under the hideous form I was condemned to wear, can you
not learn to love me in my own shape?'
28
eyes andlook kinly at m, and I ill promse to mrry y o o ko
thtIlveyu n cnnvrbehpywthu o.







cheerfully of me. I may fare much better than you dare to hope. And if
not, one can die but once, when all is said.'
So the maiden embraced her father for the last time, and saw him mount
his horse and ride slowly out of the court-
Syard,' often turning to look back, with tears
'in ,:! his sad face.
---: When he was gone she was tempted
iv a moment to sit down and weep with
i dr.ad; but the same deep voice she had
'. iheaicrd before sounded beside her, saying:

": '.. 'Fear not, Beauty, fair and dear!
Love alone awaits thee here.'

' W ''The maiden took comfort at this,
,'' and amused herself by wandering
I' through the splendid rooms which
S .. opened on every side of the great hall.
S'. When evening came the ever-attentive
hands led her into a bed-room, which
was more beautiful than any she had yet seen. The walls were all of looking-
glass, so that on every side she saw the reflection of her own lovely form.
The furniture was blue and silver, and in the centre of the room stood a silver
bed, with curtains of sky-blue velvet all sprinkled with pearls. When Beauty
lay down on this dainty couch the invisible music began to play, and softly,
softly lulled her to sleep."
"Oh! o-o-oh!" sighed Marigold, curling up her toes in ecstasy. "How
I wish I had been Beauty! Think of that lovely bed, Jean! and the looking-
glass walls! oh dear! How nice it would be to live in a fairy story!"
"When Beauty woke the next morning she rubbed her eyes and thought
20































































.I




BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.-(p. 24.)

The Baldwin Library

FI da'







'Alas! Beauty,' said the Beast, 'you know not what you ask. Still, I
cannot refuse your request, so I shall appear before you in the rose-garden in
my own dreadful shape.'
Beauty, left alone once
more, half curious and
half afraid, sought the
rose-garden, where she
/. began to pluck clusters of
/;' splendid crimson blossoms,
/, i. ri and fasten them on her
s b dress and in her golden
I hair. Suddenly looking up
i 01'she saw a hideous form
approaching her, which

S...'. ..- be that of the
S" Beast: a form so
S.-- frightful, so very
S- frightful, that
-Beauty turned
; // pale, and could
not repress a
shudder. The Beast saw it, and sighing deeply said, 'I told you,
Beauty, that you knew not what you asked. It is best that I should remain
invisible.'
But Beauty looked up bravely and said, 'No, my dear Beast, I know
so well the charms of your mind and the goodness of your heart, that I can
well bear to look at you, ugly as you are. Remain, and let us speak no more
of this.'








'Ah! what a fearful cloud is that I see yonder! It is coming towards
us at lightning speed. What can it mean? and what is that frightful roaring
,u'n1,?' All started to their feet, and the next
Ainii:.int the room grew perfectly dark. A burst
of thunder shook
the house, and
-* *.. *I .'r
instantly a violent
S., ,. storm of wind
S"I ,i and rain raged
around it, beating
-: against the
windows and









loud and dreadful voice was heard above the howling of the storm, cryt:ing
, - -

--._.. ...,, --_^-- .: 2
-- .. ..-- -- -. .. , - ,.. ---





to overwhelm the frail cottage The three maidens fell on their knees in
terror, but their father stood still, as if turned to stone, for at this moment a
loud and dreadful voice was heard above the howling of the storm, crying:

'Little loth,
Break'st thine oath,
Death with thee will keep his troth!'

Three times these words were repeated, then the storm and darkness passed





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All Rights Reserved.







sounded above them; and hand in hand, with happy and loving hearts,
Beauty and Bellino entered their palace."


"Oh!" said Jean, "is that all?"
"Ah!" sighed Marigold, "is it really finished? Dear Tree, what a lovely,
lovely story!"
"Tree," said Emanuel Philibert, looking up into the whispering green
curtain, "do you know where the prince's palace is?"
"Not exactly," replied the Tree; "my mistress, the fairy, knows. It is
somewhere beyond the sunset, on the other side of the purple cloud bank.
And now, children, go home to your supper. Come again on the next fine
afternoon and you shall hear another story."
"Yes, yes! indeed we will come!" cried all the children; and, Emanuel
Philibert leading the way, home they all went in the twilight.







s'-- I, .
i. ^o "*' ; I- ......







After this the Beast (for the Beast it was) began to talk in such a pleasant
sensible manner that Beauty became much interested in the conversation. After
il.-tkfast she was led into a wonderful
*'-. -- *.,tillen full of the most charming roses
.' that ever were seen.
:..,. .- __ As Beauty entered,
'. all the rose-trees
S '"';' '-- bowed low, and the
.---1 .--.. ." -invisible hands scat-
''- '. tered pink, and crim-
-- son, and snow-white petals
^ ii..'. .1 "l.-Fi,.r: her, making a carpet
for her feet.
'Here I shall leave you, Beauty,'
i said the Beast. 'Be happy, and re-
T'II member that all you see is your own.
f With your permission, I will sup with
i I' you this evening; but if you would
li rather be alone, you have but to speak.'
7.', Beauty willingly agreed to the
request, and when the Beast had left
her she spent the day in exploring
the gardens and the palace, finding at each step something new and wonderful.
When evening came the Beast joined her at supper, and was again so agreeable
that she was sorry when it was time to say 'good-night.' The next day passed
in the same manner, the Beast becoming still more and more an amiable and
delightful companion. Finally, on the third day Beauty said, 'Dear Beast, I
now find such pleasure in your society that I am quite sure I shall not be at all
troubled by your ugliness. Therefore, I pray you, let me see you just as you are.'
22







Her father and sisters cried out at this, and vowed that they would never
let her go again; but Beauty only smiled, and bade them make much of her
while they might.
She devoted herself to nursing her father, never leaving him day or night,
and was rewarded by seeing him improve a little each day, but the improve-
ment was very slow, and she became so absorbed in her cares that she forgot
to notice the days as they passed swiftly by. Her sisters said nothing, when
the last day of the week came, hoping that Beauty might forget her promise
to the Beast and stay with them always, for she took all care off their shoulders;
and the sick merchant thought of nothing but the joy of having his dearest
child with him once more.
One evening Beauty was bending over her father to smooth his pillow and
give him the soothing draught which should enable him to sleep and forget his
pain till morning, when she happened to rest her eyes on a large mirror which
hung against the wall. What was it she saw there? she turned pale, and
clasped her hands with a cry of terror. For in the glass she saw reflected the
rose-garden near the palace of the Beast; and under the fair rose-tree that she
loved best, stretched cold and pale on the mossy turf, lay the Beast itself.
At first, as Beauty gazed horror-stricken in the glass, the Beast seemed to be
without life or motion; but presently its pale lips moved, and Beauty fancied
she heard a faint voice saying:

'Beauty, farewell! by thee forsaken,
I sleep in death, no more to waken.'

The maiden sprang to her feet, and, after pressing a kiss on the brow of
her sleeping father, fled down the stairs and out of the door, and found the
golden carriage awaiting her. She sprang in, waving a hurried farewell to her
sisters; and cried to the invisible coachman:
'Oh! hasten! hasten! lest I be too late, and then I too must die.'




r w -- .


& 71


GORDO. ?O/J .S .ES ,i[.,s OLD -.-I/R I MILES.
4:


i. HOP O' MY THUMB.


2. BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.


Eui bol. k ow it.'i; s 32 l 'o' I L I" d i l I I I'l l , l I Il .. /.' t; l,. ; ill lll I II) i p/.'I l


i .i 0 i r.:.\1 i .l' : \ .:uli. -' c ['ie ~I ll li 111, .i !' i .l t F ,. .\ l I ., [ .1 i, ._ I .:L i !. u l li -[ i: r.:.l
ill T he .1 ], t ir[ : l i.1 .l Ij ll l r.
T he .i.:.ul:- 'ia L i (;.,:. r,. ]_ ',r.. I.r. i L i. ri. \.:r:l .I . 1i \ t r i 1 a .- [ lIu. t..i ,:.llfi,-l-.. '

"-.':inc. ElT l, r u . .i! s <.;,l. r. :li. :l, ; .' i. c l ,r i u --.r .i ,i ..j u., IIr n i -. i h. ,. | .. :l

b.;clh ill bee I.:,, L. li\ I :Cl:,l > , , A,,: .IiI.
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in\ .. r: i i he ['," l,;,u r: ''l,;(. ir, l i t l ir .nr ,., I' -. lh -i Hi'i' l J i _i .,., lull .4 .t l. in r., ., i i ren.


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Tlte \W i;e Prince.-. F. i ii .1 *i .
A Bo\ TI -:il' n.%: '. I.: .. L I .I t. r
Hamltl '+ T.:.ier. f i i ,
F.ii v Lo c-u: ji 'i Favotn ites. i .I L'' .


Ali Jet-ain. E. r ,- .rif
The RPedfo'd. I i.: -
i'lih-i '. L I i ,. H -... . ,
Hidtlen S cdIl. i r. i ,-
Lirsl. la's Ai'it. f F
Jack's Tuc So\erc-Lio.. i r I ,
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lihree Li One i ..
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Tao Lillle Brotlhelrs. H I .-
The New Boa at lerriton. F i... .- .
The Blind Bc,\ of Dresden and hi- Sister.
Jon of le land: .\ '. .. i I.. Fa. N .I
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Compl.t' L: .;:.f BP,.; i,. II.,


* Etel'y Mlani -i His Placte.
Fireside F'ui i and Flu te FanLti..
To lth Sea in Shlips.
j l.:k '! i.:.. ; : :... 1 i '.: r .. .. r i .
Thr:e i0C\ ol a Kini=. 11: ... II.
Pi lice Ale .xi r i. T ,.. T-..


a In 1.e Iel f: i i 11. I "1 ...... I
T i I e S i i, ,. I I, n H ;, .: i


i. ~ , I ,i. ,'iI, I ,. I .



I I .. .. I I 1
i i i I, , , r, I ii ,, h r I i ,,


J3ck ind the GCip;e_. i i
Hanlt lthe Painter. f .
L;[lle Ti ul)ilesoime. F i
NI\ Lid\ Ma13. I H i r.. i
A Lin tle He-, L i I I. .
Prince J,\'s PilgNilniigce. .ir
Harold', Ambiti.:.n. i .


I '


Scelppc) l ite Drl'niilner-Bo,. i

Aboard lle Hcli- y. i .
A Blind PLI);. : i -
Lor'i a d Foun, i-. i' I I
Fi Ihe 'lian l l im1. i. i : .I


SOMETHING FOR THE VERY LITTLE ONES.
E i, ,, -: H ]-{ ..


FT les Easy nnd Sim all I .. ... .. .... .J .-. ,- .- i. ,,, [ ..
O ld D ;c k G i ,) .. . .. . i ,.
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Inl H lJhda Tolne. .-\ 1 :.l r r ..-; i r l r J: .:. l r..t ,. ': n r ].:L


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4t., )NI. S ii i _-i P. E .,A i..







enough daylight lingering in the west to show him that this was a very strange
forest indeed, very strange and very
frightful For all the trees seemed to , '
have human shapes. As he gazed i i
about him, in wonder that was fast
turning into terror, gaunt, withered
arms seemed to point and beckon to .-. .-
him, hideous grinning faces peeped at .
him from behind the knotted trunk /:
they made uwly rimnees at himl, and '
"/i' inus and hand w-aved i iwild I anl
Sl:..lt_.nin ll .e turi. And all the lank arms beckoned, and
4-. "i a11 all th: u.lly hlea l1 n, 'ld-'Il anud tossed in one direc-
.I'' ti n. a.sl it' tl hn im ll the \\ay that he must take.
I \nl i An11 --hark were those voices, mingling
,ithl th. ru-hing and roaring of the
S. wtind What were they saying?
.F F r.uwar, forward!' was that
.LJ 1- it The merchant drew his
Smantle closely about
S him, for the long
arms of the trees
.:.- now seemed to
S, stretch out skinny
Z hands to clutch at him;
; ". andI clapping the spurs
to : his steed he dashed
Sr forwardd at his utmost
.speed.







called Superba, the second was called Gracilia, but the youngest was called
only Beauty, for there was no other name that was good enough for her. The
merchant was wealthy, as I said, and many suitors came to woo his fair daughters,
some for the girls' own sakes, and some for their father's gold. Superba
looked haughtily at her lovers, and said she would marry no one except a king.


,^- - -







- /lud te o g'lt e

'rf ^ I"




Gracilia laughed at hers, and told" j i
them they might be fit for horse
boys but not for husbands; so they all went off in a huff and left the
scornful maidens alone. But Beauty smiled so sweetly
i '. on hIiir .iuit,.,,s, and told them so gently that she could
A not laive ,lit-r _itar father, that they only loved her the
b\! -* mIll e. and sat and.-t


S- ,." .. t:l miles around. I ,

(373) A2-
(373) 5 A 2








He then told Beauty that he had been cl(a1_i:'i.1 into a Beast by a malicious
witch because he had refused to marry her ugly, one eyed, hump backed
daughter, and he was condemned to keep the frightful shape until a fair and
virtuous maiden should offer of her own free-will to marry him.
'And now, my Beauty,' he added, clasping her in his arms, 'your loving
heart has broken the spell, and I am a free man. Love and life are before
me, so let us forget the Beast and his troubles, and be happy together.'
They turned towards'the palace. At that instant a burst of music was
heard. The doors of the palace opened, and a chorus of sweet voices sang:











.. ( -I ,



*, ', ,' i "
.I~ii~ .i~" V_4


The invisible hland-1


17. if, -







scattered rosy blossoms before them, the joyous music
29


'r
""







replied her father, 'a velvet gown you shall have. And now, my dear Beauty,'
he said, 'tell me what I shall bring to you?'
'My father,' replied Beauty, 'bring me back your own dear self safe and
sound, and I ask for nothing else.'
'Nay,' said the merchant, 'if I bring nothing for you, I bring nothing
for the others. Are you not my best and dearest child?'
Then the two elder sisters whispered angrily to Beauty, 'Ask for'
something, or we shall lose our gifts, only because you are a fool.'
'Well,' said Beauty, 'if it must be so, my father, I pray you to bring
me a fair white rose, the fairest that you see in your journeying.'
The merchant promised, mounted his horse, and rode away.
On arriving at the great city he found that the news was really true.
There were his ships at anchor in the bay, safe and sound, and still holding in
their oaken sides the precious freight of gold-dust, ivory, spices and cocoa-nuts.
So now the merchant brought
S hi- '....,ds on shore, and sold lth-i'
:it very high price; f.r it
happened that the kini;'-.
daughter was to 1,.-
pi married the next da\.
and the palace cook- '
Shad been looking ',-,-.,'- <,," \
/^ /. s ~ where for cinnamn, t, Si
flavour their spice- ei
and for gold-
-- dust to gild
them withal,
and for cocoa-nuts to make the cramjam pudding, without which no wedding-
feast may be celebrated in the kingdom of Rigdom Funnidos.
8







the merchant gave the rose to his youngest daughter, the tears stood in his
eyes, and he said:
'Ah! Beauty, Beauty, your present has cost me more than both the others
put together.'
Beauty, in great alarm, asked the meaning of these strange words; but her
father refused to say anything more, and she was left to wonder.
The next morning when the merchant awoke in his peaceful home the
recollection of all his strange adventures seemed like a fearful dream. The
forest, with its clutching hands and grinning
faces, the palace, the invisible hands, the horrible
.; .. form of the Beast-he wondered if they had
really existed at all save in his imagination.
. .But when he saw the white rose blooming
S. in a slender silver vase, and carefully tended
Sby Beauty, a cold shudder ran through him,
S' "and he fancied he heard a terrible voice saying:
''' 'In one week!'
''- 1 It was only fancy, however, and as the days
ciS- passed he put off from one time to another the
S --evil moment when he must tell his daughters of
the fate which awaited him.
At length the last day of the week came, and still the merchant had said
nothing. He tried to persuade himself that the Beast might have forgotten,
or might have relented towards him; at all events, could he be expected to
keep an oath which had been forced from him when in danger of his life?
was it right, merely because he had given his word, to leave his daughters
alone in the world, and give himself up to a horrible death?
In this way the poor merchant thought to himself, as he sat with his
children, on the evening of the last day of the week. Suddenly Gracilia cried:







started and bore her swiftly on her way to her father's house. On arriving
Beauty sprang from the
carriage, and scarcely wait-
: .- .' ''....,-' ing to greet her astonished
-: --/ sisters, rushed up to the
.':: ., room where her father lay
pale and suffering. The
Maiden, throwing herself
S,. down beside him, and kiss-
'i! ing his pale brow, cried:
I 'Father, dear father! speak
S' to me. I am Beauty, your
own Ra-it.ty. ', fine biack to ylu to nuiii'r ;n.1 ,iv- you.' The merchant opened
hi' -iike.n *.y>. aind -wh,-n hI. .-atw hii- b,.l, Vd child, life seemed to return to
him, and he clasped her to his heart with tears of joy.
In reply to the eager questions, Beauty now related all that had happened
to her in the Beast's palace; and her father became so much interested that
he forgot his pain and began to recover -
from that moment. Superba and Gracilia
were heartily glad to see their sister, but
they could not help feeling envious when
they saw her magnificent attire, and the
radiant jewels which sparkled on hr ',
neck and arms; but Beauty, with a .
charming grace, drew off a necklace of i,.ii.' i. I
rubies and a splendid sapphire bracelet, ,,
and begged her sisters to accept them
as keepsakes from her, and to love her always. 'For,' lih said, 'in a week
I must return to my kind friend the Beast, as I have promised.'







Then the Beast began to talk so wisely and delightfully that Beauty soon
forgot the hideous form, and listened and replied with delight.
In this way Beauty passed several weeks at the palace of the Beast,
becoming more and more attached to her kind friend and host. One night,
however, she had a dream which made her very unhappy. She dreamed that
her father was lying at the point of death. She seemed to see him, pale and
haggard, lying on his bed; and she heard him say, 'I am dying because I have
no desire to live, since Beauty is gone, and I shall never see her again. Oh!
Beauty, oh! my child, was it indeed I who delivered thee over to thy fate?'
Beauty awoke from her sleep crying, 'Father! father! I come!' As soon as
morning came she hastened to the rose-garden, and impatiently awaited the
coming of the Beast. The moment that hideous but kind and gentle creature
appeared she ran to tell her dream, and to implore that she might go to her
dying father. 'Oh! good Beast! kind Beast!' she cried 'let me but go and nurse
him now, and I will return and serve you all the days of my life. Nay, gladly
will I give up my life itself, if so I may save my father's, or at least comfort his
last hours. Ah! have pity on me, ul;itilppy maid that I am, and let me go!'
At these words the Beast
uttered a great cry and fell -
to the ground as one dead,-._ '' *' "4; -
lying motionless, with that ;
grim and grisly head resting ----
on the crimson rose-leaves. -. .
Beauty, in great alatin .:, -
knelt beside it. She -
sprinkled drops of dew
over its face, by shaking
the masses of glowing blossoms that hung above them. In tones of agony she
besought the Beast not to add thus to her sorrow.






hand. iwhi:h took hi- own ihand and led him gently across the threshold
and through the hall. Stare as he
Might, he could see no one; but invisible
hands now took off his cap and mantle,
Aand led him to a chair; and when one
, pair of--sof hands had gently pressed
him down into it, another pair drew off
/ his heavy riding-boots and put upon his
~' f- feet fur-lined slippers, which fitted as if
i they had been made for him. Then he
"I j / I rose, and was led into a large banquet-
S. .- hall, where a table was laid, decked with
S "i gold and silver plate, snowy damask,
'Id rand sparkling glass. Seating him at
the table, the invisible hands served him
.,;-_ :' most skilfully, pouring
S out golden wine in ruby
glasses, and tempting
him every mi. ient with some new and deli',_-iu .. '
dish. When he had -qlippld as well as he could .
in his amazement, he was led into another ri,_in. i -
where stood a softly-cushioned bed, with ha_-insi. -i .,.'
of crimson satin. The hands undressed --
him, and assisted him to get into bed,
where they tucked him up, and handed. ',
him a night-draught of hot spiced wine. .
Wondering, and still wondering, and yet
again wondering, the merchant at length =, -
fell asleep, and slept soundly till morning.
12







"They brought butter and artichokes," replied the Tree, "bees'-wax and
'young goslings, and the fruit of the fingo palm,
/ [l with many other things too numerous to mention.
One day, however, one of the suitors brought
i.' something which was better than any of these
.\ 9 things, for he brought the news that some ships,
long delayed by storms and winds, had come into
I port, and that several of the merchant's ships were
Among them. There was great gladness in
'. the little cottage. The merchant saddled
"'---"--" t the old farm-horse, the only steed he now
possessed, and got ready to ride at once to
the great city to see for himself if the good news was true. He took an
affectionate leave of his daughters, and said, 'My dear children, if I find that
my ships are really safe I will biin, y.u ,.-i i. a hnid-ii l
some present. Tell me, Superba, \\l;t i11- y.11n 1ii-t / /
wish for?'
'I wish for a ring,' said th. -
eldest daughter, 'with a diamond
as large as a pea in it.'
'If the ships have come,'
replied her father, 'a diamond
ring you shall have. And you,
Gracilia, what will best please J
you l
'A velvet gown,' said the '
second daughter, 'set about j
with pearls and rubies. '' i. '
'If the ships have come, .'







So by the end of the day our merchant found himself once more a rich
man, and he spent the whole evening at his inn, counting his broad gold pieces








,,.r.. ; .















and bought a ring with a diamond as big as a pea in it, and a velvet gown
o-;- ---b~ -;~---- --------~_-















After trying in vain to find one, the merchant was obliged to give up the
search and turn his horse's head towards home, for the day was now far spent,
and hasten as he might he could not reach his cottage home before nightfall.
He rode fast and he rode far, but the black shadows rode faster, and the way
grew darker and darker; at length in his ]hate he took a wrong turn in the
road, and was very soon completely lost in a deep forest. There was still
(373) 9 A









'On one condition, and one only, I will spare your life; and that condition

is that you will send me this fair maiden in your stead.'

'Never!' cried the merchant, 'never! I would rather die a thousand deaths

myself than give up my best-beloved child to so horrible a fate. Take your

revenge on me alone, Monster, for my daughter you shall not have.'

'Nevertheless,' said the Beast, 'take time to think about it. Go home,

and in a week you shall return here, prepared to forfeit either your daughter's

life or your own. Swear to do this, and you may go free.'

The merchant swore, and immediately the bronze gates of the courtyard

opened and suffered him to pass through, closing with a clang behind him.

With despair in his heart, the merchant rode towards his home, the Beast

having told him the way. When he arrived at the cottage his daughters came


,t.


241-I',,


o
L 1.
"' 5'. '`i
.. ?1, J. II~~F~-~I
~? c U ;r------ ~r-'i~~_
~d:
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I-:
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---~
-
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---


running out to meet him, and welcomed him back. Superba received the diamond

ring with delight, and Gracilia was enchanted with her velvet gown; but when







sound. No one was to be seen in the courtyard, but the marble pavement
was strewn with white roses, and the invisible hands scattered fresh blossoms
before Beauty as she dismounted and moved toward the
palace. Over the great door, which -to.l:,] iivitin.iily in. -.
were garlands of roses, and the ail wi, l -:,\-\ \\il, li,-ir .' ri.
fragrance. As the maiden paused
on the threshold she heard a deep
voice, which said: J '

'Enter, Beauty, to thine own! ,
Thou art queen, and thou alone.' /

She entered, followed by her '
father. As before, the invisible, .
hands were ready to attend by
bringing them fur-lined robes and ,
embroidered slippers, and then by
conducting them to the banquet-1 i
hall. They found the table spreadii 1'.
with every kind of dainty; and
while they ate, soft music from
unseen instruments, harp and flute
and viol, sounded above them in
delightful harmony. The merchant was far t:,o unlli.l\i; to have any appetite,
but he made a pretence of eating, to please his daughter. When the meal was
over, he embraced her many times, with tears and sobs.
'Alas! alas!' he cried. 'Must I indeed leave you, my best-loved child,
to be the prey of a horrible monster, who mocks his victims with pomp and
splendour before he destroys them?'
'Farewell, dear father!' said Beauty. 'Farewell! and try to think
19







After some time the Beast recovered a little, and seemed to regain strength.
'Beauty,' said the voice she now knew so well, 'if I let you go, will you promise
to marry me when you return?'
Beauty shuddered and turned pale. 'Alas! dear Beast,' she said, 'ask
me anything but that. I will be your friend, your servant; but do not ask
me to marry you.'
'Say, at least, that you will think of it,' urged the Beast, 'and I will
let you go.'
'That I may safely promise,' said Beauty, 'so I give you my word.'
The Beast then said that in an hour a carriage should be ready to take
her to her father's house. 'I shall expect you to return when a week is
past,' he added; 'if you tarry longer, remember that you will be the cause
of my death.'
Beauty promised to return, and hastened to the palace to make ready for
her journey. In her mirror-lined room she found a beautiful travelling dress
of gray and silver laid out for her, and a purple velvet mantle lined with
ermine. The invisible hands assisted her to dress, brought her a delicate repast
of fruits and wine served on a golden salver, and in an hour's time led her out
into the great courtyard. Here she found a magnificent carriage, glittering with
gold and silver, with ivory wheels, and soft cushions of gold-coloured satin.
It was drawn by four superb black horses, with harness and trappings of beaten
gold. They pawed the ground and tossed their stately heads, impatient of
delay; but though they were evidently restrained by some powerful hand, no
driver was visible. The hands helped Beauty into the carriage, and as she
seated herself on the satin cushions she heard the deep voice of the Beast
saying:-
'Farewell, Beauty! woe is me!
Light and joy do go with thee.'

She would have replied, but at that moment the whip cracked, the horses


















lovely clear aft~ wt!,
...,,1 ,x_-,,.











a cloudless sky and a warm -ift uir. Thr .
sun was preparing to go down bMhiind tl-


for he knew, the clever old tll..\\-. t.t i .n
he was once down he could ii'' l.Iir-1r 1'*'* tIi,-
pretty scene which he had I--.i-ni Jati iii- 1 ..
the last hour. He had beedless sky and a war i il itl
his great golden eye into th.- tiny *'i. i. :-i- i.-
where stood the Whisperin-= Tr n lt :itti
four children, tMarigold, Peti. J i I-an., li.'d Eu .1inel ., I




Philbert, who were all sitting: ,i thIr *t-tt 1.iank
of greenest moss under the .tr''..




The jolly old sun thouiad beei i '] l -.
seen four merrier-looking ., '&
four children, M marigold Petr.-r 1. ziiid Eiiiillitiell
Philbert, who were all sitti ,n ,, wit it h,'. llt ll,ii.
of greenest moss under the t-lt-r T,
The jolly old sun toou~i t !-,io tlzoi,"'.


children, but he did not .
know what kept them so quiet just then. I do know, however, and I will tell
you if you are quite sure you have been good all day.
(373) A








she must be dreaming, when she saw the splendid room in which she lay. The
shining walls gave back the rays of the morning sun, which streamed softly
in through curtains of silver and rose coloured gauze, and glittered on the


..






-;--
SI Y-

r
I, ;


'''I'




;~~~t ~ :-I;
I:I~" j--i *:Wi-I.

..., /'/.~ s
5 / ;':~R~"
--~~ILZ~rrpp i~1/


~II


golden lilies of the coverlet. The invisible hands were busy about the room,
some sprinkling perfumes through the air with mops of rose-leaves, others filling
a huge marble bath with fragrant waters, while others again were laying out
delicate robes of lace and rose-coloured satin. Beauty rose, and after dressing,
found that the friendly hands were leading her into the banquet-hall, where she
was greeted by a burst of joyous music from the unseen musicians. As she sat
at table the deep voice which she had heard twice before spoke to her, saying:
'Beauty, you see now that you are sole mistress of this palace and all
it contains. Your father has given you a frightful account of me, no doubt;
and for that reason I shall remain invisible until you yourself are willing to
see me. Meantime let us be as good friends as we can.'







The fact is, the Tree was telling the children a story; a story which the
fairy who lived in its branches had told it only the night before. Would you
also like to hear the story? Listen, then, for this is it.

THE STORY OF BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.

"LONG, long ago, there lived in the kingdom of Rigdom Funnidos a rich


mer-chant who had three fair daughters. The eldest was tall and stately, the
second was slight and graceful, but the third was more 1.auiitiful than both the
others put together, or than any one else in the world. The eldest daughter was
4







When he awoke the sun was shining brightly in through the crimson curtains,
and the invisible hands were busy brushing his
clothes and pouring perfumed water into a silver
basin. Rising at their silent invitation. Ilw ii,- 11.-i, lnir '-
suffered himself to be dressed an l in 1t'i ,. "
banquet-hall, where a good breakf:r \\-; -l v I , .-. .
him. After this the hands led him it.., rti:. I. t-
yard, where he found his horse -t ii. ;i al rl
saddled and bridled, having evil-i tl I
groomed and fed and well -
taken care of. He thanked, "
his invisible hosts very warmly 1
and mounting his horse pre- -
pared to ride out of the -
courtyard. But as he neared -' t-- '
the gate what should he see \
but a climbing rose-bush growing --. ti.- 1 il,
and covered with pure white roses, thi-. !,--li-.-t
that ever were seen. He thought of Beauty's
request for a white rose, and reining in his steed he reached up and plucked
the fairest blossom that grew within his reach. Instantly there came a crash,
as if a thunderbolt had burst over his head; and then he heard behind him
a frightful growl, as if an angry lion were about to spring upon him.
Turning round in great alarm he saw a most hideous and horrible Beast,
which stood glaring at him with eyes of fire, and gnashing its long gleaming
teeth.
'Wretch!' exclaimed the Beast in an angry tone, 'is it thus you repay
my hospitality! I have sheltered you from storm and wind, have fed and
lodged you, asking nothing in return; and now, ingrate that you are, you steal









Presently the trees began to open right and left before him. A long

avenue appeared, at the further end of which he saw brilliant lights gleaming.

As he drew near, behold! there stood a stately palace, in the midst of fair


Pgsw
-- 11'k


-.- -;-- l
-t c-!:
1Z.





0-1r,, C


Il ~ ~ r~i' c. n~ ~I~
,,~ j







=2:7

5:_-' -


gardens and lawns. Every window was ablaze with light, as if for some great

feast, and the merchant, as he entered the courtyard, felt as if he had left

darkness and danger behind him.

Dismounting, he knocked at the great bronze door of the palace, which

swung back instantly without sound. He looked eagerly into the vast hall

which opened before him; but what was his amazement to see no living

creature. The marble walls were hung with rich tapestries, and costly furniture

and ornaments appeared on every side; but no human form was seen, no

human voice was heard. Suddenly he felt the touch of a hand! an invisible
11







my roses. Say your prayers and make your peace with Heaven, for this hour
you must die!'
The unhappy merchant fell on
his knees and 1:e-_.--l for mercy.
He told the Beast about his fair '
young daughter Beauty, who ha.i ,
asked him to bring her a whire
rose, and of his vain search i. ii.- =-
roses in the great city. 'Ala,! '
when I saw your flowers,' he sai...
'I thought only of my promise
to my child, and plucked ..




-, {, ^ '"\

,I r'',



.( I -. -' - .,



the blossom without pausing to .think whether it were right to do so. Have

mercy, my Lor~d Beast! Have mercy, and spare me! Truly, it seems but a
little sin to cost a man his life.'
The Beast seemed to reflect for a few minutes, then he said:







Now one day a terrible storm arose, and the wind blew three dayc
and three nights; and news was
brought to the merchant that all his
ships, which were on their way home -
from the Indies, laden with gold-
dust, and spices, and ivory, and
cocoa-nuts, were lost, and that he was "- --
a ruined man. He gave up his fine, -
house, and went with his three
daughters to a small cottage, where
they lived for some time in poverty.
Superba and Gracilia did nothing
but scold and storm and weep over their ill fortune; but Beauty bared her
lovely arms, and tied a kerchief over her golden curls, and did all the work
of the house cheer-
!" fully and willingly.
a .When her suitors
?1 -V beard of this, they
.. -: were more deeply in
r love with her than
before, and they
brought her many
presents to help her
S, in her housekeeping,
which they left at
jL2 >,.. I 6 the back door with
S- the greatest delicacy
and decorum."
"What sort of things did they bring to Beauty?" inquired Jean.
6






away as if by magic, and left the four unhappy ones staring at each other, with
pale faces and beating hearts. Beauty now insisted upon knowing the meaning
of the words, and the merchant, feeling that he could no longer be silent, told
the whole story, and said that in the morning they must take their last farewell
of their unhappy father. But when Beauty heard that the Beast had offered
to take her instead of her father, she said:
'My father, I will go! Your life is most important, mine of little consequence.
Say no more, for I am resolved, and nothing can change me.'
The merchant would not hear of this for a long time; but Beauty was firm
in her resolve, and finally gained her point.
Early the next morning the merchant saddled the old horse, and taking
Beauty on a pillion behind
him, started on his way to-
'' wards the Beast's palace. He
S ; was bowed down with sorrow,
and wept so bitterly that he
S--could hardly see the road;
f but Beauty cheered and com-
'. 'i forted him, and bade him keep
,,i! I '
S\, a good heart.
S' I feel,' she said, 'as if
J: l i i li '1 the Beast would spare my life.
^ \i i k 'Indeed, what good would it
S'\ ,' do him to kill me? whereas,
-- / if I lived I might be of use
-' ,- to him in many ways.'
,-: \ ~ By noon they reached
the gates of the courtyard,
which swung open to receive them, and closed behind them with a ringing
18


















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t
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.. .. -..






"p
iIt
'~ "'~i ''''


a"- . - a, .'- .- .


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"T E FIHF LFR-A-ONA DI T L C IU A YOUNG, MAN BE UTFU AST E M NN. -P 2.
"- .;':" r ," .

,, i





"'DFRTT[TFT. W S -N ,.D T[' ".D.C "!'OD "O .I] A~ FT..,.,. V /OD[C,"-D ,




Full Text

PAGE 1

/ k 2 NV BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.-(p. 24.) The Baldwin Library Sjm'iB' _~e.~~_i-P-~-Rityi ~~"?.Rm' H".:-x fid,



PAGE 1

After this the Beast (for the Beast it was) began to talk in such a pleasant sensible manner that Beauty became much interested in the conversation. After breakfast she was led into a wonderful garden full of the most charming roses that ever were seen. SAs Beauty entered, all the rose-trees --bowed low, and the -, `invisible hands scatitered pink, and crim? son, and snow-white petals S .before her, making a carpet for her feet. / iB I'Here I shall leave you, Beauty,' T-said the Beast. 'Be happy, and re!l member that all you see is your own. S'j -With your permission, I will sup with you this evening; but if you would rather be alone, you have but to speak.' .Beauty willingly agreed to the request, and when the Beast had left Sher she spent the day in exploring the gardens and the palace, finding at each step something new and wonderful. When evening came the Beast joined her at supper, and was again so agreeable that she was sorry when it was time to say 'good-night.' The next day passed in the same manner, the Beast becoming still more and more an amiable and delightful companion. Finally, on the third day Beauty said, 'Dear Beast, I fiow find such pleasure in your society that I am quite sure I shall not be at all troubled by your ugliness. Therefore, I pray you, let me see you just as you are.' 22



PAGE 1

'Alas! Beauty,' said the Beast, 'you know not what you ask. Still, I cannot refuse your request, so I shall appear before you in the rose-garden in my own dreadful shape.' SBeauty, left alone once more, half curious and half afraid, sought the rose-garden, where she began to pluck clusters of splendid crimson blossoms, and fasten them on her dress and in her golden hair. Suddenly looking up she saw a hideous form approaching her, which she knew must be that of the "Beast: a form so S frightful, so very frightful, that Beauty turned pale, and could not repress a shudder. The Beast saw it, and sighing deeply said, 'I told you, Beauty, that you knew not what you asked. It is best that I should remain invisible.' But Beauty looked up bravely and said, 'No, my dear Beast, I know so well the charms of your mind and the goodness of your heart, that I can well bear to look at you, ugly as you are. Remain, and let us speak no more of this.' 23



PAGE 1

cheerfully of me. I may fare much better than you dare to hope. And if not, one can die but once, when all is said.' So the maiden embraced her father for the last time, and saw him mount his horse and ride slowly out of the court--yard, often turning to look back, with tears S< on his sad face. 7_ When he was gone she was tempted / for a moment to sit down and weep with dread; but the same deep voice she had heard before sounded beside her, saying: 'Fear not, Beauty, fair and dear! Love alone awaits thee here.' The maiden took comfort at this, and amused herself by wandering through the splendid rooms which opened on every side of the great hall. When evening came the ever-attentive hands led her into a bed-room, which was more beautiful than any she had yet seen. The walls were all of lookingglass, so that on every side she saw the reflection of her own lovely form. The furniture was blue and silver, and in the centre of the room stood a silver bed, with curtains of sky-blue velvet all sprinkled with pearls. When Beauty lay down on this dainty couch the invisible music began to play, and softly, softly lulled her to sleep." Oh! o-o-oh!" sighed Marigold, curling up her toes in ecstasy. "How I wish I had been Beauty! Think of that lovely bed, Jean! and the lookingglass walls! oh dear! How nice it would be to live in a fairy story!" "When Beauty woke the next morning she rubbed her eyes and thought 20



PAGE 1

After some time the Beast recovered a little, and seemed to regain strength. 'Beauty,' said the voice she now knew so well, 'if I let you go, will you promise to marry me when you return?' Beauty shuddered and turned pale. 'Alas! dear Beast,' she said, 'ask me anything but that. I will be your friend, your servant; but do not ask me to marry you.' 'Say, at least, that you will think of it,' urged the Beast, 'and I will let you go.' 'That I may safely promise,' said Beauty, 'so I give you my word.' The Beast then said that in an hour a carriage should be ready to take her to her father's house. 'I shall expect you to return when a week is past,' he added; 'if you tarry longer, remember that you will be the cause of my death.' Beauty promised to return, and hastened to the palace to make ready for her journey. In her mirror-lined room she found a beautiful travelling dress of gray and silver laid out for her, and a purple velvet mantle lined with ermine. The invisible hands assisted her to dress, brought her a delicate repast of fruits and wine served on a golden salver, and in an hour's time led her out into the great courtyard. Here she found a magnificent carriage, glittering with gold and silver, with ivory wheels, and soft cushions of gold-coloured satin. It was drawn by four superb black horses, with harness and trappings of beaten gold. They pawed the ground and tossed their stately heads, impatient of delay; but though they were evidently restrained by some powerful hand, no driver was visible. The hands helped Beauty into the carriage, and as she seated herself on the satin cushions she heard the deep voice of the Beast saying:'Farewell, Beauty! woe is me! Light and joy do go with thee.' She would have replied, but at that moment the whip cracked, the horses 25



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When he awoke the sun was shining brightly in through the crimson curtains, and the invisible hands were busy brushing his clothes and pouring perfumed water into a silver basin. Rising at their silent invitation, the merchant suffered himself to be dressed and led into the banquet-hail, where a good breakfast was ready for him. After this the hands led him into the courtyard, where he found his horse standing, all saddled and bridled, having evidently been groomed and fed and well taken care of. He thanked his invisible hosts very warmly, and mounting his horse pre, pared to ride out of the courtyard. But as he neared the gate what should he see but a climbing rose-bush growing over the wall and covered with pure white roses, the loveliest \ that ever were seen. He thought of Beauty's request for a white rose, and reining in his steed he reached up and plucked the fairest blossom that grew within his reach. Instantly there came a crash, as if a thunderbolt had burst over his head; and then he heard behind him a frightful growl, as if an angry lion were about to spring upon him. Turning round in great alarm he saw a most hideous and horrible Beast, which stood glaring at him with eyes of fire, and gnashing its long gleaming teeth. 'Wretch!' exclaimed the Beast in an angry tone, 'is it thus you repay my hospitality! I have sheltered you from storm and wind, have fed and lodged you, asking nothing in return; and now, ingrate that you are, you steal 13



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So by the end of the day our merchant found himself once more a rich man, and he spent the whole evening at his inn, counting his broad gold pieces V-i and tying them up in bags. He kept out enough, however, to buy the presents for his daughters, and the next morning he went to the great bazaar and bought a ring with a diamond as big as a pea in it, and a velvet gown set about with pearls and rubies. These were easily obtained, but when it came to Beauty's present it was quite another matter. This was the day of the royal wedding, and not a rose was to be had for love or money, as the court gardeners had bought them all the day before. After trying in vain to find one, the merchant was obliged to give up the search and turn his horse's head towards home, for the day was now far spent, and hasten as he might he could not reach his cottage home before nightfall. He rode fast and he rode far, but the black shadows rode faster, and the way grew darker and darker; at length in his haste he took a wrong turn in the road, and was very soon completely lost in a deep forest. There was still (373) 9 A3



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sound. No one was to be seen in the courtyard, but the marble pavement was strewn with white roses, and the invisible hands scattered fresh blossoms before Beauty as she dismounted and moved toward the palace. Over the great door, which stood invitingly open, were garlands of roses, and the air was heavy with their fragrance. As the maiden paused on the threshold she heard a deep voice, which said: 'Enter, Beauty, to thine own! Thou art queen, and thou alone.' She entered, followed by her father. As before, the invisible hands were ready to attend by bringing them fur-lined robes and embroidered slippers, and then by conducting them to the banquethall. They found the table spread with every kind of dainty; and while they ate, soft music from unseen instruments, harp and flute and viol, sounded above them in delightful harmony. The merchant was far too unhappy to have any appetite, but he made a pretence of eating, to please his daughter. When the meal was over, he embraced her many times, with tears and sobs. 'Alas! alas!' he cried. 'Must I indeed leave you, my best-loved child, to be the prey of a horrible monster, who mocks his victims with pomp and splendour before he destroys them?' 'Farewell, dear father!' said Beauty. 'Farewell! and try to think 19



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started and bore her swiftly on her way to her father's house. On arriving Beauty sprang from the h carriage, and scarcely waitSing to greet her astonished sisters, rushed up to the Sroom where her father lay Spale and suffering. The Smaiden, throwing herself 1 5w, down beside him, and kissing his pale. brow, cried: 'Father, dear father! speak to me. I am Beauty, your own a .thi save you.' The merchant opened his sunken eyes, and when he saw his beloved child, life seemed to return to him, and he clasped her to his heart with tears of joy. In reply to the eager questions, Beauty now related all that had happened to her in the Beast's palace; and her father became so much interested that he forgot his pain and began to recover from that moment. Superba and Gracilia were heartily glad to see their sister, but they could not help feeling envious when they saw her magnificent attire, and the radiant jewels which sparkled on her neck and arms; but Beauty, with a charming grace, drew off a necklace of rubies and a splendid sapphire bracelet, and begged her sisters to accept them a's keepsakes from her, and to love her always. 'For,' she said, 'in a week I must return to my kind friend the Beast, as I have promised.' 26



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'On one condition, and one only, I will spare your life; and that condition is that you will send me this fair maiden in your stead.' 'Never!' cried the merchant, 'never! I would rather die a thousand deaths myself than give up my best-beloved child to so horrible a fate. Take your revenge on me alone, Monster, for my daughter you shall not have.' 'Nevertheless,' said the Beast, 'take time to think about it. Go home, and in a week you shall return here, prepared to forfeit either your daughter's life or your own. Swear to do this, and you may go free.' The merchant swore, and immediately the bronze gates of the courtyard opened and suffered him to pass through, closing with a clang behind him. With despair in his heart, the merchant rode towards his home, the Beast having told him the way. When he arrived at the cottage his daughters came ,4,, 60running out to meet him, and welcomed him back. Superba received the diamond ring with delight, and Gracilia was enchanted with her velvet gown; but when 15



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replied her father, 'a velvet gown you shall have. And now, my dear Beauty,' he said, 'tell me what I shall bring to you?' 'My father,' replied Beauty, 'bring me back your own dear self safe and sound, and I ask for nothing else.' 'Nay,' said the merchant, 'if I bring nothing for you, I bring nothing for the others. Are you not my best and dearest child?' Then the two elder sisters whispered angrily to Beauty, 'Ask for something, or we shall lose our gifts, only because you are a fool.' 'Well,' said Beauty, 'if it must be so, my father, I pray you to bring me a fair white rose, the fairest that you see in your journeying.' The merchant promised, mounted his horse, and rode away. On arriving at the great city he found that the news was really true. There were his ships at anchor in the bay, safe and sound, and still holding in their oaken sides the precious freight of gold-dust, ivory, spices and cocoa-nuts. So now the merchant brought his goods on shore, and sold them at a very high price; for it happened that the king's daughter was to be married the next day, and the palace cooks had been looking everywhere for cinnamon to " flavour their spice-cakes, and for golddust to gild them withal, and for cocoa-nuts to make the cramjam pudding, without which no weddingfeast may be celebrated in the kingdom of Rigdom Funnidos. 8



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enough daylight lingering in the west to show him that this was a very strange forest indeed, very strange and very frightful For all the trees seemed to have human shapes. As he gazed about him, in wonder that was fast turning into terror, gaunt, withered arms seemed to point and beckon to him, hideous grinning faces peeped at him from behind the knotted trunks; "f they made ugly grimaces at him, and i arms and hands waved in wild and i threatening gestures. And all the lank arms beckoned, and all the ugly heads nodded and tossed in one direction, as if to show him the way that he must take. And now-hark! were those voices, mingling with the rushing and roaring of the wind? What were they saying? 'Forward! forward!' was that it ? The merchant drew his mantle closely about him, for the long '< arms of the trees i now seemed to stretch out skinny hands to clutch at him; -and clapping the spurs to his steed he dashed "forward at his utmost speed. 10



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Presently the trees began to open right and left before him. A long avenue appeared, at the further end of which he saw brilliant lights gleaming. As he drew near, behold! there stood a stately palace, in the midst of fair 0i gardens and lawns. Every window was ablaze with light, as if for some great feast, and the merchant, as he entered the courtyard, felt as if he had left darkness and danger behind him. Dismounting, he knocked at the great bronze door of the palace, which swung back instantly without sound. He looked eagerly into the vast hall which opened before him; but what was his amazement to see no living creature. The marble walls were hung with rich tapestries, and costly furniture and ornaments appeared on every side; but no human form was seen, no human voice was heard. Suddenly he felt the touch of a hand! an invisible 11



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T was Tuesday afternoon ;: lovely clear afternoon, #wi a cloudless sky and a warm soft air. The sun was preparing to go down behind the wood, but he was in no hurry about it, for he knew, the clever old fellow, that wh(e he was once down he could no longer see th pretty scene which he had been watchingo the last hour. He had been staring down witi his great golden eye into the tiny green mead where stood the Whispering Tree, and watchiwg, four children, Marigold, Peter, Jean, and Emanue Philbert, who were all sitting on the soft bank of greenest moss under the tree. The jolly old sun thought he had never seen four merrier-looking children, but he did not know what kept them so quiet just then. I do know, however, and I will tell you if you are quite sure you have been good all day. (373) 3A



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Her father and sisters cried out at this, and vowed that they would never let her go again; but Beauty only smiled, and bade them make much of her while they might. She devoted herself to nursing her father, never leaving him day or night, and was rewarded by seeing him improve a little each day, but the improvement was very slow, and she became so absorbed in her cares that she forgot to notice the days as they passed swiftly by. Her sisters said nothing, when the last day of the week came, hoping that Beauty might forget her promise to the Beast and stay with them always, for she took all care off their shoulders; and the sick merchant thought of nothing but the joy of having his dearest child with him once more. One evening Beauty was bending over her father to smooth his pillow and give him the soothing draught which should enable him to sleep and forget his pain till morning, when she happened to rest her eyes on a large mirror which hung against the wall. What was it she saw there? she turned pale, and clasped her hands with a cry of terror. For in the glass she saw reflected the rose-garden near the palace of the Beast; and under the fair rose-tree that she loved best, stretched cold and pale on the mossy turf, lay the Beast itself. At first, as Beauty gazed horror-stricken in the glass, the Beast seemed to be without life or motion; but presently its pale lips moved, and Beauty fancied she heard a faint voice saying: 'Beauty, farewell! by thee forsaken, I sleep in death, no more to waken.' The maiden sprang to her feet, and, after pressing a kiss on the brow of her sleeping father, fled down the stairs and out of the door, and found the golden carriage awaiting her. She sprang in, waving a hurried farewell to her sisters; and cried to the invisible coachman: 'Oh! hasten! hasten! lest I be too late, and then I too must die.' 27



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Then the Beast began to talk so wisely and delightfully that Beauty soon forgot the hideous form, and listened and replied with delight. In this way Beauty passed several weeks at the palace of the Beast, becoming more and more attached to her kind friend and host. One night, however, she had a dream which made her very unhappy. She dreamed that her father was lying at the point of death. She seemed to see him, pale and haggard, lying on his bed; and she heard him say, 'I am dying because I have no desire to live, since Beauty is gone, and I shall never see her again. Oh! Beauty, oh! my child, was it indeed I who delivered thee over to thy fate?' Beauty awoke from her sleep crying, 'Father! father! I come!' As soon as morning came she hastened to the rose-garden, and impatiently awaited the coming of the Beast. The moment that hideous but kind and gentle creature appeared she ran to tell her dream, and to implore that she might go to her dying father. 'Oh! good Beast! kind Beast!' she cried 'let me but go and nurse him now, and I will return and serve you all the days of my life. Nay, gladly will I give up my life itself, if so I may save my father's, or at least comfort his last hours. Ah! have pity on me, unhappy maid that I am, and let me go!' At these words the Beast uttered a great cry and fell__ to the ground as one dead, __ lying motionless, with that __ grim and grisly head resting on the crimson rose-leaves. Beauty, in great alarm, knelt beside it. She sprinkled drops of dew over its face, by shaking the masses of glowing blossoms that hung above them. In tones of agony she besought the Beast not to add thus to her sorrow. 24



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VV .'.~~i :~"" 5~~ "THE FRIGHTFUL FORM WAS GONE, AND IN ITS PLACE STOOD A YOUNG MAN BEAUTIFUL AS THE MORNING."-(p. 28.)



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she must be dreaming, when she saw the splendid room in which she lay. The shining walls gave back the rays of the morning sun, which streamed softly in through curtains of silver and rose -coloured gauze, and glittered on the r NY,, golden lilies of the coverlet. The invisible hands were busy about the room, some sprinkling perfumes through the air with mops of rose-leaves, others filling a huge marble bath with fragrant waters, while others again were laying out delicate robes of lace and rose-coloured satin. Beauty rose, and after dressing, found that the friendly hands were leading her into the banquet-hall, where she was greeted by a burst of joyous music from the unseen musicians. As she sat at table the deep voice which she had heard twice before spoke to her, saying: 'Beauty, you see now that you are sole mistress of this palace and all it contains. Your father has given you a frightful account of me, no doubt; and for that reason I shall remain invisible until you yourself are willing to see me. Meantime let us be as good friends as we can.' 21



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"They brought butter and artichokes," replied the Tree, "bees'-wax and ,1 young goslings, and the fruit of the fingo palm, l with many other things too numerous to mention. One day, however, one of the suitors brought something which was better than any of these things, for he brought the news that some ships, long delayed by storms and winds, had come into port, and that several of the merchant's ships were "among them. There was great gladness in I' the little cottage. The merchant saddled $ the old farm-horse, the only steed he now -..... possessed, and got ready to ride at once to the great city to see for himself if the good news was true. He took an affectionate leave of his daughters, and said, 'My dear children, if I find that my ships are really safe I will bring you each a handsome present. Tell me, Superba, what do you most wish for?' 'I wish for a ring,' said the eldest daughter, 'with a diamond as large as a pea in it.' 'If the ships have come,' replied her father, 'a diamond ring you shall have. And you, Gracilia, what will best please you?' 'A velvet gown,' said the 'V second daughter, 'set about with pearls and rubies. 'If the ships have come, 7



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called Superba, the second was called Gracilia, but the youngest was called only Beauty, for there was no other name that was good enough for her. The merchant was wealthy, as I said, and many suitors came to woo his fair daughters, some for the girls' own sakes, and some for their father's gold. Superba looked haughtily at her lovers, and said she would marry no one except a king. '\ Gracilia laughed at hers, and told them they might be fit for horse boys but not for husbands; so they all went off in a huff and left the S scornful maidens alone. But Beauty smiled so sweetly on her suitors, and told them so gently that she could Snot leave her dear father, that they only loved her the Smore, and sat and -w -wept on all the fences -d for miles around. (373) 5 A 2



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B5, /_l E5 1, ;GORDON BR-WNL'S SERIEs oF OLD FA R Y TALES. 4to, ONE SHILLING I EACCH. .i: HOP O' MY THUMB. 2. BEAUTY AND THE BEAST. OTH-ERS TO FOLLOW. Each book contains 32 pages 4to, and is illustrated on every page by pictures printel in co/olrsi, Thils Series provides young people with the old favourite Fairy Tales, pleasingly told and verCy fil y illustited in a reall% artistic manmeC r. "The pictures are by GORDON BRTOWNE, who "stands in the veryy first rank as an illustrator of childrenis books." Everj page is illustrated, and th little reader can thus follow the story step by step byv the pictures alone. The pictures are all in colour, and are graphic character illustrations of a quaint and ihumorous kkind wli.chwiln be equally relished by young anld old... The stories; hae been delightfully retold by LAURA E.' RIdicAR a lady who has the. rare faulty of Invetilng the purest romance vwith that air of realism which is so 'fullof chaIrm to children. THE SHILLING SERIES OF BOOKS FOR CHILDREN. THE NINEPENNY SERIES FOR CHILDREN. NuVw VOLSu MES. Every Man in His Place. p ea' 9acoln dnir'i The Children of Haycombe. By A. S. FE. Fireside Fairies and Flower Fancies. NEW VOLUMES The Cruise of the Petrel. By F. 1 H To the Sea in Ships. Jack and the Gypsies.. By KATE 'OO The Wise Princess.'; By M. H, .CArER 'Jack's Victory: and other tories about Dogs. Hans the Painter. By MAR c. Ros: i. i A i Boy Musician: Or theYoung Daysof Mozar. he Story f a King, told by one of:his oldiers Little Troublesome. By IsAuins oos SHatto' Tower. ByMARYu C.o vsRLL. Prince Alexis, or BEUTY: AND TE BEAST." My Lady May. By H ARRisETOLTw Fairy Love-bairn's Favourites. ByJ. Di iLittle Daniel: A Story of a Flood on the .A Little HeIro By I Mrs I SO : Sashathe Serf: a dole iSt riesofRussian Life. Prince Jon's Pilgrimage. ByJEss i ..True Stories of Foreign History. Harold's Ambition. By JENNIEPEtiTT. Alf Jetsa.; By Mrs. "The-whole;of'theset will be found admirably The Rledfords. Ily Mrs. GEORnu CPPLES. iladapted for thee e of the young. The books, well Sepperp the Drummer-Boy. 1.By MARY C. S" printed ndelegantly bund i cloth, are a l'rvel R TW*ELL. iisasy. 'By F. BA "oR H aosh of cheapness." Journal of Education. Hidden Seed. Bv EMMA 117. Q t .u Aboard the Mersey. By Mrs. G. curLs us j |K'.? if r ... .Tl^A* • ,i, Quality" is hgaificed to quaobity, the toit es *'A Blnd. Pupil.hestore 'sBy ANNIE.S PCtF ... ."i Ursula's Aunt. lBy ANNIE S. FERN. oneand all boi of the, highest, and' eminently A Blind Pupil. By S F -' Jack's Two Sovereigns. ByANE S NNE suited fo.,he pur oses qf gift booksfor ether Loday st and Found. ByM, RR R OT A ittle Adventurer. EBy or Sabbath schol.Schoolmaster. rFisherman Grim. By MARYC. RonEL Olive Mount. 'ByAIE S FNN.*. ThreeaLittleOnes. By Co, .LA 1,,. SOMETHING FOR THE VERY LITTLE ONE S. Tom Watkins' Mistake. PBy EMA.LEsM.t ,l By JE NrN I TTHI P.i : Two Lle Brthers By H E CAP Fll l I ted oods and one Coloured-Plate each. .rs., cloth. ee e 'TheNewBoyatMerriton. BlyJUAGA'N.. fales Easy and Small for the,Youngest ofAll. In no word will you see more letters than th'ree. The Blind Boy of Dresden and his Sister. Old Diqk Grey and Aunt Kate's Way. 'Stories in little words of not more th fo)ur letters-. Jon of Iceland: A Sty ,f t he Fh i N .Maud's Doll and Her Walk. In Picture and.l. I' little words of not more thaufol letters Stories from Shake are. In Holiday Time. And other i tories. I little words of(ot more than f .lte'e rs e A Csomlete List of Books for the Young, pices from 4d to 7s. 6d., with Synopsis of their Contents, wil/ be supplied S" on Application to the Publishers. LONDON: BLAKIE & SON; GLASGOW, EDINBUR 1, AND DUBLIN. 5*5~ 8i ~ :y"A1~~~ .2~s~~ .55 ,B~l~t" .' .~~' 5 >



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the merchant gave the rose to his youngest daughter, the tears stood in his eyes, and he said: 'Ah! Beauty, Beauty, your present has cost me more than both the others put together.' Beauty, in great alarm, asked the meaning of these strange words; but her father refused to say anything more, and she was left to wonder. The next morning when the merchant awoke in his peaceful home the recollection of all his strange adventures seemed like a fearful dream. The forest, with its clutching hands and grinning faces, the palace, the invisible hands, the horrible form of the Beast-he wondered if they had really existed at all save in his imagination. But when he saw the white rose blooming in a slender silver vase, and carefully tended by Beauty, a cold shudder ran through him, and he fancied he heard a terrible voice saying: 'In one week!' "It was only fancy, however, and as the days _. --passed he put off from one time to another the --evil moment when he must tell his daughters of the fate which awaited him. At length the last day of the week came, and still the merchant had said nothing. He tried to persuade himself that the Beast might have forgotten, or might have relented towards him; at all events, could he be expected to keep an oath which had been forced from him when in danger of his life? was it right, merely because he had given his word, to leave his daughters alone in the world, and give himself up to a horrible death? In this way the poor merchant thought to himself, as he sat with his children, on the evening of the last day of the week. Suddenly Gracilia cried: 16



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'Ah! what a fearful cloud is that I see yonder! It is coming towards us at lightning speed. What can it mean? and what is that frightful roaring sound?' All started to their feet, and the next S moment the room grew perfectly dark. A burst of thunder shook All the house, and instantly a violent Sstorm of wind and rain raged to overwhelm the frail cottage. The three maidens fell on their knees in terror, but their father stood still, as if turned to stone, for at this moment a loud and dreadful voice was heard above the howling of the storm, crying: Little loth, Break'st thine oath, Death with thee will keep his troth!' Three times these words were repeated, then the storm and darkness passed 17 sss,.



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PRICE ONE SHILLING. rk1n'rowncs Senes of 0,1•rCy TL o' I e s IT All Rights Reserved.



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sounded above them; and hand in hand, with happy and loving hearts, Beauty and Bellino entered their palace." "Oh!" said Jean, "is that all?" "Ah!" sighed Marigold, "is it really finished? Dear Tree, what a lovely, lovely story!" "Tree," said Emanuel Philibert, looking up into the whispering green curtain, "do you know where the prince's palace is?" "Not exactly," replied the Tree; "my mistress, the fairy, knows. It is somewhere beyond the sunset, on the other side of the purple cloud -bank. And now, children, go home to your supper. Come again on the next fine afternoon and you shall hear another story." "Yes, yes! indeed we will come!" cried all the children; and, Emanuel Philibert leading the way, home they all went in the twilight. 30



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hand, which took his own hand and led him gently across the threshold sl.... -and through the hall. Stare as he i might, he could see no one; but invisible i hands now took off his cap and mantle, Sa and led him to a chair; and when one pair of -so fthands had gently pressed him down into it, another pair drew off his heavy riding-boots and put upon his T] feet fir-lined slippers, which fitted as if they had been made for him. Then he rose, and was led into a large banquetShall, where a table was laid, decked with Sgold and silver plate, snowy damask, "i .and sparkling glass. Seating him at the table, the invisible hands served him S most skilfully, pouring out golden wine in ruby glasses, and tempting him every moment with some new and delicious dish. When he had supped as well as he could in his amazement, he was led into another room, where stood a softly-cushioned bed, with hangings of crimson satin. The hands undressed him, and assisted him to get into bed, where they tucked him up, and handed him a night-draught of hot spiced wine. Wondering, and still wondering, and yet again wondering, the merchant at length fell asleep, and slept soundly till morning. 12



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away as if by magic, and left the four unhappy ones staring at each other, with pale faces and beating hearts. Beauty now insisted upon knowing the meaning of the words, and the merchant, feeling that he could no longer be silent, told the whole story, and said that in the morning they must take their last farewell of their unhappy father. But when Beauty heard that the Beast had offered to take her instead of her father, she said: 'My father, I will go! Your life is most important, mine of little consequence. Say no more, for I am resolved, and nothing can change me.' The merchant would not hear of this for a long time; but Beauty was firm in her resolve, and finally gained her point. Early the next morning the merchant saddled the old horse, and taking Beauty on a pillion behind him, started on his way towards the Beast's palace. He was bowed down with sorrow, and wept so bitterly that he could hardly see the road; but Beauty cheered and comforted him, and bade him keep a good heart. h 'I feel,' she said, 'as if the Beast would spare my life. Indeed, what good would it do him to kill me? whereas, if I lived I might be of use Sto him in many ways.' By noon they reached ': "the gates of the courtyard, which swung open to receive them, and closed behind them with a ringing 18



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He then told Beauty that he had been changed into a Beast by a malicious witch because he had refused to marry her ugly, one -eyed, hump -backed daughter, and he was condemned to keep the frightful shape until a fair and virtuous maiden should offer of her own free-will to marry him. 'And now, my Beauty,' he added, clasping her in his arms, 'your loving heart has broken the spell, and I am a free man. Love and life are before me, so let us forget the Beast and his troubles, and be happy together.' They turned towards the palace. At that instant a burst of music was heard. The doors of the palace opened, and a chorus of sweet voices sang: 41^'4 Welcome, Bellino noble prince, And Beauty, fairest maid! SAnd greater happiness be yours S^i1 Than can be sung or said.' The invisible hands scattered rosy blossoms before them, the joyous music 29 lil1''; *s ml, VIS I



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Now one day a terrible storm arose, and the wind blew three days and three nights; and news was brought to the merchant that all his ships, which were on their way home from the Indies, laden with golddust, and spices, and ivory, and cocoa-nuts, were lost, and that he was a ruined man. He gave up his fine house, and went with his three daughters to a small cottage, where they lived for some time in poverty. Superba and Gracilia did nothing but scold and storm and weep over their ill fortune but Beauty bared her lovely arms, and tied a kerchief over her golden curls, and did all the work of the house cheerfully and willingly. When her suitors heard of this, they 4 were more deeply in love with her than before, and they brought her many presents to help her in her housekeeping, which they left at Sthe back door with the greatest delicacy and decorum." "What sort of things did they bring to Beauty?" inquired Jean. 6



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my roses. Say your prayers and make your peace with Heaven, for this hour you must die!' The unhappy merchant fell on his knees and begged for mercy. He told the Beast about his fair young daughter Beauty, who had asked him to bring her a white rose, and of his vain search for roses in the great city. 'Alas! "when I saw your flowers,' he said, I thought only of my promise to my child, and plucked the blossom without pausing to think whether it were right to do so. Have mercy, my Lord Beast! Have mercy, and spare me! Truly, it seems but a little sin to cost a man his life.' The Beast seemed to reflect for a few minutes, then he said: 14



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The fact is, the Tree was telling the children a story; a story which the fairy who lived in its branches had told it only the night before. Would you also like to hear the story? Listen, then, for this is it. THE STORY OF BEAUTY AND THE BEAST. "LONG, long ago, there lived in the kingdom of Rigdom Funnidos a rich merchant who had three fair daughters. The eldest was tall and stately, the second was slight and graceful, but the third was more beautiful than both the others put together, or than any one else in the world. The eldest daughter was 4



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The four coal-black horses fairly flew along the road, and soon reached the palace. Beauty hurried to the garden, where she saw a figure lying motionless under the white rose-tree. She ran towards it, and found it was indeed the unhappy Beast, apparently quite dead. Beauty burst into tears and cried: 'Oh! my Beast, my dear, kind Beast! come back to me! only open your eyes and look kindly at me, and I will promise to marry you, for now I know that I love you, and can never be happy without you.' As she wept and mourned, suddenly a wonderful thing happened. The lifeless figure sprang to its feet, and lo! all in a moment it was changed. The hideous, frightful form of the Beast was gone, and in its place stood a young man as beautiful as the morning. His eyes were dark and soft, his hair fell in long curls of raven black, and he was dressed in a splendid suit of green and gold, which glittered in the sun. Beauty shrank back in affright from this, wonderful vision; but the young prince said: 'Fear not, my beloved Beauty! you have saved my life. And since you learned to love me under the hideous form I was condemned to wear, can you not learn to love me in my own shape?' 28