Cinderella, or, The glass slipper

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Material Information

Title:
Cinderella, or, The glass slipper
Series Title:
Cinderella series
Portion of title:
Glass slipper
Physical Description:
6 leaves. : ;
Language:
English
Creator:
McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Publisher:
McLoughlin Brothers
Place of Publication:
New York
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Juvenile literature -- 1880   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1880   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1880
Genre:
Juvenile literature   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Includes publisher's advertisement.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001826998
oclc - 28268507
notis - AJQ1055
System ID:
UF00025016:00001

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Full Text
iAIRi --LEF.P, ll


OR,THE GLASS SLIPPER.CINDERELLA was a very good little girl, and so long as her own dear motherlived, she was very happy: but whilst yet young her mother died, and her father"married again. This second wife was cross and cruel, and she had two daugh-ters, older than Cinderella, who were as bad as herself. Their whole pleasurewas in dressing themselves out in fine clothes, and they fancied themselves verybeautiful, and were vain and conceited. They could not, however, help seeing"that Cinderella was a much better as well as prettier girl than themselves; but"instead of loving her on this account and trying to copy her good example, theygrew envious, and hated her. All the hard work in the house was put off uponCinderella, and whilst her sisters sat finely decked out before their looking-glasses, she was 'rced to stay in the kitchen and to do all the cooking, and whenshe was tired, sh'i had no better bed than the ashes on the hearth. Ad othis reason she 1 ked black and was called Cinderella. And her sistersoften came in to qirrel with her, and her step-mother would scold heir withocause. So the poor irl had a sorry life. ...;L"\The Baldwin lbU-~: '\I r ?


-ysOne day the king was going to give a ball, and it was to last for three days.We are going to the ball, said the cross sisters, and we shall, perhaps, dance withthe young prince, the king's only son. Do not you wish you we going, Cinderella ? Cinderella cried, but that was of no use, and she begged her step-motherto let her go too, but her step-mother said no, you must stop at home and sweepthe house, that we may find it all in order when we come back. So they alldressed themselves out in their best clothes, and away they went to the ball.Poor Cinderella sat down and cried for a littf while; but at last, as she was agood girl, she said to herself, I will not cry, I will sweep the house as I was told,then perhaps they will be kind to me when they come home. So she took thebroom and began to sweep; when all at once a very beautiful lady stood beforeher and said, Cinderella, listen to me, I am your god-mother, and I am a fairy.I love you because you are good, and I do not like to see you so sad. Tell mewhat you were crying for just now. Because I want to go to the ball, saidcCinderella. You shall go to the ball, said the fairy.r-i-ix:. '. '-."*


Cinderella, you may be sure, was very much pleased when she heard thesewords; but when she looked at her soiled hands, and ragged dress, she thoughtto herself, how can I go such a figure as this ? Go and wash yourself, said thefairy; and Cinderella did so. Is this your only frock, said the fairy? Yes, saidpoor Cinderella, and she began to cry again. Do not cry, said the fairy. It istrue that fine clothes are of little worth in themselves, nay, they often do moreharm than good to those who wear them; but you must have a fit dress for theball if you are to go at all. So saying, she laid her magic wand upon the tornfrock of Cinderella, and behold it was instantly changed into a splendid balldress, glittering with silver. The long yellow hair that hung in tangled masses onher shoulders arranged itself in glossy ringlets on her fair neck, and on her feetthe fairy put a lovely little pair of slippers, all made of glass, and that shonelike diamonds; never was the like seen before. Now we must call your coach,said the fairy, for you must go to court in state. My coach? said Cinderella inamazement. 0 I can run like the wind in these sweet little slippers.


Do as 1 tell you, said the fairy. Go into the garden and out me the larg- Away went the coach then in great style, and the fairy god-mother flew firstest pumpkin you can find. Cinderella did so. Now go into the cellar and try if with her magic wand, but nobody could see her except Cinderella. When theyyou can find any rats and mice in the trap. Cinderella soon came back with reached the palace, every body was struck by the beauty of Cinderella, and thefour mice and an old rat. And what was her surprise to see the pumpkin con- splendor of her dress. Who is she? Who is she? was asked on every side;Sverted into a gay gilded coach. Now for the horses and the coachman, said the but no one could tell, and so it was concluded that she must be some rich prin-"fairy; and quick as thought, at the touch of her magic wand, the mice were har. cess from a foreign land, and everybody looked at her with delight and wonder.hessed steeds to the pumpkin coach, and the rat was a venerable coachman on As for the young prince he would dance with no one else, and as he was verythe box. Cinderella had no time to speak her thanks, for the fairy said, now handsome and very good, Cinderella liked him very much indeed, and the timejump in, and ride away to the ball, only take care you do not stay too long. You went very fast. She took care, however, to be home in time, and when her step-must be home again by twelve o'clock; if not, the coach will change into a mother and sisters returned, there she lay, as usual, in her dirty clothes amongpumpkin again, the horses into mice, the coachman into a rat, and you will find the ashes. Oh, Cinderella, said her proud sisters, if only you had seen the beau-yourself ragged and dirty in the midst of the ball-room; for all your fine clothes tiful princess that was at the ball. They little thought their younger sister waswill vanish away. Cinderella promised to do as she was told, and with a light that fair lady. Do let me go to the ball? begged Cinderella on the following,heart she skipped into the coach, which drove away at a rapid rate towards the day, but her step-mother and sisters said to her, you go to the ball, Cinderella?king's palace, where the ball was to be held that iiight. go and wash up the dishes.


When they were gone the second day, Cinderella once more followed themto the king's ball. And the young prince danced all the evening with her asbefore. Again she got safely back, and again her sisters taunted her with notbeing able to go and see the princess, of whom they talked more than ever. Andnow the third and last night was come, and this was to be the grandest of all.Cinderella once more begged leave to accompany her step-mother and sisters,but they laughed in her face, and bade her go and sit among the ashes. Anda soon as they were gone Cinderella set off in her coach, and danced merrilyat the ball with the handsome prince, the old king's son. But this time sheforgot toJ eave the ball at a quarter to twelve. All at once she remembered thefairy's warning, and she curtsied to the prince, and took leave of him. At thatvery moment the clock began to strike twelve. Then Cinderella turned roundand ran out of the room so fast that one of her glass slippers fell off. And the"*coach was once more a pumpkin, and the horses mice. So she was forced torun home as hard as she could, and only just got there in time.


But the prince picked up the little glass slipper, and began to make inquiriesas to what had become of the beautiful lady who had disappeared so suddenly.No one could tell where she went to. One servant said he had seen a dirtylittle girl run out just at the moment when the prince came from the ball-roomto follow the princess; but that could not be the lady. Now the prince lovedCinmdev4 and was determined to find her, that he might marry her; so he.gave wt that whoever could put .on that glass slipper should be his bride.And Umbers of ladies from all parts came to try on the slipper, but it was toosmall for any of them. We will go, said Cinderella's two vain sisters. So they.went, but their feet were larger' th those of any lady who had yet tried, andthey were ashamed of themselves. At last every girl in tiie kingdom, exceptCinderella, had tried it on; and, much against her will, the step-mother wasobliged to let Cinderella go. But her sisters stood mocking by, when she satdown to try it on, and said, you Cinderella! But what was their surprise whenCinderella's foot slipped easily in, and when she produced the fellow slipper.


Then the prince was delighted, and looking in her face he saw that this wasindeed the beautiful lady who had won his heart at the king's ball. And Cinde-"Brella was taken to a bath, and then dressed in royal robes ; and when she camebefore the prince and the people again, they were quite astonished at her beautyAnd the prince said, now you shall be my bride, for there is no one in the whworld I love so much as you. So he married her that very day, and as; t,king died soon after, Cinderella became queen, for her husband succeethrone; and everybody loved her, because she was gentle and goodthose who were in sorrow, since she herself had known what itAs for her bad step-mother and cruel sisters, they were sothemselves that they went home and hid from everybody.ing to hear of the gentleness of Cinderella, they took coto court and begged her pardon. And the good Cikissed them, and made them very rich, and never"all their wicked conduct to herself.


OL1.6 5ill::7. A ml11 NlLA'.414. .Ll.


Full Text

PAGE 1

OR, THE GLASS SLIPPER. CINDERELLA was a very good little girl, and so long as her own dear mother lived, she was very happy: but whilst yet young her mother died, and her father "married again. This second wife was cross and cruel, and she had two daughters, older than Cinderella, who were as bad as herself. Their whole pleasure was in dressing themselves out in fine clothes, and they fancied themselves very beautiful, and were vain and conceited. They could not, however, help seeing "that Cinderella was a much better as well as prettier girl than themselves; but "instead of loving her on this account and trying to copy her good example, they grew envious, and hated her. All the hard work in the house was put off upon Cinderella, and whilst her sisters sat finely decked out before their lookingglasses, she was 'rced to stay in the kitchen and to do all the cooking, and when she was tired, sh'i had no better bed than the ashes on the hearth. Ad o this reason she 1 ked black and was called Cinderella. And her sisters often came in to qirrel with her, and her step-mother would scold heir witho cause. So the poor irl had a sorry life. ....;L "\The Baldwin lb U-~ :'\I r ?



PAGE 1

Then the prince was delighted, and looking in her face he saw that this was indeed the beautiful lady who had won his heart at the king's ball. And Cinde"Brella was taken to a bath, and then dressed in royal robes ; and when she came before the prince and the people again, they were quite astonished at her beauty And the prince said, now you shall be my bride, for there is no one in the wh world I love so much as you. So he married her that very day, and as; t, king died soon after, Cinderella became queen, for her husband succee throne; and everybody loved her, because she was gentle and good those who were in sorrow, since she herself had known what it As for her bad step-mother and cruel sisters, they were so themselves that they went home and hid from everybody. ing to hear of the gentleness of Cinderella, they took co to court and begged her pardon. And the good Ci kissed them, and made them very rich, and never "all their wicked conduct to herself.



PAGE 1

But the prince picked up the little glass slipper, and began to make inquiries as to what had become of the beautiful lady who had disappeared so suddenly. No one could tell where she went to. One servant said he had seen a dirty little girl run out just at the moment when the prince came from the ball-room to follow the princess; but that could not be the lady. Now the prince loved Cinmdev4 and was determined to find her, that he might marry her; so he .gave wt that whoever could put .on that glass slipper should be his bride. And .Umbers of ladies from all parts came to try on the slipper, but it was too small for any of them. We will go, said Cinderella's two vain sisters. So they .went, but their feet were larger' th those of any lady who had yet tried, and they were ashamed of themselves. At last every girl in tiie kingdom, except Cinderella, had tried it on; and, much against her will, the step-mother was obliged to let Cinderella go. But her sisters stood mocking by, when she sat down to try it on, and said, you Cinderella! But what was their surprise when Cinderella's foot slipped easily in, and when she produced the fellow slipper.



PAGE 1

OL 1.6 5i ll::7. A ml 11 Nl LA'. 414. .Ll.



PAGE 1

-ys One day the king was going to give a ball, and it was to last for three days. We are going to the ball, said the cross sisters, and we shall, perhaps, dance with the young prince, the king's only son. Do not you wish you we going, Cinde rella ? Cinderella cried, but that was of no use, and she begged her step-mother to let her go too, but her step-mother said no, you must stop at home and sweep the house, that we may find it all in order when we come back. So they all dressed themselves out in their best clothes, and away they went to the ball. Poor Cinderella sat down and cried for a littf while; but at last, as she was a good girl, she said to herself, I will not cry, I will sweep the house as I was told, then perhaps they will be kind to me when they come home. So she took the broom and began to sweep; when all at once a very beautiful lady stood before her and said, Cinderella, listen to me, I am your god-mother, and I am a fairy. I love you because you are good, and I do not like to see you so sad. Tell me what you were crying for just now. Because I want to go to the ball, saidc Cinderella. You shall go to the ball, said the fairy. r-i-ix:. '. '-."*



PAGE 1

When they were gone the second day, Cinderella once more followed them to the king's ball. And the young prince danced all the evening with her as before. Again she got safely back, and again her sisters taunted her with not being able to go and see the princess, of whom they talked more than ever. And now the third and last night was come, and this was to be the grandest of all. Cinderella once more begged leave to accompany her step-mother and sisters, but they laughed in her face, and bade her go and sit among the ashes. And a soon as they were gone Cinderella set off in her coach, and danced merrily at the ball with the handsome prince, the old king's son. But this time she forgot toJeave the ball at a quarter to twelve. All at once she remembered the fairy's warning, and she curtsied to the prince, and took leave of him. At that very moment the clock began to strike twelve. Then Cinderella turned round and ran out of the room so fast that one of her glass slippers fell off. And the "*coach was once more a pumpkin, and the horses mice. So she was forced to run home as hard as she could, and only just got there in time.



PAGE 1

Do as 1 tell you, said the fairy. Go into the garden and out me the largAway went the coach then in great style, and the fairy god-mother flew first est pumpkin you can find. Cinderella did so. Now go into the cellar and try if with her magic wand, but nobody could see her except Cinderella. When they you can find any rats and mice in the trap. Cinderella soon came back with reached the palace, every body was struck by the beauty of Cinderella, and the four mice and an old rat. And what was her surprise to see the pumpkin consplendor of her dress. Who is she? Who is she? was asked on every side; Sverted into a gay gilded coach. Now for the horses and the coachman, said the but no one could tell, and so it was concluded that she must be some rich prin"fairy; and quick as thought, at the touch of her magic wand, the mice were har. cess from a foreign land, and everybody looked at her with delight and wonder. hessed steeds to the pumpkin coach, and the rat was a venerable coachman on As for the young prince he would dance with no one else, and as he was very the box. Cinderella had no time to speak her thanks, for the fairy said, now handsome and very good, Cinderella liked him very much indeed, and the time jump in, and ride away to the ball, only take care you do not stay too long. You went very fast. She took care, however, to be home in time, and when her stepmust be home again by twelve o'clock; if not, the coach will change into a mother and sisters returned, there she lay, as usual, in her dirty clothes among pumpkin again, the horses into mice, the coachman into a rat, and you will find the ashes. Oh, Cinderella, said her proud sisters, if only you had seen the beauyourself ragged and dirty in the midst of the ball-room; for all your fine clothes tiful princess that was at the ball. They little thought their younger sister was will vanish away. Cinderella promised to do as she was told, and with a light that fair lady. Do let me go to the ball? begged Cinderella on the following, heart she skipped into the coach, which drove away at a rapid rate towards the day, but her step-mother and sisters said to her, you go to the ball, Cinderella? king's palace, where the ball was to be held that iiight. go and wash up the dishes.



PAGE 1

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PAGE 1

Cinderella, you may be sure, was very much pleased when she heard these words; but when she looked at her soiled hands, and ragged dress, she thought to herself, how can I go such a figure as this ? Go and wash yourself, said the fairy; and Cinderella did so. Is this your only frock, said the fairy? Yes, said poor Cinderella, and she began to cry again. Do not cry, said the fairy. It is true that fine clothes are of little worth in themselves, nay, they often do more harm than good to those who wear them; but you must have a fit dress for the ball if you are to go at all. So saying, she laid her magic wand upon the torn frock of Cinderella, and behold it was instantly changed into a splendid ball dress, glittering with silver. The long yellow hair that hung in tangled masses on her shoulders arranged itself in glossy ringlets on her fair neck, and on her feet the fairy put a lovely little pair of slippers, all made of glass, and that shone like diamonds; never was the like seen before. Now we must call your coach, said the fairy, for you must go to court in state. My coach? said Cinderella in amazement. 0 I can run like the wind in these sweet little slippers.