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Title: The Delightful colored picture book
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00025015/00001
 Material Information
Title: The Delightful colored picture book
Physical Description: 12 p. : ;
Language: English
Creator: Fisher & Brother ( Publisher )
Publisher: Fisher & Brother
Place of Publication: Philadelphia ;
Baltimore
Publication Date: [ca. 1880?]
 Subjects
Subject: Juvenile literature -- 1880   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1880   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1880
Genre: Juvenile literature   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
United States -- Maryland -- Baltimore
 Notes
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: Includes publisher's advertisement.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00025015
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Special Collections, George A. Smathers Libraries
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001763234
oclc - 26812777
notis - AJH6397
 Related Items
Other version: Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
Full Text






















FVFB^II&BORTHIM
PUBLISHERS S
PHILADELPH IA&BALT MORE.




















































How pleasant it is to go out upon a pic-nic, to spend a day in the woods with our friends
when we have nothing to think of but our own enjoyment. The novelty of getting our
dinner in the woods, and of eating it from a cloth spread upon the ground adds to the
pleasure.
The pic-nic, we have here represented, consists of a number of young ladies and gentle.
men, among which are several acquainted with music, whom the others have prevailed
upon to enliven the excursion by singing and playing. They are seated under the shade
of a tree, where they can enjoy the cool pure air, and be shielded from the sun's rays.-
The rest of the company are in front, but where you cannot see them.
1


The Baldwin Library
University
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A TRIP ACROSS TUE ATLANTtC.

This voyage, which, before the application of steam to navigation, consumed long weary
months, now can be -ecomiplished in from two to three weeks. Soon after leaving port, a
person not accustomed to life on the water, becomes very sick, but as he becomes more
accustomed to the rolling motion of the ship, he recovers, with a ravenous appetite. The
various sights which attract the attention of passengers. render a. trip across the Atlantic
one of the pleasintest and most interesting experiences that a person can enjoy. As the
land frides gradually out of sight, and the passenger finds himself entirely at the mercy of
the skill of the engineers and sailors, he is impressed. as he looks upon the trackless ocean,
with feelings of the most solemn description, and' cannon think, but with awe, of the
might and grandure of the Creator.
---- -- -- -


-- -- :--=-~~-




































The different ships they meet with upon their journey, the various birds, as well as
the numerous kinds of fish, afford a fine recreation.
----=-= I --- = ~- -


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the nuue~rous kiinds of fish, aford: ai firt recreation.





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A Scene in Japan.

This picture
represents ascenei
in Japan. The
people, as you|
may see, have
long black hair,:
as well as yellow-
Sish complexions:
and small black:
eyes.


A Day in the Woods, or Life
in the Country.
Life in, the country has
many advantages over city
life. In the country the air
is pure and bracing, and
children require less watch-
ing than they do in towns
where the streets are crowd-
ed with men, horses and
wagons. Little children
who live in cities, delight
to spend their summers in
the country, where they
can run over the green
fields and enjoy themselves
to their hearts 'content.-
They see many things that
are new to them. The cows
arenovelties, the chickens
are strange, and every-
thing wears a first and
blooming appearance.


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THE FAVORITE HORSE.


The horse we see here is_
the steed of a sportsman, he
stands as if he were tired out
by a long journey, near himn
are lying the dogs, watching
the game that they have been
taught not to touch. Gunning
is an amusement much liked
by those who often so splelld
their time, but it seems a pity
to destroy the innocent, birds,
that have never caused injury
to any one, but have been of
great service to farmers by
destroying worms, which
would cause considerable in-
jury to the field and fruit crops, 7_-
besides enlivening the season by their pleasant songs.:

THE SCOTTISH ORPHANI.
SAmid the highlands of
Scotland resided a happyfam-
ily, consisting of a gentleman,
his wife and one daughter.
i Their life was undisturbed,
ea-ch day seemed to make the
1) I bnds of love which united
them, more firm and lasting.
But when least expected,
,ie'kness overtook the father,
and in spite of all the care
and attention that his wife
and daughter could bestow,
he died. The daughter's
whole time was now devoted
S U.- to her mother, whohad con-1
tracted a severe fever in con-
sequence of her days and nights of watching over her husband,
which proved fatal, and poor Mora was left an orphan.
4


51

















Indians are a barbarous and uncivil-
i ed people. They have often carried
off little children, and made them live
the same lives as themselves, never
more to see their brothers and sisters.
They often fight among themselves, but
1 before doing so, they engage in a horrid
k.L.. 4". war-dance.









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-/. Indian Life in the fPar West.
SIndians have gone westward ever since the white man first
landed on the shores of America. They have become better
acquainted with our habits of living, and are now seldom guilty
of any of their former barbarous deeds.



















THE YOUNG SURV~EYOIR
LAFAYETTE.
SThe Mariques De 'Lafayette was a great
- friend to this nation when it was struggling
for its independence. His name will be
ever remembered, with gratitude, by -the
people of America, for fighting side by side
with our great-grandfathers in the cause of
liberty.









DANIEL WEBSTER.
Daniel Webster was one of the
greatest statesman that Amerigd
"has produced. He was considered
the great expounder of the Consti-
tution.
6
A





THE EVENING PARTY.


Here you have a picture of a
very pleasant evening party.-
The father is instructing his own
1 I and several other children. They
Appear as if the subject was very
interesting, and.from the young-
est to the oldest lookto be equal-
ly amused. It is his custom to
entertain his little ones by telling
them the most interesting parts
of history, and while they are
apparently but listening to stor-
ies; they are having their minds
stored- with. one: of the most
useful branches of knowledge,
and which will be of service to
them as long as they live. They
are already acquainted with all
the particulars of the American Revolution, as well as the prin-
cipal points of English history.



COMMERCE. ---
Commerce is one
of the chief sources -
of the comforts we
enjoy, for by send-
inmg to other coun-
tries, those pro-
ducts we raise ~,;
ourselves we obtain
what cannot be
manufactured hv
us. Commerce
makes us acquaint-
ed with nearly all the people on the earth.





The Elephant.
This animal, which all of you have
seen probably in the menageries, is one
of the largest of the animal kingdom.-
When tamed, he is perfectly harmless,
unless his good nature is imposed upon,
when he becomes quite revengeful, often
having caused serious injury to persons
who have played tricks upon him. A
man, who was in the habit of giving fig
leaves to an elephant, one day wrapped
a stone among some, which he handed to
the animal; the elephant immediately
___~. ~ dropped it, but seemed to have taken
such special notice of the man, that when
he met again, the same day, he wrapped his trunk around his body, threw him to the
ground and trampled him to death.


The Camel.
The camel in not found anywhere in a .
wild state but in parts of Asia and Africa '
it is used as a beast of burden. The 4
Camel and the Dromedary are two varie-
ties of the same animal. The Dromedary
is to the Camel, what a racer is to a
draught horse. There are one humped
and two humped Camels, and one humped
and two humped Dromedaries. The f-. '
height of the Camel rarely exceeds seven
feet. He is admirably adapted by the
Creator to traveling across deserts, in
the structure of his feet, nostrils and in- __-
his ability to carry within himself a
supply of water.



Chickens.
Here are the birds which furnish us
with all our eggs, as well as with the
young chickens for our table. The kind
you see in the picture' are' called Cochin
China chickens, having been imported
front the place, from which they derive
.their name. They. are a much better
variety than our common chickens, laying
for a longer time, as well as larger eggs.
They are entirely white, except around
the neck, where the feathers are pointed
with black. There are a, number of
other kinds of fine chickens, some of
which are larger.


















George Washington.
George Washington is an ex-
ample to all my young readers,
to show how great a man
can become.by his own energy.

.-* ** IB


Martha Washington.


The Patriotic Farmer.
Here is the patriotic far-
mer, who, when he heard the
call for men to fight our battles,
left his plough in the field, bid
adieu to his wife and children,
and seized his musket.


The Fop.


The Sailor Boy.


Children at Play.


\o :'


Childhood.


Mr, Longface.





















A' OCISE ts LAPLAND


Lapland is a country where the ground is generally covered
with snow. The Laplanders have reindeer.to do for them what
horses aind oxen do for us, These reindeer pull their sleds at
the rate of from seven to ten miles an hour, furnish milk and
meat, and their fur is used for clothing.
a


To this house, soon after George Washington was born, his
father removed. It was situated on the Rappahannock near
Fredricksburg. Here under this humble roof his mother reared
her six children, the eldest of whom became so illustrious.





























EMIGRANTS.
This is an emigrant family, which has left their home among
their friends and relations, and sailed across the Atlantic to seek
their fortunes in America.

DOGS.
No animal is more attach-
ed to man than the dog, you
have .all heard of the many
anecdotes which are related
of his affections and faithful-
ness in discharging duties
entrusted to him. There are
S.-verymany different varieties.
rri^''..,,1;r, --. i7-e J.: -11






LITTLE BERTHA.
Little Bertha was left an
orphan before she was seven
years old; several kind fam-
ilies in the village assisted
her and sent her to school.
Bertha during her leisure
hours delighted to pick
powers to present to her
friends.














ANDREW JACKSON.
Andrew Jackson was
,, ad a distinguished man while-
She lived. He was the hero
of New Orleans, where in
1812 he fought the British
MY BABY. from behind cotton bales.
Mother appears very fond of He was afterwards made
her baby, as your mother is of President of the United
you, and always will be as long States
as you are good. -o



















































," U U 0

















Millard Fillmore.

Millard Fillmore was one

S_ ) of the most popular presi-

The Orang Outang. dents of the United States.


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THE PELICAN.
This bird has an enormous pouch
and is a good fisherman.


JOHN ADAMS.
John Adams was
Washington's successor
to the Presidency.
14








FISHER 6 BROTHERS
112 N. Sirth Street, Philadelphia, and 64 Baltimore Street, Baltimore,)


WITH PLENTY TO LAUGH AT, AND PLENTY TO LEARN.
Royal octavo, 6 kinds, 2 f each kind in the dozen, 16 pages each, printed d and eatil'lly colored on
all sides. No blank pa-cs. A model series of the largest Toy Books pul-lished in the world


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PL E ASURE. fN JBOO K IB,
Royal o6tavo, 6 kinds, 2 of each 'kind in the dozen, 16 pages each, printed and colored on all sides.
No blank pages. A beautiful set of the largest Toy Books published.


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HAPPY DAYS. T H REE

CHILDHOOD.! LITTLE KITTENS.

TR I REMARKABLE EVENTS


COLORED PICTURE BOOK. tt for G BE .
DE IL uIGHTFIUIIL. IN .j.^ i~rld torl od hlrn


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NATURAL HISTORY.


4T THA BOK OR
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NATURAL HISTORY.
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SIME P I CTU R B OO S,
Profusely Illustrated, and Painted in all the Colors of the Rainbow.
Royal octavo. 6 kinds, 2 of each kind in the dden, 16 pages each, printed and splendidly colored. No
blank pages. A paragon series or the largest Toy Books published in the world


LITTLE JOSEPH, I;J:SERY FUN:
TOMMY TROBT THE
THE CHILD OF THE SEA. jTOM TROTLWTFOLKPTURE BOK.
... ..TT.IL.KS' PICTURE BOOK.


8 TORIE 8
ABOUT
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ALPHABET

ZAERICAN SUBJECTS.
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MY FIRST A B C BOOK
i. an
Progressive Primer.
---------- $MR, a.: s 10 9 1


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