• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 The fox and the bear
 What if?
 The wise and the foolish mouse
 Out in the snow
 Bo-Peep's stock-ing
 Bessie's Christmas wish
 Back Cover






Title: A holiday greeting
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00025009/00001
 Material Information
Title: A holiday greeting
Physical Description: 16 leaves. : ;
Language: English
Creator: Cox, Palmer, 1840-1924
Cox, Palmer, 1840-1924 ( Illustrator )
D. Lothrop & Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: D. Lothrop Co.
Place of Publication: Boston
Publication Date: [ca. 1880]
 Subjects
Subject: Juvenile literature -- 1880   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1880   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1880
Genre: Juvenile literature   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: Some illustrations signed by Palmer Cox.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00025009
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Special Collections, George A. Smathers Libraries
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001801805
oclc - 27719511
notis - AJM5574
 Related Items
Other version: Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    The fox and the bear
        Page 1
        Page 2
    What if?
        Page 3
        Page 4
    The wise and the foolish mouse
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Out in the snow
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Bo-Peep's stock-ing
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Bessie's Christmas wish
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text














































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D.LOTHROP CO. BOSTON


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THE FOX AND THE BEAR.

BY PALMER COX.


A BIG bear who did not like
to work, was sit-ting by the
road-side one day. He saw a
sly fox trudg-ing past with the
ma-ter-i-als for a good din-ner
in his bag.
Hal-lo, neigh-bor !" said


he, call-ing out to the fox.
"You are not a ver-y so-cial
fellow; hard-ly a day pass-es
but you sit down to a good
meal, and you nev-er in-vite a
friend to take a bite with you,
it seems no mat-ter to you


~----- --- -


~-1--~-~- -~-'-




THE FOX-AND THE BEAR.
at all how hun-gry he may be." to my bag of their own free
I would of-ten go hun-gry will. When tur-keys roost low-
too," said the fox, if I sat er than they do at pres-ent,
wait-ing for the fowl to run in- there is no know-ing how gen-


er-ous I may be, but un-til then
I shall find it hard e-nough
work to pro-vide for my-self
and fam-i-ly with-out feast-ing


a big, la-zy fel-low like you."
And off he tramped, leav-
ing the la-zy bear to sit there
as hun-gry as ev-er.




WHAT IF?


WHAT IF ?

THREE lit-tle men on the door-steps sat,
And all three ro-si-ly sweet and fat.

Late-ly come from Ba-by-land were they,
Dear lit-tle men that ought to be gay.


But there on the green lay white snow-flakes--
A-pril weath-er was mak-ing mis-takes.

"0, you don't sup-pose," says Dick-y Dear,
" That, may-be, there won't be flowers this year ?
" O0, no-bod-y knows," says Tom-my Jinks,
"No-bod-y knows what the weath-er thinks."

"If no-bod-y knows," cries Hop-o'-my-Thumb,
"If no-bod-y knows what's go-ing to come,




WHAT IF?
" The rose may dress brown in-stead of red,
But, sir, if she does, snip goes her head!"

And then the three, and all in a jiff,
Sob-bing be-gan, What if ? What if ?

"What if the vi-o-lets on trees should grow,
In-stead of their hid-ing gras-sy low ?

"What if there is noth-ing nice to eat ?
What if the straw-ber-ries shouldn't be sweet ?
" And what if the cher-ries green should stay ?
And what if the ap-ples did same way ?

"And it be so cold that we couldn't play,
And so in the house all sum-mer stay ?

" And the fish-es with their sil-ver gleams
Should all freeze up in the sil-ver streams ?

"And all the chick-ies and birds should die ?
What if ?" they said. "What if? 0, my!"

Tom-my Jinks said Oh!" Dick-y said" Oh !"
And Hop-o'-my-Thumb, he, too, said so.

"Oh! oh-oh! Oh! oh-oh-oh!"
This is how the three wee men said Oh!"

They'd wept till now, but the sun came out,
And up they jumped, and off with a shout.





































A Successful Raid.


Not so easy.


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THE WISE AND THE FOOL-ISH MOUSE.


A FAITHFUL FRIEND.


THE WISE AND THE FOOL-ISH MOUSE.

BY PALM-ER COX.


ONE night two hun-gry mice
en-tered a pan-try, and, to their
great de-light found a large
piece of cheese.
If there is one thing I like
more than an-other it is cheese,"
whis-pered one.
"Just so," mum-bled the


oth-er, as they closed in up-on
the cheese, and be-gan to make
up for their long fast.
Af-ter they had been nib-
bling for some time, one of
them drew back as though sat-
is-fied.
What!" ex-claimed his corn-





THE WISE AND THE FOOL-ISH MOUSE.


pan-ion. "You are not go-ing
to quit yet, I hope! Why,
this is the best feast we have
had for ma-ny a night."
I ad-mit that," re-plied the
oth-er. The cheese is cer-
tain-ly ver-y nice. But you
must re-mem-ber that in com-
ing here we en-tered through
a ver-y, ver-y small hole in-
deed ; and if we should eat
too free-ly we will not be a-ble
to pass back in case a cat
should pop in up-on us."
Hum-bug! squeaked the
first. I nev-er saw such a
mouse as you are! When I
find a-ny-thing good to eat I
al-ways make the most of it
and take my chances."
So he nib-bled at the cheese
a-gain, while the wise mouse,
fear-ing for the safe-ty of his
friend, tried to pull him a-way
be-fore it was too late.
While they were thus en-
gaged, a pus-sy, that had been
watch-ing their move-ments for
some time, now pounced in
with-out knock-ing, and of


course there was a has-ty scam-
per-ing for the hole on the
part of the mice. The wise
-mouse, who had eat-en mod-er-
ate-ly, reached the hole first,
and es-caped with-out a-ny dif-
fi-cul-ty. The sil-ly mouse,
how-ev-er, who had eat-en with-
out a-ny re-gard for the fu-
ture, was rath-er slow in get-
ting to the hole, and e-ven
af-ter he reached it he was too
full to squeeze through, but
stuck fast un-til two great paws
were up-on him, and be-fore
long he was de-liv-ered o-ver
to the ten-der care of a whole
fam-i-ly of kit-ties, who were
soon cry-ing out:
0 mam-ma! Go get us
some more mouse. It's so
nice!"
Dear me! said the wise
mouse, a few min-utes af-ter-
wards, pok-ing up his head to
seek for his friend :
"Dear me! What
a great mor-al les-
son has been il-lus- -
trat-ed to-night !" "
g DEAR ME-GONEM




OUT I THE SNOW.


Here
Ralph


are
and


my
Kate.


three
And


pets,
oh!


fun as they have out in the
new snow. Ralph has two
but he don't mean to throw
just yet. He will let Beth and
throw theirs first, and then
they stoop down to get some
snow, the rogue will pelt


both. But the balls are so soft they
will do no harm, and Beth and Kate
like the fun as well as Ralph.
What! both hands bare, Beth?
And, dear me! what have you and
Ralph done with your caps ?
Thrown them off just for fun ?
Ah! but you must put them right
on, or Jack Frost will catch you.


Beth,
such
soft,
balls,
them
Kate
when
more
them




I ______
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BIR











Ted-dy was a wee boy, but naught-y
e-nough for ten big boys. He was
naught-y to the dog, to the cat, to ev-
er-y-thing. One night he had a dream
that was two dreams in one. In the
first he played a splen-did trick on
the cat and her kit-tens; and he
laughed in his sleep. In the sec-ond
they played a splen-did trick on him;
and this time he screamed right out.




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BO-PEEP S TOCK-ING.


BO-PEEP'S STOCK-ING.


Bo-peep was Jack Hor-ner's
lit-tle sis-ter. When he had
his Christ-mas pie she was a
wee ba-by. But the next
Christ-mas, mam-ma hung up
her own lit-tle red-and-white
speck-led stock-ing for her.
Christ-mas morn-ing there
was a great time. Bo-peep
sat on the bed, and shouted
"Goo! goo!" and pulled the
things out her-self from the
-gay lit-tle stuffed stock-ing.
A lit-tle white rab-bit peeped
out at the top. His eyes were
made of pink beads. He had
a clov-er leaf in his mouth.
Then came a chi-na pus-sy,
black and yel-low and white.
Then a brown mouse and a
white one. The brown mouse
was choc-o-late. The white
one was su-gar: and Bo-peep
bit off the choc-o-late tail


and a su-gar ear at once.
There was a knit dol-ly, in
a bright blue dress and blue
shoes.
And a-way down in the toe
of the stock-ing, there was a,
lit-tle chi-na hen. She sat in
her nest. The nest was chi-na
too. Bo-peep took her off, and
what do you think she had for
eggs ? Pink-and-white car-a-
way seeds!
When Bo-peep went to bed
that night, the lit-tle r.ed stock-
ing was left on the car-pet. In
the morn-ing mam-ma heard a
rus-tle in the stock-ing, and
shook it. Out ran a gray
mous-ie, a real, live mous-ie !
Two or three of Bo-peep's
lit-tle pink-and-white car-a-way
eggs had stayed in the toe of
the stock-ing. Mous-ie had
smelt them in the night, and had





BO-PEEP S STOCK-ING.


/ I,
~ t~; -
I


T


CHRIST-MAS MORN-ING.


crept in to get his share of Christ- So Bo-peep thinks she had
uias. Wasn't that fun-ny ? two Christ-mas morn-ings.


. ~


-77













BESSIE'S CHRISTMAS WISH.


0 Santa Claus, listen a moment, do!
Come close to the chimney-top,
For I have a secret to tell to you,
I'm sure that you've time to stop

And hear me through, though the folks do say
You have thousands of miles to go;
And. millions of chimneys upon -the way,
Peep out through the drifting snow.

But surely when I have been sick so long,
You wouldn't be hurrying by,
Without looking in just to see how strong
I am growing, and stout and spry.

So well that I've stood on the doorstep twice,
Just a moment, to take the air,
And mamma says on Christmas, isn't it nice ?
That is, if the day be fair -

She will wrap me up warmly, and uncle Dan
Who lives just 9ver the hill,
Will harness his handsome chestnut span -
He says that he surely will -

And take us to grandma's; and uncle Jo
Will be there, and dear aunt Ray,







BESSIE' S CISMISTIAS WISIL


With Willie and Walter and baby Zoe,
Ned and Ellen and Sue and May.

Phim pudding and turkey -0 aren't they prime!
And the starry, green Christmas-tree 1
With romps and with games a jolly good time!
How merry and glad we all shall be '

But if it should storm- 0 dear! 0 dear!
All my pleasures would melt away.
So Santa Claus, dear, for my gift this year
Please send me a pleasant day!


A CHRISTMAS DINNER.






















The dancing lesson.


Santa Claus is struck by the modesty of little boys.




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