Christmas boxes

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Material Information

Title:
Christmas boxes to Harry Good from Santa Claus ; to Frank Best from Santa Claus
Physical Description:
20 p. : ;
Language:
English
Creator:
McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Publisher:
McLoughlin Bros.
Place of Publication:
New York
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Christmas stories -- 1880   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1880
Publishers' advertisements -- 1880   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1880
Genre:
Christmas stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Includes publisher's advertisement.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001749437
oclc - 26441395
notis - AJG2327
System ID:
UF00025001:00001

Related Items

Related Items:
Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Full Text
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THREE CHRISTMAS BOXES.DEAR children, gather round my knee,A simple story, you shall hear;In which I hope, you all will see,How strong a brother's love appears;---The joy that doinggood imparts,Wheretrue- forgivenessfills the heart.Look atthis howling,hunteddog!All wild with pain, and fear she flies;These wicked boys are at her heels,And vainly to escape she tries.With blood, and bruises coveredo'er,Poor little-Fan can run no more!Somepasser-by,with pitying heart,Has stoppedthe hailof cruel stones;Poor Fan has reached her master's,door,And there, withWith brokensad arlimbs,idplaintivemoans;and piteous cries,She licks his gentle hand, anddies!The Baldwin LibrarymUnivrityofFlorida_-=-A


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Three Chizstlmas Boxes.Frank wasa, noble, manlyyouth,As frank by nature, as by name;And when he saw poor Fan was gone,The tears rolled down his face like rain!He clasped her to hissobbing breast,Then laid her tenderly to rest.This was a bitter blow to Frank;But whenhe knew, a brotler'shand,Had playedthis cruel, wicked prank;'Twas almost more, than love could stand.For Tom had tiedThe horrid, clangingto Fanny's tail---g, fatal pail!And now again, the happy time,Of Christmas bells, is drawing near;Andsoon will greet, with merrychimes,The crowning dayof all the year;When songsof gladness, fillthe land,And love, andj oy, go handin hand.


Three Chtzistmas Boxes.Now, Santa-Claus, at Christmastime,Can all the acts ofchildren see;And as their deeds, are good or ill,So will their Christmas presents be!You see himin his easy chair,His good-wifesmilingon him there.ked work;They talk ofTommy's wic]And Santa-Claus with angry frown,Says, "wickedness like this, my love,With punishment, must be put down;His cruel play shall cost him dear,No present will he get thisyear.Then up, and spoke thebuxomdame;A kind, andfeeling heart hadshe!" Dearhusband, though your judgmentblame,With mercy, let it tempered be;We'll try his heart,with griefand pain,But leadhim back to hopeacrain. 1


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Three Chtistmas Boxes.Old Santa-Claus, then,---withYou might have heard aa kiss,mile around;The good old dame, with love embraced,And chuckled low---a merry sound.Then both their heads, togetherlaid,To see what could, of Tom be made.And, after many doubts and fears,They hit at last upon a plan;By which, they hoped the wicked boy,Mightgrow to be an honest man.And what the lesson proved to be,And how it worked, you'll shortly see.And "MerryChristmas," now had come,And Frank, and Will,were happy boys;Three boxes, bearing each a name,That ready seemed, to burst with toys;Layfair, beforetheir eagersight,And filled them with a wild delight.


Three ChIst/mas Boxes.With cries of joy,then, Frank andWill,Soon had their boxes opened wide;What store of precious toys were there,With many usefulA piece of Fairthingsbeside.ry-land it seemed,Or something, that the boys had dreamed.But where was Tommy, all thistime ?A sad, unhappy boy was he!With fear and pain, his heart was filled,No gleam of hope, couldHe seemed to feel theTommy see.cruel stones,And hear poorFanny'sdyinggroans.So, while his brothers, filledthe house,With joyous shouts, and cries of glee;Poor Tommy dared not touch his box;An em/ly one, hefeared tosee.With tears of shame, he stole away,No joyfor him that blessed day!


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Th rc CChristmas Boxes.The happy brothers, then looked round,To know whyTom so quiet kept;And saw,with wonderingsurprise,That Tommy from the room had crept;They saw hisbox, unopened there,And heard himsobbingon thestair.Then nobleFrank,with pitymoved,Said, "Will, go send poorBut don't come back againTommy here;yourself,Until I've made this trouble clear;Go, brother dear, and make him come,To have his share ofChristmasfun.Now Frank, in lookingthroughhis box,'Had noticed with astonished eyes;A doubleWhichshare of booksand toys,filled him with a gladsurprise;And quickly ran, at once to see,If Tommy's box could empty be.


ThreeChrzstmas Boxes.So now, that brother Willhadgone,He raised the lid, with gentle care;And saw, that not a toy or book,Of any kind, was hiding there.---Thought of poor Fan, with passingpain,Then sighed,and, closedthe lid again.He stood a moment, deepin thought,Then yieldingto his gen'rousheart;brim---FilledTommy's box, up to theOf all his treasures, gave him part!Then blushing, with therosy glow,can bestow;---That sweetforgiveness,Wentsoftly from the quiet room,That Tommy mightbe there alone;And never need suspect the truth,Of what his brother's love had done.Ah! nobleheart, so bright and' fairNo angry hate could harbor there.


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1Lree Christmas Boxes.And now,with saddened steps and slow,Poor Tommy creeps into the room;His heavy eyes, are dimwith tears,His boyish face, is dark with gloom;For well he knew, that justicegrim,Would say, "no Christmas toys for him."He sees, that brother Frank is gone,And only Willie'sdog is there;(A sister, she--to luckless Fan.)The sight is hardfor Tom to bear.It bringsto mind his sin again,And fills him with remorse andpain.He turns away fromWillie's pet,Alas! he cannot bear the sight;When suddenly, his face lights up,He glowswith wonder and delight.---A moment stands,with eagereyes;Thenbreathless, to his box he flies.


ThreecChristmas Boxes.Just where 1But now,With books,Where hehe left it, there it stands;'tis full and runningo'er,and toys, and wondrous things;had nothing seen before!He took them out, with trembling hands;Then, all atonce, amazedhe stands.What is it, thatpoor Tommy sees?That dyeshis cheeks withburningpain;He finds, upon a cross-bow tied,A card, which bears hisbrother'sname.Frank meant, that Tommy should not know---But Santa-Claus'Tis done! and Torhad willed itso!nmy's stubborn heart,Is broken down with honest shame;He knows, that Frank hasfilled his box,Without a single word of blame.His tears are flowing,thick andfast,True penitence, he feels at last.


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ThrcceChristmas Boxes.Quick as a flash, he leaves the room;As quickly rushes back again---His own pet dog, is inhis arms,And seems to soothe his bitter pain.Dear Frank comes in the other door,And smiling walks across the floor.Then Tommy, holding out his dog,Said, "brother Frank, I've brought youhere,My own dear pet,for you to keep,(HereTommy dropped a scalding tear.)"And if you'll take her now from me,A better boy, I'll try tobe."Frank'shonest eyes, are fullof tears;his breast;He holdspoor Tommyyour darling," Takebackbrother dear,And let me set your heart at rest.Be kind, and good, in word and deed,And that is all the pay I need."


-----rl-- C ------I-- ..h -I- UC- --L-- a --.- r-ItIIIBIG PICTURE BOOKS.FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.VgTWENTY-FIVECENTSEACH.Coimprise fifty kinds, representing the finest Picture Books that can be found in the market. They are printed uponfine paper, specially prepared by ourselves, with a view of producing the best effects in color. The designs for theillustrations have been executed by the best artists, and give the bocls pre-eminence as an attractive line for youngpeople. The language employed is simple, and easily understood by those for whom they are intended, and many ofthe series have become almost juvenile classics. 4to. Demi, with six to twelve illustrated pfEges.HOTE.-Any of these Books can be had Mounted on Linen. Price, Sixty Cents each.Ten Little Niggers.Nine Niggers More.Ten Little Mulligan Guards.Alphabet of Country Scenes.Baby.Putnam.Pocahontas.Three Bears.Tom -Thumb.Visit to the Menagerie.Home Games for Boys.Home Games for Girls.Yankee Doodle.Robinson Crusoe.White Cat.Hey Diddle Diddle.Jack and the Bean-Stalk.Hare and Tortoise.Puss in Boots.My Mother.Children in the Wood.Fat Boy.Visit of St. Nicholas.i" " in German.Santa Claus and his Works." it " in German.Domestic Animals.Kindness to Animals.Home Kindness.Rip Van Winkle.Humpty Dumpty.-Vol. 1.Humpty Dumpty.-Vol. 2.Nursery Rhymes.House that Jack Built.Wild Animals.-Part One.Wild Animals.-Part Two.Mother Hubbard's Dog.Tit, Tiny, aid TittensFour-Footed Friends.Three Little Kittens.Three Good Friends.Cock Robin.The Froggy .who would a woo-ing go.Nonsense for Girls.World-Wide Fables.Cinderella and the Little GlassSlipper.IN PRESS.Henny Penny.Little Red Riding Hood.The Bears.The Monkeys.II -- -- ;; .4 INew Paper Dolls.The most Amusement at little cost that can be found.SIX: CE3NTS EACEI. 'TEN CENTS EACH.Polly Prim. Gerty Good LottieLove. Myra Mild.Jennie June. Bessie Bliss.IE'r'TEEN CE2NTs EA.CH.Dottie Dimple. Susie Simple. Bertie Bright.Bride, Bridesmaid, and Groomsman.Dolly Varden Dolls.X.A A. R G- ME S I Z E.:Figures cut out, and put up in Fine Envelopes.TWENTY-FIVE CENTd S EACOH.Baby Blue. Bertha Blonde. Betsy Brunette.STANDARD FOLDING GAME BOAHuS,Each Game played upon a separate and largesized design.Pilgrim's Progress contains the games of Pilgrims Pro-gress, Tower of Babel, and Going lo Sunday School. Threemoral games in one Board. The Pilgrim's Progress is unsur-passed in beauty of coloring and artistic excellence. The designof the Tower of Babel is a splendid representation of the BiblicalTower, some fifteen inches in height. The Sunday School gameis a novelty in appearance. Played with the Indicator, a newmethod of playing games, superior to dice and teetotums, andwholly unobjectionable......................Price,The Jerome Steeple Chase Game contains threegames-The Steeple Chase Game, Balky Horse, and Pool-inthe same style as foregoing .................Price, $2.00Life s .lIishaps and Domino Rex- two games inone Board ................................Price, $1.00Captive Princess-The simplest'and best game published.New method throughout. Directions for playing occupy onlyten lines ..............................e i lce, $1.00- ---- ------: I -- 3CII... m ii, r


Full Text

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THREE CHRISTMAS BOXES. DEAR children, gather round my knee, A simple story, you shall hear; In which I hope, you all will see, How strong a brother's love appears;--The joy that doing good imparts, Where true forgiveness fills the heart. Look at this howling, hunted dog! All wild with pain, and fear she flies; These wicked boys are at her heels, And vainly to escape she tries. With blood, and bruises covered o'er, Poor little Fan can run no more! Some passer-by, with pitying heart, Has stopped the hail of cruel stones; Poor Fan has reached her master's door, And there, with sad and plaintive moans; With broken limbs, and piteous cries, She licks his gentle hand, and dies! S The Baldwin Library m6 -3 University Florida



PAGE 1

Three Chrizstmas Boxes. Quick as a flash, he leaves the room; As quickly rushes back again--His own pet dog, is in his arms, And seems to soothe his bitter pain. Dear Frank comes in the other door, And smiling walks across the floor. Then Tommy, holding out his dog, Said, "brother Frank, I've brought you here, My own dear pet, for you to keep," (Here Tommy dropped a scalding tear.) "And if you'll take her now from me, .A better boy, I'll try to be." Frank's honest eyes, are full of tears; He holds poor Tommy to his breast; "Take back your darling, brother dear, And let me set your heart at rest. Be kind, and good, in word and deed, And that is all the pay I need."



PAGE 1

BIG PICTURE BOOKS. FOR LITTLE CHILDREN. TWENTY-FIVE CENTS EACH. Coimprise fifty kinds, representing the finest Picture Books that can be found in the market. They are printed upon fine paper, specially prepared by ourselves, with a view of producing the best effects in color. The designs for the illustrations have been executed by the best artists, and give the bocls pre-eminence as an attractive line for young people. The language employed is simple, and easily understood by those for whom they are intended, and many of the series have become almost juvenile classics. 4to. Demi, with six to twelve illustrated plfges. JO0TE.-Any of these Books can bo had Mounted on Linen. Price, Sixty Cents each. Ten Little Niggers. Puss in Boots. Mother Hubbard's Dog. Nine Niggers More. My Mother. Tit, Tiny, and Tittens. Ten Little Mulligan Guards. Children in the Wood. Four-Footed Friends. Alphabet of Country Scenes. Fat Boy. Three Little Kittens. Baby. Visit of St. Nicholas. Three Good Friends. Putnam. " in German. Cock Robin. Pocahontas; Santa Claus and his Works. The Froggy who would a wooThree Bears. " in German. ing go. Tom Thumb. Domestic Animals. Nonsense for Girls. Visit to the Menagerie. Kindness to Animals. World-Wide Fables. Home Games for Boys. Home Kindness. Cinderella and the Little Glass Home Games for Girls. Rip Van Winkle. Slipper. Yankee Doodle. Humpty Dumpty.-Vol. 1. Robinson Crusoe. Humpty Dumpty.ol. 2. IN PI RES S. White Cat. Nursery Rhymes. Henny Penny. Hey Diddle Diddle. House that Jack Built. Little Red Riding Hood. Jack and the Bean-Stalk. Wild Animals.-Part One. The Bears. Hare and Tortoise. Wild Animals.-Part Two. The Monkeys. New Paper Dolls. STANDARD FOLDING GAME BOAHUS. The most Amusement at little cost that can be found. Each Game played upon.a separate and large sized design. SIX CENTS EAChI. TEN CENT EACH. sized design Polly Prim. Gerty Good LottieLove. Myra Mild. IPilgrim's Progress contains the games of Pilgrim's ProJennie June. Bessie Bliss. gress, Tower of Babel, and Going to Sunday School. Three moral games in one Board. The Pilgrim's Progress is unsurPIrFTEEIN CENTS EACHI. passed in beauty of coloring and artistic excellence. The design Dottie Dimple. Susie Simple. Bertie Bright. of the Tower of Babel is a splendid representation of the Biblical Tower, some fifteen, inches in height. The Sunday School game Bride, Bridesmaid, and Groomsman. is a novelty in appearance. Played with the Indicator, a new method of playing games, superior to dice and teetotums, and D olly V arden Dolls. wholly unobjectionable...................... Price, oys The Jerome Steeple Chase Game contains three "1i A. :R c!E S I Z: :E games--The Steeple Chase Game, Balky Horse, and Pool--in the same style as foregoing .................Price, $2.00 Figures cut out, and put up in Fine Envelopes. Life s JMishaps and Domino Rextwo games in one Board...........................Price, $1.00 TWENTY-FIVE CENTS EACOH. Captive Princess-The simplest'and best game published. New method throughout. Directions for playing occupy only Baby Blue. Bertha Blonde. Betsy Brunette. ten lines .............................. rice, $1.00





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Three ChGistmas Boxes. Old Santa-Claus, then,---with a kiss, You might have heard a mile around; The good old dame, with love embraced, And chuckled low---a merry sound. Then both their heads, together laid, To see what could, of Tom be made. And, after many doubts and fears, They hit at last upon a plan; By which, they hoped the wicked boy, Might grow to be an honest man. And what the lesson proved to be, And how it worked, you'll shortly see. And "Merry Christmas," now had come, And Frank, and Will, were happy boys; Three boxes, bearing each a name, That ready seemed, to burst with toys; Lay fair, before their eager sight, And filled them with a wild delight.



PAGE 1

Three Christmas Boxes. Just where he left it, there it stands; But now, 'tis full and running o'er, With books, and toys, and wondrous things; Where he had nothing seen before! He took them out, with trembling hands; Then, all at once, amazed he stands. What is it, that poor Tommy sees? "That dyes his cheeks with burning pain; He finds, upon a cross-bow tied, A card, which bears his brother's name. Frank meant, that Tommy should not know--But Santa-Claus had willed it so! 'Tis done! and Tommy's stubborn heart, Is broken down with honest shame; He knows, that Frank has filled his box, Without a single word of blame. His tears are flowing, thick and fast, True penitence, he feels at last.



PAGE 1

Three Christmas Boxes. So now, that brother Will had gone, He raised the lid, with gentle care; And saw, that not a toy or book, Of any kind, was hiding there.--Thought of poor Fan, with passing pain, Then sighed, and, closed the lid again. He stood a moment, deep in thought, Then yielding to his gen'rous heart; Filled Tommy's box, up to the brim--Of all his treasures, gave him part! Then blushing, with the rosy glow, That sweet forgiveness, can bestow;--Went softly from the quiet room, That Tommy might be there alone; And never need suspect the truth, Of what his brother's love had done. Ah! noble heart, so bright and fair No angry hate could harbor there.





PAGE 1

Three Chlistmas Boxes. With cries of joy, then, Frank and Will, Soon had their boxes opened wide; What store of precious toys were there, With many useful things beside. A piece of Fairy-land it seemed, Or something, that the boys had dreamed. But where was Tommy, all this time? A sad, unhappy boy was he! With fear and pain, his heart was filled, No gleam of hope, could Tommy see. He seemed to feel the cruel stones, And hear poor Fanny's dying groans. So, while his brothers, filled the house, With joyous shouts, and cries of glee; Poor Tommy dared not touch his box; An empty one, he feared to see. With tears of shame, he stole away, No joy for him that blessed day!



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Three Chi*stmas Boxes. Frank was a. noble, manly youth, As frank by nature, as by name; And when he saw poor Fan was gone, The tears rolled down his face like rain! He clasped her to his sobbing breast, Then laid her tenderly to rest. This was a bitter blow to Frank; But when he knew, a brother's hand, Had played this cruel, wicked prank; 'Twas almost more, than love could stand. For Tom had tied to Fanny's tail--The horrid, clanging, fatal pail! And now again, the happy time, Of Christmas bells, is drawing near; And soon will greet, with merry chimes, The crowning day of all the year; ,When songs of gladness, fill the land, And love, and joy, go hand in hand.



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Three Christmas Boxes. And now, with saddened steps and slow, Poor Tommy creeps into the room; His heavy eyes, are dim with tears, His boyish face, is dark with gloom; For well he knew, that justice grim, Would say, no Christmas toys for him." He sees, that brother Frank is gone, And only Willie's dog is there; (A sister, she--to luckless Fan.) The sight is hard for Tom to bear. It brings to mind his sin again, And fills him with remorse and pain. He turns away from Willie's pet, Alas! he cannot bear the sight; When suddenly, his face lights up, He glows with wonder and delight.--A moment stands, with eager eyes; Then breathless, to his box he flies.



PAGE 1

Three Chistmas Boxes. Now, Santa-Claus, at Christmas time, Can all the acts of children see; And as their deeds, are good or ill, So will their Christmas presents be! You see him in his easy chair, His good-wife smiling on him there. They talk of Tommy's wicked work; And Santa-Claus with angry frown, Says, "wickedness like this, my love, With punishment, must be put down; His cruel play shall cost him dear, No present will he get this year. Then up, and spoke the buxom dame; A kind, and feeling heart had she! "Dear husband, though your judgment blame, With mercy, let it tempered be; We'll try his heart, with grief and pain, But lead him back to hope again."



PAGE 1

Three ChGistmas Boxes. The happy brothers, then looked round, To know why Tom so quiet kept; And saw, with wondering surprise, That Tommy from the room had crept; They saw his box, unopened there, And heard him sobbing on the stair. Then noble Frank, with pity moved, Said, "Will, go send poor Tommy here; But don't come back again yourself, Until I've made this trouble clear; Go, brother dear, and make him come, To have his share of Christmas fun. Now Frank, in looking through his box, "Had noticed with astonished eyes; A double share of books and toys, Which filled him with a glad surprise; And quickly ran, at once to see, If Tommy's box could emly be.



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