The old shepherd

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Material Information

Title:
The old shepherd and other choice stories for the young : with illustrations
Physical Description:
5, 120, 12 p., 1 leaf of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 17 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Bertall, 1820-1882 ( Engraver )
Trichon, François Auguste, b. 1814 ( Engraver )
Manini ( Illustrator )
Gauchard, Félix Jean ( Illustrator )
Virtue and Yorston ( Publisher )
Ballantyne and Company ( Printer )
Publisher:
Virtue and Yorston
Place of Publication:
New York
Manufacturer:
Ballantyne and Company
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Shepherds -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Dogs -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Abuse of animals -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Abraham (Biblical patriarch) in the New Testament -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Fishing -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Courage -- Juvenile ficiton   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1870   ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1870   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1870
Genre:
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York

Notes

General Note:
Date of publication from inscription.
General Note:
Illustrations engraved by Bertall after Trichon, Manini, and J. Gauchard.
General Note:
Publisher's catalogue follows text.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
General Note:
"Lucy Hovey, Please accept from Fannie + Ella Dec 23, ' 70".

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002235105
notis - ALH5547
oclc - 00368288
System ID:
UF00024379:00001

Full Text















THE OLD SHEPHERD.













































PRINTED BY BALLANTYNE AND COMPANY

EDINBURGH AND LONDON








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THE OLD SHEPHERD.










THE OLD SHEPHERD



AND OTHER



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WITH ILLUSTRATIONS








NEW YORK
VIRTUE AND YORSTON
12 DEY STREET.
























CONTENTS.







PAGE
I. THE OLD SHEPHERD, I

II. ABRAHAM'S SACRIFICE, . 22

III. LIGHT, 32

IV. DOGS AND THEIR USE, . 40

V. THE FISHING PARTY, 61

VI. THE FATE OF POOR MARTIN, 89

VII. ISAAC'S MARRIAGE, 09





















LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.







PAGE
THE SHEPHERD, 8

ABRAHAM'S HAND STAYED BY THE ANGEL, 28

DANCING DOGS, 40

A BEGGING CUR,. 44

FISHERMEN, 82

POOR MARTIN, 99

REBECCA BY THE WELL, 116



































I.

THE OLD SHEPHERD.

< flERE you are, my little children, returned
from your holidays," said Mrs Templeton
to a smiling group of little ones; and
now you must each relate your adventures in turn."
Oh, yes, yes," cried all the children at once, "we
will tell grandmamma all our adventures "
VOL. VI. A


---I--
"C- ~






2 THE OLD SHEPHERD.

"Flora must commence, then," said Arthur, "be-
cause she is the eldest."
Flora was a pretty little girl about twelve years old,
with a laughing, rosy face, and a pair of merry black
eyes, that had a twinkle of mischief in them.
"You know," said she, "how happy I was to set
out for Scotland to stay with my uncle at the Glen,
in the county of Perth. Mamma had often told me
that there were a great many flocks and shepherds
there, and that I might go with them to the fields
every day. I was very happy to see my little cousin
Margaret again, but I was still happier to think that
for six whole weeks I was going to be a shepherdess.
I had often read about them in books; for one day,
when mamma was out, she left her bookcase open,
and I was so fond of stories that I took a book, and
it was all about a beautiful shepherdess called Flora,
the same as me. That made me wish to read more,
and I read of shepherds who went about playing
flutes, beautiful white lambs adorned with ribbons,
huts built in the green woods, and surrounded with
roses, jasmine, and honeysuckle. The interior of
those huts was like a fairy palace; the shepherds
slept on beds of moss and flowers, and near them
rippled streams of pure fresh water."






THE OLD SHEPHERD.


"So that they might have a bath even while they
were sleeping," interrupted Arthur, mockingly. It
must have-been very pleasant indeed "
"It all sounded so pretty," continued Flora, that
I could dream of nothing but of being a shepherdess.
"What increased my wish more than ever was a
painting which hung above the door of papa's library,
which represented shepherds dressed in rose-coloured
silk; shepherdesses, with flowers in their hair and
wreaths round their large straw hats, silk stockings
and kid shoes, and holding crooks in their hands,
ornamented with lovely bouquets. Their sheep were
so white and beautiful too They rested peacefully
along with the dog at their mistresses' feet, and
seemed to be listening to the sweet sounds of music
which came floating on the breeze. You may im-
agine how delighted I was when mamma told me that
my uncle had a great many shepherds and sheep,
and that it was a very beautiful part of the country
where he lived.
I had scarcely arrived at the Glen before I asked
my little cousin Margaret, who is only eight years old,
to show me the flocks. Margaret went and asked my
uncle, and he promised to take me next day to where
they were feeding.







4 THE OLD SHEPHERD.

I could not close my eyes all that night; I think,
perhaps, I slept a little, but all the time I was dream-
ing of my uncle's shepherdesses At last daylight
appeared, and I rose. Margaret was still sleeping,
which I thought very strange, for she did not seem to
care in the least for my uncle's promise to us. How-
ever, I awoke her, and told her she was very lazy;
but we had still a good while to wait for breakfast,
and after that we set out.
"When we left the house, we went through some
pretty winding lanes, bordered with bushes, flowers,
and turf; and I expected every moment to see
among them a little fairy hut like what I had read
about.
However, we had gone a long way without seeing
anything. All at once the little road stopped, and
we found ourselves on an immense field or moor,
which stretched away as far as we could see; but
there were neither bushes, nor turf, nor flowers. At
the very other side of the field I thought I described
something-a kind of gray mass, which was like no-
thing I had ever seen before.
Is this what you wanted to see, Flora ? asked
my uncle.
I thought perhaps he had not understood what I






THE OLD SHEPHERD.


wanted to see, and so I asked him to show me the
flocks.
"'Well, there they are, over there,' said Margaret,
'do you not see them ?'
"I looked all round, and seeing nothing, I con-
cluded that they must be speaking of that gray mass
in the distance. As we drew near, I distinguished a
lot of dirty white sheep, a lean dog, a little wooden
shed or hut, built so low that it would scarcely allow
me to stand upright. There was also an old man,
brown and wrinkled, dressed in the coarsest garments
and a pair of great leather boots covered with mud.
This man had a large stick in his hand, with an iron
hook at the end of it, but so different from the crooks
I had read about!
"I was so disappointed with the appearance of
everything that I could not help showing it.
"' What are all those filthy sheep for?' I asked my
uncle.
"'It is the flock,' he replied with a look of surprise.
"'And who is that ugly-looking man that keeps
them?'
'The shepherd, of course.'
'You are just joking, uncle,' I said, half crying
with vexation. 'And where are the shepherdesses?'







6 THE OLD SHEPHERD.

"'Ah, the shepherdesses!' he said, with a smile,
'we have left them at the farm. Betsy and Sarah


,,
7.-t


make the butter and cheese, and little Madge looks
after the sheep and lambs that are too young to come
up here and feed.'
"'What!' said I to Margaret, 'are Betsy, and
Sarah, and Madge, those great fat girls that I saw
yesterday when I came? And are they your shep-
herdesses, and this man your shepherd ?'
"'Yes,' replied Margaret, laughing, 'but what is






2HE OLD SHEPHERD. 9

the matter with old Daniel? I like him, for he is
very kind, and a good shepherd into the bargain.'
"I could not help telling Margaret that I thought
him so ugly, I was quite afraid of him. Then my
little foolish cousin seized hold of my hand, and
laughing heartily at the very idea of my being
frightened, she dragged me, in spite of all my efforts
at resistance, to old Daniel's side.
When he saw us approaching, the old shepherd
advanced to meet us, and bid us good-morning.
'Look, Daniel,' said Margaret, here is my cousin
from London, who says she is afraid of you because
you are so ugly.'
"As my little cousin spoke, I felt myself blush up
to the very eyes, for her words seemed so rude, I
thought they would make the old shepherd angry. I
would have liked to have asked him to forgive me,
but I dared not even look at him.
"' It is true, my young lady, that I am not so
pretty as you, but do not be afraid, for I have never
hurt a living soul, thank God,' said the old man.
"Those gentle words surprised me not a little. I
raised my eyes, and instead of the frightful counte-
nance I had imagined, I saw a smile full of kindness
on the old shepherd's face.







io THE OLD SHEPHERd.


"' Forgive Margaret and me,' I stammered, I
thought shepherds-I didn't know they were dressed
like you.'
"'My dress is certainly not very pretty,' he
answered, but one must wear something substantial
if they have to pass the night under the stars.'
"' Do shepherds stay out in the fields all night ?' I
asked with astonishment; those that are dressed in
silk, too?'
"The old shepherd looked at me for a moment
and smiled.
"'Where have you seen shepherds like that?' he
asked.
"'In pictures and stories,' said I, 'they are al-
ways dressed so beautifully, and the sheep are so
white I'
"' My child,' said the old shepherd, you may have
read that in stories, but they were not true ones.
Shepherds dressed in such clothes would be bad
keepers of their flocks. Cold would soon carry them
off, the sheep would be lost, and-well, the price of
wool would rise fast!'
"'Why?'
"'Because, little one, if the sheep were lost, the
fleece would be lost too.'






THE OLD SHEPHERD. I

What is the fleece ?' I asked, now quite at my
ease.
"' The fleece is the sheep's dress, and after they
have used it all winter, to protect them from the cold,
it is cut off with a pair of great scissors called shears.
The wool which is got in this way is far the best; it
takes on the dye better than when it is taken from
the skin after death.'
Do they dye wool?' I asked.
"'Of course, they do; and I am sure you will have
a dress of black or blue merino, and that you have
knitted some pretty little piece of work with worsted
of all shades and colours.'
"' Yes, we have,' answered Margaret. And she
told the shepherd all about our needlework,-of the
slippers I had worked for my uncle's birthday, and
of the pretty hood Lucy had made for grandmamma.
I was surprised to hear that all those things are made
from the wool of the sheep, and the old shepherd told
me that it is one of the most valuable animals that
God has created.
"'Sheep are useful for everything,' he said; 'their
wool dresses us from head to foot. They make cloth
and flannel from it, and stuff for dresses; shawls and
scarfs for ladies, and wool for knitting and embroider-






12 THE OLD SHEPHERD.

ing. They make also carpets for rooms, damask for
curtains, and fringes of all kinds. The Arabs of
Africa have nothing else to make their clothing from.
'Sheep give milk also, from which is made cheese,
and even butter, as well as from the milk of the cow.
But this is not all. When the animal is dead, parch-
ment is made from its skin, or it is dyed green, red,
black, or yellow, and prepared as they do in the
kingdom of Morocco in Africa, and transformed into
morocco for shoes, portfolios, and for the binding of
books ; into leather for making whips, saddles, bridles,
and little balls for children.'"
Your shepherd must have been a learned man !"
interrupted Arthur.










"Yes; for while he watched the sheep, he learnt
their history," said Flora. Besides he had not always
been a shepherd, though he commenced this work
when he was only seven or eight years old ; but he







THE OLD SHEPHERD.


was then only a little keeper, as he said. But after-
wards he became a soldier. Do you remember the
regiment of Hussars we saw the other day? Their
horses had saddle-cloths, which looked like fur. Well,
old Daniel says, they are all made from sheep-skin,
and that it is called Astracan, because the manufac-
ture of it was first learnt from a town in Persia which
bears that name.
In travelling from place to place with his regiment,
old Daniel learnt a great deal, as he said.
In the south of France there were a great many
sheep with very fine wool; and in a mountainous
country near the Pyrenees there were sheep with
wool finer than all the rest, and they were called
Merino. It was a learned naturalist called Dauben-
ton who brought them from Spain many years
ago.
"In Gascony Daniel saw another kind of sheep,
but they were not pretty. They were black, and had
a great deal of very coarse wool, which is used for
making mattresses and some other things. But they
are very useful to the inhabitants of the country, and
to the shepherds, who sleep on their skins, and dress
themselves in them from head to foot, which makes
them look like so many wild beasts. Another curious






THE OLD SHEPHERD.


thing about those shepherds of the Landes is, that
they are obliged to mount on stilts higher than them-
selves to lead their flocks. They have often to cross
such wide plains of sand, and thicket or marsh, that
they would be very much at a loss without their
stilts. I cannot remember all that old Daniel told
me about them. I wish you could hear him your-
selves."
"Go on, go on," said Arthur; "we are just as
pleased to have it from you."
"He told me, also," continued Flora, "that with
the fat of sheep they make tallow, from which candles
are afterwards made.
When Daniel was tired of being a soldier, he got
a situation in a manufactory where they made all
kinds of woollen stuffs. Unfortunately he was one
day caught by one of the wheels of the machinery,
and got his shoulder blade and arm broken, which
disabled him for work for the rest of his life. But
Daniel was not a man to turn a beggar, and so he
resolved to become a shepherd once more. So he
returned to his old trade, though he had not been
accustomed to its hardships for long.
"I asked him why he stayed all night in the
fields.





THE OLD SHEPHERD.


"He said, 'It was often necessary to feed the
flock in places too far from the folds to take them
back every evening.'
"'But do the sheep not wander at night ?' I asked.
"' Not at all,' replied Margaret, who seemed to
know all about those things. 'Sheep very seldom
scatter from each other; then they are enclosed be-
tween those hedges which you see there. Do you
think Star would let the sheep go away? You do
not know him.'"
"Who was Star?" asked Lucy.
The shepherd's dog," replied Flora.
"Margaret pointed out to me how he ran to the
right and to the left to watch the flock while his
master talked with us. And to let me see how vigi-
lant he was, she tried to make him leave his work by
calling him. But the dog only wagged his tail in
token of recognition, and attended to his business.
"' My good dog,' said the shepherd, he is always
brave and faithful; he would defend the whole flock
if a fox appeared.'
"'Can sheep not defend themselves ?' I asked.
"' They have no means of defending themselves,'
replied the shepherd; their teeth are not made for
biting, like those animals which live on flesh. Sheep






16 THE OLD SHEPHERD.

are called herbivorous, because they only live upon
herbs.
"'The rams, which are the strongest among the
flock, are the only ones which have horns, and yet
those horns are turned round their ears in such a
manner as to be of no use to them as a means of
defence.'
And then sheep are not wicked,' replied I; 'for
mamma always says my brother Jack is as gentle as a
lamb.'
But it would not be wicked only to defend one-
self against an enemy,-it would be brave,' said the
shepherd; 'and the wild sheep know how to protect
themselves. In the countries where they are found,
in the north of Asia, for instance, they fear neither men
nor animals ; they give fearful blows with their heads,
and with so much courage, that they are sometimes
conquerors. But when the sheep is domesticated, it
loses its natural qualities; it has gradually become
timid, improvident, and incapable of providing for
its own wants; it is spoilt and degenerated, in short,
because that is the usual effect of bondage.'"
Ah, well," continued Flora, those poor sheep,
which are so useful to us, which give us milk, wool,
candle, and so many other things, those good, gentle







7HE OLD SHEPHERD. 17

creatures are also eaten;" and the children's eyes
filled with tears.
"Who eats them?" cried the children.
"We do."
"We!" and they looked at each other in astonish-
ment.
"The whole of us," said Flora; "and every-
body."
"And, now that I think of roast mutton and
chops having once been alive, I will never eat them
again," said Jack.
"Nor me," added Lucy.
"I said as much to old Daniel," replied Flora,
"but he said that then I must eat no meat, for beef,
and veal, and fowl have all been living as well as
mutton. And as I thought men must be very wicked
to kill the poor animals for their food, the shepherd
said to me, with a very serious face-oh! I will
never forget his words:
"'My chifd, it is a consequence of the punish-
ment that God inflicted upon men for having dis-
obeyed His laws. God had not intended our first
parents to eat of the flesh of animals; but after the
fall his purposes were changed. And men showed so
much submission to their punishment, of being obliged
VOL. VI. B






18 THE OLD SHEPHERD.

to find their own food that, much as cruelty is repug-
nant to those who have kind hearts, they generally eat










without ever thinking of it. It would even put them
very much about if they were obliged to do without
meat for a day or two.'
"'Are we obliged to eat it, then?' I asked.
"'My child,' said old Daniel, the Israelites ate
the Passover in the land of Egypt, where Pharaoh
loaded them with sorrow, and from whence the Lord
had promised to deliver them and conduct them into
the land of Canaan. Let us do as they did, in this
world where we are overwhelmed with sin, while we
patiently wait till it pleases God to conduct us to,
a better country, even a heavenly one.'
I soon became accustomed to the sight of the
old shepherd, and, while I listened to his voice, I
never thought any more of his odd dress, which had
at first appeared so terrible to me.






THE OLD SHEPHERD. 19

"On the contrary, he was so good, and answered
all our questions with so much kindness, that I began
to love him as much as my little cousin Margaret did.
I pitied this poor man very much when I thought
of him spending the night in the fields, and I would
have liked to send him my pelisse and muff to keep
him warm. I could not help telling him how sorry
I was for him, and then he took my hand, and
said-
"' My good little girl, do not pity me too much;
the trade of a shepherd is indeed a laborious one;
it requires robust health, and is not a thing which
makes one rich. But the worst of it is, shepherds live
so isolated, away up among the hills and the heather
for days, only returning home to snatch a hurried meal
and a few hours' rest. When the weather is bad, I
shelter myself in this little hut, from which I can
easily watch the flock. Then I have two faithful
friends, which make amends for all my trouble-a
book, which makes the hours grow shorter and shorter
every day, and the good God above, who allows me
to admire the works of His hands spread around me,
above all, the beautiful heaven, with its myriads of
glittering stars.'
"'The stars are very beautiful,' said Margaret;






20 THE OLD SHEPHERD.

'Daniel has explained them to me sometimes, and
I know fifteen of them by name already.'"
"What !" interrupted Arthur, "did Daniel know
astronomy too ?"
I do not know if he had ever studied it, but he
told us about the lives of the first shepherds, which
we have all read, though without paying much atten-
tion perhaps, in our Bibles; and he told us that they
were the first who knew anything about the stars.
"I wished very much for Daniel to teach me to
know the stars in the heavens, like Margaret. Un-
fortunately the days were still too long; the night was
too late in coming; and then very soon I had to come
away.
"But my uncle has promised me, and I am sure
he will not forget, that I am to go back and get some
more lessons from the old shepherd."
"We will all go," cried the children; "we would
like to hear Daniel speak too."
And now," said Mrs Templeton, who had listened
to this story in silence, "do you never think of the
shepherdesses you read about in your story-book?"
"Never," replied Flora, laughing. "I know now
that they never existed; and if they did exist, I
would not change my old shepherd, with his coarse






IHE OLD SHEPHERD. 21

clothes, for all the fine ones dressed in rose-coloured
satin."
"And do you know why?" asked the grand-
mother.
"No," said Flora, I do not know. I love Daniel
better, but I cannot tell why."
Ah well, I will tell you," replied Mrs Templeton.
"Old Daniel is a real shepherd, who acts, thinks, and
speaks like a true man, while the shepherds in your
story-book were only false people, false shepherds.
In spite of all the ornaments with which they try to
adorn what is not true, it is truth alone which is
beautiful, and nothing pleases but the truth."



















ABRAHAM'S SACRIFICE.

OU know, my dear children, that when Noah
and his family came out of the Ark, after
the deluge, they found the earth quite de-
void of inhabitants, for they had all been drowned,
and so they separated, and Noah and his sons went
in different directions.
Shem, Ham, and Japheth had many children, who
became the centres or founders of new tribes, and
were, in their turn, called patriarchs, which means,
chief of a house or father of a family.
One of the descendants from the family of Shem
was called Abraham. He dwelt in a town called
Haran. He was a married man, and had great flocks
and herds; and altogether Abraham seems to have
been very happy in that country.
Abraham had been accustomed, ever since he was







ABRAHAM'S SACRIFICE.


a child no bigger than you are now, to do all that
God commanded him;'so God loved him, and He
loves you too, when you are good, and keep all His
holy laws.
God had not yet told Abraham to do anything very
difficult; but one day He said to him: "You must
leave your country and family, and depart into a land
that I will show you."
Such a command would cause us a good deal of
trouble and grief, and very likely it did to the patiarch
Abraham. To leave the country he loved, where all
his friends dwelt, and where he had such numerous
possessions, and to go into a country he knew not,-
which, perhaps, had neither water nor pasture, and
which was, no doubt, a long way off, was very sad
and painful; but God wished it, and so Abraham
wished it also. He called all his family together,
collected his flocks, and departed as God had told
him to do.
It was, indeed, a long and weary journey, and
Abraham had to endure many difficulties on the way.
Once, a famine had fallen upon the land through
which he was travelling, and Abraham was obliged
to go into Egypt, so that his family might not die of
starvation.







ABRAHAM'S SACRIFICE.


In those days, people did not work and till the
ground every season, as they-do now. They had no
order nor foresight, and so it often happened that they
had no bread. They were hungry, and there was no
corn to make flour for bread, and that is what is called
famine. So Abraham was obliged to go into Egypt,
which lengthened his journey a great deal; but in
spite of all his difficulties and trials, he did not repent
having obeyed God.
After the famine was over, the patriarch experienced
a new trouble : he quarrelled with Lot, his brother's
son, whom he had brought with him to this new land,
and who also possessed large flocks of sheep and
cattle.
"We are brothers,' said Abraham. "Do not let
us quarrel, but rather let us agree, as brothers should
do. Since our flocks cannot feed in the same place,
let us separate. Go in whichever direction you like
best, and I will go in the other. The earth is surely
large enough for us both to find a place where we will
not disturb each other."
And so Abraham had the grief of separating from
Lot, whom he loved very much, and who had always
lived with him and his family.
The country to which God conducted Abraham was


24






ABRAHAM'S SA CRIFICE.


the land of Canaan. During the journey, God, who
was pleased with Abraham's prompt and unquestion-
ing obedience, spoke to him many times.
"I will give you all this country," said God to the
patriarch one day; "and I will give you a son who
will be the father of a great nation. And your children,
and your children's children, will be so numerous that
they shall be like the stars of heaven in multitude !"
Abraham thanked the Lord for those gracious pro-
mises, and he built altars to Him in testimony of his
gratitude; and he continued to obey the Lord all
things.
At last, God gave Abraham and Sarah his wife the
son that He had so often promised them, an event
which was hailed with great rejoicing in the patri-
arch's family. This little boy was called Isaac. I
cannot tell you how much he was beloved by Abra-
ham and Sarah. All parents love their children, and
you know that, little ones. But Abraham and Sarah
had only this one little son; and they had waited for
him such a long, long time; and then he was to become
the father of such a mighty people In those days it
was considered a glory to have many children, and
Abraham and Sarah loved Isaac all the more for
those motives.






26 ABRAHAM'S SACRIFICE.

However, one day, when Isaac was still very
young, God called his father to Him.
"Abraham! Abraham!" He said. "Here I am,
my Lord," replied the patriarch; and the Lord said
unto him-
"Take your son, your only son Isaac, who is so
dear to you; and bring him up to the mountain, and
offer him to me as a burnt-offering "
To offer Isaac as a burnt-offering was to kill him,
andifterwards burn his body like a heap of wood.
To kill Isaac, his dear and only child! this son
who, according to God's promise, was to grow old
and be the father of a great nation. Was it not for
this that God had made Abraham leave his country,
that He had led him through so many toils and
fatigues, to this distant land of Canaan, which He
had promised to give to him and his children? And
now God tells him to kill Isaac the only son of
Abraham and Sarah! How would all this happiness,
"promised by God, come to pass, if Isaac were killed ?
What would become of this numerous people,-this
posterity which was to equal the stars of heaven in
multitude? Were God's promises about to fail?
All that seems very strange to us! Some might
even think God wicked to command a father to kill






SABRAHAM'S SACRIFICE. 29

4 his child. It seems, at the first glance, unjust to
A .mmand the death of young Isaac, who had done
o wrong.
# But that cannot be. God is not wicked ; and He
only loves those who are good, and act kindly to-
wards their neighbours.
He is not unjust, for he only loves those who prac-
tise justice.
He does not fail in Hisword, and He forbids us to lie.
We cannot understand all His wonderful ways, and
B4%Mraham did not understand Him either. But he
I had faith in God; he knew that God would never
deceive him; that He is wise, and just, and good,
and that it was his duty to obey. Abraham had
heard the Divine command quite distinctly-he was
sure of that; and so he determined to obey, and
offer up Isaac as a burnt-offering; and God, who
rules everything, would order all the rest.
The patriarch was quite right to believe thus in
God's word, and trust in His goodness and justice;
for the very moment in which he was about to sacri-
fice his son, God sent His holy angel to stay the
father's hand.
"Abraham Abraham !" cried the Lord, do not
sacrifice your son Isaac. You have willingly agreed






30 F ABRAHAM'S SACRIFICE.

to give up to me what is most dear to you, and I am
satisfied. Abraham I will bless you and your son,
and his children's children, and all nations will be
blessed because of Him who will be born yet."
This last promise, my dear children, was still more
gracious than all those that God had formerly made
to Abraham, because He who was to be born many
years afterwards, from the family of Abraham. and
Isaac, was Jesus Christ, the Saviour of the world, who
said, Suffer little children to come unto me, and for-
bid them not, for of such is the kingdom of heaven.J'.
This promise was the greatest reward Abraham "
received from God for having had-such great faith
and obedience.
Dear children, God commands us sometimes, like
Abraham, not by His own voice, but by those of our
parents, our masters, and also by the voice of our
conscience, to do things which sometimes appear,
difficult, or vex, or grieve us. But God no longer
requires us to offer up sacrifices. He only asks us.
to love each other, and help those that are weaker
than ourselves, which is much easier and more agree-
able than killing people and making them suffer pain.
But we have not all Abraham's blessed faith and
obedience.






r
ABRAHAM'S SACRIFICE. 31
; ^--Y---------------------.
.Sometimes it even troubles us to come to the help
"f those who have need of our aid, or to do what
w e do not exactly like, or not to do what we wish;
VfW share what belongs to us with those who are poor,
and even to give them what is necessary, grieves us.
We are unhappy and miserable at being called on for
assistance, and we fear a crowd of evils, and that
takes away all desire of obeying God's commands,-
of fulfilling our duties; and sometimes, alas! in con-
-sequence of this false prudence, we leave them
utnfulfilled.
SIt. is, then, my dear children, that we ought to re-
member, like the patriarch Abraham, that God orders
everything for our good; that He is holier, better,
and wiser than we; and that, if we keep His com-
mandments and obey His voice, though we may not
'understand them, He will care for us, both in ffiis
world and in the next.
























III.

LIGHT.

I HE village of Roseden was a pretty little
place, where lived a number of good,
honest, hard-working people.
It was Christmas-eve : this is a very joyful time to
all, for it is then we celebrate the anniversary of our
Saviour's birth,-that Saviour who, a great many years
ago, came to earth to save the world, under the form
of the little child Jesus, and slept in the arms of His
mother, the gentle Virgin Mary.
Mr Norton had promised to take his children to






LIGHT.


church next day with their mamma; but it would be
no easy matter, for the church was in the town, about
two miles distant, and that was no small walk for
such little legs as Susan's. But neither Susan nor
Frank ever thought of the fatigue, but looked forward
to it all with the greatest of pleasure, and longed for
the time to come.
As you know, my little friends, Christmas-day is on
the twenty-fifth of December, in the very middle of
winter. The days are short, the nights are long: it
rains, it snows, it freezes-but there are beautiful,
clear, frosty nights in December.
Such was this Christmas-eve, and as Frank and
Susan stood at the window, they thought they had
never seen such a lovely night. There was just a
sprinkling of snow on the ground, and it clung to the
bare branches of the naked trees, and made them
look feathery and beautiful; a multitude of stars
shone and glittered like suns; the milky way stretched
from one end of heaven to the other like a river of
brightness; and the moon pursued its course through
the blue vault with not a cloud to dim its brightness.
The brother and, sister stood gazing at the scene for a
few minutes, spell-bound.
"Oh, how beautiful it is!" whispered Frank at
VOL. VI. C






LIGHT.


last. How the stars sparkle and shine they look
at the very least like diamonds or gold."
Just then Susan felt something soft poked into her
hand, and turning round, she saw their good dog
Lion standing by her side.
He is coming to look at the stars, Frank !" said
the little girl. But Lion did not seem to care any-
thing about the stars, and presently stretched himself
on a soft mat at the children's feet.
"Why does he not come and see them?" asked
Susan of her brother.
"Because he is only a dog, and does not care
whether it is dark or light."
"Oh, does he not? I do not like darkness," said
Susan, with a little shudder; "one does not know
where they are going!"
The most beautiful day succeeded this lovely
night, and the children were up and dressed at an
early hour, that they might be ready to go to church
with their papa and mamma; for they had not for-
gotten the promise, and had dreamt of it all night.
The road was a long one, as I told you, but the
little party went briskly along over the crisp snow,
and by and bye the bells came ringing through the
clear air, and made the children feel very happy.






LIGHT


"Come," the bells seemed to say, "come, young
Christians, to the holy Jesus, who was born to save
you!
"It is cold, but you have fire and light, and the
child Jesus had neither, but was born in a humble
stable. Come to Jesus, little ones,-come, come,
come!"
And as the bells spoke thus, they rang as loud
as they could, so that their voice might be heard
all through the country.
At last they arrived at the church. The children
were quite enraptured with the beauty of the wreaths
twined up the large pillars, and the red berries which
came peeping out from behind the dark green leaves,
and the solemn pealing sounds of the organ swelling
through the church.
And while the children admired and prayed, Lion
the dog, who had followed them to church, slept
under the pew, and saw nothing. At last the ser-
vice was ended, the beautiful hymns were sung, and
it was time to return home.
The sun shone in all its splendour, and glittered
so much upon the pure snow that the children were
obliged to put their hands before their eyes. This
bright light of day seemed still more beautiful than






LIGHT.


the night that was past. But Lion walked along at
the children's side quite indifferent to the beautiful
sunshine.
"Why does Lion not like the sun, mamma, and
the beautiful stars?" asked Susan, on their way
home.
Because, my child, Lion is only a dog, and not
a human being."
"But he has eyes, and can see," replied Susan,
still puzzled.
"Yes, dear, he has eyes to see the light, but he
has no soul to understand it," replied the mother.
"0 mamma! I see !" said Susan. "We under-
stand that light comes from heaven, that it belongs
to God, and that He sent it to us, in His goodness,
to save us from darkness."
S"You are quite right, dear; all light comes from
God, both the light of the sun and the light of our
souls,-and that light was brought to the world by
the little child Jesus.
"Try, then, my children, to possess that light
which will chase away all darkness and evil from
your hearts, and fill it with the fear of God, and love
to all mankind.
"To learn is to approach God, who is light and






LIGHT. 37

truth, whilst to remain ignorant is to continue in
that fearful darkness which we know not where it
may lead us.
May God keep you, my children, you and all
mankind, from resembling Lion, our good dog, who
sees no beauty in light, but is content to pass his
life in darkness 1"





















IV.

DOGS AND THEIR USE.

ITTLE Louisa Graham and her cousin Henry
had just finished dinner when they heard
the sounds of music in the street.
"What is that?" exclaimed Henry, who was busy
smoothing his golden curls at the glass.
"0 mamma Henry, come and see," cried
Louisa, who had darted to the open window.
And Mrs Graham and Henry hastened to her,
eager to see what was going on.
A man and a woman stood in the street below,
accompanied by two dancing dogs, the one dressed
as a soldier, the other as a lady.






DOGS AND THEIR USE.


The dancing and dress of the dogs were so ridi-
culous, that the two children laughed heartily as they
looked at them. The soldier-dog was dressed in a
red coat, epaulettes, and a cocked hat; while the
other, which represented a lady, had a long black tail
coming out below its dress.
The man played the fiddle, the woman beat the
drum, and the dogs danced as well as they could.
The passers-by stopped to look, at them, and very
soon there was quite a crowd gathered round, who
all seemed to be highly amused with the performance.
But Mrs Graham did not laugh-she rather seemed
to look sadly at the dogs, as if she pitied them.
"What is the matter, mamma?" asked Louisa;
"do you not like to see these funny dogs?"
I do not think, dear, that they will find much fun
in that," said the mother.
"Do you not think they will like it?" asked
Henry. "But, look how they dance."
"Look also how they stop to rest every now and
then, as if they were tired of remaining on their hind
paws. And see how the man cracks his whip over
them to make them rise and leap to the sound of his
fiddle."
Yes, it is quite true !" said Louisa. "Oh, the






42 DOGS AND THEIR USE.

wicked man! why does he whip the dogs, if they are
tired ?"
But, aunt," said Henry, why do these dogs not
like dancing? Louisa and I are so happy when papa
makes us dance to his violin."
"My dear children, you are happy because you
only dance when you choose, and no one forces you
to do it longer than you please. But with those dogs
it is not so : they are obliged to dance, whether they
like it or not, from morning till evening; and they
are all the more unhappy because God never destined
them for this."
"Did God mean dogs to be of any use?" asked
Henry.
"God has never created anything to be useless or
idle," replied Mrs Graham.
And of what use are dogs ? asked the boy again.
"To serve man," replied the mother.
Henry was only seven years old, but he kept his
eyes open and took notice of everything; and then
he asked many questions of people who were older
than he, and knew more.
But will not those dogs be serving their master
by gaining money for him ?" he asked.
My child," said Mrs Graham, there are many






DOGS AND THEIR USE.


ways of being useful, as there are many ways of em-
ploying the blessings which God has bestowed upon
Us. It is not sufficient for us to profit by what God
has put at our disposal, but we must try to make a
good use of it, and one of which He would approve."
"But in what way does God wish us to make use
of dogs, aunt ? asked Henry.
"He wishes them to be useful according to their
instincts and the faculties with which He has gifted
them. Thus, dogs are, in general, docile, intelligent,
faithful, and attached to their masters. Their delicacy
of smell is so great that they can distinguish the ap-
proach of an enemy or a friend at a great distance.
They are brave and courageous. God has not given
them such precious faculties to lie idle "
Then what good can dogs do ? asked the child
again.
At that moment they heard the sound of a flute
at a little distance, and Mrs Graham looked out of
the window.
"Look, children," said she; "come and look at
this."
The children looked, and saw a poor blind man
led by a dog, which he held by a chain.
The dog carried a little wooden bowl in his mouth,






46 DOGS AND THEIR USE.


which he held out to the passers-by, as if asking alms.
And as his master was old and could not walk quickly,
the good dog went slowly on in front of him, leading
him gently by the chain to keep him out of the gutters,
and all the dangers that presented themselves on their
way.
The children looked and seemed to understand that
this dog was really of some use.
Here is a good dog, which is of great service to
this poor old man !" said Louisa.
This dog," said Mrs Graham, "belongs to a kind
which is, perhaps, the most intelligent of all. They
learn to fetch and carry different things, to open and
shut doors, and I have even seen one which was
taught by its master to play cards, make up sentences
with moveable letters, and perform many wonderful
tricks. It was very strange, even though we saw the
signs by which the master directed the dog. But as
there is no true good results from all that, I like the
blind man's.dog better."
"But, aunt," said Henry, after reflecting a few
moments, "all dogs cannot be employed like that
one, for there are not so many blind men in the
world."
"No, thank God !" replied Mrs Graham, smiling;






DOGS AND THEIR USE.


"so dogs are put to different uses, according to their
species, their strength, and their qualities. There are
some which hunt, some which watch their master's
houses, and some which look after sheep."
"I thought the sheep were looked after by men,
mamma," said Louisa.
"By shepherds?" added Henry.
"Yes, so they are; but a shepherd could not look
after a large flock of sheep, containing some hundreds
of them, if he had not an active dog with him, which
seems to be born for that express purpose. If the
sheep begin to stray from the place where they ought
to feed, the dog places himself before them, and pre-
vents that. If they are scattered, he gathers them
together. If any danger threatens them, the shep-
herd's dog warns his master of it by barking."
And has he no fear ? asked the little Louisa.
"No," replied her mother; "he has no fear. He
is brave because he knows he is doing a good action
in defending the flock."
"I would like to have a shepherd's dog," cried
Henry. "I love them because they are so brave!"
"And what would you do with it?" asked his
aunt.
"Do with it? I would do with it the same as






,48 DOGS AND THEIR USE.

mamma does with her spaniel; I would keep it in
my room and feed it with biscuits, and put a ribbon
round its neck, for me to lead it by when we went
out to walk."
First of all, Henry," said his aunt, eating biscuits
and living in idleness would not suit a shepherd's dog,
who likes work and plain food better than anything.
This dog is large and strong; he is of a dark-brown
colour, mixed with black, and has a large, bushy tail.
He would not be very ornamental in a room: spaniels
are. preferred for pets, because they are little, and have
beautiful long silky hair."
"But spaniels are useful too, are they not, mamma ?"
asked Louisa. "Grandmamma's sleeps at her feet to
warm them, and barks whenever any one comes into
the room."
"Yes, my little daughter, but when grandmamma's
spaniel lies at her feet, it is only thinking of warmihg
itself. They are generally so much spoiled by petting,
that they get jealous and selfish, and will not suffer
any other animal to approach. It is of very little use
as a defence, for, being always shut up, they only
bark when strangers are already in the house; whereas
the watch-dog, for example, warns us of their ap-
proach."







DOGS AND THEIR USE. 49

"Mamma, is that a watch-dog, that great Prince'
which Matthew Bell chains to his cart when he goes
to market?"
"I have never seen it; but tell me what it is like."
"It is very large, and has great feet, a thick tail,
and a big mouth, with its lips hanging over it. I do
not know what like its ears are, because they have
been cut, but it looks very fierce. If any one goes
near the cart to which it is chained, it barks furiously,
and darts out as if it would eat everybody up; but,
fortunately, it cannot get away."
"You have given us the exact description of a
watch-dog, my dear child, and you see how vigilant
it is in keeping and defending its master's property.
It is generally to be found on all farms and in all
solitary houses, for fear of thieves-for a watch-dog is
a terrible enemy of theirs."
*: ," Louisa says that watch-dogs are very large," said
Henry. I have seen the butcher's, and it is a great
deal less than Matthew Bell's."
"The butcher's was a bull-dog," replied Mrsl
Graham; "but he has been obliged to put it away,
because it was so fierce. This kind of dog is often
very dangerous. Their teeth are so strong, that when
they bite they will not let go. There are some
VOL. VI. D






50 DOGS AND HEIR USE.

countries, such as Spain, where the people have a
horrible custom of making animals fight together, and
the bull-dog is sometimes employed in those combats.
It is also used as a watcher; but they are so fierce
and unruly that they are no great favourites."
"There is no use keeping wicked dogs. that will
not learn," added Louisa, wisely.
"Or rather, it is necessary to employ them accord-
ing to their nature," replied her mother; and bull-
dogs are very valuable for hunting."
"What do you say, aunt?" asked Henry. I have
been out hunting, and I know all papa's dogs, and
there is not a bull-dog nor a fierce one among them
all."
"Yes, my boy, perhaps you have been out hunting
rabbits or hares, but you have never been hunting
bears and tigers," said Mrs Graham, smiling.
"I know all uncle's dogs, too," said Louisa. "There
is Bob,' and Mira,' and Victor,' and Pepper.'
Poor Pepper' is very ugly."
"He is no uglier than the rest," said Henry,
anxious to preserve 'Pepper's' dignity; "and if you
only saw how well he hunts! One day a friend of
papa's was out shooting with him. They took
'Pepper' with them to start the hares and partridges,






DOGS AND THEIR USE. 51

and then papa's friend fired his gun; but he always
missed. Then 'Pepper,' tired of hunting with such
an awkward sportsman, sat down and looked at him
so comically, as if he was saying he would have no-
thing more to do with him."
"Yes; but 'Mira' does better," said Louisa.
" Uncle says he can hunt all by himself."
"So he can, he is so swift," replied Henry; "but
he is a different kind from 'Pepper.' When papa
goes to shoot hares and rabbits, he takes 'Pepper;'









C -'






but when he hunts foxes, 'Mira' goes with him,
because he can follow the scent."
How can he do that?" asked Louisa, with some
astonishment.






52 DOGS AND THEIR USE.

"Their scent is so fine, that they can track a fox
by the smell it leaves on the road. Pepper' only
starts the game, but 'Victor' can catch it himself,
and bring it to papa in his mouth."
"Without eating it ?" asked Louisa.
"Yes, without touching it. 'Victor' is a grey-
hound, and very fleet of foot; and though he is so
thin, he is not greedy."
"Would you believe it, children, that this dog,
which looks so thin and emaciated, likes better to
hunt stags, and even wild beasts, than small game ?"
The children looked at their mother.
"But there are no wild beasts now," said the little
girl.
"Are there lions and tigers in our country yet,
aunt?" asked Henry.
No, my child; but there are plenty of them in
Africa, and Victor' belongs to a race of dogs which
come from that country."
Oh, I remember seeing pictures of a lion-hunt,
with dogs in it just. the same as 'Victor,'" cried
Henry.
And soldiers, and frightful black men, with large
guns and white cloaks, which covered them from
head to foot!" added Louisa.







iJDOGS AND .THEIR USE.


"Mamma," asked the child again, "was my pretty
little Gipsy,' that died, one of those greyhounds ? "
"No, my little daughter, Gipsy' was much smaller
and more delicate. Its dispositions were too gentle
to be used for the chase, and its bones were so fragile
that, you remember, it twice broke one of its paws.
Your little terrier was only meant for a plaything."
Had you once a terrier, cousin ?" asked Henry.
"Yes, once," said little Louisa, sadly; "if you had
seen my poor 'Gipsy,' how pretty it was!"
"And what did it die of?"











"It was always cold, because it had no long hair
to keep it warm. Mamma made it a pretty little
blanket of red flannel, and tied it round its body
with a ribbon: One day papa went away to the
country; he was on horseback, and 'Gipsy' followed
him. Unfortunately, it came on to snow; 'Gipsy' got







54 DOGS AND THEIR USE.

tired, and lay down to rest; and, as it was night, papa
thought it was still following him; but next day, they
found my poor 'Gipsy' lying, stiff and cold, near a
hedge !"
"Why did it not run on, instead of lying down ?
that would have kept it warm. Your little 'Gipsy'
must have been lazy!" added the boy, without
observing that he was grieving his cousin by talking
this way, and that her eyes were filled with tears.
It is not to be wondered that the poor little
terrier died of cold; for it did not belong to this
country, but came from Malta, which, you know, is
a little sunny island in the Mediterranean. God has
given to all animals belonging to cold countries
plenty thick fur to protect them,-for instance, the
Alpine dogs, Newfoundland, &c."
"But, aunt, it cannot be very cold in the Alps
surely, for they.lie between France and Italy."
My boy, it is always cold on the top of moun-
tains; so cold that there are some which are con-
tinually covered with snow. One might almost say
that the summits of those mountains are concealed
in snow, and their bases lost in precipices. Many un-
fortunate travellers have lost their way, and perished
in those dangerous paths."







DOGS AND THEIR USE. 55

"How are they dangerous, aunt ?"
"Because very often great masses of snow, called
avalanches, come tumbling and rolling down from
above, and bury all beneath it."
"And is there no one to come and help those
travellers?" asked Louisa, anxiously.
Yes, dear child, it is the Alpine dog which comes
to their help."
"How do they do that?"
On the top of one of those mountains, called
the Great St Bernard, good pious men, full of love
to God and their fellow-creatures, have built a hos-
pice or inn for travellers. They have also brought
up a number of dogs, accustomed to the cold, and
have taught them to go and look for those unfor-
tunate people who have been lost in the snow.
Whenever there has been a storm, or a great wind
to loosen the avalanches, all the dogs set out from
the hospice, and disperse themselves through the
mountains, looking and smelling on every side, and
listening to every sound. They have a little bell
tied round their necks, so that they may be heard,
and a little flask full of brandy, to restore fainting
travellers. When they have smelt any one under
the snow, which they can do even at a great depth,






56 DOGS AND THEIR USE.


they dig and scratch with their paws till they have
discovered him. They lick him and shake him, to
awake him, and if they cannot succeed, they bark
loud enough to let the good monks hear them, and











then they come and carry the traveller to their hos-
pice, and nurse him with the tenderest care."
Oh, how kind they must be !" cried the children,
thinking both of the charitable men and the good
dogs.
"Mamma," asked Louisa, "what are those dogs
like ?"
"They are almost the same size as watch-dogs,
my child, but they have a thoughtful, serious look,
as if they knew all the good work that was before
them. They have also thicker and longer hair than
watch-dogs, as I told you a little while ago in
speaking of dogs which belong to cold countries."







DOGS AND THEIR USE. 57

You spoke of Newfoundland dogs, too, aunt. Is
Mr Wilson's a Newfoundland dog? asked Henry.
"Yes, it is!'
"Does Mr Wilson come from a cold country?"
asked Louisa.
Oh, you foolish little girl!" said Henry, bursting
out laughing; it is not Mr Wilson, but his dog, we
are speaking of."
It is both, my dear children," said Mrs Graham.
"Newfoundland is a large island of North America,
where was first found that species of dog which is
called by the name of their country. Mr Wilson
lived in this island for some little time, and he
brought his dog home with him."
Is it very cold in Newfoundland?" asked
Louisa.
Very cold, indeed; the snow lies on the ground
for six months in the year, and the inhabitants of
Newfoundland are very fortunate in having such good
dogs, which render them so many services."
"What services?" asked Henry.
First of all, they hunt, they draw large loads over
the snow, they serve as couriers to carry letters to
a great distance, and they endure any amount of
fatigue. You have seen Mr Wilson's, with its long






58 DOGS AND THEIR USE.

black and white hair: how large and strong it is,
what big paws it has, and what a large head !"
"And yet it does not look fierce," said Louisa,
"but always wishes to be caressed. The other day
it nearly knocked me down with its embraces!"
"Newfoundland dogs are very affectionate," re-
plied Mrs Graham, and they are also intelligent, de-
voted, and faithful. Mr Wilson once told me a story
which proves they have all those good qualities."
What story ? what story ?" cried both the chil-
dren at once.
"Mr Wilson had two little boys," said Mrs
Graham. "One day two of their companions came
to see them, and brought them a little boat made of
wood, with masts and sails, and a helm just the same
as a real boat; it wanted nothing. The children
immediately set out to make the boat sail on a pond
which was some little distance from the house.
When they reached the water they put their boat in,
but the wind immediately wafted it away into the
middle of the pond, and the little boy to whom it
belonged, fearing that it might go too far, bent over
to take hold of it, but he lost his balance and.fell in.
The three other little boys screamed, and called
for help, but they were too far from the house, and no







DOGS AND THEIR USE.


one heard them. The brother of the boy who had
fallen into the.water threw himself on his knees and
prayed to God to save him.
"But the dog, which had followed the children,
plunged into the pond, seized the child, who had
already disappeared under the water, by his jacket,
and brought him safely to land. You may imagine
how happy the poor children were !"
How fortunate that the dog had learnt to swim,"
said Louisa.
"All dogs swim without ever being taught," said
Mrs Graham, especially Newfoundlands, whose feet
are formed very much like those of ducks and swans,
which naturally belong to the water. But what are
you dreaming about, Henry?" Henry was indeed
looking very thoughtful.
"I was just thinking," said he, "that many of
those good dogs of which you have spoken are more
useful than those which dance; but do you think
they are happier? Do they not work quite as hard ?
That poor dog that we saw sitting at its master's feet,
do you think it will be happy leading a blind man all
day ?"
"It is likely," replied the mother. "See how
eagerly and attentively it fulfils its task. How it






6o DOGS AND THEIR USE.


caresses its master, and seems to love him; whilst
those poor dancers appear to be so tired, and work
only through fear of the whip."
"But," added Henry, "to drag loads, hunt lions,
fight thieves, and save men, must be quite as fatiguing
and more difficult work than dancing on the street "
"Ah! but .what does the difficulty matter, dear
children, if it really belongs to the task which God
has destined us to fulfil? In order to obey the
instinct He has given them, animals will courage-
ously brave all danger and endure suffering. And to
fulfil the duties which are imposed upon him, man,
guided by his conscience, should cheerfully and
patiently submit to the trials and sorrows which are
attached to his existence here.
"You will one day find, dear children, that mis-
fortune-the only true misfortune in this world-is in
disobeying God's holy laws; and the only true happi-
ness is in fulfilling His divine will."


I- (- .. ~,
.I



















V.

THE FISHING PARTY.

W, dear children, to-morrow is Saturday,
and a holiday," said Mrs Egerton, to a
group of little ones. "You have been
very diligent and obedient during the week; you
have fulfilled all your duties like good children, and
it is right that you should reap the reward. To-
morrow is Saturday; how shall we employ it ?"
"Let us go to the Zoological Gardens, mamma "
cried Francis, the youngest boy. "There are so
many strange animals there "
"Oh, yes; the Zoological Gardens!" echoed a
little rosy mouth, belonging to Miss Kate, the eldest
sister, who was just nine years old. "And we shall
see the monkey running up the pole, and the elephant





62 THE FISHING PARTY.

lifting up pins and needles with its long trunk, Oh,
how nice that will be !"
"I would rather go to the circus," said Henry. I
like to see the beautiful horses so much; those ones,
S above all, for they seem to be as clever as their riders."
"You do not remember, dear children, that there
are too many of us to indulge in a pleasure which
would cost so much. We could not all go to the
circus without spending a sum of money which might
be far more usefully employed. In that way, we
would only purchase pleasure for ourselves; whereas
we could buy many things with this money which
might do good to others."
"So we might," said Helen,'sadly. "Well, mam-
ma, what shall we do with our holiday ?"
"Think for yourselves, my children."
"I know !" cried Henry, at last, with a merry
twinkle in his eye. "Papa is going to the fishing to-
morrow. Let us ask if we may go with him !"
Oh, yes, yes; that will be famous fun !" cried all
the little voices at once.
"Yes," said Henry, quite proud at having his idea
so unanimously adopted; "papa goes to the fishing
whenever he pleases, and we never go. I would like
to learn to fish too "






THE FISHING PARTY.


And I and I cried all the children at
once.
That will not cost anything, mamma," said Helen,
wisely.
"No, my daughter; it will not only cost nothing,
but if your papa consents to the plan, as I do not
doubt he will, the produce of your fishing excursion
may be given to a poor family whom you know very
well, and who very seldom have anything but dry
bread to eat."
Oh, yes, mamma !" said Helen; "that will be
the best part of the whole day!"
"It will, at least, be one pleasure more," replied
Henry. "And we will all do our best to catch as
many fish as possible !"
But you must remember that you will have to rise
at five o'clock in the morning Will that not be too
soon for you, dear little dreamers ?"
"What is the use of rising so early for that I" ex-
claimed Victor, crossly. It is not such a very rare
thing to see fishing. I saw plenty of it every day
when I was staying at Hastings."
"Listen cried Henry, "because he saw plenty
of it when he was staying with grandpapa, he thinks
we should not see it at all. Besides, we can go to






64 THE FISHING PARTY

bed immediately after dinner, and so we do not need
to lose any sleep !"
"Oh, yes; we will go to bed after dinner, and get
up with the sun to-morrow morning !"
"We must not forget one thing," said Kate, "and
that is to ask papa's permission."
"I will take charge of that," replied the mother,
"your papa is so kind and so pleased with your good
behaviour and diligence at your work, that I am quite
sure he will grant you the innocent pleasure you have
chosen."
Mr Egerton was indeed quite willing that his chil-
dren should enjoy this treat; and, that no pleasure
might be wanting, mamma promised to join the
party.
The next morning every one was up with daylight.
The sun was already shining brilliantly, for it was in
the middle of July. The birds were singing merrily,
and a gentle breeze floated softly through the air, and
made the green leaves dance and tremble with joy.
All the doors and windows of the neighboring houses
were still closed. Our little friends seemed to be the
only people awake at this early hour. They took pro-
visions for a second breakfast with them; and as those
provisions were intended for all, each little fisher was





THE FISHING PARTY


laden according to his size and strength. Each child
carried a basket, in which there was packed bread, or
wine, or meat, or fruit, and other good things. Papa
took his fishing-basket also, which held all his tackle;
and so, as each one bore part of the common burden,
no one was too heavily laden.
Mamma was the only one who carried nothing.
Neither papa nor the children would allow her to take
care of anything, for they loved her so much, they were
afraid of tiring her.
So the little party set out. Mr Egerton headed the
procession, and led the way, accompanied by his son
Henry, who carried some small nets on his shoulder
to receive the fish, and also lines for himself and his
brothers. At the end of each of those lines hung a
little flat piece of wood, hollowed at both ends, and to
which were attached a long white thread and a little
bit of red cloth. As the line was flexible, the little
bit of wood danced about with every step that Henry
took, which seemed to amuse Francis very much, who
was walking behind with his sisters Kate and Helen,
and who, wishing to be a little man, went along with-
out ever complaining of the length of the road, though
he was the youngest among the young flock.
Mamma brought up the rear with Victor, who was
VOL. VI. E





66 THE FISHING PARTY

not altogether very well pleased at being roused so
early in the morning.
The amusement of fishing seemed to be no plea-
sure to him, for he had lived a whole year with his
grandfather, who lived near a seaport, and there, as
he said, he had seen fishing every day, which had left
anything but an agreeable impression on his memory.
What is the matter with you, Victor? asked his
mother; and why is my little boy so cross ?"
Because I do not want to go to the fishing. Why
could they not have chosen something else, when
they knew I did not like it?"
"But anything else might not have pleased your
brothers and sisters."
But it would have amused me, perhaps," replied
Victor.
"And do you not think that, in that case, your
four brothers and sisters might be as vexed as you are
now ? Is it not better that the greater number should
be pleased? And, besides, would you wish to gratify
your own wishes at the expense of the inclinations of
the others?",
Victor saw how selfish he had been, and to show
that he knew his mamma was right, he gently kissed
the hand he held in his own.






THE FISHING PARTY 67

"Mamma, I will not be cross any more," he said,
raising his beautiful black eyes to her face.
Here is the river Here is the river !" shouted
the children on in front, as they darted to its side.
"Not here, my children; we will not stop here!
Do you not see that this place is too open and too
much frequented? The people passing by would
frighten the fish; so let us go farther on and look for
a quiet spot."
"How would they frighten the fish, papa? Do
fish really know when people come and look into the
water ?"
Of course they do, Francis," replied Kate, for
they have eyes."
And very good eyes too, I can tell you," said Mr
Egerton; "and this advantage is all the more useful
to them, because the light shines less brightly upon
them down in the water than upon us. But this is
not all: if fish see, they can also hear; so speak very
softly now."
Presently they reached a desirable resting-place.
It was on the very border of the river, surrounded by
large trees, whose branches formed a leafy roof which
would perfectly protect them from the rays of the sun,
for in a few hours they would be fierce enough.






68 THE FISHING PARTY.

"Here is a capital place for us," said papa, "so we
will unload ourselves and place the provisions at the
foot of this old oak."
"Will we have breakfast just now?" asked little
Francis.
What would you begin to eat before you work,
my boy? You are going to be a man to-day, and so
you must work for your bread."
It is quite right," said the children, struck with
the justice of this rigorous logic.
To work! to work !" was the call of each; and the
lines were immediately distributed. They commenced
by unwinding the thread from the little pieces of wood.
This thread was half silk and half twisted horse-hair.
It was fastened to a feather by two little knots, and
to this was also attached a small morsel of red cloth.
"What is the use of that ? asked Kate.
"You will see immediately," said her papa; only
have a little patience."
At the end of this line of silk and horse-hair was
another small piece of thread, extremely fine. The
children observed it, and began to fear that it was not
strong enough to draw the fish from the water.
On the contrary," said their papa, "this thread is
stronger than the other. It is formed of the skin of






THE FISHING PARTY 69

the silkworm steeped in the spirit of wine, and pre-
pared in a certain way-mostly at Florence, in Italy.
To this delicate thread was attached a steel hook,
bent and finished off like an arrow, with two points
going in opposite directions.
"Look !" said papa," this little bit of steel is called
the hook. Let each place on it his bait, which will
be detained there, like the fish, by the double hook.
Here is bait of different kinds. In one of these little
boxes there is fly, and in the other worms out of the
ground."
"What! living ?" cried Helen, with a shudder.
"Well, there is bread and cheese too, which may
perhaps suit some tastes better," said Mr Egerton;
"and here is a line which requires no bait at all.
See, the hook is twisted and concealed behind this
little feather, which looks like a water-spider-at least
like enough to attract and deceive the fish."
"I would like one of those, please, papa," said
Helen.
"And me too, papa," added Kate.
"Take them, then; but do you know how to use
them? You must keep the little feather moving and
floating in the water, or the fish will not be deceived
by it."






70 THE FISHING PARTY.


Papa-and the boys put bait on their hooks; all the
lines were thrown into the water; and each one re-
mained silent and attentive.
Victor, who did not care to join in the, sport,
seated himself on the grass beside his mother. He
watched his brothers and sisters, who kept so still
and quiet, and the river, which flowed peacefully
along, its tiny wavelets shining and glittering in the
sunlight like flames. He also watched the little fish
in the transparent water, who, fearing nothing, were
darting about the surface, as if enjoying the heat.
Papa," said Helen, speaking very softly for fear
of frightening the fish,-" Papa, .here is something
pulling at my line, and the hook is dragged away
under the water !"
"It is a fish that has got hold of it," replied "her
father; draw in your line."
Helen drew her line out of the water, and saw a
little struggling fish suspended from it.
"Why does it move about so much, papa ?-is it
suffering any pain ? asked the little girl.
Of course it is, my child, for it is pierce& by the
hook."
0 papa! how sorry I am I I will not fish any
more "






THE FISHING PARTY 71

And now you ought to rest," said Victor, laughing
at his sister, "for you have secured a great prize,-it
is a stock-fish at least !
"No," said his papa, "it is only a gudgeon; but
it is not a bad prize, after all; for, though they are
small, they are very delicate."
"A gudgeon?" said Victor; "I never saw one
when I was at grandpapa's !"
I believe you, my boy, because it is a fresh-water
fish."
"And is the sea not made of fresh water, papa ? "
asked little Francis.
SAt this, Victor gave a great shout of laughter,
which somewhat disconcerted his brother.
"Do not laugh at your brother, Victor," said his
papa, "for there is no shame in being ignorant of a
thing that he has had no opportunity of learning.
Tell him all he wishes to know about it, as you have
nothing else to do."
But, papa, I do not know anything to tell him,"
confessed Victor. "I only know the sea is salt,
because I have tasted it."
"Papa," cried Henry, "I have caught a fish.
Come and help me; it is pulling at my line so ter-
riblyl"






THE FISHING PARTY


"Surely this is something worth your trouble,'
said Mr Egerton, taking his son's rod; and drawing
the line gently in, he soon landed a large fish on
the bank.
"It is a carp," cried Henry. "I recognize it quite
well, for I have seen them in the kitchen at home.
How difficult it is for some beasts to part with life,"
added he, while his father was detaching the carp
from the hook. ".Other fish die whenever they come
out of the water; but the other day I saw a carp
living and jumping about even after it had been cut
into pieces."
"They should be allowed to die in peace," said
Mrs Egerton, "or killed with a blow, rather than be
so tortured."
"That is what I said to the cook, but she said the
fish was better when it was cooked alive."
The fish is quite good, if it is fresh," replied the
mother; "and if we are obliged to kill animals for
our food, we need not torture them to pamper our
selfish tastes."
But why do fish die as soon as they are taken out
of the water?" asked Kate; "for, if we were put
into the water, we could not live."
"Because," said Mr Egerton, "they can only





THE FISHING PARTY.


breathe the air through water, whilst we can only
breathe pure air."
." Do fish breathe the same as we do ?"
"Of course they breathe, or they could not live."
"And have they lungs like ours ?
"No; instead of lungs, they have openings on
each side of the head, called gills. Look at this
carp, for instance; do you see those little brown
borders?"
"Yes."
"Ah, well, those are little tubes through which the
water that the fish swallows, goes, and which keep










back part of the air, as do the lungs of animals living
on land."
While they talked away thus, the fishing continued ;
and there was soon landed upon the grass, in the
little nets, a number of fish of all kinds and sizes;
and each little fisher told what he knew about them.






74 THE FISHING PARTY

Thus they related that the carp is one of the most
sociable of fish, and that it is even possible to tame
it, up to a certain point.
In the time of Charles IX. of France," said papa,
"there was a large basin in front of the palace at
the Louvre full of those fish, and they came darting
forward whenever they were called."
Then Mr Egerton-told the children that the carp
is exceedingly simple in its habits, that it feeds prin-
cipally upon plants and seeds, and that, in winter, it
lies at the bottom of the water for many months,
preferring to do without food rather than make war
upon other fish. The pike, on the contrary, is a dis-
agreeable companion; it devours other fish, and is so
greedy that it is not very particular about what it eats;
so much so, that one day a pike seized hold of the
nose of a horse that was drinking in the river, and
let him take it away out of the water rather than
leave go.
They had also caught a barbel; the children
greatly admired the little barbles it carried in its
mouth; and they were astonished to hear that this
fish grew to such a length that it sometimes
measured six feet.
They likewise- took bream and tench; and they






THE FISHING PARTY


remarked how much they resembled the carp in
appearance, only the scales of the latter are much
larger.
There were perch also; and the children observed
that its back was covered with black stripes, while
its fins were of a reddish hue. Their papa told them
that this fish is as greedy as the pike; that it not
only devours little fish, but very often leaps out of
the water to catch the clouds of flies that hover on
the surface.
They commenced fishing again, for there were all
sorts of fish in this fine river, and all sorts of bait in
papa's little boxes; and by and bye they caught a fish
which was almost bright yellow, streaked and spotted
with brown, about a foot in length, very slender, and
which, when the children wished. to take hold of it,
slipped out of their hands in a moment.
"I know that fish," said the mother. It makes
a very fine and delicate dish. It is called an eel, but
everybody does not appreciate it."
"Oh, how glad I am -" triedd Helen, thinking of
the poor family who were to have the produce of the
fishing. "How nice it will be to have something so
good to give to the little Lamberts "
At last they caught a salmon trout.






76 THE FISHING PARTY.

A salmon trout, papa "cried Victor, with surprise.
"I used to see plenty of them. But you have just told
me that sea-fish do not live in fresh water."
"My child, the salmon trout is indeed a sea-fish:
but it leaves the sea in spring-time, and sometimes
comes very high up the rivers."
"But how does it get into the river?" asked
Helen.
"It enters from the mouth which falls into the sea,
and comes gradually up, sometimes even very near
the source, which is where the river takes its rise."
Then the source is the beginning of a river, and
the sea is the end of it," said Helen.
"Yes; the commencement of a stream or river is
called the source, but the end, or its entrance into
the sea, is called the mouth."
"Did you use to see trout at grandpapa's ?" asked
Kate, turning to Victor.
"Trout, and salmon, and all kinds of things!"
replied Victor. "I have seen enormous tunny, cod,
and sea-eels. They catch the sea-eels with a net; but
when the tide is low, they can get them with the
hand under the stones, where they hide themselves.
I have also seen them fishing for oysters and mussels:
those are sticking like banks to the rocks or on the






THE FISHING PARTY. 77

pebbles of the sea. They detach them with great
rakes, put them into boats, and bring them to land.
The oysters they put into large reservoirs into which
the sea-water flows at every tide, and leave them
there to fatten for eight or ten months, and then they
sell them. I have also seen turbots; and they are
strange fish to look at, for they are flat, round, and
swim on one of their sides, and have two eyes on the
other."
They must be very ugly," said Francis.
"Yes," replied Victor, "but it is so good to eat
that they call the turbot the sea-pheasant."
"I have seen fish very like that in the kitchen,"
.said Kate; "but they were soles and flounders."
S"All the fish there are good," said Victor; "but
there is none of them like turbot."
"And then turbot is much larger, and sells dearer,"
said Mrs Egerton.
I have seen cod," said Henry; but it was only
in a grocer's shop, all cut into pieces and salted into
a barrel. So it would be very difficult for me to say
what like it once was."
And I have seen sardines and anchovies in little
boxes," said Kate.
"Sardines," said her papa, "are caught in great






78 THE FISHING PARTY

abundance on the coasts of France, and there are lots
of anchovies in the Mediterranean."
"And I have seen salt herring," said little Francis.
"And I have seen all those caught!" said Victor,
triumphantly.
"Ah, well, tell us all that you have seenI" cried
his brothers and sisters.
"To table cried the mother, who during this
conversation had laid out the provisions on the grass.
"To table I" echoed the joyous children, relieving
themselves of their lines; and very soon they were all
seated on the turf in a circle round their mother.
The little boys and girls spread their white hand-
kerchiefs on their knees, to serve for table-cloths and
napkins.
They were all very busy and silent for a while, for
a good appetite always follows hard work.
The children were quite delighted at dining in the
open air under those great trees, whose leafy branches
formed a lovely bower of shade in the midst of the
surrounding open country, on which the sun rested
so fiercely.
"And now, Victor, tell us all about the fishing you
saw at Hastings," said Henry to his brother.
The hero was just about to commence his story, and






THE FISHING PARTY 79

his brothers and sisters had all quieted themselves to
listen, when, in the midst of the silence, they heard
from the adjoining meadow a strange croaking cry.
What is that ? asked the children.
"It is a frog," replied their papa. "In general,
frogs do not begin to croak till the evening, but it
appears this one must be a little more active than his
fellows."
"Where is it, do you think, papa? "
"Doubtless among the rushes of some little stream
in the meadow over there."
"They are very ugly beasts, papa! Are they of
any use?"
Yes; they are of great use in some countries, and
the .people go to the streams and marshes and fish
them."
"Fish frogs I and what to do ?" asked Kate, with
no little horror.
"To eat them of course."
"What! does any one eat frogs ? But they are
reptiles, -and they say'frogs are poison."
"Not all of them; and, besides, it is only certain
parts of the animal that are used for food. It is chiefly
in France they are used; and they are considered a
great luxury."


I






80 THE FISHING PARTY.

Do they not fish for crabs too, papa ? "asked a
little one.
"Yes. I have often seen crab-fishing. They catch
them in nets; and on each net they put a piece of
tempting meat for bait, which attracts the crabs, and
so they are enclosed in'the net and carried off."
And that is how they catch shrimps and lobsters
too, papa," said Victor.
Do they fish for those ugly red lobsters ?" asked
Francis, opening his eyes very wide.
Yes; but they are only red after they are cooked,"
said Victor. "When they are living, they are nearly
black."
In the midst of their talk and questions, the children
heard the voices of men and the sound of oars coming
from the other side of the river, and each one turned
to look.
"Those are fishermen," said Mr Egerton, "and
they are going to cast their nets."
"Let us see them let us see them!" cried the
children; and they ran towards the bank.
They saw three men approaching in a small sloop.
Two of them were plying the oars, and the third was
letting a net slip into the water, the other end of which
was being held on the opposite bank by other men.




























































VOL. VI.






THE FISHING PARTY


At one edge of the net were attached balls of lead,
which drew it down in the water, while the other and
topmost edge was kept floating by large pieces of
cork, so that the net was extended vertically in the
river.
The men that guided the boat made it describe a
large circle, dragging the net along with them, and
returning to the place from which they started. Then
they drew the net out of the water, and all the fish
enclosed in the circle were taken.
"Those fishermen rent this part of the river like a
farm," said Mr Egerton.
But in the sea they fish with far larger nets, papa,"
said Victor; "and the men are so funnily dressed.
As they are almost always wet, and do not wish to
take cold, they have great leather boots that come up
nearly to their waist, slouching hats, and blue jackets.
They fish for mackerel also: the little ones are eaten
fresh, but the large ones keep for three months. The
fishermen take away salt in their boats, and they
empty the mackerel in among it whenever they are
caught, or they would spoil and could not be sold."
You are not weary now, Victor," said his mother,
smiling, "because you are occupied in amusing and
pleasing others."







THE FISHING PARTY


Victor understood, and blushed and smiled at the
same time.
"Do they fish for cod too ? asked Henry.
"Yes; but not much," replied Victor.
"The cod," said Mr Egerton, "is found almost
everywhere, but this fish is especially plentiful at
Newfoundland. Sometimes the cod is dried, and
then it is called stock-fish."
"Often they salt it like mackerel," continued Mr
Egerton; "but they cut off the head, open the fish,
and put it into barrels, as you have seen."
"And dried herring, papa, where do they catch
them ?" asked Francis.
"They do not catch dried herring anywhere, my
child; for dried herring are just herring salted and
smoked. They have great quantities of herring in
Holland, where it is a great article of commerce. They
fish them with nets in spring and autumn. Certain
learned men say that at those periods they come down
from the North Seas; others think that they do not
travel, that they only bury themselves at the bottom of
the sea, from where they afterwards rise to the surface
in such numerous shoals that they sometimes smother
one another."
"A herring is such a little thing that I am sure






THE FISHING PARTY 85

there must be plenty room for them in the sea ex-
claimed Victor.
"But then they must choose their place of resi-
dence, like everything else."
"And so they are like people, who leave the beauti-
ful country, and crowd themselves together in a great
city like London !" said Henry.
"I would like to know who was the first fisherman
who thought of salting herring ? said Helen.
"You are quite right to wish information, my
daughter. He was a very useful man, for he has in-
troduced the means of securing people with healthy
and abundant food. He was a Dutchman, and was
called Buckaly. His country raised a monument to
his memory in token of their gratitude; and the
Emperor Charles himself did him honour by visiting
this monument."
"And had Buckaly no other glory than that of
having found out how to salt herring?" exclaimed
Henry.
My son," replied his father, he had no other than
that of having been useful to his fellow-creatures."
"-And that ought to be enough," replied the boy,
reflecting; "for glory ought to proceed from doing
good."







86 THE FISHING PARTY.


In that case," said Victor, those fish which do
evil instead of good, by eating and devouring each
other, must be very wicked."
"Yes," said little Francis; "they should all be
killed-fathers and mothers who eat up their little
children !"
"It is impossible to kill all the fish at once," said
Mr Egerton; "and it would be a piece of great folly,
for it would deprive us of one of the most precious
means of food that God has placed at our disposal."
Ah, well, if we cannot kill all the fish, we will eat
all we can," said Francis.
"You speak of fish, Victor, as if they were men,"
said Mr Egerton. "God has not given them the
same duties as us. If He had, He would also have
given them a soul to love, a mind to lighten their
souls, and a body able to serve it.
"Look at them, and see of how many advan-
tages they are deprived, which we possess. Their
skin, which is covered with scales, cannot feel. They
have neither taste nor smell. Their blood is cold,
and circulates very slowly through their imperfect
hearts. .Their heads are so flat that there is scarcely
room for even the smallest brain. Their lives are, for
the most part, monotonous and solitary. They have






THE FISHING PARTY


no joys, no friendships, no family, nor bonds of so-
ciety; and you think, my children, that those inferior
creatures should perform the same duties as we, who
are favoured by the Creator above all other beings!
No, no; the duties given to each are in proportion to
the intelligence which God has given them to under-
stand them, and the means He has put at their dis-
posal to accomplish them."
"Then, papa," said Kate, "a person who has edu-
cation, health, and fortune must have a great many
more duties than one who is sick or poor."
"You have spoken the truth," replied her papa.
"The more God gives us, the more He expects from
us. The more benefits we have received, the more
good works ought we to do."
The evening came, and the sun went down behind
the trees on the other side of the river. They gathered
together their lines and nets, and the whole family
returned home, and finished the happy holiday by
visiting the poor Lamberts' humble cottage, and
carrying a ray of gladness to it by their kindness.
This was mamma's happy thought, and it had
given a new charm to the holiday, for the little band
had the joyful consciousness that this day had not
been devoted entirely to their own pleasure. Even







88 THE FISHING PARTY.

Victor, who had felt such an ill-used mortal in the
morning, thought their treat had been wisely chosen,
and was glad that his mother had helped him to
sacrifice his own inclinations with cheerfulness to
those of his brothers and sisters-for that evening
he felt that it was more blessed to give than to re-
ceive; and so this holiday was by no means lost.





-A






















VI.

THE FATE OF POOR MARTIN.

" 4 ENRY, Louisa, and Emily, here is the
story I promised you," said Mrs Co-
ventry to her children, one morning:-

THE TWO DRUMS.
One day a gay regimtient passed through the town
of E- with their colours floating behind them in
the breeze, and fifteen drums beating the march, so
as to make the window-panes quiver. A troop of
happy children followed the soldiers. Good little
Willie watched them pass from a window, while
mischievous little Peter gazed at them from the






90 IHE FATE OF POOR MARTIN.

threshold of the little shop where his father mended
old shoes.
All this commotion and noise charmed the two
little boys so much, that as soon as the regiment had
passed, each threw their arms round their mother and
begged her to give him a drum.
"Yes, dear child, you shall have a drum," said
Willie's mother, and she sent her nurse to buy one.
"I have not any drums, my poor child," replied
Peter's mother, "and I have no money to buy one;
you know we are very poor."
"Well, mother," said the child, "give me that old
wooden pail that has neither top nor bottom, and a
piece of paper and some twine, and I will soon make
myself a drum!"
You may take them, my son," said the mother.
Little Peter leapt with joy, and immediately set
himself to work. He stretched the sheet of paper
over the open part of the Wooden vessel, as they
cover a pot of preserves, and fastened it firmly down
all round with the twine.
With a small stick cut in two he made two drum-
sticks, and overjoyed at his success, he hung the
newly-made drum round his neck.
Meanwhile, Willie, charmed with the new toy






THE FATE OF POOR MARTIN. 91

which had just been presented to him, stood before
the window, beating as loud as he could so as to let
Peter hear. But the latter, still happier and prouder
because he had made his plaything himself, kept
saying to himself,
"Wait, you shall hear me too!" and so he com-
menced to play upon his drum.
But alas! at the very first blow, the paper burst,
and the poor child, so joyous a few minutes ago, was
now buried in tears.
0 mother !" said kind, little Willie, who had seen
the misfortune which had just happened to Peter,
"let me take him the pretty drum that you have
given me!"
"It belongs to you, dear child," said the mother,
"and you may do whatever you choose with it."
As soon as this permission was granted, Willie ran
down-stairs, crossed the street, and entered Peter's
house.
See, Peter," said he, "take my drum, take it, and
do not cry any more, for it is yours."
And before Peter had time to thank him, Willie
was off.
He had no drum now, but he heard and saw Peter
playing joyfully on the one he had given him, and




Full Text

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II8 ISAAC'S MARRIAGE. knew that God had heard his prayer, and knelt down to thank and bless Him. Meanwhile Rebecca quickly returned to her mother, and told her all that had passed, and that the traveller had asked if he might lodge in their house. Then Laban, Rebecca's brother, went immediately to seek Eliezer, who was still resting near the well. "Why do you remain here?" he said to him. "Come and lodge in our house, where I have prepared a place to receive you." And he took Eliezer and all his camels into the town. He unloaded the poor animals and gave them food, washed Eliezer's feet, and the feet of the servants that were with him, which was an act of great politeness in that country, where there was so much heat and dust, and so little water. Thus every one was kind and good in Nachor's family, and so Eliezer could tell them without fear what he had come for. He told them that he had been sent by their relative Abraham, and he asked them to give him Rebecca in marriage for Isaac, his master. They asked Rebecca if she was quite willing to be Isaac's wife, and as she consented, her father, mother, -Ar



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The Baldwin Library v FBarida



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Io THE OLD SHEPHERL.. "'Forgive Margaret and me,' I stammered, I thought shepherds-I didn't know they were dressed like you.' "'My dress is certainly not very pretty,' he answered, but one must wear something substantial if they have to pass the night under the stars.' "' Do shepherds stay out in the fields all night ?' I asked with astonishment; those that are dressed in silk, too?' The old shepherd looked at me for a moment and smiled. "'Where have you seen shepherds like that?' he asked. "'In pictures and stories,' said I, 'they are always dressed so beautifully, and the sheep are so white !' "' My child,' said the old shepherd, you may have read that in stories, but they were not true ones. Shepherds dressed in such clothes would be bad keepers of their flocks. Cold would soon carry them off, the sheep would be lost, and-well, the price of wool would rise fast 'Why? "'Because, little one, if the sheep were lost, the fleece would be lost too.'



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58 DOGS AND THEIR USE. black and white hair: how large and strong it is, what big paws it has, and what a large head !" "And yet it does not look fierce," said Louisa, "but always wishes to be caressed. The other day it nearly knocked me down with its embraces !" "Newfoundland dogs are very affectionate," replied Mrs Graham, and they are also intelligent, devoted, and faithful. Mr Wilson once told me a story which proves they have all those good qualities." "What story ? what story ?" cried both the children at once. "Mr Wilson had two little boys," said Mrs Graham. "One day two of their companions came to see them, and brought them a little boat made of wood, with masts and sails, and a helm just the same as a real boat; it wanted nothing. The children immediately set out to make the boat sail on a pond which was some little distance from the house. When they reached the water they put their boat in, but the wind immediately wafted it away into the middle of the pond, and the little boy to whom it belonged, fearing that it might go too far, bent over to take hold of it, but he lost his balance and.fell in. "The three other little boys screamed, and called for help, but they were too far from the house, and no



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THE OLD SHEPHERD. I "' What is the fleece ?' I asked, now quite at my ease. The fleece is the sheep's dress, and after they have used it all winter, to protect them from the cold, it is cut off with a pair of great scissors called shears. The wool which is got in this way is far the best; it takes on the dye better than when it is taken from the skin after death.' "' Do they dye wool?' I asked. "'Of course, they do; and I am sure you will have a dress of black or blue merino, and that you have knitted some pretty little piece of work with worsted of all shades and colours.' "'Yes, we have,' answered Margaret. And she told the shepherd all about our needlework,-of the slippers I had worked for my uncle's birthday, and of the pretty hood Lucy had made for grandmamma. I was surprised to hear that all those things are made from the wool of the sheep, and the old shepherd told me that it is one of the most valuable animals that God has created. "' Sheep are useful for everything,' he said; their wool dresses us from head to foot. They make cloth and flannel from it, and stuff for dresses; shawls and scarfs for ladies, and wool for knitting and embroider-



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54 DOGS AND THEIR USE. tired, and lay down to rest; and, as it was night, papa thought it was still following him; but next day, they found my poor 'Gipsy' lying, stiff and cold, near a hedge !" "Why did it not run on, instead of lying down ? that would have kept it warm. Your little 'Gipsy' must have been lazy!" added the boy, without observing that he was grieving his cousin by talking this way, and that her eyes were filled with tears. "It is not to be wondered that the poor little terrier died of cold; for it did not belong to this country, but came from Malta, which, you know, is a little sunny island in the Mediterranean. God has given to all animals belonging to cold countries plenty thick fur to protect them,-for instance, the Alpine dogs, Newfoundland, &c." "But, aunt, it cannot be very cold in the Alps surely, for they.lie between France and Italy." My boy, it is always cold on the top of mountains; so cold that there are some which are continually covered with snow. One might almost say that the summits of those mountains are concealed in snow, and their bases lost in precipices. Many unfortunate travellers have lost their way, and perished in those dangerous paths."



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4 Virtue &d Yorston. gltnusrateb aakhs for Nbgs. TEE KINGSTON LIBRARY. ThAr volumes, I6mo, with numerous engravings, bound in cloth extra. PFice, per set, $4 501 Separately, . $ 50 T. Foxholme Hall: a Legend of Christmas, and other Amusing Tales for Boys. By W. H. G. KINGSTON. Thirty Illustrations. II. The Pirate's Treasure: a Legend of Panama, and other Tales for Boys. By W. H. G. KINGSTON. Thirty-three Illustrations. II. The Perils and Adventures of Harry Skipwith. By W. H. G. KINGSTON. Numerous Illustrations. THE NOW OR NEVER LIBRARY. (Uniforrm with the Kingston Library.) Three volumes, I6mo, beautifully illustrated, cloth extra. Price, per set, . $4 50 Separately, . 50 Now or Never; or, The Trials and Perils of Frederick Lonsdale. By CHARLES A. BEACH, Author of "Lost Leonore," &c. Numerous Illustrations. IiL Tales of Many Lands. By M. FRASER TYTLER. Numerous Illustrations. III. Grecian Stories. By MARIA HACK. New Edition, with Eight Illustrations. "MEN WHO HAVE RISEN" LIBRARY. Four volumes, i6mo, illustrated, cloth extra. Price, per set, $6 oo Separately, . 50 Men who have Risen: a Book for Boys. With Eight Illustratrations, printed on toned paper. Small Beginnings; or, The Way to Get On. With Eight Illustrations, printed on toned paper. TiT. The Steady Aim: a Book of Examples and Encouragements from Moden Biography. By W. H. DAVENPORT ADAMS. With Eight Illustrations, printed on toned paper. Iv. Famous London Merchants: a Book for Boys. With Twentyfour Illustrations. By H. R. Fox BOURNE, Author of "Merchant Princes of England."



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THE OLD SHEPHERD. 13 was then only a little keeper, as he said. But afterwards he became a soldier. Do you remember the regiment of Hussars we saw the other day? Their horses had saddle-cloths, which looked like fur. Well, old Daniel says, they are all made from sheep-skin, and that it is called Astracan, because the manufacture of it was first learnt from a town in Persia which bears that name. In travelling from place to place with his regiment, old Daniel learnt a great deal, as he said. In the south of France there were a great many sheep with very fine wool; and in a mountainous country near the Pyrenees there were sheep with wool finer than all the rest, and they were called Merino. It was a learned naturalist called Daubenton who brought them from Spain many years ago. "In Gascony Daniel saw another kind of sheep, but they were not pretty. They were black, and had a great deal of very coarse wool, which is used for making mattresses and some other things. But they are very useful to the inhabitants of the country, and to the shepherds, who sleep on their skins, and dress themselves in them from head to foot, which makes them look like so many wild beasts. Another curious



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42 DOGS AND THEIR USE. wicked man why does he whip the dogs, if they are tired ?" But, aunt," said Henry, why do these dogs not like dancing? Louisa and I are so happy when papa makes us dance to his violin." "My dear children, you are happy because you only dance when you choose, and no one forces you to do it longer than you please. But with those dogs it is not so: they are obliged to dance, whether they like it or not, from morning till evening; and they are all the more unhappy because God never destined them for this." "Did God mean dogs to be of any use ?" asked Henry. "God has never created anything to be useless or idle," replied Mrs Graham. And of what use are dogs ? asked the boy again., "To serve man," replied the mother. Henry was only seven years old, but he kept his eyes open and took notice of everything; and then he asked many questions of people who were older than he, and knew more. But will not those dogs be serving their master by gaining money for him ?" he asked. "My child," said Mrs Graham, there are many



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io6 THE FATE OF POOR MARTIN. "From that day poor Martin was quite happy. The little cart had four wheels, and so there was no weight on his back, and he dragged it easily. The musician, who had suffered a great deal himself from fatigue, hunger, and sickness, had more feeling for the poor ass, and took better care of it. He had neither hay nor corn to give it, but he let it eat the grass as they went along the road; and as the ass is as simple in its food as it is brave in working and patient in difficulties, the least bunch of grass satisfied it. The only thing it was particular about was the purity of the water it drank, for it would rather want than take water which was not perfectly clean. Sometimes, if they had a good days' work, the poor musicians would each give a mouthful of bread to the ass, and it was a great pleasure for the whole family to see how much Martin enjoyed them, for they loved it as a companion and friend.



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I. THE OLD SHEPHERD. ERE you are, my little children, returned from your holidays," said Mrs Templeton to a smiling group of little ones; and now you must each relate your adventures in turn." Oh, yes, yes," cried all the children at once, "we will tell grandmamma all our adventures VOL. VI. A



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CONTENTS. PAGE I. THE OLD SHEPHERD, . I II. ABRAHAM'S SACRIFICE, . . 22 III. LIGHT, . . 32 IV. DOGS AND THEIR USE, . 40 V. THE FISHING PARTY, .. 61 VI. THE FATE OF POOR MARTIN, . 89 VII. ISAAC'S MARRIAGE, . 09



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ISAAC'S MARRIA GE. II9 and brothers gave their consent also. Then Eliezer displayed the presents he had brought with him. There were rich robes which he gave to Rebecca, and jewels and vases of gold and silver,-for the land of Canaan produced, and still produces, many precious metals. Eliezer divided those fine things among the' different members of the family, in behalf of their relative Abraham; then, being anxious to return, he said farewell and departed, very happy to take back to his master such a good wife as Rebecca. Abraham and Isaac awaited the return of their servant very impatiently. One evening, the work and toil of the day being over, Isaac went out to walk in the direction by which Eliezer should return. He was alone, and walked along with his eyes bent on the ground, like one thinking and reflecting very deeply. All at once he looked up and saw the camels coming in the distance. Rebecca also perceived Isaac, and asked of the servant"Who is that man coming out to meet us ?" "It is my master's son," replied Eliezer. Eliezer immediately advanced to meet Isaac, and gave him





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II. ABRAHAM'S SACRIFICE. OU know, my dear children, that when Noah and his family came out of the Ark, after the deluge, they found the earth quite devoid of inhabitants, for they had all been drowned, and so they separated, and Noah and his sons went in different directions. Shem, Ham, and Japheth had many children, who became the centres or founders of new tribes, and were, in their turn, called patriarchs, which means, chief of a house or father of a family. One of the descendants from the family of Shem was called Abraham. He dwelt in a town called Haran. He was a married man, and had great flocks and herds; and altogether Abraham seems to have been very happy in that country. Abraham had been accustomed, ever since he was



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V. THE FISHING PARTY. i OW, dear children, to-morrow is Saturday, and a holiday," said Mrs Egerton, to a group of little ones. "You have been very diligent and obedient during the week; you have fulfilled all your duties like good children, and it is right that you should reap the reward. Tomorrow is Saturday; how shall we employ it ?" Let us go to the Zoological Gardens, mamma cried Francis, the youngest boy. "There are so many strange animals there "Oh, yes; the Zoological Gardens!" echoed a little rosy mouth, belonging to Miss Kate, the eldest sister, who was just nine years old. "And we shall see the monkey running up the pole, and the elephant



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I4 THE OLD SHEPHERD. thing about those shepherds of the Landes is, that they are obliged to mount on stilts higher than themselves to lead their flocks. They have often to cross such wide plains of sand, and thicket or marsh, that they would be very much at a loss without their stilts. I cannot remember all that old Daniel told me about them. I wish you could hear him yourselves." "Go on, go on," said Arthur; "we are just as pleased to have it from you." "He told me, also," continued Flora, "that with the fat of sheep they make tallow, from which candles are afterwards made. When Daniel was tired of being a soldier, he got a situation in a manufactory where they made all kinds of woollen stuffs. Unfortunately he was one day caught by one of the wheels of the machinery, and got his shoulder blade and arm broken, which disabled him for work for the rest of his life. But Daniel was not a man to turn a beggar, and so he resolved to become a shepherd once more. So he returned to his old trade, though he had not been accustomed to its hardships for long. "I asked him why he stayed all night in the fields.



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LIGHT. 37 truth, whilst to remain ignorant is to continue in that fearful darkness which we know not where it may lead us. May God keep you, my children, you and all mankind, from resembling Lion, our good dog, who sees no beauty in light, but is content to pass his life in darkness 1"



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THE FISHING PARTY 6 5 laden according to his size and strength. Each child carried a basket, in which there was packed bread, or wine, or meat, or fruit, and other good things. Papa took his fishing-basket also, which held all his tackle; and so, as each one bore part of the common burden, no one was too heavily laden. Mamma was the only one who carried nothing. Neither papa nor the children would allow her to take care of anything, for they loved her so much, they were afraid of tiring her. So the little party set out. Mr Egerton headed the procession, and led the way, accompanied by his son Henry, who carried some small nets on his shoulder to receive the fish, and also lines for himself and his brothers. At the end of each of those lines hung a little flat piece of wood, hollowed at both ends, and to which were attached a long white thread and a little bit of red cloth. As the line was flexible, the little bit of wood danced about with every step that Henry took, which seemed to amuse Francis very much, who was walking behind with his sisters Kate and Helen, and who, wishing to be a little man, went along without ever complaining of the length of the road, though he was the youngest among the young flock. Mamma brought up the rear with Victor, who was VOL. VI. E



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THE OLD SHEPHERD. 3 "So that they might have a bath even while they were sleeping," interrupted Arthur, mockingly. It must have-been very pleasant indeed "It all sounded-so pretty," continued Flora, that I could dream of nothing but of being a shepherdess. "What increased my wish more than ever was a painting which hung above the door of papa's library, which represented shepherds dressed in rose-coloured silk; shepherdesses, with flowers in their hair and wreaths round their large straw hats, silk stockings and kid shoes, and holding crooks in their hands, ornamented with lovely bouquets. Their sheep were so white and beautiful too They rested peacefully along with the dog at their mistresses' feet, and seemed to be listening to the sweet sounds of music which came floating on the breeze. You may imagine how delighted I was when mamma told me that my uncle had a great many shepherds and sheep, and that it was a very beautiful part of the country where he lived. I had scarcely arrived at the Glen before I asked my little cousin Margaret, who is only eight years old, to show me the flocks. Margaret went and asked my uncle, and he promised to take me next day to where they were feeding.



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104 THE FATE OF POOR MARTIN. 'sell me this wicked beast at a fair price, and I will soon checkmate him !'" Ah, the wicked miller was going to beat the poor ass !" said Henry. "He not only beat it, my son, but he made it carry enormous loads. The millers sometimes go into the country to buy sacks of corn to grind into flour, and for this purpose they often employ donkeys, if they cannot afford a horse. And it was for this work, which was far too heavy for it, that the old miller destined Martin. He put two or three sacks of grain on his back at once, till poor Martin's trembling limbs could hardly support him; but far from having mercy upon him, the careless miller increased this already heavy load, by adding his own weight to it, and there he would sit on the top of the sacks, smoking his pipe, and giving the ass great blows every now and then to make it hasten its speed. "At last, one day the poor ass, worn out and exhausted, fell down beneath its burden. Its master was obliged to unload it before it could rise, and then he saw that its knees were broken, its sides bruised, and that the blood was trickling from its nostrils; in short, the miller was afraid it was going to die.



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ABRAHAM'S SA CRIE1CE. 25 the land of Canaan. During the journey, God, who was pleased with Abraham's prompt and unquestioning obedience, spoke to him many times. "I will give you all this country," said God to the patriarch one day; "and I will give you a son who will be the father of a great nation. And your children, and your children's children, will be so numerous that they shall be like the stars of heaven in multitude !" Abraham thanked the Lord for those gracious promises, and he built altars to Him in testimony of his gratitude; and he continued to obey the Lord t all things. At last, God gave Abraham and Sarah his wife the son that He had so often promised them, an event which was hailed with great rejoicing in the patriarch's family. This little boy was called Isaac. I cannot tell you how much he was beloved by Abraham and Sarah. All parents love their children, and you know that, little ones. But Abraham and Sarah had only this one little son; and they had waited for him such a long, long time; and then he was to become the father of such a mighty people In those days it was considered a glory to have many children, and Abraham and Sarah loved Isaac all the more for those motives.



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I



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LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. PAGE THE SHEPHERD, 8 ABRAHAM'S HAND STAYED BY THE ANGEL, 28 DANCING DOGS, 40 A BEGGING CUR,. 44 FISHERMEN, . . . 82 POOR MARTIN, 99 REBECCA BY THE WELL, 116



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26 ABRAHAM'S SACRIFICE. However, one day, when Isaac was still very young, God called his father to Him. "Abraham Abraham!" He said. "Here I am, my Lord," replied the patriarch; and the Lord said unto him"Take your son, your only son Isaac, who is so dear to you; and bring him up to the mountain, and offer him to me as a burnt-offering To offer Isaac as a burnt-offering was to kill him, andifterwards burn his body like a heap of wood. To kill Isaac, his dear and only child! this son who, according to God's promise, was to grow old and be the father of a great nation. Was it not for this that God had made Abraham leave his country, that He had led him through so many toils and fatigues, to this distant land of Canaan, which He had promised to give to him and his children? And now God tells him to kill Isaac! the only son of Abraham and Sarah! How would all this happiness, 'promised by God, come to pass, if Isaac were killed ? What would become of this numerous people,-this posterity which was to equal the stars of heaven in multitude? Were God's promises about to fail? All that seems very strange to us! Some might even think God wicked to command a father to kill



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DOGS AND THEIR USE. 57 You spoke of Newfoundland dogs, too, aunt. Is Mr Wilson's a Newfoundland dog? asked Henry. "Yes, it is.' "Does Mr Wilson come from a cold country?" asked Louisa. "Oh, you foolish little girl!" said Henry, bursting out laughing; it is not Mr Wilson, but his dog, we are speaking of." "It is both, my dear children," said Mrs Graham. "Newfoundland is a large island of North America, where was first found that species of dog which is called by the name of their country. Mr Wilson lived in this island for some little time, and he brought his dog home with him." "Is it very cold in Newfoundland?" asked Louisa. "Very cold, indeed; the snow lies on the ground for six months in the year, and the inhabitants of Newfoundland are very fortunate in having such good dogs, which render them so many services." "What services?" asked Henry. "First of all, they hunt, they draw large loads over the snow, they serve as couriers to carry letters to a great distance, and they endure any amount of fatigue. You have seen Mr Wilson's, with its long



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34 LIGHT. last. How the stars sparkle and shine they look at the very least like diamonds or gold." Just then Susan felt something soft poked into her hand, and turning round, she saw their good dog Lion standing by her side. He is coming to look at the stars, Frank !" said the little girl. But Lion did not seem to care anything about the stars, and presently stretched himself on a soft mat at the children's feet. "Why does he not come and see them?" asked Susan of her brother. "Because he is only a dog, and does not care whether it is dark or light." "Oh, does he not? I do not like darkness," said Susan, with a little shudder; "one does not know where they are going !" The most beautiful day succeeded this lovely night, and the children were up and dressed at an early hour, that they might be ready to go to church with their papa and mamma; for they had not forgotten the promise, and had dreamt of it all night. The road was a long one, as I told you, but the little party went briskly along over the crisp snow, and by and bye the bells came ringing through the clear air, and made the children feel very happy.



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THE F ATE OF POOR MARTIN 93 long way before they are milked, so that the invalid may receive it fresh and warm from the animal." "Oh, how tired the pretty little ass must be following its mother so far!" said Louisa. "Did you notice, mamma, that they put an ugly piece of leather across its mouth, covered with bristles-what was that for?" It is to prevent the young ass drinking its mother's milk, which is sold so dear; so that the poor little ass is deprived of the nourishment which God had destined for its use, for the sake of gain." "Poor little thing," said Emily, "it must be very unhappy." "Alas! my daughter, this is only the first of its many misfortunes; for though the ass is very obliging and serviceable, and has many precious qualities, yet its whole life seems to be one of suffering and



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68 THE FISHING -PAR TY "Here is a capital place for us," said papa, "so we will unload ourselves and place the provisions at the foot of this old oak." "Will we have breakfast just now?" asked little Francis. What would you begin to eat before you work, my boy ? You are going to be a man to-day, and so you must work for your bread." "It is quite right," said the children, struck with the justice of this rigorous logic. "To work! to work !" was the call of each; and the lines were immediately distributed. They commenced by unwinding the thread from the little pieces of wood. This thread was half silk and half twisted horse-hair. It was fastened to a feather by two little knots, and to this was also attached a small morsel of red cloth. What is the use of that ? asked Kate. "You will see immediately," said her papa; only have a little patience." At the end of this line of silk and horse-hair was another small piece of thread, extremely fine. The children observed it, and began to fear that it was not strong enough to draw the fish from the water. On the contrary," said their papa, "this thread is stronger than the other. It is formed of the skin of





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THE FISHING PARTY 83 At one edge of the net were attached balls of lead, which drew it down in the water, while the other and topmost edge was kept floating by large pieces of cork, so that the net was extended vertically in the river. The men that guided the boat made it describe a large circle, dragging the net along with them, and returning to the place from which they started. Then they drew the net out of the water, and all the fish enclosed in the circle were taken. "Those fishermen rent this part of the river like a farm," said Mr Egerton. But in the sea they fish with far larger nets, papa," said Victor; "and the men are so funnily dressed. As they are almost always wet, and do not wish to take cold, they have great leather boots that come up nearly to their waist, slouching hats, and blue jackets. They fish for mackerel also: the little ones are eaten fresh, but the large ones keep for three months. The fishermen take away salt in their boats, and they empty the mackerel in among it whenever they are caught, or they would spoil and could not be sold." You are not weary now, Victor," said his mother, smiling, "because you are occupied in amusing and pleasing others."







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84 THE FISHING PARTY Victor understood, and blushed and smiled at the same time. "Do they fish for cod too ? asked Henry. "Yes; but not much," replied Victor. "The cod," said Mr Egerton, "is found almost everywhere, but this fish is especially plentiful at Newfoundland. Sometimes the cod is dried, and then it is called stock-fish." "Often they salt it like mackerel," continued Mr Egerton; "but they cut off the head, open the fish, and put it into barrels, as you have seen." "And dried herring, papa, where do they catch them?" asked Francis. "They do not catch dried herring anywhere, my child; for dried herring are just herring salted and smoked. They have great quantities of herring in Holland, where it is a great article of commerce. They fish them with nets in spring and autumn. Certain learned men say that at those periods they come down from the North Seas; others think that they do not travel, that they only bury themselves at the bottom of the sea, from where they afterwards rise to the surface in such numerous shoals that they sometimes smother one another." "A herring is such a little thing that I am sure



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86 THE FISHING PARTY. In that case," said Victor, those fish which do evil instead of good, by eating and devouring each other, must be very wicked." "Yes," said little Francis; "they should all be killed-fathers and mothers who eat up their little children !" "It is impossible to kill all the fish at once," said Mr Egerton; "and it would be a piece of great folly, for it would deprive us of one of the most precious means of food that God has placed at our disposal." "Ah, well, if we cannot kill all the fish, we will eat all we can," said Francis. "You speak of fish, Victor, as if they were men," said Mr Egerton. "God has not given them the same duties as us. If He had, He would also have given them a soul to love, a mind to lighten their souls, and a body able to serve it. "Look at them, and see of how many advantages they are deprived, which we possess. Their skin, which is covered with scales, cannot feel. They have neither taste nor smell. Their blood is cold, and circulates very slowly through their imperfect hearts. Their heads are so flat that there is scarcely roomfor even the smallest brain. Their lives are, for the most part, monotonous and solitary. They. have



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76 THE FISHING PARTY. "A salmon trout, papa! "cried Victor, with surprise. "I used to see plenty of them. But you have just told me that sea-fish do not live in fresh water." "My child, the salmon trout is indeed a sea-fish: but it leaves the sea in spring-time, and sometimes comes very high up the rivers." "But how does it get into the river?" asked Helen. It enters from the mouth which falls into the sea, and comes gradually up, sometimes even very near the source, which is where the river takes its rise." "Then the source is the beginning of a river, and the sea is the end of it," said Helen. "Yes; the commencement of a stream or rivet is called the source, but the end, or its entrance into the sea, is called the mouth." "Did you use to see trout at grandpapa's ?" asked Kate, turning to Victor. "Trout, and salmon, and all kinds of things!" replied Victor. "I have seen enormous tunny, cod, and sea-eels. They catch the sea-eels with a net; but when the tide is low, they can get them with the hand under the stones, where they hide themselves. I have also seen them fishing for oysters and mussels: those are sticking like banks to the rocks or on the



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N. / lllqlI'Il cI



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36 LIGHT. the night that was past. But Lion walked along at the children's side quite indifferent to the beautiful sunshine. "Why does Lion not like the sun, mamma, and the beautiful stars?" asked Susan, on their way home. "Because, my child, Lion is only a dog, and not a human being." "But he has eyes, and can see," replied Susan, still puzzled. "Yes, dear, he has eyes to see the light, but he has no soul to understand it," replied the mother. mamma! I see !" said Susan. "We understand that light comes from heaven, that it belongs to God, and that He sent it to us, in His goodness, to save us from darkness." "You are quite right, dear; all light comes from God, both the light of the sun and the light of our souls,-and that light was brought to the world by the little child Jesus. "Try, then, my children, to possess that light which will chase away all darkness and evil from your hearts, and fill it with the fear of God, and love to all mankind. "To learn is to approach God, who is light and



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THE OLD SHEPHERD. 15 "He -said, 'It was often necessary to feed the flock in places too far from the folds to take them back every evening.' "'But do the sheep not wander at night ?' I asked. "'Not at all,' replied Margaret, who seemed to know all about those things. 'Sheep very seldom scatter from each other; then they are enclosed between those hedges which you see there. Do you think Star would let the sheep go away? You do not know him."' "Who was Star?" asked Lucy. The shepherd's dog," replied Flora. Margaret pointed out to me how he ran to the right and to the left to watch the flock while his master talked with us. And to let me see how vigilant he was, she tried to make him leave his work by calling him. But the dog only wagged his tail in token of recognition, and attended to his business. "' My good dog,' said the shepherd, he is always brave and faithful; he would defend the whole flock if a fox appeared.' "'Can sheep not defend themselves ?' I asked. "' They have no means of defending themselves,' replied the shepherd; 'their teeth are not made for biting, like those animals which live on flesh. Sheep I



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DOGS AND THEIR USE. 47 "so dogs are put to different uses, according to their species, their strength, and their qualities. There are some which hunt, some which watch their master's houses, and some which look after sheep." "I thought the sheep were looked after by men, mamma," said Louisa. "By shepherds?" added Henry. "Yes, so they are; but a shepherd could not look after a large flock of sheep, containing some hundreds of them, if he had not an active dog with him, which seems to be born for that express purpose. If the sheep begin to stray from the place where they ought to feed, the dog places himself before them, and prevents that. If they are scattered, he gathers them together. If any danger threatens them, the shepherd's dog warns his master of it by barking." And has he no fear ? asked the little Louisa. "No," replied her mother; he has no fear. He is brave because he knows he is doing a good action in defending the flock." "I would like to have a shepherd's dog," cried Henry. "I love them because they are so brave!" "And what would you do with it?" asked his aunt. "Do with it? I would do with it the same as



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ISAAC'S MARRIA GE. II7 "Drink," said she. And taking the pitcher from her shoulder, she held it for Eliezer to drink. After he had quenched his thirst, she added"I will now draw water for your camels, that they may drink also."' So saying, she filled the stone basins, which were intended for his flock to drink out of, with water, and Eliezer's camels were very soon refreshed. So much kindness and benevolence had been displayed by Rebecca, that, Eliezer no longer doubted but that she was the wife the Lord had destined for his master Isaac. So he took some bracelets and ear-rings of gold from among the presents he had brought with him, and offered them to Rebecca, saying"Whose daughter art thou? Is there any room in thy father's house where I may lodge ?" I am the granddaughter of Nachor, and there is plenty room inmy father's house for you, and straw and grass for your camels," said Rebecca. What, then! Rebecca was the granddaughter of Nachor, Abraham's brother ? So it was even to his master's own kindred that God had conducted Eliezer! The pious servant



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THE FA TE OF POOR MARTIN 9 1 which had just been presented to him, stood before the window, beating as loud as he could so as to let Peter hear. But the latter, still happier and prouder because he had made his plaything himself, kept saying to himself, "Wait, you shall hear me too and so he commenced to play upon his drum. But alas! at the very first blow, the paper burst, and the poor child, so joyous a few minutes ago, was now buried in tears. "0 mother !" said kind, little Willie, who had seen the misfortune which had just happened to Peter, "let me take him the pretty drum that you have given me!" "It belongs to you, dear child," said the mother, "and you may do whatever you choose with it." As soon as this permission was granted, Willie ran down-stairs, crossed the street, and entered Peter's house. See, Peter," said he, "take my drum, take it, and do not cry any more, for it is yours." And before Peter had time to thank him, Willie was off. He had no drum now, but he heard and saw Peter playing joyfully on the one he had given him, and



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DOGS AND THEIR USE. 51 and then papa's friend fired his gun; but he always missed. Then 'Pepper,' tired of hunting with such an awkward sportsman, sat down and looked at him so comically, as if he was saying he would have nothing more to do with him." "Yes; but 'Mira' does better," said Louisa. Uncle says he can hunt all by himself." "So he can, he is so swift," replied Henry; "but he is a different kind from 'Pepper.' When papa goes to shoot hares and rabbits, he takes 'Pepper;' ~ -.. 'c. but when he hunts foxes, 'Mira' goes with him, because he can follow the scent." "How can he do that?" asked Louisa, with some astonishment.



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III. LIGHT. BSSI^HE village of Roseden was a pretty little Adlz place, where lived a number of good, honest, hard-working people. It was Christmas-eve: this is a very joyful time to all, for it is then we celebrate the anniversary of our Saviour's birth,-that Saviour who, a great many years ago, came to earth to save the world, under the form of the little child Jesus, and slept in the arms of His mother, the gentle Virgin Mary. Mr Norton had promised to take his children to



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DOGS AND. THEIR USE. 41 The dancing and dress of the dogs were so ridiculous, that the two children laughed heartily as they looked at them. The soldier-dog was dressed in a red coat, epaulettes, and a cocked hat; while the other, which represented a lady, had a long black tail coming out below its dress. The man played the fiddle, the woman beat the drum, and the dogs danced as well as they could. The passers-by stopped to look, at them, and very soon there was quite a crowd gathered round, who all seemed to be highly amused with the performance. But Mrs Graham did not laugh-she rather seemed to look sadly at the dogs, as if she pitied them. "What is the matter, mamma?" asked Louisa; "do you not like to see these funny dogs?" I do not think, dear, that they will find much fun in that," said the mother. "Do you not think they will like it?" asked Henry. But, look how they dance." "Look also how they stop to rest every now and then, as if they were tired of remaining on their hind paws. And see how the man cracks his whip over them to make them rise and leap to the sound of his fiddle." Yes, it is quite true !" said Louisa. "Oh, the



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U' 4. IV. DOGS AND THEIR USE. ITTLE Louisa Graham and her cousin Henry had just finished dinner when they heard the sounds of music in the street. "What is that?" exclaimed Henry, who was busy smoothing his golden curls at the glass. 0 mamma Henry, come and see," cried Louisa, who had darted to the open window. And Mrs Graham and Henry hastened to her, eager to see what was going on. A man and a woman stood in the street below, accompanied by two dancing dogs, the one dressed as a soldier, the other as a lady.



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1 O ISAAC'S MARRIAGE. which often torment us, and of which you have not yet any idea, happy little children. So Isaac lived and grew up to be a man. You may be sure he profited by his old father's good example. Like him, he loved God; and like him, he also served Him; for what would loving God be without serving Him too? Isaac was made the shepherd of Abraham's flocks; he also cultivated the earth and sowed corn in the land of Canaan, where Abraham had established himself according to God's will. In short, Isaac was now a man, and so heworked. Unfortunately, as soon as children grow up, their parents begin to get old; as their children grow strong they grow feeble, and it is their turn to be cared for and nursed with love and tenderness. If this is the case, a-parent's old age is not so very sad; they are rewarded for the work of their whole life, and they die blessing the children who have loved them to the last. It was thus that Isaac's mother died, Abraham's wife, Sara, who loved this only son, whom God had given her, so tenderly. Abraham and Isaac wept and mourned for her very bitterly. Isaac became very sad, and Abraham, 9*L



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96 2THE FATE OF POOR MARTIN. day of rest, rolled himself on the grass, and refreshed himself as much as he could after his painful work during the week; then when the time to go back to the stable had come, he called his master. You know the singular cry an ass gives." "Oh yes, mamma; they make a loud braying noise," said Henry. "Exactly; and at this call the farmer came, and led his ass to the stable. "One day, a juggler, who was going about the country, came to the farmer's house, and begged hospitality, which was granted to him. "This juggler gained his living by performing clever tricks. He made pennies and eggs disappear from their places, and made them reappear where they had never been put" "And did people give him money for that?" asked Henry, "and were his tricks difficult to do?" "Nothing is more simple, my child; but ignorant people are easily surprised, and their purses always pay for their ignorance. "The juggler was at the farmer's house, then, when suddenly the ass brayed, and the farmer said to his wife-



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12 THE OLD SHEPHERD. ing. They make also carpets for rooms, damask for curtains, and fringes of all kinds. The Arabs of Africa have nothing else to make their clothing from. "' Sheep give milk also, from which is made cheese, and even butter, as well as from the milk of the cow. But this is not all. When the animal is dead, parchment is made from its skin, or it is dyed green, red, black, or yellow, and prepared as they do in the kingdom of Morocco in Africa, and transformed into morocco for shoes, portfolios, and for the binding of books; into leather for making whips, saddles, bridles, and little balls for children.'" Your shepherd must have been a learned man !" interrupted Arthur. "Yes; for while he watched the sheep, he learnt their history," said Flora. "Besides he had not always been a shepherd, though he commenced this work when he was only seven or eight years old; but he



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THE OLD SHEPHERD. 19 "On the contrary, he was so good, and answered all our questions with so much kindness, that I began to love him as much as my little cousin Margaret did. I pitied this poor man very much when I thought of him spending the night in the fields, and I would have liked to send him my pelisse and muff to keep him warm. I could not help telling him how sorry I was for him, and then he took my hand, and said"' My good little girl, do not pity me too much; the trade of a shepherd is indeed a laborious one; it requires robust health, and is not a thing which makes one rich. But the worst of it is, shepherds live so isolated, away up among the hills and the heather for days, only returning home to snatch a hurried meal and a few hours' rest. When the weather is bad, I shelter myself in this little hut, from which I can easily watch the flock. Then I have two faithful friends, which make amends for all my trouble-a book, which makes the hours grow shorter and shorter every day, and the good God above, who allows me to admire the works of His hands spread around me, above -all, the beautiful heaven, with its myriads of glittering stars.' "'The stars are very beautiful,' said Margaret;



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ABRAFAM'S SACRIFICE. 29 :t his child. It seems, at the first glance, unjust to A* pomand the death of young Isaac, who had done n 'wrong. t But that cannot be. God is not wicked; and He only loves those who are good, and act kindly towards their neighbours. He is not unjust, for he only loves those who practise justice. He does not fail in Hisword, and He forbids us to lie. We cannot understand all His wonderful ways, and 1%hraham did not understand Him either. But he r had faith in God; he knew that God would never deceive him; that He is wise, and just, and good, and that it was his duty to obey. Abraham had heard the Divine command quite distinctly-he was sure of that; and so he determined to obey, and offer up Isaac as a burnt-offering; and God, who rules everything, would order all the rest. The patriarch was quite right to believe thus in God's word, and trust in His goodness and justice; for the very moment in which he was about to sacrifice his son, God sent His holy angel to stay the father's hand. "Abraham Abraham !" cried the Lord, do not sacrifice your son Isaac. You have willingly agreed



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70 THE FISHING PARTY. Papa-and the boys put bait on their hooks; all the lines were thrown into the water; and each one remained silent and attentive. Victor, who did not care to join in the, sport, seated himself on the grass beside his mother. He watched his brothers and sisters, who kept so still and quiet, and the river, which flowed peacefully along, its tiny wavelets shining and glittering in the sunlight like flames. He also watched the little fish in the. transparent water, who, fearing nothing, were darting about the surface, as if enjoying the heat. Papa," said. Helen, speaking very softly for fear of frightening the fish,-" Papa, .there is something pulling at my line, and the hook is dragged away under the water !" "It is a fish that has got hold of it," replied her father; draw in your line." Helen drew her line out of the water, and saw a little struggling fish suspended from it. "Why does it move about so much, papa ?-is it suffering any pain ? asked the little girl. "Of course it is, my child, for it is pierce& by the hook." "0 papa! how sorry I am I I will not fish any more



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I --i--.



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2HE OLD SHEPHERD. 9 the matter with old Daniel? I like him, for he is very kind, and a good shepherd into the bargain.' "I could not help telling Margaret that I thought him so ugly, I was quite afraid of him. Then my little foolish cousin seized hold of my hand, and laughing heartily at the very idea of my being frightened, she dragged me, in spite of all my efforts at resistance, to old Daniel's side. When he saw us approaching, the old shepherd advanced to meet us, and bid us good-morning. 'Look, Daniel,' said Margaret, here is my cousin from London, who says she is afraid of you because you are so ugly.' "As my little cousin spoke, I felt myself blush up to the very eyes, for her words seemed so rude, I thought they would make the old shepherd angry. I would have liked to have asked him to forgive me, but I dared not even look at him. It is true, my young lady, that I am not so pretty as you, but do not be afraid, for I have never hurt a living soul, thank God,' said the old man. "Those gentle words surprised me not a little. I raised my eyes, and instead of the frightful countenance I had imagined, I saw a smile full of kindness on the old shepherd's face.



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64 THE FISHING PARTY bed immediately after dinner, and so we do not need to lose any sleep !" "Oh, yes; we will go to bed after dinner, and get up with the sun to-morrow morning !" We must not forget one thing," said Kate, "and that is to ask papa's permission." "I will take charge of that," replied the mother, "your papa is so kind and so pleased with your good behaviour and diligence at your work, that I am quite sure he will grant you the innocent pleasure you have chosen." Mr Egerton was indeed quite willing that his children should enjoy this treat; and, that no pleasure might be wanting, mamma promised to join the party. The next morning every one was up with daylight. The sun was already shining brilliantly, for it was in the middle of July. The birds were singing merrily, and a gentle breeze floated softly through the air, and made the green leaves dance and tremble with joy. All the doors and windows of the neighboring houses were still closed. Our little friends seemed to be the only people awake at this early hour. They took provisions for a second breakfast with them; and as those provisions were intended for all, each little fisher was



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62 THE FISHING PARTY. lifting up pins and needles with its long trunk. Oh, how nice that will be !" "I would rather go to the circus," said Henry. I like to see the beautiful horses-so much; those ones, above all, for they seem to be as clever as their riders." "You do not remember, dear children, that there are too many of us to indulge in a pleasure which would cost so much. We could not all go to the circus without spending a sum of money which might be far more usefully employed. In that way, we would only purchase pleasure for ourselves; whereas we could buy many things with this money which might do good to others." So we might," said Helen, sadly. "Well, mamma, what shall we do with our holiday ?" "Think for yourselves, my children." "I know !" cried Henry, at last, with a merry twinkle in his eye. "Papa is going to the fishing tomorrow. Let us ask if we may go with him !" Oh, yes, yes; that will be famous fun !" cried all the little voices at once. "Yes," said Henry, quite proud at having his idea so unanimously adopted; "papa goes to the fishing whenever he pleases, and we never go. I would like to learn to fish too



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Io8 THE FATE OF POOR MARTIN. think that this law for the prevention of cruelty would be required ?,"



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THIE FISHING PARTY. 63 "And I and I cried all the children at once. That will not cost anything, mamma," said Helen, wisely. "No, my daughter; it will not only cost nothing, but if your papa consents to the plan, as I do not doubt he will, the produce of your fishing excursion may be given to a poor family whom you know very well, and who very seldom have anything but dry bread to eat." "Oh, yes, mamma !" said Helen; "that will be the best part of the whole day "It will, at least, be one pleasure more," replied Henry. "And we will all do our best to catch as many fish as possible !" But you must remember that you will have to rise at five o'clock in the morning Will that not be too soon for you, dear little dreamers ?" "What is the use of rising so early for that !" exclaimed Victor, crossly. It is not such a very rare thing to see fishing. I saw plenty of it every day when I was staying at Hastings." "Listen cried Henry, "because he saw plenty of it when he was staying with grandpapa, he thinks we should not see it at all. Besides, we can go to



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94THE FATE OF POOR MARTIN. trial. I know -one at least which experienced many troubles." "Oh, tell us about it, dear mamma!" cried the children. "It is a very sad story, children. When it was very young, 'poor Martin,' as they called it, was deprived of its mother's milk, like the little ass you see here sometimes. It was descended from a very good stock. Its grand-parents were born in a little town in France, called Mirebeau, which you will find on your map in the department of Vienne. The asses of this little country are the finest in all Europe, and so they sell very dear. Martin's grandfather had been bought at one hundred and--seventy pounds, or very nearly three times the price of a good horse. "The ass is not a pretty animal, when compared with the horse-it has such long ears. Then, as it is never combed, its gray hair is always rough and shaggy. Sometimes they have very peculiar dispositions; but the little ones are gentle and pleasing, and Martin was the prettiest of donkeys. "It was scarcely two years old when its master sold it to a neighboring farmer, who had only one horse to work his field. "The farmer, who was a careful man, immediately



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! im, m i i s id I ~~~~c



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30 ABRAHAM'S SACRIFICE. to give up to me what is most dear to you, and I am satisfied. Abraham I will bless you and your son, and his children's children, and all nations will be blessed because of Him who will be born yet." This last promise, my dear children, was still more gracious than all those that God had formerly made to Abraham, because He who was to be born many years afterwards, from the family of Abraham. and Isaac, was Jesus Christ, the Saviour of the world, who said, Suffer little children to come unto me, and forbid them not, for of such is the kingdom of heaven.)'. This promise was the greatest reward Abraham received from God for having had-such great faith and obedience. Dear children, God commands us sometimes, like Abraham, not by His own voice, but by those of our parents, our masters, and also by the voice of our conscience, to do things which sometimes appear, difficult, or vex, or grieve us. But God no longer requires us to offer up sacrifices. He only asks us to love each other, and help those that are weaker than ourselves, which is much easier and more agreeable than killing people and making them suffer pain. But we have not all Abraham's blessed faith and obedience.



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ISAAC'S MARRIAGE. II seeing his son's grief, and thinking that he was also old and might very soon die, and not wishing to leave him all alone -without any one to love him and comfort him, desired him to marry. So Abraham resolved that his son Isaac should have a good wife. But where would he look for one? The daughters of Canaan, where he dwelt, had followed the example of their fathers and others; they had abandoned God, and wisdom, and virtue, and lived in idolatry, vice, and disorder. It would certainly not be amongst them that Abraham would choose a wife.for his son. Then he thought of the daughters of his own country, how well brought up they were, how good, how wise. It was from them that he had taken his own much-loved wife, Sara, and he said that it was in that country he must go to :seek one. Then he -called one of his servants named Eliezer, who was a good, trustworthy man, and in every way merited his master's confidence. "Promise me," he said, "that you will not take one of the daughters of Canaan to be my son's wife, but that you will go to the country where my parents dwelt, to the city of my brother Nachor, to choose a wife for my son Isaac." a



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II4 ISAAC'S MARRIAGE. young and beautiful, but how was he to choose from among them. How was he to know which was best, that he might ask her in marriage for his master Isaac. Being very much perplexed, Eliezer had recourse to God, and prayed thus: "My Lord! God of Abraham Behold me near this spring, where the people of the town come to draw water. Be with me, and let it come to pass that the daughter whom I ask for water, and she not only gives it to me, but to all my camels also, let that be the one destined to be the wife of Thy servant Isaac, who loves Thee and serves Thee faithfully !" He had scarcely finished this prayer when he observed a tall, beautiful girl coming along the road, who seemed to be very gentle and thoughtful. She went to the well and returned, bearing on her shoulder, as was the custom of the country, her pitcher full of water. Eliezer went forward and spoke to her. "Will you give me to drink of the water you carry in your pitcher!" he asked. The young girl, who was called Rebecca, stopped and looked at the man. She did not know him, but seeing him tired and covered with dust, she answered him in a pleasant voice.



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IHE OLD SHEPHERD. 21 clothes, for all the fine ones dressed in rose-coloured satin." "And do you know why?" asked the grandmother. "No," said Flora, I do not know. I love Daniel better, but I cannot tell why." "Ah well, I will tell you," replied Mrs Templeton. "Old Daniel is a real shepherd, who acts, thinks, and speaks like a true man, while the shepherds in your story-book were only false people, false shepherds. In spite of all the ornaments with which they try to adorn what is not true, it is truth alone which is beautiful, and nothing pleases but the truth."



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THE OLD SHEPHERD AND OTHER otlre Stories for tbe 'otung WITH ILLUSTRATIONS NEW YORK VIRTUE AND YORSTON 12 DEY STREET.



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DOGS AND THEIR USE. 45 ways of being useful, as there are many ways of employing the blessings which God has bestowed upon us. It is not sufficient for us to profit by what God has put at our disposal, but we must try to make a good use of it, and one of which He would approve." "But in what way does God wish us to make use of dogs, aunt ? asked Henry. "He wishes them to be useful according to their instincts and the faculties with which He has gifted them. Thus, dogs are, in general, docile, intelligent, faithful, and attached to their masters. Their delicacy of smell is so great that they can distinguish the approach of an enemy or a friend at a great distance. They are brave and courageous. God has not given them such precious faculties to lie idle !" "Then what good can dogs do ? asked the child again. At that moment they heard the sound of a flute at a little distance, and Mrs Graham looked out of the window. "Look, children," said she; "come and look at this." The children looked, and saw a poor blind man led by a dog, which he held by a chain. The dog carried a little wooden bowl in his mouth,



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52 DOGS AND THEIR USE. "Their scent is so fine, that they can track a fox by the smell it leaves on the road. Pepper' only starts the game, but 'Victor' can catch it himself, and bring it to papa in his mouth." "Without eating it ?" asked Louisa. "Yes, without touching it. 'Victor' is a greyhound, and very fleet of foot; and though he is so thin, he is not greedy." "Would you believe it, children, that this dog, which looks so thin and emaciated, likes better to hunt stags, and even wild beasts, than small game ?" The children looked at their mother. But there are no wild beasts now," said the little girl. "Are there lions and tigers in our country yet, aunt?" asked Henry. No, my child; but there are plenty of them in Africa, and Victor' belongs to a race of dogs which come from that country." Oh, I remember seeing pictures of a lion-hunt, with dogs in it just the same as 'Victor,'" cried Henry. And soldiers, and frightful black men, with large guns and white cloaks, which covered them from head to foot!" added Louisa.



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THE FISHING PARTY 69 the silkworm steeped in the spirit of wine, and prepared in a certain way-mostly at Florence, in Italy. To this delicate thread was attached a steel hook, bent and finished off like an arrow, with two points going in opposite directions. Look !" said papa," this little bit of steel is called the hook. Let each place on it his bait, which will be detained there, like the fish, by the double hook. Here is bait of different kinds. In one of these little boxes there is fly, and in the other worms out of the ground." "What! living ?" cried Helen, with a shudder. "Well, there is bread and cheese too, which may perhaps suit some tastes better," said Mr Egerton; "and here is a line which requires no bait at all. See, the hook is twisted and concealed behind this little feather, which looks like a water-spider-at least like enough to attract and deceive the fish." "I would like one of those, please, papa," said Helen. "And me too, papa," added Kate. "Take them, then; but do you know how to use them? You must keep the little feather moving and floating in the water, or the fish will not be deceived by it."



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C' A I I "/ / / / V 3 [II ii





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20 THE OLD SHEPHERD. 'Daniel has explained them to me sometimes, and I know fifteen of them by name already."' "What !" interrupted Arthur, "did Daniel know astronomy too ?" I do not know if he had ever studied it, but he told us about the lives of the first shepherds, which we have all read, though without paying much attention perhaps, in our Bibles; and he told us that they were the first who knew anything about the stars. "I wished very much for Daniel to teach me to know the stars in the heavens, like Margaret. Unfortunately the days were still too long; the night was too late in coming; and then very soon I had to come away. "But my uncle has promised me, and I am sure he will not forget, that I am to go back and get some more lessons from the old shepherd." "We will all go," cried the children; "we would like to hear Daniel speak too." And now," said Mrs Templeton, who had listened to this story in silence, "do you never think of the shepherdesses you read about in your story-book ?" "Never," replied Flora, laughing. "I know now 'that they never existed; and if they did exist, I would not change my old shepherd, with his coarse



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72 THE FISHING PARTY "Surely this is something worth your trouble,' said Mr Egerton, taking his son's rod; and drawing the line gently in, he soon landed a large fish on the bank. "It is a carp," cried Henry. "I recognize it quite well, for I have seen them in the kitchen at home. How difficult it is for some beasts to part with life," added he, while his father was detaching the carp from the hook. ".Other fish die whenever they come out of the water; but the other day I saw a carp living and jumping about even after it had been cut into pieces." "They should be allowed to die in peace," said Mrs Egerton, "or killed with a blow, rather than be so tortured." "That is what I said to the cook, but she said the fish was better when it was cooked alive." The fish is quite good, if it is fresh," replied the mother; "and if we are obliged to kill animals for our food, we need not torture them to pamper our selfish tastes." "But why do fish die-as soon as they are taken out of the water?" asked Kate; "for, if we were put into the water, we could not live." "Because," said Mr Egerton, "they can only



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4 THE OLD SHEPHERD. I could not close my eyes all that night; I think, perhaps, I slept a little, but all the time I was dreaming of my uncle's shepherdesses At last daylight appeared, and I rose. Margaret was still sleeping, which I thought very strange, for she did not seem to care in the least for my uncle's promise to us. However, I awoke her, and told her she was very lazy; but we had still a good while to wait for breakfast, and after that we set out. "When we left the house, we went through some pretty winding lanes, bordered with bushes, flowers, and turf; and I expected every moment to see among them a little fairy hut like what I had read about. However, we had gone a long way without seeing anything. All at once the little road stopped, and we found ourselves on an immense field or moor, which stretched away as far as we could see; but there were neither bushes, nor turf, nor flowers. At the very other side of the field I thought I described something-a kind of gray mass, which was like nothing I had ever seen before. "' Is this what you wanted to see, Flora ? asked my uncle. I thought perhaps he had not understood what I



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88 THE FISHING PARTY. Victor, who had felt such an ill-used mortal in the morning, thought their treat had been wisely chosen, and was glad that his mother had helped him to sacrifice his own inclinations with cheerfulness to those of his brothers and sisters-for that evening he felt that it was more blessed to give than to receive; and so this holiday was by no means lost. IN ~ ~ ~~~~*



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go0 HE FATE OF POOR MARTIN. threshold of the little shop where his father mended old shoes. All this commotion and noise charmed the two little boys so much, that as soon as the regiment had passed, each threw their arms round their mother and begged her to give him a drum. "Yes, dear child, you shall have a drum," said Willie's mother, and she sent her nurse to buy one. "I have not any drums, my poor child," replied Peter's mother, "and I have no money to buy one; you know we are very poor." "Well, mother," said the child, "give me that old wooden pail that has neither top nor bottom, and a piece of paper and some twine, and I will soon make myself a drum !" "You may take them; my son," said the mother. Little Peter leapt with joy, and immediately set himself to work. He stretched the sheet of paper over the open part of the wooden vessel, as they cover a pot of preserves, and fastened it firmly down all round with the twine. With a small stickcut in two he made two drumsticks, and overjoyed at his success, he hung the newly-made drum round his neck. Meanwhile, Willie, charmed with the new toy



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II2 ISAAC'S MARRIAGE. Then Eliezer, Abraham's servant, pledged his word, and promised to fulfil all that had been entrusted to him. But this country was a great way off; you know that, in his youth, Abraham dwelt in the town of Haran, in Mesopotamia, a very fertile country, situated to the north-east of Canaan, and surrounded by great rivers. If you look in your map of Ancient Asia you will see those two great rivers, the Euphrates and Tigris, and the country which lies between them was formerly called Mesopotamia, a name which justly signifies, in the language of that country, "a land among rivers." Then if you turn to the map of Palestine, you will find the town of Hebron, where Abraham lived, and near which was the field and cave in which he buried the body of his beloved Sara. It was from this place that Eliezer departed. He took with him six camels from his master's flocks, well laden with presents of all kinds for Abraham's friends; mounted himself and servants on others, and departed for Mesopotamia. It was a very long way from the town of Hebron to Nachor, many hundreds of miles, and it was much



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I 1I K 1' ' 2 1 // I N 111/



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ISAA C'S MARRIA GE. I13 more difficult work travelling then than it is now. Men had not yet invented either carriages or railways; they travelled either on foot or on the backs of camels, exposed to the fierce rays of the sun, across great wide plains of burning sand, warmed by the heat of the day, and which almost dazzled their sight; and they could not always find a tree to rest under or a spring of water to quench their thirst. Eliezer had to endure all that; but he had promised his master to go into Mesopotamia, and besides he knew that all the difficulties in the world are nothing when one is acting from a kind heart, and fulfilling their duty. At last, after a weary journey, they arrived at the entrance to the town of Nachor, by a road where there was a well of water. It was towards evening, andcthe heat of the day was beginning to die away under the influence of the gentle breeze which was floating softly over the parched and thirsty earth. It was at this hour that the daughters of the town came to draw water from the well, near which Eliezer had halted. He did not know Abraham's friends; he only knew their name; and he had never seen any of those girls who came for water before. They were VOL. VI. H



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r 'C. 4? L *L~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



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THE OLD SHEPHERD. 5 wanted to see, and so I asked him to show me the flocks. 'Well, there they are, over there,' said Margaret, 'do you not see them ?' "I looked all round, and seeing nothing, I concluded that they must be speaking of that gray mass in the distance. As we drew near, I distinguished a lot of dirty white sheep, a lean dog, a little wooden shed or hut, built so low that it would scarcely allow me to stand upright. There was also an old man, brown and wrinkled, dressed in the coarsest garments and a pair of great leather boots covered with mud. This man had a large stick in his hand, with an iron hook at the end of it, but so different from the crooks I had read about! "I was so disappointed with the appearance of everything that I could not help showing it. "' What are all those filthy sheep for?' I asked my uncle. "'It is the flock,' he replied with a look of surprise. "'And who is that ugly-looking man that keeps them ?' "' The shepherd, of course.' "' You are just joking, uncle,' I said, half crying with vexation. 'And where are the shepherdesses?'



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24 ABRAHAM'S SACRIFICE. In those days, people did not work and till the ground every season, as they do now. They had no order nor foresight, and so it often happened that they had no bread. They were hungry, and there was no corn to make flour for bread, and that is what is called famine. So Abraham was obliged to go into Egypt, which lengthened his journey a great deal; but in spite of all his difficulties and trials, he did not repent having obeyed God. After the famine was over, the patriarch experienced a new trouble : he quarrelled with Lot, his brother's son, whom he had brought with him to this new land, and who also possessed large flocks of sheep and cattle. "We are brothers,' said Abraham. "Do not let us quarrel, but rather let us agree, as brothers should do. Since our flocks cannot feed in the same place, let us separate. Go in whichever direction you like best, and I will go in the other. The earth is surely large enough for us both to find a place where we will not disturb each other." And so Abraham had the grief of separating from Lot, whom he loved very much, and who had always lived with him and his family. The country to which God conducted Abraham was



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THE FISHING PARTY 87 no joys, no friendships, no family, nor bonds of society; and you think, my children, that those inferior creatures should perform the same duties as we, who are favoured by the Creator above all other beings! No, no; the duties given to each are in proportion to the intelligence which God has given them to understand them, and the means He has put at their disposal to accomplish them." "Then, papa," said Kate, "a person who has education, health, and fortune must have a great many more duties than one who is sick or poor." "You have spoken the truth," replied her papa. "The more God gives us, the more He expects from us. The more benefits we have received, the more good works ought we to do." The evening came, and the sun went down behind the trees on the other side of the river. They gathered together their lines and nets, and the whole family returned home, and finished the happy holiday by visiting the poor Lamberts' humble cottage, and carrying a ray of gladness to it by their kindness. This was mamma's happy thought, and it had given a new charm to the holiday, for the little band had the joyful consciousness that this day had not been devoted entirely to their own pleasure. Even



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THE FATE O POOR MARTIN. 103 new master, took a cruel' delight in beating the ass. The ass trots quickly enough, but it does not gallop like a horse, and so they beat it. "The prophet Balaam, as you know, went to the camp of the Moabites mounted upon a she-ass. An ass also served to carry the Holy Family when they. fled from Egypt; and when Jesus Christ entered Jerusalem, He was mounted on an ass: perhaps our Lord chose this humble beast for its gentleness, patience, humility, and courage. But the worldioes not always recognize those virtues; and as the ass is not so elegant as the horse, it is ill-used and beat for its misfortune, not its fault. "So much cruelty soon destroyed poor Martin's good disposition. Treated with wickedness, it became wicked also. It tried to revenge itself, and got into the habit of biting and kicking. When a rider tormented it, it tried to throw him, and if he could not succeed in doing this, he would .suddenly kneel down, roll over on his back, and the rider was then only too happy to resign his seat. "At last he became so dangerous to ride that his master, finding that no one would hire him, was, in his turn, obliged to sell him. "'I know what I am about,' said an old miller;



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THE FA7TE OF POOR MARTIN. 107 "Martin was no longer ill-used; the children loved and caressed the poor animal tenderly, so that he soon became as gentle as he had been when young. When it was cold they all crouched into some barn or shed together; the family and the ass slept on the same straw, and kept each other warm. And there is nothing, my children, which attaches us more to each other, or even to an animal, than sharing the same sorrows and misfortunes. "At last poor Martin died, though he was only twenty years old, and asses often live till thirty. But they are generally so unfortunate that they seldom see that age." "And, mamma, why are those wicked people not punished for abusing them so much ? asked Emily. "Yes, why ?" echoed the children. "They should be, for thus forgetting its many services. The ancients had a law for the punishment of ingratitude; and now in England, and France too, there is a law for the prevention of cruelty to animals. "But, my children, if men, when they were young like you, learnt to love God and their fellow-creatures, to understand all the duties required of them, and to sympathise with sorrow and suffering, do you



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50 DOGS AND .HEIR USE. countries, such as Spain, where the people have a horrible custom of making animals fight together, and the bull-dog is sometimes employed in those combats. It is also used as a watcher; but they are so fierce and unruly that they are no great favourites." "There is no use keeping wicked dogs that will not learn," added Louisa, wisely. "Or rather, it is necessary to employ them according to their nature," replied her mother; "and bulldogs are very valuable for hunting." "What do you say, aunt ?" asked Henry. "I have been out hunting, and I know all papa's dogs, and there is not a bull-dog nor a fierce one among them all." "Yes, my boy, perhaps you have been out hunting rabbits or hares, but you have never been hunting bears and tigers," said Mrs Graham, smiling. "I know all uncle's dogs, too," said Louisa. "There is 'Bob,' and Mira,' and 'Victor,' and' Pepper.' Poor Pepper' is very ugly." "He is no uglier than the rest," said Henry, anxious to preserve 'Pepper's' dignity; "and if you only saw how well he hunts! One day a friend of papa's was out shooting with him. They took 'Pepper' with them to start the hares and partridges,



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r ABRAHAM'S SACRIFICE. 31 Sometimes it even troubles us to come to the help j f those who have need of our aid, or to do what w e do not exactly like, or not to do what we wish; :-.I$ share what belongs to us with those who are poor, and even to give them what is necessary, grieves us. We are unhappy and miserable at being called on for assistance, and we fear a crowd of evils, and that takes away all desire of obeying God's commands,of fulfilling our duties; and sometimes, alas! in consequence of this false prudence, we leave them *unfulfilled. uIt. is, then, my dear children, that we ought to re" member, like the patriarch Abraham, that God orders everything for our good; that He is holier, better, and wiser than we; and that, if we keep His commandments and obey His voice, though we may not 'understand them, He will care for us, both in ffiis world and in the next.



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THE FA TE OF POOR MARTIN. 97 "'There is Master Martin calling. It must be six o'clock; so get supper ready, and I will go and put him into the stable.' "The juggler was astonished how Martin could know the hour so well; and so the farmer related a great many things which showed how much instinct the ass had. Thus, when the roads were bad, Martin, who did not like putting his feet in the mud, always chose the little footpath. He had tried to prevent him several times, by pulling his halter, and even striking him, but all in vain; it was impossible to make him change his determination. iHe was obstinate, like all asses, and he followed the footpath he had chosen, in spite of all remonstrance. But he did not touch a single blade of grass; he destroyed nothing, and quietly followed the path, without turning either to the right or to the left. "' Unfortunately,' said the farmer, 'the poor donkey is not strong enough for my work, and I will be obliged to put him away, much to my regret.' "'Will you sell him to me?' asked the juggler. 'If he is young and intelligent, I may be able to make something of him.' '" The juggler found the ass all that he desired; they agreed about the price, and next day he led VOL. VI. G



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-DOGS AND THEIR USE. 49 "Mamma, is that a watch-dog, that great Prince' which Matthew Bell chains to his cart when he goes to market?" "I have never seen it; but tell me what it is like." "It is very large, and has great feet, a thick tail, and a big mouth, with its lips hanging over it. I do not know what like its ears are, because they have been cut, but it looks very fierce. If any one goes near the cart to which it is chained, it barks furiously, and darts out as if it would eat everybody up; but, fortunately, it cannot get away." "You have given us the exact description of a watch-dog, my dear child, and you see how vigilant it is in keeping and defending its master's property. It is generally to be found on all farms and in all solitary houses, for fear of thieves-for a watch-dog is a terrible enemy of theirs." *: *" Louisa says that watch-dogs are very large," said Henry. I have seen the butcher's, and it is a great deal less than Matthew Bell's." "The butcher's was a bull-dog," replied Mrs; Graham; "but he has been obliged to put it away, because it was so fierce. This kind of dog is often very dangerous. Their teeth are so strong, that when they bite they will not let go. There are some VOL. VI. D



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LIGHT. 33 church next day with their mamma; but it would be no easy matter, for the church was in the town, about two miles distant, and that was no small walk for such little legs as Susan's. But neither Susan nor Frank ever thought of the fatigue, but looked forward to it all with the greatest of pleasure, and longed for the time to come. As you know, my little friends, Christmas-day is on the twenty-fifth of December, in the very middle of winter. The days are short, the nights are long: it rains, it snows, it freezes-but there are beautiful, clear, frosty nights in December. Such was this Christmas-eve, and as Frank and Susan stood at the window, they thought they had never seen such a lovely night. There was just a sprinkling of snow on the ground, and it clung to the bare branches of the naked trees, and made them look feathery and beautiful; a multitude of stars shone and glittered like suns; the milky way stretched from one end of heaven to the other like a river of brightness; and the moon pursued its course through the blue vault with not a cloud to dim its brightness. The brother and' sister stood gazing at the scene for a few minutes, spell-bound. "Oh, how beautiful it is!" whispered Frank at VOL. VI. C



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THE FISHING PARTY. 73 breathe the air through water, whilst we can only breathe pure air." Do fish breathe the same as we do ?" "Of course they breathe, or they could not live." "And have they lungs like ours ?" "No; instead of lungs, they have openings on each side of the head, called gills. Look at this carp, for instance; do you see those little brown borders?" "Yes." "Ah, well, those are little tubes through which the water that the fish swallows, goes, and which -keep back part of the air, as do the lungs of animals living on land." While they talked away thus, the fishing continued; and there was soon landed upon the grass, in the little nets, a number of fish of all kinds and sizes; and each little fisher told what he knew about them.



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102 THE FATE OF POOR MARTIN. Coventry. "One day the juggler having stopped at-a place to make Martin perform his tricks, one of the spectators, surprised at the sense and learning displayed by the ass, and excited by the money it procured for its master, and thinking he would like better to gain his livelihood thus than by working, took a fancy to buy it. The juggler, thinking it was a good opportunity, and promising himself to educate another one, sold him at a good price; and pgor Martin passed into the hands of a new master. "The latter was ignorant, however, that all the animal's learning consisted in obeying certain signs made by the juggler;-and so, when he commanded, the ass to do what he wished, the ass, seeing no sign, never stirred. So that the man, punished at once for his ignorance, his idleness, and his love of money, became furious at having made such a bad bargain, and throwing all the blame on the poor beast, he beat it like a madman in order to avenge his own folly. Afterwards, not knowing how to employ him in order to recover some of the money he had cost him, he put a saddle and bridle on him, led him to the town and hired him out. "Unfortunately some of its riders, as hard as its



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THE FISHING PARTY 85 there must be plenty room for them in the sea! exclaimed Victor. "But then they must choose their place of residence, like everything else." "And so they are like people, who leave the beautiful country, and crowd themselves together in a great city like London !" said Henry. "I would like to know who was the first fisherman who thought of salting herring ? said Helen. "You are quite right to wish information, my daughter. He was a very useful man, for he has introduced the means of securing people with healthy and abundant food. He was a Dutchman, and was called Buckaly. His country raised a monument to his memory in token of their gratitude; and the Emperor Charles himself did him honour by visiting this monument." "And had Buckaly no other glory than that of having found out how to salt herring?" exclaimed Henry. My son," replied his father, he had no other than that of having been useful to his fellow-creatures." "-And that ought to be enough," replied the boy, reflecting; "for glory ought to proceed from doing good."



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74 THE FISHING PARTY. Thus they related that the carp is one of the most sociable of fish, and that it is even possible to tame it, up to a certain point. In the time of Charles IX. of France," said papa, "there was a large basin in front of the palace at the Louvre full of those fish, and they came darting forward whenever they were called." Then Mr Egerton-told the children that the carp is exceedingly simple in its habits, that it feeds principally upon plants and seeds, and that, in winter, it lies at the bottom of the water for many months, preferring to do without food rather than make war upon other fish. The pike, on the contrary, is a disagreeable companion; it devours other fish, and is so greedy that it is not very particular about what it eats; so much so, that one day a pike seized hold of the nose of a horse that was drinking in the river, and let him take it away out of the water rather than leave go. They had also caught a barbel; -the children greatly admired the little barbles it carried in its mouth; and they were astonished to hear that this fish grew to such a length that it sometimes measured six feet. They likewisetook bream and tench; and they



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THE FISHING PARTY 79 his brothers and sisters had all quieted themselves to listen, when, in the midst of the silence, they heard from the adjoining meadow a strange croaking cry. "What is that ? asked the children. "It is a frog," replied their papa. "In general, frogs do not begin to croak till the evening, but it appears this one must be a little more active than his fellows." "Where is it, do you think, papa ?" "Doubtless among the rushes of some little stream 'in the meadow over there." "They are very ugly beasts, papa! Are they of any use?" Yes; they are of great use in some countries, and the people go to the streams and marshes and fish them." "Fish frogs and what to do ?" asked Kate, with no little horror. "To eat them of course." "What! does any one eat frogs ? But they are reptiles, and they say frogs are poison." "Not all of them; and, besides, it is only certain parts of the animal that are used for food. It is chiefly in France they are used; and they are considered a great luxury."



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VI. THE FATE OF POOR MARTIN. ENRY, Louisa, and Emily, here is the story I promised you," said Mrs Coventry to her children, one morning:THE TWO DRUMS. One day a gay regiment passed through the town of E-, with their colours floating behind them in the breeze, and fifteen drums beating the march, so as to make the window-panes quiver. A troop of happy children followed the soldiers. Good little Willie watched them pass from a window, while mischievous little Peter gazed at them from the



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92 THE FATE OF POOR MARTIN. that made him so happy that he not only did not regret his action, but he felt two joys in one-his own and that of the child that he had comforted. "Mamma," asked Louisa, "why did little Peter's drum burst so quickly, while the one Willie gave him did not do so ?" "Because the first was covered with paper, while Willie's, like the drums the soldiers use, was covered with the skin of an ass." The skin of an ass! exclaimed Henry, with surprise; "are they of any use ?" "Certainly, my son I Cleaned, split, and polished with pumicestone, it makes vellum and skins for drums; tanned, like that of the horse or ox, it makes strong leather for shoes and harness. The bones of the ass, finer even than those of the horse or ox, make handles for umbrellas, knives, and a number of small things. The horn which covers the feet, when it is melted and cut, makes combs and snuffboxes." "But I thought," said the children, "that asses were only used for milk, like those we see passing sometimes." "It is quite true that asses' milk is very much used for invalids. Sometimes their master takes them a



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THE FISHING PARTY 67 "Mamma, I will not be cross any more," he said, raising his beautiful black eyes to her face. "Here is the river Here is the river !" shouted the children on in front, as they darted to its side. "Not here, my children; we will not stop here! Do you not see that this place is too open and too much frequented? The people passing by would frighten the fish; so let us go farther on and look for a quiet spot" "How would they frighten the fish, papa? Do fish really know when people come and look into the water ?" "Of course they do, Francis," replied Kate, "for they have eyes." And very good eyes too, I can tell you," said Mr Egerton; "and this advantage is all the more useful to them, because the light shines less brightly upon them down in the water than upon us. But this is not all: if fish see, they can also hear; so speak very softly now." Presently they reached a desirable resting-place. It was on the very border of the river, surrounded by large trees, whose branches formed a leafy roof which would perfectly protect them from the rays of the sun, for in a few hours they would be fierce enough.



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DOGS AND. THEIR USE. 59 one heard them. The brother of the boy who had fallen into the.water threw himself on his knees and prayed to God to save him. "But the dog, which had followed the children, plunged into the pond, seized the child, who had already disappeared under the water, by his jacket, and brought him safely to land. You may imagine how happy the poor children were !" How fortunate that the dog had learnt to swim," said Louisa. "All dogs swim without ever being taught," said Mrs Graham, especially Newfoundlands, whose feet are formed very much like those of ducks and swans, which naturally belong to the water. But what are you dreaming about, Henry?" Henry was indeed looking very thoughtful. "I was just thinking," said he, "that many of those good dogs of which you have spoken are more useful than those which dance; but do you think they are happier? Do they not work quite as hard ? That poor dog that we saw sitting at its master's feet, do you think it will be happy leading a blind man all day ?" "It is likely," replied the mother. "See how eagerly and attentively it fulfils its task. How it



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IGHT 35 "Come," the bells seemed to say, "come, young Christians, to the holy Jesus, who was born to save you "It is cold, but you have fire and light, and the child Jesus had neither, but was born in a humble stable. Come to Jesus, little ones,-come, come, come!" And as the bells spoke thus, they rang as loud as they could, so that their voice might be heard all through the country. At last they arrived at the church. The children were quite enraptured with the beauty of the wreaths twined up the large pillars, and the red berries which came peeping out from behind the dark green leaves, and the solemn pealing sounds of the organ swelling through the church. And while the children admired and prayed, Lion the dog, who had followed them to church, slept under the pew, and saw nothing. At last the service was ended, the beautiful hymns were sung, and it was time to return home. The sun shone in all its splendour, and glittered so much upon the pure snow that the children were obliged to put their hands before their eyes. This bright light of day seemed still more beautiful than



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THE FATE OF POOR MARTIN 95 took it to the blacksmith, who put iron shoes on its feet the same as a horse, so that the walking and working might not hurt or injure its hoofs." "How is it, mamma, that the iron shoes, which they fasten on with great nails, do not hurt their feet?" asked Louisa. Because the nails do not touch the flesh, dear, but are fastened into the hoof, which is insensible, and the animal suffers no more than you do when you cut your nails. It is only the first time that there is any difficulty about shoeing a horse, because it does not understand the process; but afterwards it permits it quite willingly. "The ass showed the best dispositions. It was .gentle, obedient, and industrious. When the farmer yoked it to the plough beside the horse, it worked with so much zeal, from morning till evening, that it accomplished as much as its companion. However, the horse was much stronger than the ass, and it fatigued the latter very much to keep up with it. It soon became so thin' and emaciated, that the farmer saw that he would be obliged to sell it, if he did not wish to see it die. "On Sundays, the farmer set Martin out to graze in a meadow, and the ass, quite happy to have this



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56 DOGS AND THEIR USE. they dig and scratch with their paws till they have discovered him. They lick him and shake him, to awake him, and if they cannot succeed, they bark loud enough to let the good monks hear them, and then they come and carry the traveller to their hospice, and nurse him with the tenderest care." Oh, how kind they must be !" cried the children, thinking both of the charitable men and the good dogs. Mamma," asked Louisa, "what are those dogs like ?" "They are almost the same size as watch-dogs, my child, but they have a thoughtful, serious look, as if they knew all the good work that was before them. They have also thicker and longer hair than watch-dogs, as I told you a little while ago in speaking of dogs which belong to cold countries."



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98 THE FATE OF POOR MARTIN. Martin away, saying, He would make a clever ass of him yet.'" A clever ass," interrupted Emily; "but when any one cannot learn or say their lessons, they are called as stupid as an ass !" "It is not right, though," replied Mrs Coventry; "and people are unjust towards the ass beyond everything. Because it does not show off its good qualities, like the horse, for instance, people forget that it has any virtues at all. Because it is modest, they humble it. Because it requires no attention, it is neglected and maltreated with cruel ingratitude for all its services, which seldom have any reward but blows. "-It is certain that the ass would be as intelligent as any other animal if there was any trouble taken with it. And though the ass is not born to perform skilful tricks, the juggler succeeded in educating Martin most completely. He taught him by certain signs to mark the hour of a watch, the day ofthe week or of the month, by striking so many blows with its foot. "He taught him to eat at table with a napkin round his neck, and to ring the bell with his teeth. He taught him to point out among a crowd of



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THE FISHING PARTY. 75 remarked how much they resembled the carp in appearance, only the scales of the latter are much larger. There were perch also; and the children observed that its back was covered with black stripes, while its fins were of a reddish hue. Their papa told them that this fish is as greedy as the pike; that it not only devours little fish, but very often leaps out of the water to catch the clouds of flies that hover on the surface. They commenced fishing again, for there were all sorts of fish in this fine river, and all sorts of bait in papa's little boxes; and by and bye they caught a fish which was almost bright yellow, streaked and spotted with brown, about a foot in length, very slender, and which, when the children wished to take hold of it, slipped out of their hands in a moment. "I know that fish," said the mother. "It makes a very fine and delicate dish. It is called an eel, but everybody does not appreciate it." "Oh, how glad I am L-iried Helen, thinking of the poor family who were to have the produce of the fishing. "How nice it will be to have something so good to give to the little Lamberts !" At last they caught a salmon trout.



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VII. ISAAC'S MARRIAGE. [ BOU remember, dear children, the story of young Isaac, .the son of the patriarch Abraham, who was about to be offered to God as a burnt-offering, by.-his father. You remember he was not thus sacrificed, and that God, satisfied with Abraham's faith, asked nothing more of him, and left him his child. God needs nothing from us for Himself; He only asks us to love Him, and have confidence in His goodness, so that we may patiently endure whatever happens to us, and submit our will to His, by which we will be spared a multitude of anxieties and cares


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iDOGS AND .THEIR USE. 53 Mamma," asked the child again, "was my pretty little Gipsy,' that died, one of those greyhounds ?" "No, my little daughter, Gipsy' was much smaller and more delicate. Its dispositions were too gentle to be used for the chase, and its bones were so fragile that, you remember, it twice broke one of its paws. Your little terrier was only meant for a plaything." "Had you once a terrier, cousin ?" asked Henry. Yes, once," said little Louisa, sadly; if you had seen my poor 'Gipsy,' how pretty it was!" "And what did it die of?" It was always cold, because it had no long hair to keep it warm. Mamma made it a pretty little blanket of red flannel, and tied it round its body with a ribbon. One day papa went away to the country; he was on horseback, and 'Gipsy' followed him. Unfortunately, it came on to snow; 'Gipsy' got



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2 Virtue & Yorston. Uitrasterteb cFiftieo1ik for all tZasfoos. HE SSCOTTISH LIBRARY: A SERIES OF WORKS ILLUSTRATING THE HISTORY OF SCOTLAND. Four volumes, small 8vo, beautifully printed on tinted paper, profusely illustrated by eminent Artists, and richly bound in cloth extra, bevelled, gilt edges. Price, per set, . . . $o oo Separately, . . . 50 I. The Battle History of Scotland. Tales of Chivalry and Adventure. By CHARLES ALFRED MAXWELL. It. The Wars of England and Scotland. Historical Tales of Bravery and Heroism. By the same Author. III. English and Scottish Chivalry. Tales from Authentic Chronicles and Histories. By the same Author. Iv. The Sea Kings of Orkney, and other Historical Tales. By the same Author. THE CIRCLE OF THE YEAR LIBRARY. (Uniform with the Scottish Library.) 7hree volumes, small 8vo, cloth extra, bevelled, gilt edges. Price, per set, . . 87 50 Separately, .. 2 50 I. The Circle of the Year; or, Studies of Nature and Pictures of the Seasons. By W. H. DAVENPORT ADAMS. IL Sword and Pen; or, English Worthies in the Reign of Elizabeth. By WALTER CLINTON. iT. Norrie Seton; or, Driven to Sea. By Mrs GEORGE CUPPLES, Author of" Unexpected Pleasures," &c.



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I20 ISAAC'S MARRIAGE. an account of all that had happened during his journey, When Isaac heard how kind Rebecca and her .family had been to his servants and animals, he was full of love and gratitude. He took Rebecca into the house where Sara had dwelt. She became his wife, and was so good and gentle, and loved her husband so much, that she succeeded in comforting him for the greatest grief of his life, the loss of his mother. PRINTED BY BALLANTYNE AND COMPANV EDINBURGH AND LONDON



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12 Virtue &S Yorston. PICTURES AND PAINTERS. A. SELECTION OF GEMS OF MODERN ART, ENGRA VED IN LINE BY EMINENT ARTISTS. WITH DESCRIPTIVE TEXT BY T. ADDISON, RICHARDS, Corresponding Secretary of the National Academy of Design, and Professor'of Art in the University of the City of New York. The illustrations, which exceed seventy in number, consist of large, full-paged plates, engraved on steel, by the most eminent artists of the day, after celebrated works by Landseer, Turner, Leslie, Newton, Frith, Phillip, Webster, Ward, Pickersgill, Goodall, Sant, Wilkie, Stothard, Bonington, Hohlan Hunt, Gustave Dore, Leys, Dyckman, and other *. distinguished painters, chiefly of the English, French, and Belgian Schools. The work is printed on the finest paper, and elegantly bound in morocco, from ornamental designs, made expressly for the purpose, forming an elegant volume de luxe for the parlour and for a holiday gift. Quarto, morocco cloth extra, 5 oo Full Turkey, antique or gilt, . . 30 *** Complete Catalogue of all our Publications mailed free on application.



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60 DOGS AND ZT-EIR USE. caresses its master, and seems to love him; whilst those poor dancers appear to be so tired, and work only through fear of the whip." "But," added Henry, "to drag loads, hunt lions, fight thieves, and save men, must be quite as fatiguing and more difficult work than dancing on the street "Ah! but what does the difficulty matter, dear children, if it really belongs to the task which God has destined us to fulfil? In order to obey the instinct He has given them, animals will courageously brave all danger and endure suffering. And to fulfil the duties which are imposed upon him, man, guided by his conscience, should cheerfully and patiently submit to the trials and sorrows which are attached to his existence here. "You will one day find, dear children, that misfortune-the only true misfortune in this world-is in disobeying God's holy laws; and the only true happiness is in fulfilling. His divine will."



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epio~dm;u



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I8 THE OLD SHEPHERD. to find their own food that, much as cruelty is repugnant to those who have kind hearts, they generally eat without ever thinking of it. It would even put them very much about if they were obliged to do without meat for a day or two.' "'Are we obliged to eat it, then?' I asked. "'My child,' said old Daniel, the Israelites ate the Passover in the land of Egypt, where Pharaoh loaded them with sorrow, and from whence the Lord had promised to deliver them and conduct them into the land of Canaan. Let us do as they did, in this world where we are overwhelmed with sin, while we patiently wait till it pleases God to conduct us to, a better country, even a heavenly one.' "I soon became accustomed to the sight of the old shepherd, and, while I listened to his voice, I never thought any more of his odd dress, which had at first appeared so terrible to me.



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I



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78 THE FISHING PARTY abundance on the coasts of France, and there are lots of anchovies in the Mediterranean." "And I have seen salt herring," said little Francis. "And I have seen all those caught!" said Victor, triumphantly. "Ah, well, tell us all that you have seen cried his brothers and sisters. "To table cried the mother, who during this conversation had laid out the provisions on the grass. To table I" echoed the joyous children, relieving themselves of their lines; and very soon they were all seated on the turf in a circle round their mother. The little boys and girls spread their white handkerchiefs on their knees, to serve for table-cloths and napkins. They were all very busy and silent for a while, for a good appetite always follows hard work. The children were quite delighted at dining in the open air under those great trees, whose leafy branches formed a lovely bower of shade in the midst of the surrounding open country, on which the sun rested so fiercely. "And now, Victor, tell us all about the fishing you saw at Hastings," said Henry to his brother. The hero was just about to commence his story, and



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6 THE OLD SHEPHERD. "'Ah, the shepherdesses!' he said, with a smile, 'we have left them at the farm. Betsy and Sarah make the butter and cheese, and little Madge looks after the sheep and lambs that are too young to come up here and feed.' "' What !' said I to Margaret, are Betsy, and Sarah, and Madge, those great fat girls that I saw yesterday when I came? And are they your shepherdesses, and this man your shepherd ?' "'Yes,' replied Margaret, laughing, 'but what is



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80 THE FISHING PARTY. "Do they not fish for crabs too, papa ? asked a little one. "Yes. I have often seen crab-fishing. They catch them in nets; and on each net they put a piece of tempting meat for bait, which attracts the crabs, and so they are enclosed in'the net and carried off." ( And that is how they catch shrimps and lobsters too, papa," said Victor. "Do they fish for those ugly red lobsters ?" asked Francis, opening his eyes very wide. Yes; but they are only red after they are cooked," said Victor. "When they are living, they are nearly black." In the midst of their talk and questions, the children heard the voices of men and the sound of oars coming from the other side of the river, and each one turned to look. "Those are fishermen," said Mr Egerton, "and they are going to cast their nets." "Let us see them let us see them !" cried the children; and they ran towards the bank. They saw three men approaching in a small sloop. Two of them were plying the oars, and the third was letting a net slip into the water, the other end of which was being held on the opposite bank by other men.



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DOGS AND THEIR USE. 55 "How are they dangerous, aunt ?" "Because very often great masses of snow, called avalanches, come tumbling and rolling down from above, and bury all beneath it." "And is there no one to come and help those travellers?" asked Louisa, anxiously. "Yes, dear child, it is the Alpine dog which comes to their help." "How do they do that?" "On the top of one of those mountains, called the Great St Bernard, good pious men, full of love to God and their fellow-creatures, have built a hospice or inn for travellers. They have also brought up a number of dogs, accustomed to the cold, and have taught them to go and look for those unfortunate people who have been lost in the snow. Whenever there has been a storm, or a great wind to loosen the avalanches, all the dogs set out from the hospice, and disperse themselves through the mountains, looking and smelling on every side, and listening to every sound. They have a little bell tied round their necks, so that they may be heard, and a little flask full of brandy, to restore fainting travellers. When they have smelt any one under the snow, which they can do even at a great depth,



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6 Virtue 6tvrslon. gllastratzb tjuitbile 0onkf. THE MOSSDALE LIBRARY. Two volumes, I6mo, cloth elegant, gilt edges, illustrated. Price, per set, $ 2 50 Separately, $. 25 I. Mossdale: a Tale. By ANNA M. DE JONGH. it. Labours of Love: a Tale for the Young. By WINIFRED TAYLOR. THE CHRISTMAS LIBRARY. Three volumes, illustrated, cloth extra, bevelled, gilt edges. Price, per set, 2 70 I Separately, .o 90 Christmas Day at the Beacon. ii. The Kind Governess; or, How to Make Home Happy. iii. At Home and Abroad; or, Uncle William's Adventures. Scripture History for the Young. By the Rev. JOHN HOWARD, A.M. Illustrated by 322 Engravings on Steel, beautifully bordered, and an Illuminated Title-page. Two volumes, small 4to, cloth extra, gilt edges, . $o oo ,, ,, half morocco, . 12 oo ,, full ,, .. 6'00 Scripture Natural History for the Young. By the Rev. ALEXANDER FLETCHER, D.D. Entirely New Edition, revised and corrected according to the best and most recent authorities. Illustrated with above 260 Engravings and coloured Title-page. Two volumes, small 4t0, cloth, . . oo half morocco, . 50 Juvenile Sunday Books. By the Authors of "Doing and Suffering," and "Mothers in Council." Each volume has Eight plain and Two coloured Illustrations. Price, o... cents each. OLD TESTAMENT SERIES. I NEW TESTAMENT SERIES. x. Pictures of the Old World. Childhood ofJesus. 2. Abraham, the Friend of God. /12. Chr Wneflors 3. Joseph, the Captive Ruler. 2. Christ's Wonderful Works. 4. The Desert Journey. 13. Friends of Jesus. 5. The Youthful Prophet, and Israel's 4. Parables of Jesus. First King. 6. The Shepherd King and his Wise I S. Stories of the Holy Land. Son. 6. Story of the Cross. Simply and lovingly written, printed in large type, and profusely illustrated, these little volumes will be welcomed by the little ones in every home



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66 THE FISHING PARTY not altogether very well pleased at being roused so early in the morning. The amusement of fishing seemed to be no pleasure to him, for he had lived a whole year with his grandfather, who lived near a seaport, and there, as he said, he had seen fishing every day, which had left anything but an agreeable impression on his memory. What is the matter with you, Victor? asked his mother; and why is my little boy so cross ? " Because I do not want to go to the fishing. Why could they not have chosen something else, when they knew I did not like it?" "But anything else might not have pleased your brothers and sisters." But it would have amused me, perhaps," replied Victor. "And do you not think that, in that case, your four brothers and sisters might be as vexed as you are now ? Is it not better that the greater number should be pleased? And, besides, would you wish to gratify your own wishes at the expense of the inclinations of the others?", Victor saw how selfish he had been, and to show that he knew his mamma was right, he gently kissed the hand he held in his own.



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7HE OLD SHEPHERD. 17 creatures are also eaten;" and the children's eyes filled with tears. "Who eats them?" cried the children. "We do." "We!" and they looked at each other in astonishment. "The whole of us," said Flora; "and everybody." "And, now that I think of roast mutton and chops having once been alive, I will never eat them again," said Jack. "Nor me," added Lucy. "I said as much to old Daniel," replied Flora, "but he said that then I must eat no meat, for beef, and veal, and fowl have all been living as well as mutton. And as I thought men must be very wicked to kill the poor animals for their food, the shepherd said to me, with a very serious face-oh! I will never forget his words: "'My child, it is a consequence of the punishment thatGod inflicted upon men for having disobeyed His laws. God had not intended our first parents to eat of the flesh of animals; but after the fall his purposes were changed. And men showed so much submission to their punishment, of being obliged VOL. VI. B





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THE FISHING PARTY. 71 And now you ought to rest," said Victor, laughing at his sister, "for you have secured a great prize,-it is a stock-fish at least "No," said his papa, "it is only a gudgeon; but it is not a bad prize, after all; for, though they are small, they are very delicate." "A gudgeon?" said Victor; "I never saw one when I was at grandpapa's !" I believe you, my boy, because it is a fresh-water fish." And is the sea not made of fresh water, papa ? asked little Francis. At this, Victor gave a great shout of laughter, which somewhat disconcerted his brother. "Do not laugh at your brother, Victor," said his papa, "for there is no shame in being ignorant of a thing that he has had no opportunity of learning. Tell him all he wishes to know about it, as you have nothing else to do." But, papa, I do not know anything to tell him," confessed Victor. "I only know the sea is salt, because I have tasted it." "Papa," cried Henry, "I have caught a fish. Come and help me; it is pulling at -my line so terribly I,



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THE FATE OF POOR MARTIN. Io persons he who was the wisest, or the most wicked, or the most generous. All those things amused the crowd who gathered round the juggler, and caused the pennies to rain down plentifully on to the small piece of carpet stretched in the midst of the circle." But how did the juggler manage to teach the ass all those things, if it does not naturally understand them ?" asked Henry. "Alas my son, by a very cruel means; by beating it, and depriving it of food and sleep, and by making it endure all sorts of cruelties as a punishment when it did not understand, instead of treating it gently in order to encourage it." Perhaps the juggler thought if he made it very miserable it would be more obedient," replied Henry. Perhaps he did, my son; but he was wrong. In Russia, there are post-horses which run .on the ice with incomparable rapidity, and which require neither whip nor spurs. The driver speaks to them and directs them, and the horses, accustomed to such kind treatment, set out, stop, or gallop as fast as they can, at the sound of their master's voice." "Poor Martin !" sighed Louisa, thinking of the ass; "it was much to be pitied." "It became more so afterwards," replied Mrs



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C, -ii I 1 -r



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JUVENILE AND GIFT BOOKS l FOR THE HOLIDAY SEASON, En elegant t 3inbinbng, FOR SALE BY ALL BOOKSELLERS. PUBLISHED BY VIRTUE & YORSTON, 12 DEY STREET, NEW YORK.



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THE OLD SHEPHERD.



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THE OLD SHEPHERD.



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wKV. fV n .' A ,--;I. I



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2 THE OLD SHEPHERD. "Flora must commence, then," said Arthur, "because she is the eldest." Flora was a pretty little girl about twelve years old, with a laughing, rosy face, and a pair of merry black eyes, that had a twinkle of mischief in them. "You know," said she, "how happy I was to set out for Scotland to stay with my uncle at the Glen, in the county of Perth. Mamma had often told me that there were a great many flocks and shepherds there, and that I might go with them to the fields every day. I was very happy to see my little cousin Margaret again, but I was still happier to think that for six whole weeks I was going to be a shepherdess. I had often read about them in books; for one day, when mamma was out, she left her bookcase open, and I was so fond of stories that I took a book, and it was all about a beautiful shepherdess called Flora, the same as me. That made me wish to read more, and I read of shepherds who went about playing flutes, beautiful white lambs adorned with ribbons, huts built in the green woods, and surrounded with roses, jasmine, and honeysuckle. The interior of those huts was like a fairy palace; the shepherds slept on beds of moss and flowers, and near them rippled streams of pure fresh water."



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,48 DOGS AND THEIR USE. mamma does with her spaniel; I would keep it in my room and feed it with biscuits, and put a ribbon round its neck, for me to lead it by when we went out to walk." First of all, Henry," said his aunt, eating biscuits and living in idleness would not suit a shepherd's dog, who likes work and plain food better than anything. This dog is large and strong; he is of a dark-brown colour, mixed with black, and has a large, bushy tail. He would not be very ornamental in a room: spaniels are. preferred for pets, because they are little, and have beautiful long silky hair." "But spaniels are useful too, are they not, mamma ?" asked Louisa. "Grandmamma's sleeps at her feet to warm them, and barks whenever any one comes into the room." "Yes, my little daughter, but when grandmamma's spaniel lies at her feet, it is only thinking of warming itself. They are generally so much spoiled by petting, that they get jealous and selfish, and will not suffer any other animal to approach. It is of very little use as a defence, for, being always shut up, they only bark when strangers are already in the house; whereas the watch-dog, for example, warns us of their approach."



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THE FATE OF POOR MARTIN Io5 "'That would not pay,' said he; 'a beast which has already cost me more than it was worth I will let it rest for a few days, and then take it to the fair. I might perhaps find some one to buy it, if it were only for its skin.' "He really took the ass to the fair; but poor Martin was so thin and worn-out looking, that no one cared to purchase it. Besides it was now old, and as its teeth no longer told its age, people thought it was older than it really was. "The miller was just about to lead back his ass, when a poor organ-grinder came up to him. "' How much is your ass?' he asked.' "'Twenty-five shillings,' replied the miller. "' It is more than he is worth,' said a passer-by; 'he has not more than two days' life left in him.' "' I will give you fifteen for him,' said the musician. "'Done,' replied the miller, eagerly. And the musician, having paid the money, led away his ass, and harnessed him to the little light cart which carried his children-and all his small belongings. "Fifteen shillings you will say for an ass, whose grandfather was sold for a hundred and seventy pounds! Such is the result of ignorance and brutality.



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Virtue 6; Yorston. iI Belegant g 'ib nag klnamus. TH E H TJ D SS.O NT, ,frms tje N ti>btrtess to trte Sea. BY BENSON J. LOSSING, Author of "Pictorial History ofthe Civil War," "Field-Book of the Revolution," "Field-Book of the War ofj812," &'c., S&c. Illustrated by upward of Three Hundred Engravings, on Wood and Steel, from Drawings by the Author. The engraving of the illustrations has been executed by the most skilfiul artists, and the printing done in the best manner, on toned paper made expressly for the wor] One volume, small quarto, morocco cloth, gilt, $ o oo ,, ,, morocco extra, . 5 oo0 "Very few Americans are so well qualified as is Mr Lossing to write intelligently regarding the Hudson, and every American will bear testimony to the conscientious accuracy of the illustrations."-New York Daily Times. "Mr Lossing writes, as he draws, with singular felicity, and his pages have .an unflagging interest which rarely attaches to books of mere description."Albany Evening journal. EPISODES OF FICTION; OR, >oirze Storitr from tze aretat tobelists. With Biographical Introductions. Numerous Original Illustrations by Sam Bough, Clark Stanton, J. M'Whirter, J. O. Brown, L. Huard, F. Barnard, R. P. Leitch, Harrison Weir, &c, &c. All engraved in the best style and printed on superfine calendered paper. One volume, small quarto, rich morocco cloth, gilt, $6 oo ,, ,, morocco extra, . o. o 0 This volume contains a series of choice extracts from the best works of some of the most popular English novelists; extracts selected with the view of illustrating the general character of their style, and presenting the reader with an opportunity of comparing the present school of fiction with the past. As far as possible, the editor has sought in each selection an episode of the story from which it is taken, and his object has been to furnish the reader with material for an hour or two of pleasant readingrand the artist with suitable subjects for the exercise of his pencil.



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I6 THE OLD SHEPHERD. are called herbivorous, because they only live upon herbs. "'The rams, which are the strongest among the flock, are the only ones which have horns, and yet those horns are turned round their ears in such a manner as to be of no use to them as a means of defence.' "' And then sheep are not wicked,' replied I; 'for mamma always says my brother Jack is as gentle as a lamb.' "' But it would not be wicked only to defend oneself against an enemy,-it would be brave,' said the shepherd; 'and the wild sheep know how to protect themselves. In the countries where they are found, in the north of Asia, for instance, they fear neither men nor animals; they give fearful blows with their heads, and with so much courage, that they are sometimes conquerors. But when the sheep is domesticated, it loses its natural qualities; it has gradually become timid, improvident, and incapable of providing for its own wants; it is spoilt and degenerated, in short, because that is the usual effect of bondage.'" "Ah, well," continued Flora, those poor sheep, which are so useful to us, which give us milk, wool, candle, and so many other things, those good, gentle



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ABRAHAM'S SACRIFICE. 23 a child no bigger than you are now, to do all that God commanded him;'so God loved him, and He loves you too, when you are good, and keep all His holy laws. God had not yet told Abraham to do anything very difficult; but one day He said to him: "You must leave your country and family, and depart into a land that I will show you." Such a command would cause us a good deal of trouble and grief, and very likely it did to the patriarch Abraham. To leave the country he loved, where all his friends dwelt, and where he had such numerous possessions, and to go into a country he knew not,which, perhaps, had neither water nor pasture, and which was, no doubt, a long way off, was very sad and painful; but God wished it, and so Abraham wished it also. He called all his family together, collected his flocks, and departed as God had told him to do. It was, indeed, a long and weary journey, and Abraham had to endure many difficulties on the way. Once, a famine had fallen upon the land through which he was travelling, and Abraham was obliged to go into Egypt, so that his family might not die of starvation.



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46 DOGS AND THEIR USE. which he held out to the passers-by, as if asking alms. And as his master was old and could not walk quickly, the good dog went slowly on in front of him, leading him gently by the chain to keep him out of the gutters, and all the dangers that presented themselves on their way. The children looked and seemed to understand that this dog was really of some use. "Here is a good dog, which is of great service to this poor old man !" said Louisa. "This dog," said Mrs Graham, "belongs to a kind which is, perhaps, the most intelligent of all. They learn to fetch and carry different things, to open and shut doors, and I have even seen one which was taught by its master to play cards, make up sentences with moveable letters, and perform many wonderful tricks. It was very strange, even though we saw the signs by which the master directed the dog. But as there is no true good results from all that, I like the blind man's dog better." "But, aunt," said Henry, after reflecting a few moments, "all dogs cannot be employed like that one, for there are not so many blind men in the world." "No, thank God !" replied Mrs Graham, smiling;



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THE FISHING PARTY. 77 pebbles of the sea. They detach them with great rakes, put them into boats, and bring them to land. The oysters they put into large reservoirs into which the sea-water flows at every tide, and leave them there to fatten for eight or ten months, and then they sell them. I have also seen turbots; and they are strange fish to look at, for they are flat, round, and swim on one of their sides, and have two eyes on the other." They must be very ugly," said Francis. "Yes," replied Victor, "but it is so good to eat that they call the turbot the sea-pheasant." "I have seen fish very like that in the kitchen," said Kate; "but they were soles and flounders." "All the fish there are good," said Victor; "but there is none of them like turbot." "And then turbot is much larger, and sells dearer," said Mrs Egerton. I have seen cod," said Henry; but it was only in a grocer's shop, all cut into pieces and salted into a barrel. So it would be very difficult for me to say what like it once was." And I have seen sardines and anchovies in little boxes," said Kate. "Sardines," said her papa, "are caught in great