• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Preface
 Table of Contents
 Sing-a-song of sixpence
 The frog who would a wooing go
 The three little pigs
 The ugly duckling
 Puss in boots
 Dame Trot and her cat
 The old woman and her pig
 Tom Thumb
 The three bears
 Jack and the bean-stalk
 Diamonds and toads
 Hop o' my thumb
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Aunt Friendly's nursery keepsake : containing seventy-two pages of pictures printed in colours by Kronheim with letter-press descriptions
Title: Aunt Friendly's nursery keepsake
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00024369/00001
 Material Information
Title: Aunt Friendly's nursery keepsake containing seventy-two pages of pictures printed in colours by Kronheim with letter-press descriptions
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : col. ill. ; 19 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Baker, Sarah S ( Sarah Schoonmaker ), 1824-1906
Kronheim, Joseph Martin, 1810-1896 ( Lithographer )
Frederick Warne and Co ( Publisher )
Scribner, Welford, and Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: Frederick Warne and Co.
Scribner, Welford and Co.
Place of Publication: London
New York
Publication Date: [1870?]
 Subjects
Subject: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes -- 1870   ( rbgenr )
Fairy tales -- 1870   ( rbgenr )
Children's poetry -- 1870   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1870   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1870
Genre: Nursery rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Fairy tales   ( rbgenr )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
General Note: Preface dated 1870.
General Note: Contains prose and verse.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00024369
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002221385
notis - ALG1608
oclc - 57314219

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Preface
        Preface
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents
    Sing-a-song of sixpence
        Page Song 1
        Page Song 2
        Page Song 3
        Page Song 4
        Page Song 5
        Page Song 6
        Page Song 7
        Page Song 8
        Page Song 9
        Page Song 10
        Page Song 11
    The frog who would a wooing go
        Page Frog 1
        Page Frog 2
        Page Frog 3
        Page Frog 4
        Page Frog 5
        Page Frog 6
        Page Frog 7
        Page Frog 8
        Page Frog 9
        Page Frog 10
        Page Frog 11
    The three little pigs
        Page P 1
        Page P 2
        Page P 3
        Page P 4
        Page P 5
        Page P 6
        Page P 7
        Page P 8
        Page P 9
        Page P 10
        Page P 11
    The ugly duckling
        Page Duck 1
        Page Duck 2
        Page Duck 3
        Page Duck 4
        Page Duck 5
        Page Duck 6
        Page Duck 7
        Page Duck 8
        Page Duck 9
        Page Duck 10
        Page Duck 11
    Puss in boots
        Page Puss 1
        Page Puss 2
        Page Puss 3
        Page Puss 4
        Page Puss 5
        Page Puss 6
        Page Puss 7
        Page Puss 8
        Page Puss 9
        Page Puss 10
        Page Puss 11
    Dame Trot and her cat
        Page Trot 1
        Page Trot 2
        Page Trot 3
        Page Trot 4
        Page Trot 5
        Page Trot 6
        Page Trot 7
        Page Trot 8
        Page Trot 9
        Page Trot 10
        Page Trot 11
    The old woman and her pig
        Page Old 1
        Page Old 2
        Page Old 3
        Page Old 4
        Page Old 5
        Page Old 6
        Page Old 7
        Page Old 8
        Page Old 9
        Page Old 10
        Page Old 11
    Tom Thumb
        Page Tom 1
        Page Tom 2
        Page Tom 3
        Page Tom 4
        Page Tom 5
        Page Tom 6
        Page Tom 7
        Page Tom 8
        Page Tom 9
        Page Tom 10
        Page Tom 11
    The three bears
        Page Bear 1
        Page Bear 2
        Page Bear 3
        Page Bear 4
        Page Bear 5
        Page Bear 6
        Page Bear 7
        Page Bear 8
        Page Bear 9
        Page Bear 10
        Page Bear 11
    Jack and the bean-stalk
        Page Jack 1
        Page Jack 2
        Page Jack 3
        Page Jack 4
        Page Jack 5
        Page Jack 6
        Page Jack 7
        Page Jack 8
        Page Jack 9
        Page Jack 10
        Page Jack 11
    Diamonds and toads
        Page Toad 1
        Page Toad 2
        Page Toad 3
        Page Toad 4
        Page Toad 5
        Page Toad 6
        Page Toad 7
        Page Toad 8
        Page Toad 9
        Page Toad 10
        Page Toad 11
    Hop o' my thumb
        Page Hop 1
        Page Hop 2
        Page Hop 3
        Page Hop 4
        Page Hop 5
        Page Hop 6
        Page Hop 7
        Page Hop 8
        Page Hop 9
        Page Hop 10
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text
This page contains no text.


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HOP 0' MY THUMB SAVES HIS PARENTS.


AUNT FRIENDLY'S
NURSERY KEEPSAKE.
CONTAINING
SEVENTY-TWO PAGES OF PICTURES
crnintb in Calaurs hb trnrnim.
WITH
LETTER-PRESS DESCRIPTIONS.
LONDON:
FREDERICK WARNE AND CO.
BEDFORD STREET, COVENT GARDEN.
NEW YORKE SCRIBNARK WELFORD AND CO.


THE great success which has attended the Nursery
Literature issued by the Publishers, has induced
them to add another volume to the Children's Library.
AUNT FRIENDLY'S NURSERY KEEPSAKE will, they are
sure, be a welcome gift to all the Little Ones.
LONDON, 1870.


eXmfffnntx.
SING.A-SONG OF SIXPENCE.
THE FROG WHO WOULD A WOOING GO.
THE THREE LITTLE PIGS.
THE UGLY DUCKLING.
PUSS IN BOOTS.
/ DAME TROT AND HER CAT.
THE OLD WOMAN AND HER PIG.
TOM THUMB.
THE THREE BEARS.
JACK AND THE BEAN STALK.
DIAMONDS AND TOADS.
HOP O' MY THUMB.


SING-A-SONG OF SIXPENCE.
1,~ -4n a


THE OPENNING UO THE PIE.


SING-A-SONG OF SIXPENCE.
SING-a-song of sixpence,
A pocket full of rye;
Four and twenty blackbirds
Baked in a pie.
When the pie was open'd,
The birds began to sing;
Was not that a dainty dish,
To set before the king?
3


I
THE KING COUNTINU H1iS MONEY.


SING-A-SONG OF SIXPENCE.
The king was in his counting-house
Counting out his money;
The queen was in the parlour
Eating bread and honey.


a ri
QUEiN I E
r it
-!!_ % ~~~ "., ;
'IE QUEli~ L N ttER. PA i LOU{ .


E/
I
I
5
i
<*
TIIE MAID IN TLE GARDEN.


SING-A-SONG OF SIXPENCE.
The maid was in the garden
Hanging out the clothes;
By came a Jackdaw,
And snapt off her nose.
0


w
I~ 4 / /
2
%~* K
iI
/ O~~~~
THE JACKI)AW'S WICKE1I)NESS.


SING-A-SONG OF SIXPENCE.
They sent for the king's doctor,
Who sewed it on again;
The Jackdaw for this naughtiness
Deservedly was slain.
I
10


M i r
01 ,
TE MAIAD AND) THE DOCTOR.


THE FROG WHO WOULD A
WOOING GO.
:0ES


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i I84 l l
c i
i,\. I 4
I X } u.I
-I SA' W W | .qN
l 1__ 1 '~~~~~~~~
THE FROG IN FULL DRESS.


THE FROG WVHO WOULD A WOOING GO.
A FiOGc he would a wooing go,
Whether his nmother would let him or no.
So off he marched with his nice new hat,
And on the way he met a rat.
U
3


ri-------- -- --- -- ----~~~~~ ------ i-- -- 1
FROGGY MLEETS THE RAT.


THE FROG WHO \WOtUD A WOOING CO.
When they
came to
the door of the
Mouse's Hall,
They gave a loud knock, and they gave a
loud call.
" Pray Mrs. Mouse, are you within ?"
" Oh yes, Mr. Rat, I am learning to spin."
" Pray Mrs. Mouse, will you give us some
beer ?
For Froggy and
cheer."
I are fond
of good
5


MRS. MOUSE SPLNNIG.


THE MEiBY-MAKING.


THE FROG WHO WOULD A WOOING GO.
But as they were all a merry-making,
The cat and her kittens came tumbling
in.
The Cat she seized the rat by the crown,
The kittens they pulled the little mouse
down.
This put poor frog in a terrible fright,
So he took up his hat anld le wished them
good night.
8


FROGGY I'R1GHTENED.


TIHE lFRtOG W\VO 'WOUL]) A WOOING GO.
As Froggy
brook,
was
crossing
him
over a
A lilly-white duck came and gobbled hilm
up.
So there was an end of one, two, and
three,
The Rat,
the Mouse,
and the little
Froggee?
10


i-
DEATH OF POOR FROGGY. .


THE THREE LITTLE PIGS.


GOING TO SEEK THEIR FORTUNES.


THE STORY OF THE THREE LITTLE PIGS.
ONCE upon a time there was an old pig with three little pigs,
and as she had not enough to keep them, she sent them out
to seek their fortune. The first that went off met a man
with a bundle of straw, and said to him, Please, man, give
me that straw to build me a house ;" which the man did, and
the little pig built a house with it. Presently came along
a wolf; and knocked at the door, and said,--
" Little pig, little pig, let me come in."
To which the pig answered,-
" No, no, by the hair of my chiny chin chin."
The wolf then answered to that,-
" Then I'll huff, and I'll puff, and I'll blow your house in."
So he huffed and he puffed, and he blew his house in, and
eat up the little pig
The second little pig met a man with a bundle of furze,
and said, Please man give me that furze to build a house;"
which the man did, and the pig built his house. Then along
came the wolf; and said,-
Little pig, little pig, let me come in."
" No, no, by the hair of my chiny chin chin."
3 !


THE HOUSE OF FURZE.


THE STORY OF THE THREE LITTLE PIGS,
" Then I'll puff and I'll huff, and I'll blow your house in."
So he huffed, and he puffed, and he puffed, and he huffed,
and at last he blew the house down, and he eat up the little
pig.
The third little pig met a man with a load of bricks, and
said, "Please, man, give me those bricks to build a house
with;" so the man gave him the bricks, and he built his
house with them. So the wolf came, as he did to the other
little pigs, and said,--
" Little pig, little pig, let me come in."
" No, no, by the hair of my chiny chin chin."
"Then I'll huff, and I'll puff, and I'll blow your house in."
Well, he huffed, and he puffed, and he huffed, and he puffed,
and he puffed, and he huffed; but he could not get the
house down. When he found that he could not, with all his
huffing and puffing, blow the house down, he said, Little
pig, I know where there is a nice field of turnips." Where?"
said the little pig. Oh, in Mr. Smith's Home-field, and if
you will be ready to-morrow morning I will call for you,
and we will go together, and get some for dinner." Very
well," said the little pig I will be ready. What time lo
you mean to go? Oh, at six o'clock." Well, the little
pig got up a five, and got the turnips before the wolf
came-(which he did about six)-and said, Little pig, are
you ready?" The little pig said, "Ready! I have been,
5


EARLY ISING.


LITTLE PIG ESCAPING.


THE STORY OF THE TIlREE LITTLE PIGS.
and come back again, and got a nice pot-full for dinner."
The wolf felt very angry at this, but thought that he would
be up to the little pig somehow or other, so he said, Little
pig, I know where there is a nice apple-tree." Where ?"
said the pig. Down at Merry-garden," replied the wolf,
"and if you will not deceive me I will come for you, at five
o'clock to-morrow, and we will go together and get some
apples." Well, the little pig bustled up the next morning
at four o'clock, and went off for the apples, hoping to get
back before the wolf came; but he had further to go, and
had to climb the tree, so that just as he was coming down
from it, he saw thewolf coming, which, as you may suppose,
frightened him very much. When the wolf came up he
said, "Little pig, what! are you here before me ? Are they
nice apples ?" Yes, very," said the little pig. I will
throw you down one;" and he threw it so far, that, while the
wolf was gone to pick it up, the little pig jumped down and ran
home. The next day the wolf came again, and said to the
little pig, Little pig, there is a fair at Shanklin this after-
noon, will you go ? "Oh yes," said the pig, I will go;
what time shall you be ready ?" "At three," said the wolf.
So the little pig went off before the time as usual, and got
to the fair, and bought a butter-churn, which he w;as going
home with, when he saw the wolf coming. Then lie could
not tell what to do. So he got into the churn to hide, and
8


1 1
-b ,~~~~.-
-i
g.X.,.'duS~w' 51 XXS-..
THE WOLF, THE PIG, AND THE CHURN.


THE STORY OF TIIE TIREE LITTLE PIGS.
by so doing turned it round, and it rolled down the hill with
the pig in it, which frightened the wolf so much, that he
ran home without going to the fair. He went to the little I
pig's house, and told him how frightened he had been by a
great round thing which came down the hill past him. Then
the little pig said, Ha! I frightened you then. I had been
to the fair and bought a butter-churn, and when I saw you,
I got into it and rolled down the hill." Then the wolf was
very angry indeed, and declared he would eat up the little
pig, and that he would get down the chimney after him.
When the little pig saw what he was about, he hung on the
pot full of water, and made up a blazing fire, and just as the
wolf was coming down, took off the cover, and in fell the
wolf; so the little pig put on the cover again in an instant,
boiled him up, and eat him for supper, and lived happy ever
afterwards.
10


THE FATE OF THE WOLF.


,-_KZ 'K( C". 6-A-"" _~-~_l~:16jJ.,, ,, agL- -6T)
;~~~~~~~~~~I~~~~~~ )I
THE UGLY
DUCKLING.


NI
IN THE FARM-YARD.


THE UGLY DUCKLING.
ONCE there was a duck who had just hatched a brood of
ducklings; one of them had been longer coming out of the
shell than the others, and when it came it was very ugly.
But its mother did not love it less on that account; mothers
never think their little ones ugly. It could swim very well,
so she knew it was not a young turkey, as an old duck had
said it might be, and she took it with all the rest of the
brood to the farm-yard to introduce it into good society.
An old turkey, who was very grand, came up to the duck,
and said, Your children are all pretty except one. There
is one ugly duckling. I wish you could improve him
little." "That is impossible, your grace," replied th
mother, he is not pretty; but he has a good disposition,
and swims even better than the others." Well, the other
ducklings are graceful enough," said the turkey, "pray
make yourselves at home, here."
But how could the ugly duckling do so ? The whole farm-
yard laughed at him. The ducks pecked him, the fowls
beat him, the girl who fed the poultry drove him away with
a stick.
3


ii~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
T'UE DUCKILLNG DRIUVENN AWAYY.


THE UGLY DUCKLING.
The poor duckling flew over the pailings, and joined some
wild ducks who lived on the moor. You are very ugly,"
said the wild ducks; "but that will not matter if yQu do
not want to marry into sur family." After he had been on
the moor two days, he made friends with some wild geese,
and had nearly consented to fly over the sea with them,
when, "pop, pop," went a gun, and the poor gosling fell dead
in the water. The poor duckling was so frightened that he
hid himself amongst the rushes. When all was quiet again,
he came out and ran over the moor till lie reached a tumble-
down cottage, the door of which was ajar. He crept in, and
stayed there all night. A woman, a cat, and a hen lived
in this cottage. The hen had such short legs that her
mistress called her Chickie short legs." The old woman
let the duckling live in her house, hoping that by-and-bye
it might lay eggs. Now the cat was the master of the
house, and the hen was the mistress, and they always said,
"We and the world," because they thought themselves half
the world, at least. One day the duckling said sadly, It
is very dull here, how much I should like to swim in the
water and to dive. What a foolish idea, said the hen.
" You have nothing else to do, therefore you have strange
fancies. If you could purr or lay eggs they would pass
away; ask the cat, he is the cleverest animal I know, if
he would like to dive in the water; ask our old mistress,
5


L
TIlE CAT, THE HEN, AND THE DUCKLING.


" 75 "" --
e
r'I
CUTTING THE DUCKLING OUT OF THE ICE.


TIIE UGLY DUCKLING.
there is no one in the world more clever than she is; do you
think she would like to let the water close over her head?"
"You don't understand me," said the duckling. "I think
I must go into the world again." Very well, go," said the
hen; and the duckling went.
'Very near the cottage he found some water, where he
could swim and dive; but all creatures avoided him because
he was so ugly, therefore he was always alone. One evening
there came a beautiful flock of birds out of the bushes. They
curved their graceful necks, while their soft plumage shone
with dazzling whitness. The duckling felt quite a strange
sensation as he watched them fly up in the air. He stretched
out his neck towards them, and uttered a cry so strange
that it frightened himself. How he loved the white birds !
how he longed to be with them.
By-and-bye winter came, and froze the water quite hard.
The ice crackled round the duckling and at last shft him in,
so that he could not get out. Early in the morning a peasant
who was passing saw what had happened, broke the ice
with his axe, took up the duckling, and carried it home to
his wife.
The warmth revived the poor thing and it began.to fly
about; the children wanted to play with it, but they only
frightened it; it ran to the door which was open, and
8


TllE BEAUTI'UL BIRDS.


THE UGLY DUCKLING,
managed to slip away among the bushes, where it lay down
in the new fallen snow.
It would be very sad to tell you all the duckling suffered
that cold winter; but spring came at last, and the young
bird felt that his wings were grown strong. He flew
away, and stopped at last in a beautiful garden near a fine
piece of water. On it he saw two magnificent white birds
swimming. I will fly to those royal birds," he thought,
" they will kill me because I am ugly; but I had rather be
killed by them than pecked by ducks, or beaten by hens."
So he flew to the water and swam towards the swans. "Kill
me," he said, as they sailed towards him, and he bowed his
head meekly. But what did he see in the stream? Not a
dark grey ugly duckling, but a beautiful swan To be born
in a duck's nest in a farmyard, does not matter to a bird, if
it is hatched from a swan's egg. Yes, he too was a swan.
Now he would have friends to love him, and nobody would
scorn and ill-use him any more. He rustled his feathers,
curved his slender neck and cried joyfully, I never thought
such good was in store for me when I was an ugly
duckling."
10


I
THE DUCKLING FINDS HE IS A SWAN.


PUSS IN BOOTS.
.<^N. -z


r
8gp- | l C-i- l,
PUSS CO4SOLING THE MLLER'S SN -


PUSS IN BOOTS.
ONCE upon a time there was a miller who had three sons.
When he was dying he left each of them a legacy. To his
eldest son he left his mill; to the second his ass; and to the
youngest his cat. The poor boy was very sad when he
found that he had nothing belonging to him but a cat; but
to,his great surprise, puss jumped on the table, and said in
a friendly manner: Do not be sad my dear master. Only
buy me a pair of boots and a bag, and I will provide for you
and myself," So the miller's son, who had a shilling or two
in his pocket, bought a smart little pair of boots and a bag,
and gave them to puss, who put some bran and sow-thistles
into his bag, opened the mouth of it, and lay down in a
rabbit warren. A foolish young rabbit jumped into it; puss
drew the string and soon killed it. He went immediately to
the palace with it. He found the king and queen sitting on
their throne; and bowing low, he laid the rabbit at the
king's feet, saying: Please your majesty, my master, the
Marquis de Carrabas, has sent you a rabbit from his warren,
*as a mark of respect." I am much obliged to the Mar-
quis'," said the king, and he ordered the rabbit to be taken
3


PUSS MAKES A PRESENT TO THE KING.


PUSs IN BOOTS.
to the cook, and a piece of money to be given to the cat.
Puss, much pleased, took a rabbit daily to the king as a gift
from his master, till his majesty was well acquainted with
the name of the Marquis de Carrabas, and with his wonderful
cat. There was a very rich and cruel Ogre living in that
country. One day puss went to call on him, and the ogre
was quite amazed at hearing a cat talk; it was the firsttime
too he had seen a Puss in Boots." Is it true, most
wonderful ogre," said Puss, that you can change yourself
into any creature you please ? " Quite true, as you shall
see," said the ogre, and he changed himself into a lion, and
roa:.ed so terribly, that the cat climbed up the wall out of his
way. Then the ogre resumed his own ugly shape, and
laulghed at puss's fear. It was very surprising," said the
cat; you are of such a grand size that I do not wonder
you could become a lion-but could you change yourself
into some very small animal ?" You shall see," said the
stupid vain ogre, and he turned into a mouse. Directly
puss saw him in that shape, he darted at him and eat him
up. The ogre quite deserved it, for he had eaten many men
himself. Then puss made haste back to his master, and said,
" Come and bathe in the river, and when the king comes by,
do exactly as I tell you, for I see his carriage." The miller's
son obeyed his friend the cat, undressed and jumped into the
-;water, and cunning puss ran away with his clothes and hid


PUSS CALLS ON THE OGRE.


3~~~
"I-
PUSS ASKS IELP FOR HIS MASTER.


PUSS iN BOOTS.
them under a large stone. By-and-bye the king drove by
with his daughter. Puss began to call very loud Help,
help! or my lord Marquis 'de Carrabas will be drowned."
The king stopped the coach directly, and asked what was
the matter. Puss answered, that while his master was
bathing, some thieves had stolen his clothes, and that there-
fore the marquis could not come out of the water. The
king luckily had a dress suit with him, so he sent it by a
servant to the Marquis, and desired him to accept a seat in
the royal coach, and he would drive him home.
The miller's son looked very well in his fine clothes, and
the king was pleased with his appearance. Puss directed
the coachman to drive to the late ogre's castle, and then he
ran on before. Coming to a large field in which reapers
were at work, he said, If the king asks you to whom these
fields belong, you must say, to the Marquis de Carrabas, or
you shall all be chopped as small as mincemeat." The men
were so astonished at hearing a cat talk, that they dared not
refuse; so when the king came by and asked, whose fields are
these? they said, they belong to the Marquis de Carrabas."
Next puss came to some meadows with shepherds and flocks
of sheep, and said the same to them. So when the king
asked them, whose flocks are these ? they answered, those of
the Marquis de Carrabas. *
Puss ran on all over the dead ogre's land and said the
8


-1 r
- -
% Ik k(
I /1
PUSS THREATENS THE REAPERS.


PUSS IN BOOTS.
same thing to the woodmen and the gamekeepers on the road,
who all obeyed him, till the king at last said to the miller's
son, "You have a fine property, my lord Marquis de
Carrabas." When puss came to the ogre's castle, he stood
on the steps and waited till the coach drove up.
"Will your majesty honour my lord by taking some
refreshment," he said; and the king who had not so fine a
castle belonging to himself, alighted from his carriage and
entered the house. Now, the ogre was just going to his
dinner when puss had called and killed him, so there was a
very fine feast upon the table. Puss told the ogre's servants
they should be made into mincemeat if they did not consent
to take the Marquis de Carrabas for their master, and they
were glad to serve him instead of the ogre. The king took
such a fancy to the rich Marquis de Carrabas, that he gave
him the princess for his wife. They lived in the ogre's fine
castle (which puss presented to his master), and the most
faithful and the happiest of their servants was Puss in
Boots."
10


(
NW
THE KING AND PRINCES VISIT TIE MARQUIS.


DAME TROT AND HER CAT.
*0%S maNE


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DAME TROT BUYS THE CAT.


DAME TROT AND HER CAT.
DAME TROT once went down to a neighbouring fair,
And what do you think that she bought herself there ?
A Pussy! the prettiest ever was seen;
No cat was so gentle, so clever, and clean.
Each dear little paw was as black as a sloe,
The rest of her fur was as white as the snow;
Her eyes were bright green, and her sweet little face
Was pretty and meek, full of innocent grace.
Dame Trot hurried home with this beautiful cat;
Went up stairs to take off her cloak and her hat;
And when she came down was astonished to see
That Pussy was busy preparing the tea.
"Oh, what a strange cat !" thought poor little Dame Trot,
"She'll break my best china and upset the pot;"
But no harm befel them, the velvety paws
Were quite sure; the Dame for alarm had 1lo cause.
3


rl.
PUSS MAKING TEA.


DAME TROT AND HER CAT.
Next morning when little Dame Trot came down stairs,
To attend as usual to household affairs;
She found that the kitchen was swept up as clean,
As if Puss a regular servant had been.
The tea stood to draw, and the toast was done brown,
The Dame very pleased to her breakfast sat down;
While Puss by her side on an arm chair sat up,
And lapp'd her warm milk from a nice china cup.
Now Spot, the old house-dog, looked on in amaze,
He'd never been used to such queer cattish ways;
But Puss mew'd so sweetly, and moved with such grace,
That Spot at last liked her, and licked her white face.
The Dame went to market and left them alone,
Puss washing her face, the dog picking a bone;
But when she came back Spot was learning to dance,
From Pussy, who gnce had had lessons in France.
5


THE DANCING LESSON.


/ PUSS BRINGS A FISH.


DAME TROT AND .HER CAT.
Poor little Dame Trot had no money to spare,
And only too often, her cupboard was bare;
Then kind Mrs. Pussy would catch a nice fish,
And serve it for dinner upoh a clean dish.
The rats and the mice who wish'd Pussy to please,
Were now never seen at the butter or cheese;
The Dame daily found their numbers grow thinner,
For Puss eat a mouse ev'ry day for her dinner.
If Puss had a weakness, I needs must confess,
'Twas a Girl of the Period's fancy for dress,
Her greatest desire a high chignon and hat,
And a very short dress a la mode for a cat.
So one day when Dame Trot had gone out to dine,
Puss dressed herself up, as she thought, very fine;
And coaxed kind old Spot, who looked at her with pride,
To play pony for once, and give her a ride.
8


PUSS IN FULL DRESS.


DAME TROT AND HER CAT.
The Dame from her visit returning home late,
Met this funny couple outside her own gate,
And heartily laugh'd, when she saw her dear cat,
Dressed up in a cloak and a chignon and hat.
" You're quite a grand lady, Miss Pussy," said she,
And Pussy, affectedly, answered, Oui Oui;"
She thought it beneath her to utter a mew,
While wearing a dress of a fashion so new.
Now Spot who to welcome his mistress desired
And to company manners never aspired,
Jumped up to fawn on her,-and down came the cat,
And crushed in her tumble, her feather, and hat.
" Oh, Puss!" said Dame Trot, what a very sad mess!
You'd best have remained in your natural dress;
The graces which nature so kindly bestows,
Are more often hid than improved by fine clothes."
10


__ _I
-1
OF THE RIDE.


!
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t~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~ 1
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THE OLD WOMAN AND HER PIG.
I
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d~~~~~~~~~~~t~
N I
i,
THE OLD WOMAN FINDS SIXPENCE.


THIS OLD WO MAN AND HER PIG.
AN old woman was sweeping her house,
and she found a little crooked sixpence.
"What," said she, "shall I do with this
little sixpence ? I will go to market, and
buy a lil tle pig." As she was coming home,
she canuLe to a stile: the piggy would not
go over the stile.
She went a little further, and she met
a dog. So she said to the dog, "Dog!
bite pig; piggy won't go over the stile;
and I shan't get home to-night." But the
dog'would not.
She went a little further, and she met
'a stick. So she said," Stick! stick! beat
3


/
r
l i
I
I
" I)OG! iOG! BITE PIG."


THE OLD WOMAN AND HER PIG.
dog; dog won't bite pig; piggy won't
get over the stile; and I shan't get home
to-night," But the stick would not.
She went a little further, and she met
a fire. So she said, "Fire! fire! burn
stick; stick won't beat dog; dog won't
bite pig." But the fire would not.
She went a little further, and she met
some water. So she said, "Water! water!
quench fire; fire won't burn stick," &c.
But the water would not.
She went a little further, and she met
an ox. So she said, "Ox! ox! drink water;
water won't quench fire," &c. But the ox
would not,
She went a little further, and she
met a butcher. So she said, "Butcher!
butcher! kill ox; ox won't drink water,"
&c. But the butcher would not.
5


X,-^ ))N
-a, -7
" WATER, WATER, QUENCH FIRE."


\
"BUTCIIER, BUTCHER, KILL OX."


THE OLD WOMAN AND 1hER PIG.
She went a little further, and she met
a rope. So she said, Rope rope! hang
butcher; butcher won't kill ox," &c. But
the rope would not.
She went a little further, and she met
a rat. So she said, Rat! rat! gnaw rope;
rope won't hang butcher," &c. But the
rat would not.
She went a little further, and she met
a cat. So she said, "Cat! cat! kill rat;
rat won't gnaw rope," &c. But the cat
said to her, "If you will go to yonder cow,
and fetch me a saucer of milk, I will kill
the rat." So away went the old woman
to the cow.
But the cow said to her, If you will
go to yonder haystack, and fetch me a
handful of hay, I'll give you the milk." So
8


i""
V, I
11 I
L
"CAT CAT' KILL RAT."


THE OLD WOMAN AND HER PIG.
away went the oldwoman to the haystack;
and she brought the hay to the cow.
As soon as the cow had eaten the hay,
she gave the old woman the milk; and
away she went with it in a saucer to the
cat.
As soon as the cat had lapped up the
milk, the cat began to kill the rat; the
rat began to gnaw the rope; the rope
began to hang the butcher; the butcher
began to kill the ox; the ox beganto drink
the water; the water began to quench the
fire; the fire began to burn the stick; the
stick began to beat the dog; the dog
began to bite the pig; the little pig in a
fright jumped over the stile; and so the
old woman got home that night.
10


k k J
V -
4a
N
,
THE OLD WOMAN AND THE COW.


TOM THUMB.
0^*01,;z~,~~Th~, C


TOM THUMB'S ARRIVAL.


TOM THUMB.
IN the days of good King Arthur, there
lived a ploughman and his wife, who
wished very much to have a son; so
the man went to Merlin the enchanter,
and asked him to let him have a child
even if it were no bigger than his thumb."
" Go home and you will find one," said
Merlin'; and when the man came back
to his house he found his wife nursing a
very, very, wee baby, who in four minutes
grew to the size of the ploughman's
thumb, and never grew any more. The
fairy queen came to his christening, and
named him "Tom Thumb." She then
dressed him nicely in a shirt of spider's-
web, and a doublet and hose of thistle-
down.
3


TUM THUMB AND TIE I'UDDING.


TOM THUMB.
One day, while Tom's mother was
making a plum-pudding, Tom stood on
the edge of the bowl with a lighted
candle in his hand, that she might see to
make it properly. Unfortunately, how-
ever, while her back was turned, Tom
fell into the bowl, and his mother not
missing him, stirred him up in the
pudding, and put it and him into the pot.
Tom no sooner felt the hot water than he
danced about like mad; the woman was
nearly frightened out of her wits to see
the pudding come out of the pot and jump
about, and she was glad to give it to a
tinker who was passing that way.
The tinker was delighted with his
present; but as he was getting over a
stile, he happened to sneeze very hard,
and Tom called out from the middle of
the pudding, "Hallo, Pickens !" which so
terrified the tinker, that he threw the
( 5


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:;
---:
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TOM 'I'IIUMB AND TlHE TIiKER.


TOM THUMB AND THE COW.


TOM THUMB.
pudding into the field, and scampered
away as fast as he could. The pudding
tumbled to pieces in the fall, and Tom
creeping out, went home to his mother,
who was in great affliction because she
could not find him. A few days after-
wards Tom went with his mother into the
fields to milk the cows, and for fear he
should be blown away by the wind, she
tied him to a thistle with a small piece of
thread. Very soon after a cow eat up the
thistle and swallowed Tom Thumb. His
mother was in sad grief again; but Tom
scratched and kicked in the cow's throat
till she was glad to throw him out of her
mouth again.
One day Tom went ploughing with his
father, who gave him a whip made of a
barley straw, to drive the oxen with; but
an eagle flying by caught him up in hi
beak, and carried him to the top of a
8


TOM THUMB AND TiLE EAGLE.


TOM THUMB.
great giant's castle. The giant would
have eaten Tom up; but the fairy dwarf
scratched and bit his tongue and held on
by his teeth till the giant in a passion
took him out again and threw him into
the sea, when a very large fish swallowed
him up directly. The fish was caught
soon after and sent as a present to King
Arthur, and when the cook opened it there
was Tom Thumb inside. He was carried
to the king, who was delighted with the
little man. Tom walked on the king's
left hand, and danced on the queen's. He
became a great favourite with Arthur, who
made him a knight. He was good and
kind to his parents, and the old ballad
says,-
Such where his deeds and noble acts
In Arthur's court there shone,
As like in all the world beside
Was hardly seen or known
10


7
TOM THUMB AT ARTHUR'S COURT.


^l^^^ii~~~~~~~~:l^^ ~a
THE TIHIREE BEARS.
*Mxa~- cZ~-~ r


THE MORNING WALK.


THE THREE BEARS.
ONCE upon a time three bears lived in a
nice little house in a great forest.
There was the Father Bear, the Mother
Bear, and the Baby Bear.
They had each a bed to sleep il, a
chair to sit on, and a basin and spoon for
eating milk or honey, which was their
favourite food.
One morning the three bears resolved
on taking a walk before breakfast; but
before they went out, they poured their
warm milk into their basins, that it might
get cool by the time they came back.
Mr. and Mrs. Bear walked arm-in-arm,
and Baby Bear ran by their side.
Now there lived in the same forest a
sweet little girl who was called Golden
Hair. She, also, was walking that morning
3


-7-7
I
, -- 7- "
LITTLE GOLDEN IIAIR.


THE THREE BEARS.
in the wood, and happening to pass by
the bears' house, and seeing the window
open, she peeped in. There was no one
to be seen; but three basins of steaming
hot milk all ready to be eaten, seemed to
say: Come in and have some breakfast."
So Golden Hair went in and tasted the
milk in all the basins; then she sat down
in Baby Bear's chair, and took up his
spoon, and eat up all his milk. Now this
was very wrong. A tiny bear is only a
tiny bear, still he has a right to keep his
own things. But Golden Hair did not
know any better.
Unluckily, Baby Bear's chair was too
small for her, and she broke the seat and
fell through, basin and all.
Then Golden Hair went up stairs, and
there she saw three beds all in a row.
Golden Hair lay down on Father Bear's
5


EATING BABY BEA1R'S BliEAKFAl'T.


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