• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Cover
 Wind Anemone. Violet. Field Convolvulus....
 Back Cover






Title: Buttercups and daisies and other pretty flowers
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00024360/00001
 Material Information
Title: Buttercups and daisies and other pretty flowers
Physical Description: 8 leaves. : ;
Language: English
Creator: Dickes, William, 1815-1892 ( Illustrator )
Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge (Great Britain) ( Publisher )
Publisher: Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge
Place of Publication: London
Publication Date: [ca. 1880]
 Subjects
Subject: Children's poetry -- 1880
Bldn -- 1880
Genre: Children's poetry
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: Illustrated by W. Dickes.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00024360
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001750245
oclc - 26477368
notis - AJG3150

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Wind Anemone. Violet. Field Convolvulus. Star-Thistle. Corn Blue-Bottle. Harebell. Ground-Ivy.
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Back Cover
        Page 24
Full Text
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!R ,-' 5P M "IV7Jlol^I1.,-WIND ANEMONE. 2. YIOLET.>: : IAft. N O E .ITFJkTT,.3. FIELD CONVOLVULUS. 4. STAR-THISTLE.6 fiREBFILL 7. GROUND-IVY.


VIOLET, WIND ANEMONE, GROUND-IVY, HAREBELL, STAR-THISTLE, CORN BLUE-BOTTLE, FIELD CONVOLVULUS.t ; '- : : 'Come, let us take a country walk, and if you are in doubtAbout the names of any flowers, I'll help to find them out.Some few there are I'm sure you know-the VIOLET is one,Coming the first to let us know that Spring-time is begun.That drooping, white, and graceful flower, which by its side you see,Has a sweet name, for it is called the WIND ANEIEONE., A little creepingplant is here, with blossoms small and blue,I GROUND-IVY-sometimes used for tea, its smell is pleasant too.All these are flowers that come in spring-but in your Summer walkYou'll find the deep-blue HAREBELL, with its rustling wiry stalk,And the STAR-THISTLE, with its points-the CORN BLUE-BOTTLE bright, LAnd FIELD GOIVOLVULUS, so gay, in lovely pink and white.A pretty garland it will make to twine around your hat;But learn the names I've told you first--pray do make sure of th:at. i[ The Baldwin Library :d i _owwiesj Ia=.: ...,D ';: :U A,ai^ o ImB I .:.. *f l ^.l...... -.. *-/ \.* l"^P l'l..* '. -- l* WIjI


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1. DANDELION. 2. SILVER-WEED. 3. BUTTERCUP. 4. COWSLIP.rn IIn-NTiTi ,-YE ,DAT9IY. 7. FOX(IOVE.


""iIiIisII<-I I.<^~-, n un nnn vYvvuvvvvvvvuvvv nrmnu14DANDELION, BUTTERCUP, COWSLIP, OX-EYE DAISY, SILVER-WEED, RED DEAD-NETTLE, FOXGLOVE.Those feathered balls among the grass are DANDELION's seed;You've often laughed to blow them off-but, though a common weed,The root a useful medicine makes-and we may not despise,But love all flowers that God has given to please his children's eyes.Here are old friends, the BUTTERCUPS, that look like living gold,And COWSLIPS, smelling, oh, how sweet! pick all your hands can hold,And make a pretty cowslip ball to play with in wet weather;And those OX-DAISIES, strung on grass, will make a famous feather,Such as the soldiers wear-and now we've crossed the field and comeTo find some flowers that seem to like a dusty kind of home,For SILVER-WEED delights to creep along the road or heath,Its leaves so elegantly cut, and silvered underneath;And RED DEAD-NETTLE's heart-shaped leaves and tiny flowers aboundIn every hedge. But where, you ask, may this grand flower be found,Tall as myself, and hung all down with drooping purple bells?FOXGLOVE, or FOLK'S GLOVE, is its name, and on the hill it dwells.iIII


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kid61. SORREL. 2. CAMPION. 3. SAINTFOIN. 4. CUCKOO-PINT.i ^ Tinv TrpqD'VnliT 7 T A n-iFT.AX A n A[SY 15. WOUNDWORT.i. PRIMROSE.F'~ -~~x~~~ ~~ x~~~-~;-1- 1.'-- _-II -I I"I --__--- ----- ----- -u;--- -- ----


CITCKOO-PINT, PRIMROSE, DAISY, :C PION, BI)D'S-FOOT TREFOIL,TOAD-FLAX, WOUNDWORT, SAINTFOIN, SORREL.One of the greatest treats I know in any country walk,Is pulling up the CUCKOO-PINT, with long and juicy stalk;And then coiled up, in leafy cup, oh, joy of joys! to findly Lord or Lady, red or white, the grandest of its kind IThen wander on by hedgerows wild, some PRIlIROSE roots to glean,And the first DAISIES of the year, the sweetest ever seen,That pleasant walk in early Spring we never can forget,But Summer brings its pleasures too, when every hedge is setWith buds and blooms of colours gay;-here is the CAMPION red,There is the BIRD'S-FOOT TREFOIL, "Shoes and Stockings" called instead;TOAD-FLAX, like yellow Snapdragon, will grow on driest ground,And WOUNDWORT, with its purple flowers, in every hedge is found.That sweet pink SAINTFOIN in your bunch will very soon be placed,And pick a SORREL leaf or two, how very sour they taste I


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I%16`411IIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIII. Ii<9-"?AffagPIMPERNEL, CROSS-LEAVED HEATH, FINE-LEAVED HEATH, REST-HARROW, RED RATLLE, MALLOW, POPPY, RAGGED ROBIN.When I was young and wished to know what weather would be out,I asked the SCARLET PIMPERNEL, who never was in doubt;If fine, he opened wide his leaves; if cloudy, closed them fast;He's called "the Poor lan's Weatherglass," one that will always last.Two sorts of Heath, the CROSS-LEAVED HEATH, the leaves set on in fours,The FINE-LEAVED HEATH's are set in threes, and it has smaller flowers.REST-HARROW, with its blossoms pink, and spreading stems so strong,Gets its odd name because its roots are very tough and long.And here I see RED RATTLE too, which sheep should never eat;And MALLOW, with its purple flowers, is growing at your feet;It makes a useful medicine, and I call it very good;But naughty POPPIES grow in corn far oftener than they should:If the poor farmer pulls them up, he is not much to blame.Old RAGfGED ROBIN I am sure you well deserve your name.III. IIIIiIIIIIIIIIIII2_L ew,4VN9F11k IIIWVI,~,~,uurvYl~,uvvu~ivvuvruwur~Nr uv~l r,,~r~l ____ - - - - -uvr ~ lu


I'm rAffP-7-eo-*6c1I!!I\4I7IAi8I1. PIMPERNEL. 2. RED RATTLE. 3. FINE-LEAVED-HEATH.4. CROSS-LEAVED HEATH.5. RAiGGED ROBIN.6. REST-HARROW. 7. MALLOW.8. POPPY.


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11


CELANDINE, KNOT-GRASS, FEVERFEW, HAWK-WEED, DEAD-NETTLE, IRIS, CHRYSANTHEMUM, GOLDEN FURZE.I-rL_When early Spring has decked the hedge in grass of emerald green,With heart-shaped leaves, and star-like flowers, peeps forth theCELANDINE;KNOT-GRASS, with pinkish, greenish flowers, in fields and wastes youmeet;The FEVERFEW, with yellow eye, springs up among the wheat;For a cool drink, in feverish pains, it formerly was prized:The bees, they say, don't like its smell, and. I am not surprised.The lemon-coloured HAWK-WEED grows in any barren spot,And the DEAD-NETTLE's blossom white-nettle that stingeth not.In marshes and in shady woods springs up the IRIS yellow,With sword-like leaves and flag-like flowers, a warlike-looking fellow.YELLOW CHRYSANTHEMUMI, I like your flowers of yellow light,With Poppies and Blue-Bottles mixed, here is a nosegay bright;But not so bright as GOLDEN FURZE, that scents the evening air:In spite of all that guard of thorns, some blossoms it shall spare.I'A_wr1b, 9tAge&.a.~~,,,,,,, ^,,~~~~~~, n,,,~~~,~~rM ~~n~~,n r~~ n~~nMMM~~~n n--


1. CELANDINE. 2. GOLDEN FURZE. 3. FEVERFEW, 4. DEAD-NETTLE.5. HAWK-WRED. 6. T. lR. 7. KNOT-GRASS. 8CHRYSANTHEMUM.


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t4


*; ,.,^- > f ,: '*.D : <^HYACINTH, MILKWORT, EVERLASTING PEA, FORGET-ME-NOT,SUCCORY, HONEYSUCKLE, DOG-ROSE, SPEEDWELL., i,, iII___ I ,IICome to the woods at early Spring, and what a glorious sight!The ground with HYACINTHS is blue, just here and there one white.On heaths the pretty XILKWORT grows, with flowers white, blue, and pink;In woods the EVERLASTING PEA: it likes the shade, I think.BLUE SUCCORY, I love you well, opening your flowers so wide;FORGET-XE-NOT, I'l look for you close to the water's side.The HONEYSJUCKLE's loving arms twine round each tree it finds,While feeding all the hungry bees, and scenting all the winds.Gather a cluster of its sweets, twined with DOG-ROSES too,They grew together thus in love; add the sweet SPEEDWELL blue:Its name a message seems to give--methinks I hear it say,With gentle voice," Oh, children dear, I speed you on your way;In all your coming years of life, you'll spend no happier hoursThan those which make you better know and love the trees and flowers."ii:IiII90 1 I


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