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 Front Cover
 The Little Old Woman & Her Silver...






Group Title: Aunt Oddamadodd series
Title: Silver sixpence
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00024357/00001
 Material Information
Title: Silver sixpence
Series Title: Aunt Oddamadodd series
Alternate Title: The Little old woman & her silver penny
The Little old woman and her silver penny
Physical Description: 6 p. : ;
Language: English
Creator: McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Publisher: McLoughlin Bros.
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: [ca. 1880]
 Subjects
Subject: Nursery rhymes -- 1880   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1880   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1880
Genre: Nursery rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: Caption title: The Little old woman & her silver penny.
General Note: Includes publisher's advertisement.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00024357
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001746422
oclc - 26319642
notis - AJF9216

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    The Little Old Woman & Her Silver Penny
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
Full Text
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----- -- ----------- --------~----- ------------ ------ IONCE upon a time, a littleFi tl-'8B wee-wee old woman, who lived ina.. '~ /Jilt\ a very little wee-wee house, took'~'~L~'~~~ ~ i: "WlSl it into her head that she wouldsweep it all over with a little wee-wee broom.N ili Now, it happened, as she wassweeping out the dust from one ofthe corners, that she saw a brightlittle silver penny amongst it; thisshe quickly picked up; but not/ knowing what to do with so muchmoney, she put it very carefullyinto her little vinegar bottle, while she took time to consider howshe should spend it; when, at last, she resolved to buy a little pigwith it.Accordingly, she went to market, and soon finding a pig to her mind,she bought it with her little bright silver penny, and then returnedhomeward: but at the first style they came to, in crossing a field, thenaughty little pig stopped short, and neitherwords nor blows could make it move an inch.Night coming on, and the little old woman,being fearful of losing either herself or her pig,tried to coax it on, and said:Pray PIG, get over the style,Or I shan't get home to-night.But not a step would this obstinatelittle pig take, so she went to a dog. Ashe saw at a little distance, and said:Pray, DOG, bite pig,Pig won't get over the stile,And I shan't get home to-night.


V~--iThis the dog flatly refused; and the little old woman, turning away ina pet, saw a stick on the ground, to which she said:Pray, STICK, beat dog,. -Dog won't bite pig,i / ~Pig won't get over the stile,And I shant get home to-night.l _1!. W!hen she found the stick was asregardless of her prayers as the dogand her pig had-been, she began tofeel vexed; but thinking she mightyet find something kinder than the- stick, she traveled on a little fur-___:,_ 1mther, and came to a fire, to which-- she said:Pray, FIRE, burn stick,Stick won't beat dog,Dog won't bite pig,Pig won't get over the stile,And [ shan't get home to-night.:' /"5' But as the*_ fire took no -heed of her,H she walkedon to a pond .of water, andsaid: --|# Pray, WATER, quench fire,Fire won't burn stick,o1 ; ~Stick won't beat dog,------------ -- --cl--


- --~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ In"Dog won't bite pig,Pig won't get over the stile,And I shan't get home to-night.The only answer she got from the water was the sprinkling a little ofit in her face by the wind. Vexed,... ::. ^^^ /she turned away, and seeing anGilTL~. .... --~. ox, she went to it and said:x X-Z-- Pray, OX, drink water,~ Water won't quench fireFire won't burn stick,Stick won't beat dog,Dog won't bite pig,Pig won't get over the stile,; -- ; And I shan't get home to-night.-,: i^.,,- The only answer that the poorlittle old woman could get fromthe ox, was a loud bellow; which so frightened her that she made asmuch haste from it as possible; and in her way she met a butcher,to whom she most imploringly said:I .--; .,\\\\\Eh ,--Pray, BUTCHER, kill ox,Ox won't drink water,


-- --Water won't quench fire,Fire won't burn stick,Stick won't beat dog,Dog won't bite pig,Pig won't get over the stile,And I shan't get home to-night.The butcher only laughed at her; upona which she turned to a piece of rope sus-pended from a branch of a tree, and said:Pray, ROPE, hang butcher,_< -~~~_ YllButcher won't kill ox,Ox won't drink water,Water won't quench fire,Fire won't burn stick,Stick won't beat dog,Dog won't bite pig,Pig won't get over the stile,And I shan't get home to-night.But the rope took no more notice of her than the other things had,-seeing which, she turned away to return to her pig, when she saw arat, and said to it:Pray, RAT, gnaw rope,Rope won't hang butcher,Butcher won't kill ox,Ox won't drink water,Water won't quench fire,Fire won't burn stick,Stick won't beat dog,Dog won't bite pig,Pig won't get over the stile, %And I shan't get home to-night. i't /;The rat also refused; but the little old woman, seeing a cat run by,called out:.- L ----- -- -I-


li-- L----- I -C- -- ;- -Pray, CAT, eatrat,Rat won't gnawrope,Rope won't hangbutcher,Butcher won'tkill oxOx won't dbinkiwater,Water won'tquench fire. !<Fire won't burn stick,Stick won't beat dog,Dog won't bite pig,Pig won't get over the stile,And I shan't get home to-night.Puss, unable to resist such a dainty morsel, seized the poor rat, andwhenThe CAT began to eat the rat,The RAT began to gnaw the rope,The ROPE began to hang the butcher,,-;Z ----- --- -- I I ;I :li


_ __ __ II _ _I__ _TheTheTheTheTheTheTheBUTCHER began to kill the ox,OX began to drink the water,WATER began to quench the fire,FIRE began to burn the stick,STICK began to beat the dog,DOG began to bite the pig,PIG soon leaped over the stile,And thus the little old woman managed toher pig, that night: and a fine pig it grew,get safely home withI assure you.-


II- ~-- ~ -- --- --~THE GIRL WHO WAS ONLY MADE FOR SHOW.Of course you remember the story I toldOf the girl whose delight was to look at herself.I've another of one who believed young and oldCared for nothing but HER in full dress to behold,As a wonderful picture in jewels and gold,Or a rare vase of flowers stuck up on a shelf.She ne'er had done dressing: from morning-till nightShe was foraging over each draw'r and each box;Whatever she found that was showy and bright,She'd put on, never asking who gave her the right,And (though knowing their cost) of all warning in spite,She would constantly wear her best bonnets and frocks.She'd lounge at the window and strut out of doors,Thinking ev'ry one watch'd her with wondering eyes.She will not learn a lesson, all work she abhors,She can scarcely tell sevens or sixes from fours,She despises e'en skipping-ropes, dolls, battledoresAnd likes finery better than puddings or pies.--


Her parents were saddened to see her so vain,But they hoped for improvement as older she grew;But the taller she gets, all the more it is plainShe affects the grown woman in pride and disdain:Though at twelve years of age, in the use of her brain,She's as helpless and silly as babies at two!At last her Papa, fairly sick of her ways,Said, "It's no use attempting Louise to improve,She but cares to be stared at by popular gaze,And for nought else is fit: a new case I will glaze,And in my curiosity-closet she stays,For she's really too vain and too stupid to move."And so Miss Louise in a glass-case is stuck,As a thing to be look'd at 'mongst other things rare:A mummy, a helmet, the horns of a buck,Some statues, a stuff'd four-wing'd Muscovy duck,Coins, butterflies, snakes:-Those who envy her luck,Had best do as she did in hopes to get there..Ij


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