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 Front Cover
 Happy Days of Childhood
 Back Cover






Group Title: Aunt Mavor's toy books
Title: Happy days of childhood
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00024354/00001
 Material Information
Title: Happy days of childhood
Series Title: Aunt Mavor's toy books
Physical Description: 6 p. : ;
Language: English
Creator: Brooks, Vincent ( Printer )
George Routledge and Sons ( Publisher )
Publisher: George Routledge & Sons
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: Vincent Brooks
Publication Date: [ca. 1880]
 Subjects
Subject: Publishers' advertisements -- 1880   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1880
Genre: Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: Includes publisher's advertisement.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00024354
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001745623
oclc - 26279706
notis - AJF8407

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Happy Days of Childhood
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Back Cover
        Page 19
        Page 20
Full Text
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The Baldwin LibraryUniversity;


UFPT DAYS of CeHIfIKobLbVWALTER and Hugh Fermor, with their little brotherFrank, and their sisters Julia and Maude, lived in alarge house in a busy town. The house was in adark street, where there always was a great noise ofcarriages and drays rattling along, and where thesmell of tar, and gas, and damp straw, was veryunpleasant. There was. a large garden behind thehouse, where the children used to play, but wherenothing ever would grow well.. The soil was blackand clammy; the leaves on the shrubs were greyand withered; and the pale flowers half opened, andthen died away: they did not like the smoke, andthe gas, and the dark garden.,lfl/ 6A\yL __ _A


HAPPY DAYS OF CHILDHOOD.IFEEDING DEER.


VISIT TO ASH BANK.And the children began to look pale and puny, likethe flowers; so their Papa and Mamma put theminto the carriage one morning, with their good Nurseto take care of them, for they were to go and makea long visit to their aunt in the country. Howpleased they all were, when they drove far fromthe smoky town, through pleasant lanes with greenhedges, and through a park, where they saw a littleboy feeding the young deer, which eat from his hand,and seemed quite as tame as Julia's little dog Dot;and how much Nurse had to tell them about thetrees, and flowers, and animals they drove past!Ig;;t!e afternoon they came to Ash Bank, andfoimd their cousins, Mark and Susan Wilton, waitingat the hall door to welcome them, and help them totake off their things; adin th the y sat down todinner in a cool dining-room, t windows opna,and such a sweet smell of rE sand jaswine, andahations coming in, thate Jia' said "Oh! drunt Wilton, how happy I : an i tt I ik this lcemust be like Heaven.!" .: t .."4' I am surerpl will, esures thecountry, heaar,-"' said Mrs Wiltlxn; "but, to betruly hapy, you must know" and love God, and thenyou will .see hat ,rea Heaven, which is far moreoeautifut than even his good gifts in this world."""Come along, Cousin Julia!" said Mark, "andpull some of the flowers in the garden, and then Iwill give you and Maude a toss in the swing."A


HAPPY DAYS OF CHILDHOOD.SUSAN'S SWING.


THE S WIN G.- "Your cousins have never been in a swing,Mark," said Mrs. Wilton, "and you must move itvery gently at first, or they will be afraid. Susanwill show them how to keep their seat."The swing was fixed to a large tree, in a fieldbehind the garden; and when Mark swung Susan sohigh that she seemed to be flying, Julia and Maudethought they never should be bold enough to learnto swing; but Mark only laughed, for he knew theywould soon like the swing as much as Susan did.How pleasant it was to be waked, next morning,by the bright sun, which shone through the broadgreen leaves of the vine that hung over the windows,with large blunches of grapes, which looked verytempting, though they were not yet ripe. Nurse.dressed little Frank first, and let him go with th: 'dairy-maid, to see the cows milked. He carried :china cup, that he might drink some fresh new mniikin' the fleld'; and his brothers and sisters wete tofol1ow, when they were dressed. Frank liked thedairy-maid very much; but he was rather afraid ofthe cows, till she took his hand, and "led him upclose, to show him that the legs of the cow weretied, that she might not kiick over tlhe -pail of: milk.Then he stood still, and drank his cup of sweet,good milk, and was so pleased that he stroked thecow, and said the whole of "Thank you, prettycow ;" and the dairy-maid said he was a clever littlefellow. When his brothers and sisters came for their


BAPPY DAYS OF CIIILDHOOD.~~~~~~~~~ic. ;. i, :I .W, ___/'0,'5,%'w~~zi'''..e5,, 11-I .2<Wi b ./~~~~~~~~~~~~' ~ liqC-X g -fi.-M.t-6{gl<StE~~w A |-iS S4--PEASPA Si5 Xg1w tS~~~~~" :I.i*. v-1 n E ='1WX-ffi'-~ ~ ~ ~~ ~~i- ;i9c0rlq_~ .V ja,.,,.H._ ,e..90+RW u i$ S-f 2 S-,w CUP IN THE MORNING EARLY.


THE HAY-FIELD.milk, Frank was very proud to show them how boldhe was, and what good friends he and the cows were;and the town children looked quite rosy with themorning walk, when they went in."Now then," said Mr io ilton, "this is the lastday of the hay-making, anaif you boys wish to seea hay-field, you must lostlS time. SR take upyour caps, and come away ;leave the little fellowto come with the girls, for we 'imt not deiay; weare working men.What a strange sight was "tha ihay-fied to Wal-ter and Hugh, and how they pl ed and stumbled,in trying to walk among the thick,'ry hay! Marklaughed at his cousins, and said they must leainto ;wakin H gh -places, if' they. lived in thecouitry.:.I he" showed them'how the ibe usefiul, riakig the loose hay together, i ia.heaping it in:iAc -cocks. But Walter s:isib!gan to say thli' very- hard work, :an0rl'lay down on tlihay, and said it was so 'o'-hecould not rake; 'and Mr. Wilton told them theyshould hlve: no wages, they were such useless work-men. :But .they e soon -got up, to have a good gameof throwing the hay at each other, which theydid not think was hard work; and Hugh said it.i's teni times better than snow-balling, for it wasmuch pleasanter to handle the dry hay, than thecold, wet snow.


HAPPY DAYS OF CHILDHOOD.- 78rr?-- --zFUN IN THE HAYFIELD.8-..


HAPPY DAYS OF CHILDHOOD.APPLE-GATHERING.


"THE RIDE ON THE PONIES. -Next day, the girls had their share of work, fortheir Aunt sent them to help to gather the apples.One of the garden-women brought a ladder, to .placeagainst the trees in the orchard, and she climbedthe ladder, to pull the sweet, rosy apples, and tothrow them down to be caught by the girls below,who were very proud to be of use, and only laughedwhen they got a bump on the head from some applethat fell before it was expected.The garden-woman said, the store-apples, theRibston pippins, and the Yorkshire codlins, werenot yet ripe enough to pull. The apples they weregathering now would not keep till winter, theymlust be used' soon. Julia and Maude were gladto hear this, for they thought apple-tart, with richcream from the dairy, very nice indeed. Whenthey carried the baskets of apples to the house,Mrs. Wilton told the cookl to bake some apples forthe children's supper; arid they all said the sweetbaked apples and new milk weire very good, andthey had never had such ai nice wpper.The town children grewe iioreactive and -healthyevery day. The girls fed the poultry, and helpedthe gardener; and Mr. Wilton, got two safe and,gentle ponies, that Walter and Hlugh might learnto ride, which their Papa wished very much; andin two or ftree weeks they learned to manage theirponies as well as their cousin Mark limself coul(ldo. They could canter over the fields, and through'


HAPPY DAYS OF CHILDHOOD.A MORNING RIDE.


NU-TTIN N!G.the lanes, and collld even. ac last, open the gateswithout dismounting, though it was a long timebefore they learned to do it. Julia and Maude oftenstood at the bottom of the garden to see them ridepast, and said, how pleased Papa would be, to knowthat they could ride like men.One day, Mrs. Wilton said, "I know there willbe nuts ripe in Hazel Wood. I think, my dearchildren, you must have a nutting day. Mark caidrive the car, which will hold Nurse and Frank andyou three girls; and Walter and Hugh can now ridevery well on their poneys."This was glad news; and, for the next three days,the children thought of the nutting, and talked of it,and watched the clouds, for fear rain should cometo stop their. But the morning was' bright andclear; and, not long after breakfast, Mark drovethe car to the door, and his cousins mounted theirponeys: then thle little girls came out, in very plain,'strong dresses, for Nurse knew that the nut-woodswere close and thick, and that muslin dresses wouldhave been soon torn to pieces. Before they got intothe car, two large baskets were put under tile scats:tthe they sat down, and Mark drove off.As they drove along, Nurse told Frank lie mustkeep near liM .sisters Cr brothers, or he might be lost.in that wide, thick wood, like :the children in thetale. When they got out of the car at the wood, allthe children thought it wa\s a wonderfll place ; tlie


HAPPY I)AYS OF CHILDHOOD.THE NUTTING DAY.


NURSE'S STORY.saw nothing but trees, and high rocks, and the skyover them. What clusters of nuts there were, thateverybody could reach; and what clusters there werethat nobody could reach, even with a hooked stick!And how tired and hot they all were; and howheavy the bags and baskets were with nuts, whenNurse called them all into a shady glade in the wood,where she had spread out the dinner on the ground.Chickens and ham, tarts and cheesecakes, strawberriesand cream: such a nice dinner! And they were somerry when the ants ran over their plates, and thebold little sparrows hopped up to pick the crumbs."I will have those nuts yet," said Hugh, " thatgrow above yon high rock."" You will break your neck," said Mark."Oh! I know better, said Hugh; "I can climbbetter than anybody I know.""Do not boast, Master Hugh," said Nurse, " Iwill tell you the fate of a boaster I knew long ago.It was at a great sheep-washing, in a river whichwas full of deep holes; but the shepherds knew ofthese holes, and kept the sheep near the bank, wherethe water was shallow. This did not please theboasting young man; he would wash his sheep lowerdown the river, where there were imany deep holes;he said, 'What d+o I care for holes;1 I can swimbetter than anybody I know.'" The men called out to 'himi< to con back, butlhe plunged in with a large, strong, old -ramf, -which


HAPPY DAYS OF CH'ILDHOOD.SHEEP-WASHING.


HAPPY DAYS OF CHILDHOOD.fought to get away from him, till somehow his handsgot entangled in the long, matted wool on its sides,and when they were in the middle of the river, hecould not get free to swim; the sheep and manstruggled, till both went down. The last words ofthe drowning man were, 'Lord, have mercy on me !'He was never seen more.""I will not climb the rock, Nurse," said Hugh;"I was wrong to boast. I shall always think of theyoung shepherd, when I wish to boast again. Didyou really know him, Nurse?"" He was my brother, Master Hugh," said she;and little Frank put up his face to kiss Nurse, for hesaw she vwas crying.-THE END?, ,";-!-" D..^-f' X ;*, X f 'VINCENT BROOKs, LONDON.


I"


-- .E AR O T L E DGE'S T,;SIXPENNY TOYS OOKSB^A^ WH EEAUTIFULD WPR EDICLOURSBY MESSRS.LLEIGHTON BROS., VINCENT BROOKS, & EDMUND DEVANS.'GREEDY j AND -.IS: LITTLE BROTERS.''I. ^OUR/PSS AND .HER' KITTENS.e- d e ma:be' ha, st :HOP nO' MY THUMB.eO *,;a .' 'JACKM THE- .GIANT I KILLER.^Ct tT'LITTLE RED RIDIN'G; : H.OOD.!:'?::?: :; GEORGE "RouT: D G[,A AN D Hs B ,AEAUTLYD AND T HE :BEAST. OLD' MOTHER HUBBARDf5- '' *HAPY.Y DAYS OF CHILDHO.OD.*;COCK ROBIN.. *',. IT...LI.TTLE`DOG-TRUSTY.lTHE CATS' TEA PARTY.THEBABES INA THE WObD.W'ILD ANIMALS. LBRITISH ANIMALS..''THE FAITHLESS PARROT.^T '.:HE FARMYARD.,1**.* " HORSES.OLD DAME TROT."SIN''lM ^ G .A; .SONG "OF SIXPENCE."Th', Te above may be had strongy mounted on cloth, p:pce: One Shilling each.: -;;'LONDON AND NEWYO.S,-ViNCENT BROOKS, LONDON.


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