The Baker County press
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00024160/00352
 Material Information
Title: The Baker County press
Uniform Title: Baker County press (Macclenny, Fla. 1929)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Tate Powell
Place of Publication: Macclenny Fla
Publication Date: 07-07-2011
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Macclenny (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Baker County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Baker -- Macclenny
Coordinates: 30.283333 x -82.116667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Apr. 12, 1929.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 39 (Jan. 2, 1931).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579533
oclc - 33284409
notis - ADA7379
lccn - sn 95047186
System ID: UF00024160:00352

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THURSDAY





THE BAKER COUNTY PREiSS


82nd Year, Vol. 11* Winner of 7 state awards for journalism excellence in 2010


10 years

for DUI

death in

July, '10
The driver of an SUV that
crashed head-on into a south-
bound vehicle on SR 121 south
of Macclenny the night of July
31, 2010 was sentenced on
June 30 to 10 years in prison
for DUI manslaughter.
The sen-
tencing of
Anthony
Daniels,
54, of Mac-
clenny fol-
lowed an
emotional
and of-
ten tearful
three-hour
hearing
before Cir- Anthony Daniels
cuit Judge
Phyllis Rosier that afternoon.
She also ordered Mr. Dan-
iels onto a five-year probation
upon release.
He must serve a minimum
of four years.
Judge Rosier rejected the
defense's appeal for a 15-year
probation or the minimum
sentence in light of the defen-
dant's clean record before the
night of the accident that took
the life of Alex Gene Trail, 58,
of Fort White, the sole occu-
pant of the second vehicle who
died at the scene.
Much of the hearing was
taken up with statements by
family members of both the
defendant and victim. The de-
fense presented 14 witnesses
- family, co-workers, friends
and fellow church members
of Mr. Daniels attesting to his
character.
Relatives of the victim spoke
at length of the aftershock of
losing a family man devoted
to his church and job as a mail
truck driver.
Judge Rosier ordered Mr.
Daniels to devote 100 hours
speaking to groups on the con-
sequences of drunk driving and
permanently suspended his li-
cense. He was fined $1ooo and
a hearing later will determine
any restitution paid to the vic-
tim's family.
Mr. Daniels has been em-
ployed 33 years at the West
Fraser sawmill in west Jack-
sonville and his work record
was as flawless as his driving
record, according to court doc-
uments.
The only notation on his re-
cord was a ticket for a life pre-
server offense in June, 1990.
Mr. Daniels was arrested
See page 2�)


Four suspects

still sought

in drug

offender

roundup

See page 4


Fireworks light up Macclenny
A pair of public fireworks displays brightened the skies over the nor th and south city during the
July 4th holiday weekend. The first came at the fairgrounds (above) Saturday night following a
wrestling event. That display was followed on Independence Day by the fireworks show spon-
sored by Sam's Crystal River Seafood on South 6th Street where Jessilyn Carter (left) enjoyed
watermelon while watching the show.


A '4th of July fry' for the Browns
KELLEY LANNIGAN .
FEATURES
features@bakercountypress.com .


"We've been doing this since Daddy started it back in the 1950s,"
said Gail Brown, as she scooped crispy hush puppies from hot oil and
dumped them in an aluminum pan.
It's July 4th and Ms. Brown is standing outside one of the buildings
at the Congregational Holiness Church Campground in Glen St. Mary
where generations of the Brown family have been meeting for their
annual family reunion and holiday fish fry for the last 10 years.
Inside tables are decorated with red, white and blue cloths and
many family members wear the patriotic color combination as well.
The meal begins with the Pledge of Allegiance and a plaque with a
decorative image of the "Stars and Stripes" takes the place of an actual
flag.
The blessing over the food included prayers for the well-being of
the country.
The Brown family reunions have been held since 1938 when
Colquitt "Col" Brown, the family's patriarch and Ms. Brown's grand-
father, started the original gathering at the family's ancestral home,
today known as the Burnsed Block House.
The house has been moved from its original location near the North
Prong of the St. Mary's River and restored as a museum at Heritage
See page 2)

bakercountypress.com
ONLINE POLL RESULTS 18.5 Yes
Do you intend to disregard
the burn ban and light off 75.9 No
fireworks July 4th? 5.6% Undecided
Visit our website and vote each week in our online poll.


PHOTO BY KELLEY LANNIGAN
Gail Brown and Dewey Hebert man the fry station.


District


retains a

'B' grade

Keller drops to D
JOEL ADDINGTON
NEWS EDITOR
reporter@bakercountypress.com
The Baker County school
district kept its overall B grade
and the middle school remains
an A school, according to school
and district grades released by
the Florida Department of Edu-
cation June 30.
Keller Intermediate, how-
ever, fell two letter grades to
become a D school for the first
time since 2001-02.
The decline came in part
because not enough low-per-
forming students made reading
gains on the 2011 Florida Com-
prehensive Assessment Test, or
FCAT, administered last spring.
"Keller does a lot of good
things academically ... But
there's a select population
that doesn't perform well," ex-
plained the school district's
director of accountability and
testing, Susan Voorhees.
The state requires that at
least 50 percent of students
scoring in the bottom 25 per-
cent in reading and math make
gains within two year's time.
Schools failing to meet the re-
quirement are penalized one
letter grade.
This year 42 percent of the
low-performing students at
Keller made gains in reading
and 54 percent made gains
in math. Last year 46 percent
showed reading gains and 56
percent showed math gains.
"It's not an easy thing to
take," said Ms. Voorhees. "You
would like to get the grade that
you earned."
Keller was labeled a B school
last year.
Ms. Voorhees attributed the
dip in the school's FCAT per-
formance to the more rigorous
version of the test, the so-called
FCAT 2.0, administered to stu-
dents statewide for the first
time this year.
She also said that because a
high number of students in the
bottom quartile arrive at Keller
with just below-average scores,
it's more difficult to show im-
provement than if a student ar-
rived with very low scores.
"It's not an excuse, but that's
an extra challenge ... ," Ms.
Voorhees said. "They're com-
ing in stronger academically,
so they're harder to move. It's a
good problem to have."
The middle school, mean-
while, earned its fifth consecu-
tive A grade, which is a difficult
standard to maintain, accord-
ing to the testing director.
"You have to move the bot-
tom quartile every year ... These
teachers are taking the same
struggling students and moving
them, and moving them and
moving them," she said.
To achieve A status, schools
must also make gains in reading
See page 2�


COVERING BAKER COUNTY SINCE 1929
The county's most professional and extensive source for news, classified, display and real estate listings


904.259.2400 ** 904.259.6502 Fax
www.bakercountypress.com
bcpress@nefcom.net


6 IIIIIIIIIIII II
6 1890,76 48819 8





THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


10 years for 2010


DUI manslaughter


(From page 1
at the scene south of Northeast
Florida State Hospital and his
blood alcohol level measured
.163, twice what the state con-
siders intoxicated. He was alone
in his northbound vehicle.
Three other defendants re-
ceived prison sentences in sepa-
rate and unrelated cases after
entering no contest pleas during
a regular court session two days
earlier:
* Antonio Shapiro drew a
four-year sentence for burglary
of a north Macclenny residence
in November of last year. He
also pleaded no contest to relat-
ed counts of grand theft, crimi-
nal mischief and making a false
report to police.
Mr. Shapiro, 20, of Macclen-
ny, has a criminal past that in-
cludes burglary, grand theft and
felony criminal mischief.
* James Duffey, 25, of Pon-
te Vedra Beach entered pleas
to multiple counts centering
around a vehicle theft in Mac-
clenny last November and re-
ceived a 30-month sentence.
He drove off in an SUV be-
longing to a Macclenny man
from the S&S convenience store
on South 6th that night and
wrecked it on US 90 just west of
Glen St. Mary.
He fled the scene and police
were able to identify him from
his cell phone.
Mr. Duffey has a criminal re-
cord that includes grand theft
auto, drunk driving and disor-
derly intoxication.
* Johnathan Mann, 20, of
Glen admitted to violating pro-
bation on a number of 2010 of-
fenses when he and others were
arrested in early 2011 for steal-
ing construction tools from a
new home site.
He also pleaded no contest to
battery, attempted robbery and
conspiracy to commit robbery,
also early this year.
Judge Rosier imposed a
21-month prison term and Mr.
Mann gets credit for 335 days in
county jail.
* Tarus Wilson was sen-
tenced to a year in county jail
followed by two years on drug
offender house arrested in re-
turn for his plea to twin counts
of selling drugs near a school.
Companion possession charges
were dropped as part of the plea
agreement.
* Mitchell Mers admitted to
violating probation on a 2010
drug sale charge and will be in
county jail a year. The sentence
runs concurrently with one in
Clay County.


District


stays at 'B'
(From page 1
and math at every grade level.
"There's no averaging to make
it look good," said Ms. Voorhees.
Maintaining the A grade
makes the school eligible for
some $70 more in per-student
funding from the state. More
than 1100oo schools in Florida kept
their A grades this year.
But unlike most districts' ele-
mentary schools with kindergar-
ten through fifth grades, Baker
County has two K-3 schools and
Keller, a school of fourth and fifth
graders. Keller, however, is the
only elementary school the state
gives a grade.
As a result, Ms. Voorhees said,
to the best of her knowledge,
the record-high FCAT scores at
Westside and Macclenny ele-
mentary schools this year weren't
used in calculating the district's
overall grade.
"If they did, the data would
put us at an A," she said. "Every
other district we know of gets the
benefit of their third grade data,
but we don't."
Superintendent Sherrie Raul-
erson has been investigating
ways in which the district could


receive credit for the third grade
results.
The state's grade for the high
school, which is based on gradu-
ation rates, advance coursework
and other factors, is expected in
December.


* Floyd Proctor admitted he
violated probation on two 2009
drug counts and got a year in
jail.
* Clemon Scott admitted to
violating probation on a 2010
charge of possession of a fire-
arm by a convicted felon and
drew a one-year term.
Judge Rosier imposed sev-
eral six-month house arrest sen-
tences followed by probation, all
with stricter drug offender sanc-
tions.
They went to Robert Baglin
for possession of controlled
drugs, Felicity Crawford for
child abuse and Mark Stewart
for sale and possession of con-
trolled drugs.
* Sanita Mobley will be on a
two-year house arrest with sex
offender sanctions after admit-
ting she violated probation for
a 2009 lewd and lascivious case
involving a minor male.
The judge ordered the arrest
of two defendants who failed to
show up in court that day: Rob-
ert Porterield for felony battery
and Clayton Williams on mul-
tiple assault and tampering with
a witness charges.


Brown family: 4th of


((From page 1
Park Village in Macclenny.
Col and Minnie Brown raised to children
in the house, and two of those children, Irene
Dugger, 89, and Ruth Ricker, 92, are still liv-
ing.
Both were present at the reunion last Mon-
day.
The holiday fish fry was established in the
1950s.
"The Congregational Holiness Church was
grandma's church," said Ms. Brown. "That's
why we started having it here."
Family members still living in Florida
came from Jacksonville, Tallahassee and St.
Augustine. Others traveled in from Alabama
and Louisiana.
Each family brings fish to the gathering.
Dewey Hebert, a Louisiana native who mar-
ried into the Brown family, likes to make sure
some spicy Cajun fish are in the mix.
"I bring my own seasoning," he said,
proudly brandishing a green container.
"Don't get him talking about cooking," his
wife teased. "We'll be here all day."
During the socializing, a group of ladies
had fun tallying up the members of their cur-
rent family lines. They came up with 218 liv-
ing Brown descendents.
"Aunt Ruth is the oldest at 92 and the
youngest is Chesney Rhoden who is only one
month old," said Ms. Brown (Gail).
"My family has five generations repre-
sented and I've got two great, great grandchil-
dren," said a very proud Ms. Dugger.


The family feasting didn't stop when the
fish were gone. Everyone headed to Rudolph's
Christmas Tree Farm near Cuyler for a peanut
boil and slices of watermelon.
The farm is owned and operated by Jeanell
Fraser, whose mother Rudolph was a Brown.
The reunion festivities later wrapped up with
another tradition - hotdogs cooked on the
grill.
As the kids frolicked in the pool, the adults
leisurely snacked on boiled peanuts while
they visited and caught up on events of the
past year. A copy of the family cookbook,
compiled in 2002, circulated. It contained not
only treasured family recipes, but the photo of
the family's first reunion in 1938.
"That's me on the front row," said Claudine
Rhoden pointing to the image of a mischie-
vous looking little girl.
"See that look on my face? My mother had
to spank me more than any of her other chil-
dren. And, I could never seem to stop talking,"
she said.
Other group photos from past family gath-
erings were on display and there was a lot of
reminiscing about relatives.
The cookbook underwent a revision re-
cently and new copies were supplied to the
Baker County Historical Society.
"The historical society recently sold its last
copy," said Nettie Ruth Brown. "We were hap-
py to restock the supply - people seem to re-
ally enjoy the book."
They also discussed the entry some fam-
ily members have been composing to include
in a commemorative history book being pro-


July fry...

duced for Baker County's 150th Anniversary
celebration in October.
No reunion is complete without one funny
memory.
"My brother Marvin and I sometimes had
to go along when Daddy was out tapping tur-
pentine gum," said Marjorie Dunn. "Once,
Marvin decided to be smart and hide in the
barrel which was in the back of the wagon.
His feet got stuck in the gum and he couldn't
get out. I climbed down inside to help him get
free and I got stuck too," she said, laughing.
She recalled how they both made so much
ruckus trying to get free that it spooked the
horse who started pulling the cart away.
"That's how Daddy found us, because the
horse started moving away. He got us out but
everything our feet touched like straw and
sand stuck to the turpentine gum. He car-
ried us home, one child under each arm, and
teased us that our momma was probably go-
ing to have to cut off our feet. Scared us silly."
The fish fry is an especially happy gather-
ing but the family gets together numerous
times throughout the year as well.
"Aunt Ruth, she likes to be wherever we're
getting together, but she can't really walk at
all," said Mr. Hebert. "So when we have to
travel, like to Crescent Beach, we just pick her
up in the truck, recliner and all and head out.
She doesn't want to miss being with the fam-
ily."

Check it out...
Ibakercountypress.conm


V- [ V $II - - Io - *a 0 1 - - 0* *O S 0 a - - - * *






Baker Square


_IBSON cDONALD Shopping Center


259-5655


TWO ppflU(UbR .Ip


FURNITURE COMPANY


l


Thursday, luly 7,2011


Page 2





THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


OPINION


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Letters are welcome, but must contain the signature of the writer, a telephone number and city of residence.
Letters must reflect opinions and statements on issues of cui rent interest to the general public
Tlh i� E_, , F c, i I ' c_ lI ' [i - h I ,llh tb :.r.- -:l' 31.1i.,' m -lla I %al *I,, l l.:h in thiee ,, , F'a -I-r *:, lud'J rl'- n[i d 1i:. 1 n [:. i r-it-[ ir)i laI. ,�(- pl, ic[Ah - ior.


Page


3
JULY 7, 2011


CONTACT US
By phone at 904.259.2400 or by fax at 904 259 6502. You can stop by ouI office located at 104 S. Fifth Stieet,
Macclenny, FL o01 mail your submission to PO Box 598, Macclenny, FL 32063
We are available online at vvwvv bakeicountypiess.com


Governor sending


The forecast called for rain,
but there was another reason a
young woman protesting Gover-
nor Rick Scott during his visit to
the Vinoy Resort
in St. Petersburg
July 1 had on On
pink galoshes
- they matched In
her "Pink Slip .In I
Rick" T-shirt. el A
The governor Joel A
delivered a state-
ment in the hotel's banquet hall
to attendees of the Florida Press
Association's annual convention,
mostly reporters, editors and
publishers.
He touted the 70,000 or so
jobs the state's added since he
was sworn into office late last
year and said nothing of the 1300
jobs eliminated from the state's
payroll that day, including 70 or
more at Northeast Florida State
Hospital.
Then he took questions from
the audience, and as Governor
Scott does so often, failed to an-
swer them.
For instance, he was asked to
square his office's policy of re-
sponding to public records re-
quests as slowly and expensively
as the law allows, a contrast with
his campaign pledge to increase
transparency in state govern-
ment. The governor answered by
saying he plans to make more re-
cords available online.
I think it's safe to assume our
CEO governor loves saying he's
created jobs, cut spending and
saved taxpayers money. But if
the media attempts to verify such
statements, they're in for a has-
sle.
The governor doesn't appear
to respect the public's right to
know what its government is up
to in a timely manner. In fact,
his policy seems to be one of dis-
couraging requests for public in-
formation.
So, the obvious questions be-
come: What's he trying to hide?
Doesn't he realize the perception
of impropriety is just as bad as
the real thing?
This lack of transparency isn't
limited to the governor's office.
Last month I got a dose of it from
the Florida Department of Chil-


dren and Families.
After news of the layoffs at
Northeast Florida State Hospital
broke, DCF's state-wide spokes-
man Joe Fol-
i t lick pointed me
oint to a web site
launched to as-
r in sist those af-
rint fected by the job
in n cuts. The site
ingq ton noticed a "tran-
sition forum" at
the state hospital June 8.
I decided to check it out in
an attempt to verify the state's
assertion that laid off workers
would be provided resources to
help them find new jobs. I ar-
rived, unannounced, at noon and
was politely asked to pull to the


side at the fr
authorization
This was
been at the h
occasions fo
terviews and
ball in the gy
permission 1
Presumab
at the gate ca
istrators and
could go to
parently, eve
weren't sure
I waited fo
gate before I
Tallahassee.
my cell phon
He agree
right to attei
rum. After a]


conflicting s

ont gate and wait for on public property and involved
n to enter. public employees paid with tax-
highly unusual. I've payer dollars. All he asked was
hospital on numerous that I be considerate of hospital
)r special events, in- employees given the recent tur-
I once to play basket- moil over layoffs.
m, and never needed I was then escorted to the fo-
before. rum by Human Resources direc-
)ly the security guard tor Kim Hodges. She never left
killed hospital admin- my side.
d asked if a reporter This must be what it's like
the forum. And ap- to be a journalist in China, I
n the administrators thought.
My gut told me that the
or half an hour at the 3o-minute delay at the security
received a call from gate gave NEFSH staff plenty of
It was Mr. Follick on time to clear the forum of anyone
ie. who may be distraught or upset
d that I had every about losing their job.
nd the transition fo- At least that's what it looked
1l, it was taking place like behind the foggy veil of Rick


signals

Scott's administration.
When I got to the forum, there
were very few employees there.
Seated at tables in the gym were
representatives from Work-
Source, a contracted career coun-
selor with handy tips about "cop-
ing with transition," like eating
well and exercising and sharing
your thoughts and feelings with
supportive and helpful people;
and a handful of others there to
answer questions about accrued
leave time, health insurance and
the like.
Everything appeared to be in
order, which is dandy, but what
happens when the media's not
watching?


'Lady Liberty' a reminder that its 'our' country


The theme of independence
and freedom that originated cel-
ebrating the Fourth of July some-
times gets overshadowed by all
the other recre-
ational festivi- T H E
ties engaged in
on this holiday.
I wanted to take P O]
a moment to re-
flect on the Stat- Kelley l
ue of Liberty.
This icon of our country was
dedicated in 1886 as a symbol of
America's looth anniversary of
freedom from British rule.
Most of us probably don't give
the statute much thought on a


R
La


day-to-day basis, but it is ubiqui-
tously part of the national psyche.
Ask any American to name the
symbol of their country and the
American flag
SA . K and the Statue
^ACK of Liberty will
be at the top of
(C H the list.
The statue
nnig an will be 125 years
old in October.
In 2012, access to it will be closed
for a while in order to install a sec-
ond staircase.
Lady Liberty has undergone
repair and restoration efforts,
some of them extensive, through-


out her existence. I remember the
restoration effort from 1982-86
and seeing photos of the scaffold-
ing obscuring the statue from her
massive toes to the tip of the torch.
Replacing the original torch
which was constructed of panes
of amber glass and lit from with-
in was one of the major changes
made. The statue was originally
designed to function as a light-
house, but there were always
structural problems with the orig-
inal design. The torch today is en-
closed and covered with gold, lit at
night by flood lights.
Issues of National Geographic
and Life Magazine at the time de-
tailed the process with stunning
images of the restoration.
Emma Lazarus' famous poem
'The New Colossus" is about the
statue. Its message declares in
lofty sentiments what Lady Lib-
erty represented to the waves of
immigrants coming to America in
the late 19th century in search of a
better life than they had known in
their own countries.
Freedom, independence, de-
mocracy, liberty - these were the
things the country was founded on
and what the statue stood for.
Yet, the statue was sometimes
surrounded by irony and contra-
diction.
I read with interest that dur-
ing its formal dedication in 1886,
women were restricted (by men)
from attending the ceremony. The
excuse given was concern for their
physical safety.
It didn't stop a stubborn and
determined group of early suf-
fragettes (who were fighting for
the basic freedoms enjoyed by
males, namely, the right to vote)
from chartering a boat and getting
as close as possible.


During the often brutal epi-
sodes of violence during the Civil
Rights movement, certainly blacks
may have questioned the statue as
a symbol of freedom and liberty
for all people.
Not to mention the Native
Americans.
Geronimo was captured 1886,
the very year the Statue of Liberty
was dedicated. Even the small is-
land on which it was erected was
taken from Native Americans.
I wonder what they must have
thought of the statue of "freedom"
during a time when the common


sentiment among a majority of
white settlers across the country
was, '"The only good Indian is a
dead Indian."
Still, the statue was given in
good faith and meant ultimately
to be a symbol of hope and free-
dom for everyone who holds those
values dear.
Visitors looking out from Lib-
erty's crown over the gateway to
America should be reminded that
the land they see should not be
thought of as "my" country, but as
"our" country.


Facebook fans

'What you had to say..


We asked our Facebook friends last
week, "Given the burn ban and the fact
all fireworks are illegal for personal use
under what circumstances would you call
and report your neighbor for using them
this July 4th weekend?" Here's what they
had to say...

Marilyn Penrod: "Seeing as my
house is by a lot of woods, the first
bang would get the phone dialed.
Bans are bans, so under our current
drought conditions, we should all
obey the burn ban. Fireworks burn,
therefore they are banned! What's
not to understand?"
Cindy Oglesby: "I hope that no-
body is foolish enough to set off any
fireworks around me, but I wouldn't
report anyone who did. However,
I would keep the water hose ready
just in case there is a problem. I am
pretty confident that the people of


this county understand the serious-
ness of the burn ban and the over-
whelming possibility of a fire from
using fireworks so I am not that wor-
ried about it. We all love our commu-
nity and don't want to see it devas-
tated by fire."
Lynne Kirkland Sanville: "You
would think with the dry conditions
we have, people would know not to
set off fireworks. But the sad fact is
some people just don't care. I still see
people throwing lit cigarettes out
their car windows all thetime."
Nick Apromollo: "I guess I'm the
only one that has experienced a
complete downpour every day of
thisweek?"
Cindy Oglesby: "We have got-
ten a lot of rain at my house but the
grass still crunches under my feet
when I walk on it. I am sure we are


B



ddi


still way below where we need to be
on rainfall. The tops of my pine trees
are crispy brown and the pond is still
very low."
Nick Apromollo: "We can't even
keep our pool from being green be-
cause of the rain, my yard is a bog.
Not that I'm complaining about the
burn ban, but it's a whole other story
in my yard."
Lynne Kirkland Sanville: "Nick, a
few days of rainfall does not make
everything peachy keen again. And
at my house, we have not been get-
ting rain everyday. There were sev-
eral days it came down in Glen and in
Macclenny and we got nothing in the
Macedonia area."
Doug Wilds: "Ahhh, the heavy
hand of government, gimme some
more of that."
Join The Press at Facebook.com. We
post questions and updates about what's
happening locally everyday. We also post
breaking news updates and links to sto-
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~2OII
BbI~E~~
COu~
PRi~


THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS
',^ ,'* usps 040-280
SPost Office Box 598
Macclenny, FL32063
C/I (904) 259-2400
The Baker County Press is published each Thursday by Baker County Press, Inc.
Periodicals postage paid under permit issued December 30,1929 at the post
office in Macclenny, Florida.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
$25.00 a year inside Baker County; $35.00 a year outside Baker County;
deduct, $1.00 for persons 65 years of age or older, military personnel
on active duty outside Baker County, and college students living out-
side Baker County. POSTMASTER: send address changes to The Baker
County Press, P.O. Box 598, Macclenny, FL. 32063.
Publisher
James C. McGauley - editor@bakercountypress.com
MANAGING EDITOR-Joel Addington - reporter@bakercountypress.com
ADVERTISING/PRODUCTION-Jessica Prevatt-advertising@bakercountypress.com
FEATURES - Kelley Lannigan - features@bakercountypress.com
FEATURES/COMMENT/SPORTS - Robert Gerard
BUSINESS MANAGER - Karin Thomas - kthomas@bakercountypress.com
CLASSIFIEDS &TYPESETTING - Debbie Hansen - classifieds@bakercountypress.com
This newspaper is printed on recycled paper.


LETTER TO
THE EDITOR


Balancing


budget act
Dear Editor:
Members of Congress sup-
porting an amendment to the
U.S. Constitution that requires
the federal budget to be balanced
each year are being reckless with
our economic future. Clearly,
the federal deficit must be ad-
dressed, but such an amendment
is the wrong method.
A balanced budget amend-
ment requires federal spending
in any year to be offset by reve-
nues collected in the same year.
Sounds enticing, but a closer look
reveals a serious flaw.
During a weak economy - like
we've been experiencing since
2008 - revenues may decrease
while simultaneously demand
will likely increase for federal
expenditures such as unemploy-
ment insurance, food stamps, job
training and placement, tempo-
rary assistance to needy families
and the overall cost of healthcare
including Medicaid.
At a time when more people
would need help, less funding
would be available to provide it.
Increasing expenditures would
only be possible by a super-ma-
jority approval of Congress, a
herculean feat not likely to oc-
cur in a timely manner for many
families.
Last year, the Northeast Flor-
ida Community Action Agency
helped 32,000 people in its sev-
en-county service area that in-
cludes Baker County, a 39 per-
cent increase from the previous
year. Not only did we serve more
people, we saw our client profile
change as people who never be-
fore needed help with food, shel-
ter, utility costs, and job training
and education sought help.
Under a balanced budget sce-
nario, thousands of First Coast
families likely would not have re-
ceived assistance.
We must reduce the federal
deficit, but a balanced budget
amendment is not the answer.
Too many families would be hurt
and economic recovery would
take much longer with this ap-
proach.
John W. Edwards Jr.
Executive Director
NE Fla. Community Action
Agency
Jacksonville

Online -
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Thursday
Scat'd T-storms
High: 95 Low: 73
Friday
Scat'd T-storms
High: 93 Low: 73
Saturday
Scat'd T-storms
High: 94 Low: 74
Sunday
Scat'd T-storms
High: 95 Low: 74
Monday
Mostly Sunny
High: 93 Low: 71
Tuesday
Sunny
High: 91 Low: 70
Wednesday
Sunny
High: 94 Low: 72


I Toa' ih o epeaue-


97- ',-,. C Cahan
Jasper 7" , --/E 9t/74 &
97 / /3 -.

Maccle 9
Watertown 95/73


97/72 ,1


)


/^


High Springs
97/ 72


.Jacksonille
91 / 77
ci


Moniac, GA
Macclenny


Now
4.26 ft.
1.28 ft.


Change
0.00 ft.
-0.05 ft.


July 7. 1915 - Severe winds and
thunderstorms caused heavy
damage and 38 deaths in and
around Cincinnati, Ohio. Many
old buildings were demolished.
The steamship "Dick Fulton"
was overturned.


I SunMoonChar Thi Wee


IA Fernandina
1. Beach
86/76


Atlantic
Beach
87 / 77


naldw n
94 / 74'-


St. Augustine
92/ 75


Stake
95 / 73,


Day High Low Normals Preci Precipitation ................ 0.01"
Tue, 6/28 88 68 92/71 0.00" Normal precipitation ........ .1.57"
Wed, 6/29 90 70 92/71 0.01" Departure from normal ...... .-1.56"
Thu, 6/30 86 70 92/72 0.00" Average temperature .......... 77.8�
FSat, 7/1 88 64 92/72 0.00" Average normal temperature ... .81.9�
Sat, 7/2 90 66 92/72 0.00" Departure from normal ....... .-4.1�
Sun, 7/3 90 63 92/72 0.00"
Mon, 7/4 93 63 92/72 0.00" Data as reported from Cecil Field Airport


First
7/8


FuR
7/15


Day
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday


Sunrise
6:33 a.m.
6:33 a.m.
6:33 a.m.
6:34 a.m.
6:34 a.m.
6:35 a.m.
6:35 a.m.


Sunset
8:34 p.m.
8:34 p.m.
8:34 p.m.
8:34 p.m.
8:33 p.m.
8:33 p.m.
8:33 p.m.


Last
7/23


New
7/30


Peak Times


Day
Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun
Mon
Tue
Wed


4:54-6:54 4:24-6:24
5:46-7:46 5:16-7:16
6:41-8:41 6:11-8:11
7:38-9:38 7:08-9:08
8:36-10:36 8:06-10:06
9:34-11:34 9:04-11:04
10:31-12:31 10:01-12:01


I www.WhatsOurWeather.com


Four still sought in


drug investigations


Investigators at the s
office are wrapping up
month crackdown on
drug dealers in the area
with the arrests of eight
persons June 29 for
drug-related felonies
including "doctor shop-
ping" for prescription
pills.
Four more suspects
are being sought.
Andrea Maria Doss,
27, of Macclennyis want-
ed for filling identical
prescriptions from mul-
tiple doctors here and in
Jacksonville, a practice
commonly called doctor
shopping.
Investigators have
obtained arrest war-
rants for Timothy Dale
Hardenbrook, 44, also of
Macclenny for traffick-
ing Hydrocodone, Char-
lotte Thompson, 47, of
Jacksonville for posses-
sion and sale of Xanax,
and Timothy Michael
Stewart, 20, of Glen St.
Mary for possession of
drug paraphernalia and
contributing to the de-
linquency of a minor.
"We arrested two-
thirds of them, which is
pretty much the stan-
dard we usually get,"
said Major Chuck Bran-
nan, the chief investiga-
tor at the sheriffs office.
The investigations
took place in May and
June.
The resulting arrests
less than a week after the s
Special Response Team
two warrants at west Ma
ny addresses, arresting
Reed, 34, and Wesley Belfl


heriffs
a two-


and seizing cocaine, marijuana,
cash and a .22-caliber pistol.


Maj. Brannan said the
all the cases were made
by investigators John
Hardin and Mike Hauge,
though he and Investiga-
tor David Morgan made
- the most recent arrests.
Those taken into cus-
tody last week:
* Romona Robertson,
23, of Macclenny for
doctor shopping.
Andrea Doss * Sandra Davis
Thompson, 45, of Mac-
clenny on two counts of
possession and sale of
Xanax.
* Colvin Cox, 27, of
Macclenny for posses-
sion and sale of Xanax.
* Sandra Fay Mobley,
29, of Glen St. Mary for
possession and sale of
Xanax.
n Nathaniel Stracha-
niv,22, of Macelenny on
Timothy Hardenbrook four counts of possession
and sale of marijuana.
* Charles Edward
Hadley, 55, of Macclen-
ny on three counts of
sale and possession of
crack cocaine.
* Sheterria Jackson,
36, of Macclenny was
arrested for trafficking
Hydrocodone and her
brother, George Robert
Jackson, Jr., 29, for pos-
session and sale of crack
Charlotte Thompson cocaine within looo feet
of a school.

came
heriffs
served LOGS AND PULPWO0
acclen-
Tyrone
ord,27,


Newspaper
The Baker County Press re-
turned from the Florida Press
Association's annual convention
last week with seven awards in
FPA's 2010 Better Weekly News-
paper Contest.
Managing editor Joel Adding-
ton secured first place in the busi-
ness writing category for "County
in running for trade ports," a sto-
ry examining a handful of inland
port projects proposed in the
region, including two in Baker
County.
The front page story featured
a map identifying the locations
of each project by Advertising
and Graphics Director Jessica - _
Prevatt, which received second
place in the individual graphic
category. JESsii
"[The] great map proves that
good graphics integrated into
a story can complement and
strengthen information presen-
tation," reads the comments of-
fered by judges in the contest. Anoth
"Going beyond Baker Coun- vatt, one
ty's two inland port projects to cer rates
include three others and the place in t
chances for success and potential Mr. A
economic impact provides the ond pla<
paper's readers with context for ronment
a rapidly approaching key eco-
nomic development issue."




P ck up a little sorrthine
lvour chest pain.



. . ... .


wins


seven FPA awards


PHOTO BY ERIN PETRIE
a Prevatt, Kelley Lannigan and Joel Addington


her graphic by Ms. Pre-
comparing breast can-
in the region, won third
the same category.
kddington received sec-
ce honors in the envi-
tal or conservation and


health catego-
ries for stories
detailing the
reduced water
use in Mac-
clenny after
rate increases
and the coun-
ty's infant
mortality rate
spike in 2009,
respectively.
Judges
noted the
"captivating"
lead to the
latter story
about one
mother's loss
of a newborn
baby.
Features
writer Kel-
ley Lannigan
was awarded
third place
for her fea-


ture "Church launches 'Mercy
House'" chronicling the estab-
lishment and development of the
Raiford Road Housing Ministry
Project.
The story spotlighted a facility


called Mercy House that provides
temporary shelter for women
facing a variety of life challenges
during the transition from a bad
situation to a more positive one.
"A community newspaper
must focus on the needs of the
residents in their community.
This story honors that commit-
ment," stated the judges.
Columnist and sports writer
Bob Gerard landed third place
honors as well in the humorous
column category for "You ain't
seen snow," a column about the
trials of growing up in Buffalo,
New York's wintery climate.
The judges comments: "It's
hard to tell from this story which
is fact and which is fiction, but
that's what makes it so funny."
The Press competed in the un-
der 7000 circulation division of
the Florida Press Association's
Better Weekly Newspaper Con-
test.
Mr. Addington, Ms. Prevatt,
Ms. Lannigan and Publisher Jim
McGauley attended the associa-
tion's convention at the Vinoy
Renaissance hotel in downtown
St. Petersburg on July 1.


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I


THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


Thursday, July 7,2011


Page 4





THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


$7200 in rings are


stolen in burglary


Driver uninjured as rig flips on 1-10 ramp in Sanderson
The driver of this semi-truck was charged with careless driving the morning of July 5 when his rig flipped exiting Interstate 10 eastbound at US 90 near
Sanderson. Samuel Powell, 40, of Crestview, FL was not injured in the rollover that occurred about 10:20 and blocked both the cloverleaf exit and entrance
ramps for several hours. A hazardous materials team from Jacksonville was summoned by county fire chief Richard Dolan (in photo on cell phone) because
the trailer was leaking paint through the rear doors onto the road shoulder. Trooper K.M. Boatright of the Florida Highway Patrol said the cargo shifted as
the rig rounded the sharp curve and it jumped a concrete median from the eastbound exit ramp and landed on its left side on the adjoining eastbound
entrance pavement.



Husband violates protective order


Police arrested a Macclenny
man for violating a domestic
violence protection order ban-
ning him from the residence oc-
cupied by his estranged wife.
Christopher Gay, 34, alleged-
ly went to the address on South
Boulevard about 5:30 the morn-
ing of July 1 and argued with
Crystal Gay, 41, about a vehicle
he claimed belonged to him.
Ms. Gay told Deputy Robert
Simpkins her husband was in-
toxicated at the time, and her
juvenile age daughter also said
he drove by the residence the
next day while she was seated
on a porch, stopped and pointed
at her.
Mr. Gay was recently arrest-
ed for domestic violence against
both the wife and step-daughter.
He was restricted by the protec-
tive order from making contact


with them as a condition of his
pre-trial release.
Deputy Simpkins interviewed
him at the car repair shop where
he works, and arrested him after
Mr. Gay admitted to being at the
residence that morning.
In another case over the July
4th weekend, a criminal com-
plaint for aggravated battery
was filed against Michael Jeffer-
son, 44, for allegedly punching
Kimneshia Lloyd, 20, in the ab-
domen the afternoon of July 2.
Should the state attorney's
office decide to prosecute, the
charge is a felony because Ms.
Lloyd told Deputy Jeremiah
Combs she is eight weeks preg-
nant and Mr. Jefferson was
aware of it.
Interviewed later, the ac-
cused admitted to being at Ms.
Lloyd's residence off CR 127 N.


but denied striking her. He said
he was there to retrieve a lap-
top computer, and disputed Ms.
Lloyd's contention that he was
angry with her for not spending
the previous night at his resi-
dence.
The following day, Deputy
Simpkins was called back to the
address to investigate a threat-
ening note that Ms. Lloyd and
her mother Roxanne claimed
was found inside the gas tank
door on their vehicle.
They said it was penned by
Mr. Jefferson and contained a
death threat.
Deputy Simpkins obtained
writing samples from both
women and Mr. Jefferson, and
noted in his report that the lat-
ter's script did not match that
of the note. He added the one
furnished by Kimneshia Lloyd


most closely resembled it.
* Steven Collett, 30, of Mac-
clenny was arrested for battery
and disorderly intoxication after
he allegedly attacked and fought
with Danny Robinson, 59, of
Glen St. Mary outside the Fast-
way Store on Woodlawn Rd.
A store clerk told Deputy Ja-
son Bryan that Mr. Collett pur-
chased a six-pack of beer the
evening of July 2 and was drink-
ing it when Mr. Robinson drove
up.
He then accosted the vic-
tim while he was still seated in
his vehicle, and later did $500
damage to the windshield, the
officer's report notes.



NOEXEPIOS!


Four residential burglaries
were reported to police the past
week, including one that oc-
curred a week earlier and result-
ed in the loss of two rings valued
at $7200.
Stanley Monds of Glen St.
Mary said he last saw the rings
on a kitchen table at his home-
office on Washington St. on
June 19. He told Deputy Patrick
McGauley that entry likely was
made through an unlocked slid-
ing glass door.
He reported the loss on June
28.
In other reports:
* Johnetta Scriven returned
to her residence on Long Dr.
in Macclenny in the early af-
ternoon of July 3 to find it had
been entered and at least $950
in property stolen.
Deputy Jeremiah Combs said
it appeared a glass was broken
on a rear door to gain entry


sometime after 9:30 the previ-
ous evening. Stolen items in-
cluded a watch, necklace, Xbox,
a laptop computer and a shot-
gun.
* Daniel and Dawn Kent re-
turned to their residence on
North Boulevard in Macclenny
after an hour's absence late on
June 30o and discovered a rear
door was forced open.
Inside they found that some-
one had taken prescription
medication, a camera, DVD
player, rod and reel and a watch.
The loss value was $8oo.
* A window air conditioner
valued at $500 was removed
from a vacant rental trailer
owned by Phillip Jefferson on
California Ct. near Sanderson.
The owner reported the loss
on June 29 and said the theft oc-
curred sometime in the previous
four days.


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Thursday, luly 7, 2011


Page 5





THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


BAKER COUNTY COMMISSION


Signs lease with aging council

99-year pact for transportation hub in west city


MIKE ANDERSON
PRESS STAFF
The county commission ap-
proved a lease with the Baker
County Council on Aging on July
5 that paves the way for the coun-
ty to receive a $2.1 million grant
to build a bus transportation
hub on 10 acres of land that the
council donated to the county last
month.
The council had to give the
land to the county in order to re-
ceive funding from the Florida
Department of Transportation
because only governmental agen-
cies are eligible to receive Trans-
portation Investment Generating
Economic Recovery, or TIGER,
grants.
The lease gives the council,
which has been designated the
county's community transpor-
tation coordinator, the right to
operate a public transportation
facility for 99 years on Buck Star-
ling Road behind the Winn-Dixie
shopping center just north of In-
terstate 10.
This will enable the agency to
expand the scope of its mission,
which traditionally has focused
primarily on transportation ser-
vices for the elderly and econom-
ically disadvantaged, including
trips to pharmacies to pick up
prescription medicine and medi-
cal appointments locally and
to Jacksonville, Lake City and
Gainesville.
County Manager C.J. Thomp-
son said he anticipates comple-
tion of the new bus depot in 18 to
24 months.
The lease agreement requires
the Council on Aging pay the
county $1 per year. In exchange,
the county will be responsible for
maintenance, insurance and util-
ity bills on the property.
The issue of who should pay
for maintenance and repairs on
the facility, which could become
quite expensive as the build-
ing ages, was discussed during


a commission workshop a few
hours prior to the board's regular
meeting.
Commission Chairman Mi-
chael Crews initially expressed
reservations about the county
agreeing to assume all the re-
sponsibility for utilities and
maintenance on the building for
the next century.
"I support the Council on Ag-
ing," he said. "However, we have
to look at the county as a whole
and look at our expenses across
the board. I think it would be un-
wise to take on unknown costs."
Commissioner Gordon Crews
pointed out that the county has
always paid for repairs and utili-
ties at the existing council build-
ing, which the county owns, while
the council has taken care of mi-
nor things, such as replacing light
bulbs and unclogging toilets.
He said the same type of un-
derstanding should continue un-
der the lease agreement for the
new transportation center.
"That's the way we've done it
for the Council on Aging since
I've been on the board," Gordon
Crews said. "The county's going
to own the building and I think it
should be our responsibility to do
the maintenance."
The chairman disagreed.
"The way it has been doesn't
necessarily equate to the way it
should be," Michael Crews said.
"We won't have funds coming in
to offset those costs."
Three representatives from
the council, however, told com-
missioners that it would be im-
possible for the agency to fund all
the day-to-day operating costs,
plus pay all the utility and repair
bills, and continue to provide the
same level of services that are
provided now.
Jackie Wright, the council's
fiscal officer, stated that the coun-
ty provides $1o9,ooo in funding
assistance annually to the agen-
cy. If the council were expected
to start paying its own utility and


repair bills, she told commission-
ers, "We would have to ask you
guys for more than $1o9,ooo a
year."
Bob Lambright, a council
board member, asked commis-
sioners to ponder the following
question: If the agency had to
close its doors tomorrow, who
would provide transportation to
the poor and elderly people now
served by the council?
"We're doing work for the
county ... not for profit," Mr.
Lambright said. "We're function-
ing as a unit of the county."
Cherill Mobley, also on the
council's board of directors and
a volunteer driver, told commis-
sioners that if the council went
out of business the county would
have to find a private company
for the services that are provided
now by volunteers.
Ms. Wright said the council's
transportation services have be-
come essential to many people
in Baker County. Last year, for
example, the agency's 18 vehicles
logged 16,548 trips and traveled
293,486 miles for passengers, in-
cluding many children who had
to be taken to Nemours Clinic in
Jacksonville.
After agreeing to have the
county pay for all repairs above
$250 and the Council on Aging
to take care of those maintenance
items that fall under that amount,
commissioners unanimously ap-
proved the lease agreement dur-
ing the regular meeting.
In other business, commis-
sioners:
* Agreed with the county man-
ager that a task force should be
established to determine how the
county should handle the impact
of residential growth and devel-
opment now that the state's De-
partment of Community Affairs,
which previously had oversight
authority over local comprehen-
sive development plans, has been
stripped of its power.
The manager recommended


the county, the school board, the
tax collector's office and property
appraiser's office have represen-
tatives on the task force.
The county is going to grow, he
said, adding that the question is,
"Who's going to pay for it?"
* Complied with a request from
the Federal Emergency Manage-
ment Administration to reim-
burse the agency nearly $24,000
in money that had been overpaid
to the county for storm cleanup
efforts following the 2004 hurri-
cane season.
* Voted to buy two new 2010
Dodge 4500 emergency rescue
ambulances for a total price of
$282,519. Officials said the new
units are needed to replace ag-
ing vehicles that have become in-
creasingly unreliable, subject to
frequent breakdowns and costly
repairs.
* Accepted a bid of $420 for a
1993 Chevrolet pickup truck that
had been damaged and the coun-
ty no longer needs.



COPIES
Black & white/Full color
THE OFFICE MART
110 South Fifth St.


Arrest for tossing


block into window
A trio of vehicle vandalism cases were reported to the sheriffs
department the past week, one of them resulting in the arrest of a
Glen St. Mary man who fled the scene of a disturbance and was found
walking on US 90 west of Macclenny.
Leonard Lee, 28, is accused of tossing a cinder block through the
rear window of a parked 1992 Ford just after midnight on July 2.
Mr. Lee had been involved in an argument on Quail Lane and was
angry after being in a fight, witnesses told Deputy Jason Bryan. Dam-
age to the vehicle belonging to Avadon Carter was placed at $500.
The witnesses also said he left in a vehicle with his mother.
Mr. Lee was found walking unsteadily near the travel lane of US
90 shortly after being dropped off following a disturbance with his
mother, and Deputy Patrick McGauley charged him with disorderly
intoxication. A complaint for criminal mischief was also filed.
In other cases:
* Klate Jesseman, 25, was named in a similar complaint for dam-
aging a 2007 Chevrolet truck belonging to Daryl Tyson of Glen St.
Mary about 1:oo am on June 28.
According to the owner, Mr. Jesseman repeatedly struck the hood,
doors, rear panels and window of the truck with a wire brush. He had
moments before used the brush to defend himself during a fight with
Tyler Payne of Glen off Owens Acres Dr.
* Allen Crews of Macclenny reported the convertible top of his
1992 Ford Mustang was slashed in two places while the vehicle was
parked at a residence off Andrala Pl. the evening of June 27.
He was there about an hour, and when he left also noticed one of
his tires was flat. He estimated damage at $500.


Hides $236 in groceries


A Sanderson woman was
arrested for shoplifting the
morning of June 29 after she
attempted to leave Walmart in
Macclenny with $236 worth of
merchandise she had stuffed
into a purse.
Donna Davis, 41, was ob-


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served by security staff going
around the store and opening
packages before stowing mostly
grocery items. Others included
hair coloring and a greeting
card.
Deputy Earl Lord was told
Ms. Davis paid for a $3 item at
the garden center before head-
ing to the parking lot, where she
was stopped and detained until
police arrived.
In a second case, this one
the afternoon of July 3, Milton
Mathis, 56, of Tifton, GA was
arrested after he attempted to
leave the store with $57 worth of
merchandise he had placed into
a Walmart bag. They included
a window set and panel, shoes
and hair color.
Mr. Mathis told Deputy Jer-
emiah Combs he intended to sell
the items for cash, and was try-
ing to get to Fort Lauderdale.


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Thursday, luly 7,2011


Page 6


I





THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


1-10 driver


wanted on


2 warrants
A North Carolina motorist
stopped on Interstate 10 the
morning of June 29 was found
to be driving without a license
and wanted on two out-of-state
warrants.
Deputy Chris Walker said
he caught up with a 1991 Buick
driven westbound by Daniel
Yaros, 36, of Winston Salem
near Glen St. Mary after first
noting the driver was not se-
cured with a safety belt.
Mr. Yaros initially gave the
officer a false name, and during
a consent search of the vehicle
his identity was established via
a bank card. The existence of
warrants from Georgia and New
Hampshire for a drug charge
and violating probation were
revealed during a routine com-
puter check, as was the fact that
Mr. Yaros had no license.
He was charged with that of-
fense and resisting without vio-
lence for giving the false name.
Both states indicated they would
not extradite.
In another warrant-related
arrest, George Jackson, 32, of
Macclenny was served with one
on June 30 from Union County
for failure to pay child support.
He was in county jail on an-
other offense at the time.


PHOTO BY KELLEY LANNIGAN
Warren Dukes, center, helps Baker County EMS workers load Jerry Alford onto a stretcher.



Critical after snakebite


KELLEY LANNIGAN
FEATURES
features@bakercountypress.com
A family holiday outing
proved nearly fatal for one mem-
ber who was bitten by a timber
rattlesnake at an Ocean Pond
campsite near Olustee over the
Fourth of July weekend.
Jerry Alford, 42, of Jackson-
ville, was flown to Shands Hos-
pital following the incident about
3:30 pm Sunday.
Mr. Alford remained in criti-
cal condition in the hospital's
intensive care unit late Tuesday
evening, the victim's sister, Deb-
bie Tekin, said.
According to witnesses,
Mr. Alford was returning to
the campsite on foot with sev-
eral family members when he
dropped his cell phone in the
grass. He was bitten on the hand
by the rattler as he attempted to
retrieve it.
Remarkably, Mr. Alford
grabbed the snake and carried it
into the campsite, where family
friend Warren Dukes reported
he saw the victim begin to stag-
ger and heard him say, "Warren,
I'm going down."


Mr. Alford then collapsed,
dropping the snake and losing
consciousness.
Another camper heard the
commotion and ran to the camp-
site with the machete he used to
kill the snake.
As a call was made to 9-1-1,
Mr. Alford's family members be-
gan frantic efforts to save his life
until a rescue crew arrived.
They formed a circle around
the victim, holding his head, sup-
porting his chest and trunk. They
applied tourniquets and kept ice
on the punctured area in an effort
to keep the venom from spread-
ing rapidly.
"Stay with us Uncle Jerry, stay
with us," one family member re-
peated over and over.
Baker County EMS arrived,
then transported Mr. Alford to
the Lifeflight helicopter waiting
outside the campground.
"We nearly lost him twice that
first night at the hospital," said
Ms. Tekin. "He may lose a fin-
ger. His eyesight, liver and kid-
ney function have been affected,
but my brother is a real fighter.

Check it out...
bakercount% press.com


The folks at the hospital said if
he weren't so strong he wouldn't
be here at all. It's really bad, but I
think he's going to survive."


Glen utility project begins
This massive fitting was among several large junction units stored along with
water main PVC pipes on town property in Glen St. Mary in anticipation of the
start of a $494,000 construction project connecting the north side of town to
the central water system.The town selected Grimes Contracting, Inc. of Orange
Park from among 13 bidders earlier this year for the project expected to take
up to nine months to complete. It and accompanying engineering and super-
vising costs are covered by a $600,000 CDBG grant similar to one that funded
water service south of US 90 and central sewer along the main street.


Buttons A Quality Consignment Store!

pr363 W. Macclenny Ave.
S Zippers (904) 259-4561
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ATTORNEY

David P. Dearing
former Baker County Prosecutor


SERIOUS INJURIES CAUSED BY

NEGLIGENCE OF ANOTHER

AND

CRIMINAL DEFENSE

Jacksonville (904) 399-8989 * Macclenny 259-1352
Toll Free (888) 211-9451

All initial consultations are absolutely free.
The hiring ofa lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon
advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information
about our qualifications and experience.


OnStar credited with


a stolen vehicle arrest


The OnStar satellite-linked
system installed by General Mo-
tors in 30 of its models assisted
Baker County officers in
locating a vehicle stolen
in St. Augustine early
on June 30 and the ar-
rest of its driver.
The sheriffs depart-
ment was advised by
St. Johns County about
4:oo am that a 2009
Hummer was west-
bound on Interstate to
near Sanderson, and
was notified again when Lisa
it reversed direction
and headed east toward Glen St.
Mary.
Deputy Daniel Nichols said
he spotted the vehicle and con-
firmed its license matched the
one dispatched earlier, then be-
cause police were advised of the
presence of a loaded firearm in-
side, initiated a felony stop near
Macclenny.
He was aided also in identify-
ing the vehicle because the On-
Star alert system activated the
vehicle's emergency flashers.
The sole occupant was iden-
tified as Lisa Dasher, 45, of St.
Augustine, who said she had
taken it earlier from owner Jeff
Riberdy, also of St. Augustine.
She told Deputy Nichols she
became angry after Mr. Rib-
erdy, who she met earlier at
a bar, had passed out and left


her handcuffed in a hotel room
where they had gone to have
sex. She was able to free herself
- and drove off with his


Das


vehicle.
Police found a loaded
.357 pistol in a holster
attached to the con-
sole near the driver's
seat, along with two,
lo-round magazines
and 21 rounds of ammu-
nition.
Ms. Dasher was
booked for dealing in


sher stolen property.
OnStar is also de-
signed for use in crash response,
navigation and roadside assis-
tance.
Maj. Gerald Gonzalez, the
sheriffs department operations
chief, said this is the first case of
its kind where OnStar played a
role.
"I don't recall another, but
that sure makes it easy," he add-
ed.
In another recent theft,
someone removed a 9.9 hp mo-
tor from a boat docked on the St.
Mary's River off L.E. Wilkerson
Rd. on June 26.
Windell Wilkerson reported
the theft the next day and placed
the loss value at $1978.


W1e print obituaries % ith a
picture free of charge.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

Notice is hereby given that the proposed ordinances, whose title
hereinafter appear, will be presented in a public hearing to the Baker
County Board of County Commissioner's for possible adoption on
Monday, July 18, 2011 at 6:00 PM or as soon thereafter as possible,
at the Baker County Administration Building, 55 North Third Street,
Macclenny, Florida. Copies of said ordinances may be inspected by
any member of the public in the Commissioner's office, address stated
above. On the above mentioned date, all interested parties may appear
and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinances which are titled
as follows:

ORDINANCE: 2011-
AN ORDINANCE BY THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMIS-
SIONERS OF BAKER COUNTY, FLORIDA, AMENDING OR-
DINANCE NO. 91-1, AS AMENDED, REGARDING THE FU-
TURE LAND USE MAP OF THE ADOPTED COMPREHEN-
SIVE PLAN, WITH RESPECT TO A PARCEL OF LAND, BE-
ING APPROXIMATELY 1.5 ACRES IN SIZE, RELATING TO
THE SMALL SCALE DEVELOPMENT AMENDMENT PRO-
CEDURES ESTABLISHED IN SECTION 163.3187(1)(c), FLOR-
IDA STATUTES, AS APPLY TO AN APPLICATION SUBMIT-
TED BY REGINALD L. SMITH; PROVIDING FOR A CHANGE
IN LAND USE CLASSIFICATION FROM AGRICULTURAL B
LAND USE TO VERY LOW DENSITY RESIDENTIAL 2.5 DU/
AC; PROVIDING SEVERABILITY, INSTRUCTIONS TO THE
CODIFIER, AND AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

ORDINANCE: 2011-
AN ORDINANCE BY THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMIS-
SIONERS OF BAKER COUNTY, FLORIDA REZONING 1.5
ACRES OF REAL PROPERTY OWNED BY REGINALD L.
SMITH FROM AGRICULTURAL (AG 7.5) TO RESIDENTIAL
(RCMH 2.5); PROVIDING SEVERABILITY, INSTRUCTIONS
TO THE CODIFIER, AND AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

ORDINANCE: 2011-
AN ORDINANCE BY THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMIS-
SIONERS OF BAKER COUNTY, FLORIDA, AMENDING OR-
DINANCE NO. 91-1, AS AMENDED, REGARDING THE FU-
TURE LAND USE MAP OF THE ADOPTED COMPREHEN-
SIVE PLAN, WITH RESPECT TO A PARCEL OF LAND, BE-
ING APPROXIMATELY 6.0 ACRES IN SIZE, RELATING TO
THE SMALL SCALE DEVELOPMENT AMENDMENT PRO-
CEDURES ESTABLISHED IN SECTION 163.3187(1)(c), FLOR-
IDA STATUTES, AS APPLY TO AN APPLICATION SUBMIT-
TED BY JEFFERY D. SMITH; PROVIDING FOR A CHANGE
IN LAND USE CLASSIFICATION FROM AGRICULTURAL B
LAND USE TO VERY LOW DENSITY RESIDENTIAL 2.5 DU/
AC; PROVIDING SEVERABILITY, INSTRUCTIONS TO THE
CODIFIER, AND AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
II.et property
ORDINANCE: 2011- .. e", ed approx.
AN ORDINANCE BY THE i,,iles North
BOARD OF COUNTY COM- .j " Hwy. 90
MISSIONERS OF BAKER i..ng west of
COUNTY, FLORIDAREZON- '2 North
ING 6.0 ACRES OF REAL
PROPERTY OWNED BY
JEFFERY D. SMITH FROM
AGRICULTURAL (AG 7.5)
TO RESIDENTIAL (RCMH
2.5); PROVIDING SEVER-
ABILITY, INSTRUCTIONS V -
TO THE CODIFIER, AND AN
EFFECTIVE DATE.

Persons interested in commenting on the proposed changes may ap-
pear and shall be given an opportunity to speak at the public hearing or
may send written comments to: Baker County Planning Department,
360 E Shuey Avenue, Macclenny, Florida, 32063. Copies of the ordi-
nance are available for public inspection at the Baker County Planning
Department. For additional information, please call (9204) 259-3354.

NOTE: Pursuant to Section 286.0105, Florida Statues, if any member
of the public desires to appeal any decision made at this public hear-
ing, he/she will need a record of the proceedings and for that purpose
may need to ensure that he/she transcribe a verbatim record of the
proceedings, which record would include the testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based.

According to the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a
special accommodation or an interpreter to participate in this proceed-
ing should contact the Administration Department at (904) 259-3613
at least 48 hours prior to the time of the hearing.


Thursday, lulv 7, 2011


Page7


v


I ,






THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


Thursday, luly 7, 2011


Consider growing



pomegranates here


ALICIA LAMBORN
BAKER COUNTY
EXTENSION AGENT

Pomegranates are native to
southeastern Europe and Asia,
but produce quality fruit in re-
gions with cool winters and hot,
dry summers. Few areas are too
hot, and the pomegranate is
cold hardy citrus.
Most pomegranates are cul-
tivated in California, but a UF
researcher specializing in hor-
ticulture science believes pome-
granates could become Florida's
next cash crop. The fruit is not
currently produced commercial-
ly in the state, but the University
of Florida's Citrus Research and
Education Center in Lake Alfred
is currently studying the viabil-
ity of pomegranate production
in Florida.
Normally a dense, bushy,
6-12 foot tall shrub, the pome-
granate may be trained as a
small tree reaching 20 feet in
height. Pomegranates produce
purplish-red, apple-sized fruits
with a smooth, leathery skin.
Numerous seeds are each sur-
rounded by a pink to purplish-
red, juicy pulp, which is the ed-
ible portion.
The fruit contains healthy
compounds such as antioxi-
dants, nutrients and vitamins.
Besides being edible, the pome-
granate also makes an attractive
ornamental, having glossy, dark
green leaves and flaming or-
ange-red blooms with crinkled
petals and numerous stamens.
Pomegranate trees are self-
fruitful, meaning they pollinate
themselves. So if you think you
have room for one in your yard,
look for "Purple Seed" or "Span-
ish Ruby," which are popular
dooryard cultivars, or "Won-
derful," grown commercially in
California.
Pomegranates are adapted to
many soil types from pure sand
to heavy clay. Yields are usually
low on sands, while fruit color
is poor on clays. Plant trees in
early spring (February - March),
avoiding late frost. When used
as a hedge, plants are spaced 6-9
feet apart, otherwise spacing of
15-18 feet between plants and
rows are used for orchards and
for dooryard trees.
Severe fruit drop during the
first 3-5 years is not uncommon
and can be aggravated by over-
fertilization and excess irriga-
tion. Young trees should receive
about 2-2.5 pounds of 8-8-8 (or
similar) fertilizer in November
and March, while mature trees
require 4-6 pounds at the same
intervals. In North Florida,
pomegranate fruit matures from
July to November, but excessive
or late applications of fertilizer
tend to delay fruit maturity and
reduce color and quality.
For more information on
growing pomegranates or other
fruit trees, please contact me at
the Baker County Extension Of-
fice by calling (904) 259-3520
or stop by the Ag Center, located
at 1025 W. Macclenny Ave (Hwy



Workshop focus

to be on relaxation

There will be a free workshop,
open to the public, held Thurs-
day, July 14 from 6:00 pm to
8:00oo pm at St. James Episcopal
Church in Macclenny, with spe-
cial invitation to those currently
facing unemployment or other
significant life changes.
The workshop will focus on a
special breathing technique that
promotes deep relaxation, im-
proved physical functioning and
increased mental and emotional
clarity.




News


Obituaries


Features


School News


90) in Macclenny.
You can also receive monthly
gardening information in your
mail box by signing up for our
free newsletter. Just stop by to
complete our form or visit our
website (http://baker.ifas.ufl.
edu).


LegalNlotices


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF
FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR BAKER COUNTY.
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 02-2008-CA-000163

U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR
SMLTI 2007-WFHE2,
Plaintiff,
vs.
EDGAR M. WHITE A/K/A EDGAR M. WHITE, JR., ETAL,
Defendants
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judg-
ment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated June 15, 2011
and entered in Case No. 02-2008-CA-000163 of the
Circuit Court of the EIGHTH Judicial Circuit in and for
BAKER County, Florida wherein U.S. BANK NATIONAL
ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR CMLTI 2007-WFHE2
is the Plaintiff and EDGAR M. WHITE A/K/A EDGAR
M. WHITE, JR.; ALICE F WHITE; are the Defendants,
The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at AT THE FRONT DOOR OF
THE BAKER COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on
the 25th day of July, 2011, the following described
property as set forth in said Final Judgment:

PARCEL 17:

COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER
OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF THE SOUTH-
EAST 1/4, SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH,
RANGE 22 EAST, BAKER COUNTY, FLORIDA,
AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 57
MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE
SOUTH LINE OF SAID NORTHWEST 1/4 OF
THE SOUTHEAST 1/4, 999.74 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE NORTH 02
DEGREES 02 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST
152.50 FEET TO THE SOUTH LINE OF A 50.00
FOOT ROAD, THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES
57 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST, ALONG
THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID ROAD 58.20 FEET,
THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 57
MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST, 279.98 FEET
MORE OR LESS TO THE CENTER OF A CREEK,
THENCE SOUTHERLY ALONG THE MEANDER
OF SAID CREEK TO THE POINT OF INTER-
SECTION OF SAID CREEK WITH THE SOUTH
LINE OF SAID NORTHWEST 1/4 OF THE
SOUTHEAST 1/4, 152 FEET, MORE OR LESS,
THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES 57 MINUTES
34 SECONDS WEST, 326.18 FEET MORE OR
LESS TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING;

PARCEL 18:

COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER
OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF THE SOUTH-
EAST 1/4 OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 3
SOUTH, RANGE 22 EAST, BAKER COUNTY,
FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE NORTH 02 DE-
GREES 02 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST,
ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID NORTH-
WEST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4, 152.50
FEET, THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 57 MIN-
UTES 34 SECONDS EAST, 1032.91 FEET, TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE NORTH
02 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 34 SECONDS
WEST 135.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 88
DEGREES 57 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST,
291.75 FEET TO A CREEK, THENCE SOUTH-
ERLY ALONG THE MEANDER OF SAID CREEK,
135.00 FEET MORE OR LESS, THENCE
NORTH 88 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 34 SEC-
ONDS WEST, 305.01 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING

A/K/A 8630 S BEN ROWE CIRCLE, MACCLEN-
NY, FL 32063

Dated this 21st day of june, 2011.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of lis pendens, must file a claim within 60
days after the sale.
Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 21st
day of June, 2011.
Clerk of Circuit Court
By: Jamie Crews
As Deputy Clerk
THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY:
Florida Default Law Group, PL.
RO. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
F08071643 NMNC-CONV---Team 1
6/30-7/7c
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that DAVID CREWS the holder
of the following certificate has filed said certificate for
a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number
and year of issuance, the description of the property
and the names in which it was assessed are as follows:

CERTIFICATE NO: 08-00281
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2008

DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY:

PARCEL 9

Part of the Southeast 14 of the Southeast 14 of Section
7, and part of the Northeast 14 of the northeast 14 of
Section 18, Township 1 South, Range 21 East, Baker
County, Florida, being more particularly described as
follows: for a POINT OF BEGINNING commence at the
Northeast corner of said Section 18, thence run South
72"32'45" West, a distance of 433.26 feet; thence run
South 88"57'28" West, a distance of 275.00 feet to the
East Right-of-Way line of Raulerson Road, said Right-
of-Way line being in a curve concaved Northeasterly
having a radius of 759.87 feet; Thence run along and
around said curve, a chord bearing and distance of,
North 17"40'47" West, 203.03 feet; thence run North
89"06'03" East, a distance of 750.44 feet to the East
line of said Section 7; thence run South 00"20'54"
West along said East line, a distance of 70.26 feet to
the point of Beginning.

Subject to a 30.00 foot easement for Ingress and
Egress over the East 30.00 feet thereof.
ALL OF SAID PROPERTY BEING LOCATED IN BAKER
COUNTY FLORIDA.
NAME IN WHICH ASSESSED: David Manucy, David
Manucy Jr., James Robert Manucy.

Unless such certificate or certificates shall be re-
deemed according to law, the property described here-
in will be sold to the highest bidder at the front door
of the Baker County Courthouse, Macclenny, Florida on
Thursday, August 25, 2011 at 11:00 am.

Dated this 13th day of June, 2011

AL FRASER
CLERK OF COURT
BAKER COUNTY FLORIDA

By: Julie B. Combs, Deputy Clerk
R/1R-7/7


CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF
FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR BAKER COUNTY.
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 201 0-CA-000157

REGIONS BANK D/B/A REGIONS MORTGAGE SUCCES-
SOR BY MERGER TO UNION PLANTERS BANK, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CHERYL COCHRAN AND MICHAEL R. COCHRAN, WIFE
AND HUSBAND; WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.,
Defendants
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN PURSUANT TO AN ORDER
OF FINAL JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE DATED JUNE
17, 2011, ENTERED IN CIVIL CASE NO. 2010-CA-
000157 OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 8TH JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR BAKER COUNTY, FLORIDA,
WHEREIN REGIONS BANK D/B/A REGIONS MORT-
GAGE SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO UNION PLANTERS
BANK, N.A., PLAINTIFF AND CHERYL COCHRAN AND
MICHAEL R. COCHRAN, WIFE AND HUSBAND ARE
DEFENDANTSS, I WILL SELL TO THE HIGHEST AND
BEST BIDDER FOR CASH AT THE EAST DOOR OF THE
BAKER COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 339 East
Macclenny Ave., Macclenny, BAKER COUNTY, Florida,
AT 11:00 A.M. ON AUGUST 1, 2011, the following
described property AS SET FORTH IN SAID FINAL
JUDGMENT, TO-WIT:
PARCEL 1:
COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER
OF GOVERNMENT LOT NO. 1, SECTION 3,
TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 19 EAST, BAK-
ER COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE S
1 DEGREE 01'23" E, ALONG THE WEST LINE
OF SAID GOVERNMENT LOT NO. 1, 581.99
FEET TO THE SOUTHWESTERLY LINE OF A
30 FOOT ROAD EASEMENT AND TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE
S 1 DEGREE 01'23" E, ALONG SAID WEST
LINE, 540.40 FEET; THENCE N 88 DEGREES
58'37" E, 302.31 FEET TO THE WESTER-
LY LINE OF A 30 FOOT ROAD EASEMENT;
THENCE N 14 DEGREES 49'53" W, ALONG
SAID WESTERLY LINE, 245.75 FEET; THENCE
N 37 DEGREES 03'23" W, STILL ALONG SAID
WESTERLY LINE, 299.77 FEET; THENCE N
49 DEGREES 40'38" W, STILL ALONG SAID
WESTERLY LINE, 90.05 FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING.
ALSO,ROAD EASEMENT "A"
AN EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS,
30.00 FEET IN WIDTH, BEING 15.00 FEET
TO THE RIGHT AND 15.00 FEET TO THE
LEFT OF A LINE DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER
OF GOVERNMENT LOT NO. 1, SECTION 3,
TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 19 EAST, BAK-
ER COUNTY, FLORIDAAND RUN S 1 DEGREE
01'23"E, ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID
GOVERNMENT LOT NO. 1, 562.05 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF SAID LINE,
THENCE S 49 DEGREES 40'38'E, 104.91
FEET; THENCE S 37 DEGREES 03'23"
E, 304.38 FEET; THENCE S 14 DEGREES
49'53" E, 252.39 FEET TO THE POINT OF
TERMINATION OF SAID LINE.
ALSO, ROAD EASEMENT "B"
AN EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS,
30.00 FEET IN WIDTH, BEING 15.00 FEET
TO THE RIGHT AND 15.00 FEET TO THE
LEFT OF A LINE DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER
OF GOVERNMENT LOT NO. 1, SECTION 3,
TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 19 EAST, BAK-
ER COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN S 1 DEGREE
01'23" E, ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID
GOVERNMENT LOT NO. 1, 562.05 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF SAID LINE,
THENCE N 49 DEGREES 40'38" W, 216.24
FEET TO THE EAST LINE OF A 30 FOOT
COUNTY GRADED ROAD AND THE POINT OF
TERMINATION OF SAID LINE.
PARCEL 2:
COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER
OF GOVERNMENT LOT 1, SECTION 3, TOWN-
SHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 19 EAST, THENCE
RUN S 1 DEGREE 01'23" E, ALONG THE
WEST LINE OF SAID GOVERNMENT LOT
1, 577.05 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE
SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF EASE-
MENT "A", AS DESCRIBED IN O/R BOOK
101, PAGE 194 PUBLIC RECORDS OF BAK-
ER COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THE POINT OF
BEGINNING, THENCE RUN S 49 DEGREES
40'38" E, 104.91 FEET; THENCE S 37 DE-
GREES 03'23" E, 304.38 FEET; THENCE S 14
DEGREES 49'53" E. 252.23 FEET; THENCE
RUN S 88 DEGREES 59'08" W, 4.90 FEET,
MORE OR LESS, TO LANDS DESCRIBED IN
O/R BOOK 101, PAGE 194 OF SAID PUBLIC
RECORDS; THENCE N 14 DEGREES 49'53' W,
245.55 FEET; THENCE N 37 DEGREES 03'23"
W, 299.78 FEET; THENCE N 49 DEGREES
40'38" W, 90.05 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A
POINT ON THE WEST LINE OF SAID GOVERN-
MENT LOT 1, SAID POINT BEING 581.99
FEET FROM SAID NORTHWEST CORNER OF
GOVERNMENT LOT 1, THENCE RUN N 1 DE-
GREE 01'23" W, ALONG SAID WEST LINE A
DISTANCE OF 4.90 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
THE ABOVE DESCRIBED IS LANDS THAT
LIES BETWEEN CAPTION PROPERTY AND
EASEMENT "A", AS DESCRIBED IN O/R BOOK
101, PAGE 194 PUBLIC RECORDS OF BAKER
COUNTY, FLORIDA.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST
FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 17th
day of June, 2011.
Clerk of Circuit Court
By: Jamie Crews
As Deputy Clerk
THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY:
Attorney for Plaintiff
Shapiro, Fishman & Gache, LLP
4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd.
Suite 100
Tampa, FL 33614
(813)880-8888
(813) 880-8800
6/30

AR&R, INC
10525 DUVAL LANE
MACCLENNY, FL 32063
Phone (904) 259-4774
The following vehicle will be sold at public auction
July 22, 2011 at 10:00 am atA R & R INC, 10525
Duval Lane, Macclenny, FL 32063.
1993 Ford Aerostar
VIN #1FMDA31X9PZB13782
7/7C


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF
FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR BAKER COUNTY.
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 02-2010-CA-0223

VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND FINANCE, INC., A TEN-
NESSEE CORPORATION AUTHORIZED TO TRANSACT
BUSINESS IN FLORIDA,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JAMES ROBERT MANUCYA/K/A JAMES R. MANUCY
AND JENNIFER W. MANUCYA/K/A JENNIFER S.
MANUCY F/K/A JENNIFER SUE WILLIAMS, HUSBAND
AND WIFE; AND UNIDENTIFIED JOHN DOE(S) AND/OR
UNIDENTIFIED JANE DOE(S),
Defendants
CLERK'S NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Plain-
tiff's Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the
above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on JULY 18, 2011 at 11:00 A.M. (EST),
at the main entrance of the Baker County Courthouse,
located at 339 East Macclenny Ave., Macclenny, Flori-
da, the following described property:

A PORTION OF LAND LYING IN GOVERNMENT
LOT 1, SECTION 21, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH,
RANGE 21 EAST, BAKER COUNTY, FLORI-
DA AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DE-
SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE
EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF CREWS ROAD
(A 40.00 FOOT COUNTY ROAD) AND THE
NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION
21, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 21 EAST;
THENCE SOUTH 14 DEGREES 38 MINUTES
58 SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID EASTERLY
RIGHT OF WAY LINE, 269.03 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 87 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 32 SEC-
ONDS EAST, 350.69 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 87
DEGREES 51 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST,
326.11 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 02 DEGREES
08 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST, 267.52
FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTHERLY
BOUNDARY OF LANDS DESCRIBED IN OF-
FICIAL RECORDS BOOK 54, PAGE 337, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF SAID COUNTY;
THENCE SOUTH 87 DEGREES 59 MINUTES
20 SECONDS WEST, ALONG THE NORTH LINE
OF SAID OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 54, PAGE
337, 326.11 FEET; THENCE NORTH 02 DE-
GREES 08 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST,
266.78 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
30.0 FOOT EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND
EGRESS
A PORTION OF LAND LYING IN GOVERNMENT
LOT 1, SECTION 21, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH,
RANGE 21 EAST, BAKER COUNTY, FLORI-
DA AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DE-
SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE
EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF CREWS ROAD
(A 40.00 FOOT COUNTY ROAD) AND THE
NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION
21, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 21 EAST;
THENCE SOUTH 14 DEGREES 38 MINUTES
58 SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID EASTERLY
RIGHT OF WAY LINE, 269.03 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE
SOUTH 14 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 58 SEC-
ONDS EAST, 30.73 FEET; THENCE NORTH 87
DEGREES 51 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST,
670.14 FEET; THENCE NORTH 02 DEGREES
08 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST, 30 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 87 DEGREES 51 MINUTES
32 SECONDS WEST, 676.80 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 2006 CMH
CLASSIC 52' X 28' MOBILE HOME, SERIAL
NO. WHCO15722GAA AND WHCO15722GAB
AND TITLE NO. 96756297 AND 96756338.

PROPERTY ADDRESS: 18937 CREWS ROAD,
GLEN ST. MARY, FL 32040.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST
FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 21st
day of June, 2011.
Clerk of Circuit Court
By: Jamie Crews
As Deputy Clerk
This instrument prepared by:
SONYA DAWS, RA./ATTN: ERIN GORDON
3116 CAPITAL CIRCLE NE, SUITE 5
TALLAHASSEE, FL 32308
PHONE: (850)668-5246
FAX: (850) 668-5352
EMAIL: EGORDON@DAWSLAW.COM
6/30-7/7c

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
BAKER COUNTY, FLORIDA.
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO.: 02-2011-CP-034
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ETHELRINE JOHNSON
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that the administration of
the estate of ETHELRINE JOHNSON, deceased, File
Number 02-2011-CP-034, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Baker County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 339 East Macclenny Avenue,
Macclenny, Florida 32063. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and the personal repre-
sentative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having
claims or demands against decedent's estate includ-
ing unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims,
on whom a copy of this notice is served within three
months after the date of the first publication of this

FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and persons hav-
ing claims or demands against the decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN The TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this notice is JUNE
30, 2011.
Signed on June 22, 2011.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
ROBERT D. HINES
Florida Bar No.: 0413550
Hines Norman Hines, PL.
1312 W Fletcher Ave., Ste. B
Tampa, FL 33612
Telephone: (813) 265-0100
Personal Representative:
Daisy Mae Parker
9381 Bennie Givens Ct.
Sanderson, FL 32087
6/30-7/7c


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF
FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR BAKER COUNTY.
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 02-2011 -CA-000028

TD BANK, N.A., AS SUCCESSOR BY A SERIES OF
MERGERS WITH MERCANTILE BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JAMES HARLEY NELSON AND LINDA KAY NELSON, HIS
WIFE, ETAL,
Defendants
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure dated June 17, 2011 entered
in Civil Case No. 02-2011-CA-000028 of the Cir-
cuit Court of the Eighth Judicial Circuit in and for
Baker County, Florida, wherein TD BANK, N.A. is
Plaintiff and JAMES HARLEY NELSON, et al., are
Defendant(s).
I will sell to the highest bidder for cash, at the front
door of the Baker County Courthouse, 339 E. Mac-
Clenny Ave., MacClenny, FL at 11:00 o'clock a.m. on
the 18th day of July, 2011 the following described
property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:
LOT 14, FRANK COMBS CIRCLE ESTATES,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 89 AND 90
OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF BAKER COUN-
TY, FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH A 1981 BRIGADIER SUN-
BURST MOBILE HOME VIN #GB1 CS29450
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60
days after the sale.
Dated this21st day of June, 2011.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of lis pendens, must file a claim within 60
days after the sale.
Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 21st
day of June, 2011.
Clerk of Circuit Court
By: Jamie Crews
As Deputy Clerk
THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY:
Daniel S. Mandel, Esq.
Daniel S. Mandel, PA
Attorneys for Plaintiff
2700 N Military Trail, Ste. 356
Boca Raton, FL 33431
Tel: (561) 826-1740
Fax: (561) 826-1741
6/30-7/7c

INTHE-7/7c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OFTHE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF
FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR BAKER COUNTY.
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 02-2010-CA-0135

TD BANK, N.A., AS SUBSTITUTED PLAINTIFF FOR
CAROLINA FIRST BANK, AS SUCCESSOR BY
MERGER TO MERCANTILE BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
RONALD O. GIVENS, ETAL,
Defendants
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure dated June 15, 2011 entered in
Civil Case No. 02-2010-CA-0135 of the Circuit Court
of the Eighth Judicial Circuit in and for Baker County,
Florida, wherein TD BANK, N.A. is Plaintiff and RON-
ALD 0. GIVENS; t al., are Defendant(s).

I will sell to the highest bidder for cash, at the front
door of the Baker County Courthouse, 339 E. Mac-
clenny Ave., Macclenny, FL at 11:00 'clock a.m. on
the 25th day of July, 2011 the following described
property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:

A PART OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF THE
SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP
2 SOUTH, RANGE 22 EAST, BAKER COUNTY,
FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DE-
SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:

FOR A POINT OF REFERENCE COMMENCE AT
THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTH-
WEST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF
SAID SECTION 32; THENCE S. 89 47' 15"
W, ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF THE SAID
SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4, A
DISTANCE OF 403.29 FEET TO AN INTERSEC-
TION WITH THE PROJECTION OF THE EAST
LINE OF THE LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFI-
CIAL RECORDS BOOK 1998, PAGE 6347, OF
THE CURRENT PUBLIC RECORDS OF BAKER
COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE S 01 09' 05"
E, ALONG THE SAID PROJECTION LINE, A
DISTANCE OF 27.11 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE
NE CORNER OF THE LANDS DESCRIBED IN
SAID OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK; THENCE
S 01 09' 05" NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY
LINE OF SOUTH BOULEVARD (A 50 FOOT
RIGHT OF WAY AS PRESENTLY ESTABLISHED)
AND THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID
LANDS; THENCE N 89 29' 05" W, ALONG
SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE AND
ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID LANDS, A
DISTANCE OF 133.5 FEET TO THE SOUTH-
WEST CORNER OF SAID LANDS; THENCE
DEPARTING SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY
LINE, N 01 09' 05" W, ALONG THE WESTERLY
LINE OF SAID LANDS, A DISTANCE OF 316.4
FEET TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID
LANDS; THENCE S 89 29' 05" E, ALONG
THE NORTHERLY LINE OF SAID LANDS, A
DISTANCE 133.5 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING.

BEING THE SAME LANDS AS DESCRIBED
IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 1998, PAGE
6347, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF BAKER
COUNTY, FLORIDA.

STREET ADDRESS: 531 S. BLVD., W. MAC-
CLENNY FL 32063

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file
a claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 21st day of june, 2011.
Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 21st
day of June, 2011.
Clerk of Circuit Court
By: Jamie Crews
As Deputy Clerk
THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY:
Daniel S. Mandel, Esq.
Daniel S. Mandel, PA
Attorneys for Plaintiff
2700 N Military Trail, Ste.356
Boca Raton, FL 33431
Tel: (561) 826-1740
Fax: (561)826-1741
6/30-7/7c


CDBG PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE
1 ST PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE
The Baker County Board of Commissioners is consid-
ering applying to the Florida Department of Economic
Opportunity (DEO), Division of Community Develop-
ment, for a FFY 2011 Small Cities Community Devel-
opment Block Grant (CDBG) of up to $750,000. These
funds must be used for one of the following purposes:
1. To benefit low and moderate income per-
sons;
2. To aid in the prevention or elimination of
slums or blight; or
3. To meet other community development
needs of recent origin having a particular
urgency because existing conditions pose a
serious and immediate threat to the health
or welfare of the community and where other
financial resources are not available to meet
such needs.
The categories of activities for which these funds may
be used are in the areas of housing, neighborhood re-
vitalization, commercial revitalization, or economic de-
velopment and include such improvement activities as
acquisition of real property, loans to private-for-profit
business, purchase of machinery and equipment,
construction of infrastructure, rehabilitation of houses
and commercial buildings, and energy conservation.
Additional information regarding the range range of activities
that may be undertaken will be provided at the public
hearing. For each activity that is proposed, at least
70% of the funds must benefit low and moderate
income persons.
In developing an application for submission to DEO,
the Baker County Board of Commissioners must plan
to minimize displacement of persons as a result of
planned CDBG activities. In addition, the Baker County
Board of Commissioners is required to develop a plan
to assist displaced persons.
A public hearing to receive citizen views concerning
the community's economic and community develop-
ment needs will be held at the Baker County Grants
Office, 360 E. Shuey Ave., Macclenny, FL 32063 on
Thursday, July 14, 2011 at 1:00 pm. For information
concerning the public hearing contact Maurice Postal,
Grants Coordinator, 360 E. Shuey Ave., Macclenny,
FL 32063. Telephone (904) 259-9825. E-mail: mauri-
cep@bakercountyfl.org.
The public hearing is being conducted in a handi-
capped accessible location. Any handicapped person
requiring an interpreter for the hearing impaired or
the visually impaired should contact Maurice Postal
at least two (2) calendar days prior to the meeting
and an interpreter will be provided. Any non-English
speaking person wishing to attend the public hear-
ing should contact Maurice Postal at least two (2)
calendar days prior to the meeting and a language
interpreter will be provided. Any handicapped person
requiring special accommodation at this meeting
should contact Mr. Postal at least two (2) calendar
days prior to the meeting.
7/7c

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF
FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR BAKER COUNTY.
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 02-2010-CA-0045

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, ACTING THROUGH
RURAL DEVELOPMENT, FORMERLY FARMERS HOME
ADMINISTRATION (FMHA), UNITED STATES DEPART-
MENT OFAGRICULTURE (USDA),
Plaintiff,
vs.
ANN N. GRAY N/K/AANN N. MILLER; GARY R. MILLER,
Defendants
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Summary
Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on June 15,
2011, by the above entitled Court in the above styled
cause, the undersigned Clerk of Court or any of his
duly authorized deputies, will sell the property situ-
ated in Baker County, Florida, described as:

LOT 2, BLOCK A, MACCLENNY II, UNIT II, A
SUBDIVISION RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2,
PAGE(S) 64 & 65 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF BAKER COUNTY, FLORIDA.

PROPERTY ADDRESS: 4104 HICKORY
STREET, MCCLENNY FL 32063

At public outcry to the highest and best bidder for
cash on JULY 18, 2011, at the front door of the Baker
County Courthouse, 339 East Macclenny Avenue,
Macclenny, FL 32063, subject to all ad valorem taxes
and assessments for the real property described
above.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SUR-
PLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE
PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PEN-
DENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS
AFTER THE SALE.
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DIS-
ABILITIES ACT, PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES NEEDING
A SPECIAL ACCOMMODATION TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS
PROCEEDING SHOULD CONTACT THE OFFICE OF THE
COURT ADMINISTRATOR, JAN PHILLIPS, TELEPHONE
(352)374-3648, WITHIN TWO (2) WORKING DAYS OF
YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS SUMMONS. IF HEARING IM-
PAIRED, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, OR VOICE (V) 1-800-
955-8770, VIA FLORIDA RELAY SERVICE.
Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 21st
day of June, 2011.
Clerk of Circuit Court
By: Jamie Crews
As Deputy Clerk
This instrument prepared by:
FREDERICK J. MURPHY, JR., ESQUIRE
BOSWELL & DUNLAP, LLP
POST OFFICE DRAWER 30
BARTOW, FL 33831
ATTORNEYS FOR PLAINTIFF
TELEPHONE (863) 533-7117
FAX (863) 533-7412
6/30-7/7c


Page 8


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THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


Is he still an outsider?


JOEL ADDINGTON
NEWS EDITOR
reporter@bakercountypress.com
The 2010 mid-term election
swept many Republicans into
office, giving the Grand Ole Par-
ty control of the US House and
host of governorships including
Florida's. National commenta-
tors framed the election as one
in which voters "sent a message"
to Washington about out-of-con-
trol spending and the need for
more fiscal responsibility from
our political leaders. Locally,
Republicans performed well too.
Now, more than six months
later, The Press is checking in
with the newest members of
the county commission and the
school board to find out how the
mostly conservative public offi-
cials are adjusting to life "on the
hot seat."
Republican school board
member Jesse Davis is a
35-year-old insurance broker,
Macclenny resident, Orlando-
area native, husband and father
to three children. He responded
to questions from The Press by
e-mail during recent weeks as
follows:

Q. How has being a school
board member changed
your life - at home, at work,
at church, your routines,
your emotions, your health?
A. Being a school board mem-
ber has enlightened me to the
real struggles behind-the-scenes
that we face as a district and that
our teachers face everyday. It has
not necessarily changed my life,
but it has certainly changed my
outlook and has served as a dai-
ly reminder of how valuable our
teachers are to the children of
Baker County. The teachers are
the real heros and Baker County
has some of the best in the na-
tion. I hope everyone recognizes
that.

Q. What do you miss most
about being a civilian, so to
speak?
A. Actually, the main advan-
tage in not growing up in Baker
County is that I remain relatively
unrecognized in the community.
This is a good thing because then
I am able to catch real conver-
sations and opinions about our
school district. When someone
doesn't know who I am, then they
are more likely to give me their
true and honest opinion about
what their children are going
through, how their child's teach-
er is doing and what they would
like to see done. Not everyone is
comfortable speaking directly to
an elected official so I enjoy the
fact that people don't know me
because it helps me listen to the
real way that the people of Baker
County feel about our school dis-
trict.

Q. So what's something
useful or enlightening
you've learned by being 'in-
cognito?'
A. That we have to go to the
parents to help equip them better
because they are not coming to
us. Education starts in the home
and we have to do a better job at
raising the value of education in
this county. For many, going to
school is just part of what you do
while you grow up. They don't
realize the doors that education
opens for you. As businesses in
this county close their doors and
as the distribution centers and
the mills and the prisons and the
hospitals start to slow down and


cut off their hiring, our children
will have to look to other com-
munities to find jobs when they
graduate from high school if they
don't earn a spot in college. For
many, that would involve
moving out of the county
and that only serves to
hurt this community
more.

Q. What has been
the most challeng-
ing decision you've
faced thus far and
why?
A. My decision to
vote against the insur-
ance committee's recent
recommendation regard-
ing the district [insurance]
Broker Services RFP. I have
worked in the employee
benefits insurance
field for over 15
years and I had
concerns over
the process. I
was the only
"no" vote, but
my decision was
an educated de-
cision based my
experience and
I will stand by
it. Still, I think
it was a valuable
learning experi-
ence for everyone
involved and I was proud that we
produced an RFP since the dis-
trict had never run an RFP for
their insurance broker services
before. All in all we are definitely
moving in the right direction.

Q. What do you enjoy
most about the job and why?
A. John Maxwell wrote that
"Leadership is the ability to in-
fluence. Nothing more, nothing
less." I am blessed and proud
to be able to meet the children
of Baker County and to speak to
them about all of the possibilities
that education can bring to them.
We have amazing children here
in Baker and when you couple
that with the amazing teachers
we have then the sky is the limit
for some of these young men and
young women. It will be reward-
ing to watch them grow into in-
credible adults and I hope to look
back and say that in some small
way that I was able to influence
that.

Q. What has surprised
you or what's something
new you've learned or dis-
covered about being in
elected office now that
you're there?
A. The biggest discovery you
learn from being in office is that
you are only "one" person. It is
truly a team effort - win or lose.
Everyone runs a campaign based
on the fact that they can person-
ally make the biggest difference
on their prospective board but
that is just not true. You realize
very quickly that in order to ac-
complish anything that you have
to have a team effort. I believe
a lot of what doesn't get accom-
plished at any level of govern-
ment is because not enough ef-
fort is put into building a team
and so that trust level doesn't
exist to have your ideas imple-
mented.

Q. Is there anything you
would have liked to have ac-
complished, beyond a dif-
ferent outcome on the in-
surance RFP, that hasn't
garnered the support of
enough board members to


make it happen?
A. I would say we are all pretty


much on the same page. Hav-
ing gotten to know the other
board members I can say fairly
that there is not a single mem-
ber there now that doesn't have
the school district's best inter-
est at heart. But we are all dif-
ferent people, so we just each
come about it from a different
perspective. Personally, I think
that the high school grade issue
is the most pressing non-cap-
ital issue we face. Keeping our
teachers and staff employed and
making sure the district can run
financially is the most impor-
tant capital issue, but we have
got to turn that high school into
a success and it has got to start
in the homes. We need the sup-
port of all of the parents in the
community. This is not an issue
of how your home life runs. It is
an issue of your commitment as
a parent to make sure that your
children have best chance of sur-
vival in this world. The teachers
have a hard enough job teach-
ing these children who are in
very formidable years and many
times these teachers are asked to
play the role of substitute par-
ent. We have the best teachers in
the world and they give of them-
selves happily, but a stronger fo-
cus on education from the home
would make a world of difference
for our high school and all of our
schools. A good education is the
most important gift we can give
our children and as the world
grows more and more competi-
tive there's little room for error.
I don't want to see a single child
from Baker County miss out on
any opportunity because of a lack
of education. It is heartbreaking.

Q. Why do you think you
weren't successful at gar-
nering this level of support
on the RFP, or other issues?
A. As a board we are a cham-
pionship team. Still, even cham-
pionship teams sometimes have
trouble in the locker room. The
key to remaining a champion-
ship team is to leave those trou-
bles in the locker room. If I have
had any troubles it is because I
have forgotten the old saying,
"People don't care how much you
know, until they know how much


Davis talks teamwork, the school


budget crunch, being 'b
you care." to take the front seat. We need
business here in Baker and we
Q. Do you think it will get need rooftops. Both of those can
more or less difficult as time provide future revenue but the
goes on, and why? key is to provide concessions to
A. Unfortunately it is going get them here and sometimes
to get much more difficult and that means easing up on the
especially for our district's ad- money that it costs businesses
ministration. The funding de- and homeowners to move here.
mands from Tallahassee con- We have to start thinking long
tinue to grow and without the term reward, but nobody likes to
proper economic growth in our make that initial investment up
county then our school district front especially when you have no
will have a hard time keeping money to begin with. However,
up with those demands. Unless the long term gain is greater than
things change, we have a per- anything in the present. Again,
fect storm coming our way. this would have to be a concerted
effort by the school district, the
Q. How do you plan to Board of County Commissioners
respond to this "perfect and the Chamber of Commerce/
storm?" School district fi- Economic Development Com-
nance chief Marcelle Rich- mission. Another option could be
ardson said the state in- to solicit building repair funding
cluded no funding for grants from local non-profits. No
maintenance and re- matter how it gets done it is going
pairs and cut per to be a difficult task and I would
student spending, ask the public to stay as informed
which along with as they can and to come to the
expiring stimulus board meetings so they know the
funding will neces- true story behind the issues we
state dipping into face.
reserves to avoid
layoffs. Given the Q. What are your goals go-
need for exten- ing forward?
sive repair work at A. My goals don't mean a
BCHS, what would thing unless I can get the buy in
you like to see hap- from the other board members
pen? and the administration. First and
A. This is going to be foremost it is imperative that we
one of those workshops where get our high school's grade up.
we lock the doors and don't come From there we need to make sure


out until we have a solution.
Even if it takes days. First off
we have to give credit where it's
due. Mrs. Richardson has done a
heck of a job keeping us as fiscal-
ly sound as she knows how. Be-
cause of that we have weathered
more than one storm that could
have easily wiped us out. Still,
hard times are coming for every
level of government. Most of our
funding comes from the state
and as the state shrinks then so
do we. In my opinion it is going
to take a concerted effort locally
by all government entities and
support groups to make a differ-
ence. I believe that an aggressive
economic development plan has


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that we are as fiscally sound as
we can be in order to protect the
jobs of our teachers and district
employees. In a perfect world I
would love to see our high school
get boys and girls varsity soccer
teams, but I am afraid that may
never happen.

Q. What are the barriers
to getting soccer teams at
BCHS, and what would you
do to attempt to overcome
those barriers?
A. I love soccer. It is one of my
favorite sports to play and coach.
As a former semi-pro soccer
player myself, I can tell you that
no one wants high school soccer
in Baker more than me. I would
even coach it for free. Unfortu-
nately and realistically, it is not
even a blip on the radar from a
funding stand point. If I have to
choose between a teachers salary
and a soccer team then the teach-
er wins every time. The only real
chance of bringing soccer to Bak-
er County High School for both
girls and boys would possibly be
if a booster club or non-revoka-
ble funding source was created
and contributed to the commu-
nity and it had enough money
at the start to maintain and fund
the teams for multiple years.
Outside of that I do not see any
funds coming from the district
to support any new or additional
sports programs. But boy would
I love it!


F





THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS




OBITUARIES


Page


10
JULY 7, 2011


CHURCH AND OBITUARY NOTICE INFORMATION CONTACT US
Obituaiies must be submitted in a timely fashion and have a local connection. Pictures aie pi inted with By phone at 904.259.2400 or by fax at 904 259 6502. You can stop by oui office located at 104 S. Fifth Stieet,
obitua les free of charge. The newspaper reserves the light to publish photos based on quality It is iecluested Macclenny, FL o mail your submission to PO Box 598, Macclenny, FL 32063
that all news items be typed o01 emailed to insure accuracy in pi int. We are available online at vvwvv bakeicountypiess.com


Bootsie Frederick,
75, of Sanderson
Bootsie Grace Frederick, 75,
of Sanderson, died July 4 at the
Acosta Rua Center for Caring
in Jacksonville. Mrs. Freder-
ick was born in White Springs
and resided in Baker County
for the past
30 years.
She was the
daughter of
the late Er-
nest Daniel
and Zeffie
Johnson
Grace.
Bootsie
graduated
from Robert

School in Bootsie Frederick
Jacksonville,
was a homemaker most of her
life and enjoyed cooking, sewing
and gardening. She loved gath-
ering with family and friends for
social teas. She worked along
side her husband in the Labor
of Love Ministry until his death
in 2oo006. She also owned a small
janitorial business.
She was preceded in death by
her husband of 54 years, Rev.
Henry Durell "Pop" Frederick;
sons Clint Frederick and Charles
Frederick. She was a loving and
dedicated wife, mother, grand-
mother, great-grandmother,
aunt and friend.
Survivors include daughters
Cheryl (Jeff) Read, Fisherville,
KY, and Cathy (Steve) Harvey,
Sanderson; son Chris (Gayla)
Frederick, Big Bear, CA; sis-
ters Helen Bunkley, Keystone
Heights and Clara Rhodes, Tal-
lahassee; brothers Ernest (De-
loris) Grace, Fruit Cove, and
Charles (Jean) Grace, Keystone
Heights; brother-in-law James
"Butch" (Dianne) Frederick,
Bryceville; twelve grandchildren
and ten great-grandchildren.
The funeral service will be
conducted Thursday, July 7 at
2:00 pm in the Macclenny First
Baptist Church with the Rev.
Ricky Baldwin officiating. In-
terment will follow in the Cedar
Creek Cemetery. The family will
receive friends Wednesday, July
6, from 6:00-8:00 pm at Guerry
Funeral Home in Macclenny.

Mary Hicks, 72,
dies in June 29th
Mary N. Hicks, 72, of Glen
St. Mary died June 29, 2011.
She was born in Atlantic City,
New Jersey
to the late
Paul Sapp
and Mabel
Stott Sapp
on Febru-
ary 28, 1939.

resident of
Baker Coun-
ty since she
was 18 years
old after
moving from Mary Hicks
New Jersey,
and a member of First Baptist
Church of Glen St. Mary. She
was a store clerk at the Kwik
Stop in Glen St. Mary for 20
years. She enjoyed playing bin-
go and eating Kit Kat bars. She
was predeceased by her hus-
band George Dale Hicks, Sr.
Survivors include her chil-
dren: George Dale (Cali) Hicks
Jr of Thomasville, GA, Paul
Daniel (Cathy) Hicks of Port
Orchard, W.A. and Terri (Billy)
Wilds of Glen St. Mary; brother
Paul Sapp of Niceville, FL: sis-
ters Dee Lange of MA and Ethel
and eight great grandchildren.
The funeral service for Mrs.
Hicks was held on Saturday
July 2 at 10:00 am at her church

ficiating. Interment followed in
Manntown Cemetery in Glen
St. Mary. V. Todd Ferreira Fu-
neral Services was in charge of
arrangements. In lieu of flow-
ers, please make a donation to


the First Baptist Church of Glen
St. Mary's Master Plan Fund in
Mary's name.


Candis Thompson,
an x-ray technician
Candis Lynda Thompson, 53,
of Macclenny died on June 28,
2011. She was born in Atlanta,
Georgia to the late William
Blake and Carol Boatner Blake
on August 1, 1957. She was a
resident of Baker County for the
last 23 years
after moving
from Jack-
sonville. Ms.
Thompson
was an x-ray
technician
at St. Vin-
cent's Medi-
cal Center
for 21 years.
She was a
fun loving, CandisThompson
nurturing,
caring and giving person and
loved to cook.
Survivors include her son:
C.J. (Jessica) Thompson of
Macclenny; brother Dale (Re-
nee) Blake of Jacksonville; aunt
Barbara Boatner and grand-
daughter Kendall Thompson.
The funeral service for Ms.
Thompson was held on Friday
July 1 at 11:00 am at the cha-
pel of V. Todd Ferreira Funeral
Services in Macclenny with Pas-
tor Grady Allbritton officiating.
Interment followed at Kings-
ley Lake Baptist Cemetery in
Starke.


Heartfelt thanks
Thank you to all the family
and friends who have been there
during this most difficult time.
Your support through everything
has meant more than you'll ever
know. A special thanks to Baker
County EMS, Baker County Fire
Department, Ed Fraser ER staff,
Pastor Grady Allbritton, Sheriff
Joey Dobson and staff, county
administration staff, the Moose
Lodge and V. Todd Ferreira Fu-
neral Services. We thank each
of you from the bottom of our
hearts.
Family of Candi Thompson
CJ, Jessica and Kendall
Thompson



The Road
to Calvary
Corner of Madison & Stoddard
Glen St. Mary
Rev. Tommy & Doris Anderson
Youth Director Margie Howard
Phone: 904-259-2213
Sunday School:........... 10:00 am
Sunday Morning Service .... 11:00 am
Sunday Evening Service ..... 6:00 pm
Wednesday Night.......... 7:30 pm





Saint Peter's
in [~lfthe G~len
ANGLICAN CHUm' nRCH

9:00 am Adul:t, Su 'ndayScoo

100 m Sundaym orshi pt


Harold Wilkerson
of Jacksonville dies
Harold Wilkerson, 59, of
Jacksonville died Saturday, July
2. He was the son of the late
Lewis and Leola Smith Wilker-
son, and a truck driver who at-
tended the Otis Road Church of
God.
Mr. Wilk-
erson is
survived
by his wife
Deborah
Wilkerson of
Jacksonville;
sons Lewis
Wilkerson
of Jackson-
ville, Bran-
den Wilker-
son, Gerald Harold Wilkerson
(Toni) Wilk-
erson and Colson (Jennifer)
Wilkerson, all of Macclenny;
daughters Rebecca (Randell)
Davis of Glen St. Mary and Cath-
erine Townsend of Macclenny;
brother Franklin (Linda) Wilk-
erson of Baldwin; step-children
Robert (Renee) Graham of Mac-
cenny, Tanya Rewis of Baldwin,
and Lydia Wilkerson of St. Pe-
tersburg; numerous grandchil-
dren and great-grandchildren.
He was preceded in death by
daughter Alisha R. Wilkerson.
A memorial service was held
at 11:oo am, Wednesday, July
6 at his church with Rev. John
Spratlin Jr. officiating. Arrange-
ments were under the direction
of Forbes Funeral Home, Mac-
dcenny.

Night worship
First Community Holiness
Church will be having Sunday
Night Worship at Faith Temple
COGIC, Five Churches Road,
with special guest Tommy Rich-
ardson on Sunday, July 10 at 6:30
pm.








Cornerstone

Congregational

Methodist
Church
Where relationships are built
to last an Eternity
482 South 71, St., Macclenny, FL
Service Times -
Sunday 11:00 AM & 6:00 PM
Sunday School 10:00 AM
Wed. Bible Study 7:00 PM
Rev. Eddy Sanders, Pastor
Rev. Mae White, Assistant Pastor


In Loving Memory of
My Granny
Glenda Ann King
06/26/2010
Missed, loved, gone but never
forgotten
The tears that roll down my
face are for you. I try to remind
myself you always said, "Don't
cry, 'baby girl,' I will always be
here with you," but now it's not
the same. I can't touch your face
and tell you how much I love
you. It hurts, especially when
the boys come to us and say how
much they miss you and want to
see you. It helps us to know that
they remember you as you were
and not in pain. They remem-
ber that smiling face of yours.
You may not be here standing
in plain sight with us, but we
feel your presence. We love you,
Granny, and miss you so dear-
ly. I miss the days when we just
sat at the house and watched
Golden Girls together, so now I
lay in bed and think of you being
right there beside me watching
it. Peyton and Brycen miss the
Popsicles and kisses you used to
give them. We love you dearly,
Granny. It's hard to believe it
has been a year now.....
LOVE,
MALISSA KING TUBBERVILLE


c1L/ClcomTc
First Baptist Church
of Sanderson
CR 229 S., Sanderson FL
Sunday School ....... 10:00 am
Sun. Morning Worship. 11:00 am
Sun. Evening Worship .. 6:00 pm
Wed. Eve. Bible Study.. 7:00 pm
Pastor Bob Christmas



Mt. Zion N.C.

Methodist Church
121 North t 259-4461
Macclenny, FL
Pastor Tim Cheshire
Sunday School 9:45 am
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 am
Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 pm
Wednesday Prayer Service 7:00 pm







Jesus. 3ll iVele'i V [llv . llln n I
S..,/ unt till[,:, [l < i.: ..p:,t 3 r .alln be
b, l t l ,, .:I el .: 11(1 ,,,I 11 . S p i, i n
l 110 (. HI P l0[ il1[el l1[. ) [i le kI illJ-
(li rn ., lij ld oli, ..; ':5'


- 0 S 606 SENIORPASTO
Glen St. Mary
DIRECTIONS FOR LIFE


Calvary Baptist Church


Sunday School 10:I Oam
Preaching Service 11.:0 am
Sunday Might Service tOO pm
Wednesday Service 7.00 pm


523 North Boulevard W.
Four blocks north of Hwy. 90 in Macclenny
Pastor Donnie E. Williams ** 259-4529


THE LORD'S CHURCH
Inltetseclion ot CR 125 & 250 in T lot .. 259 -8353,.
Su ilday school -- 10:00 am i
Suildav sei-vice - 11:00 aim iiil
W\.dnes day nyiglt Bible StLudy :30 p ml
' u;:':"aih , n nL . ul ,' I iI


'A chiich alive is 'ortoththe1dr'e " A' Fi\ (,,rfi,
� . :�v " ." ,,:. . '....,. . ... . ,. " *'.. '-



23-A to Lauramore Rd. & Fairgrounds Rd.
Sunday School 9:45 am
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 am
Sunday Children's Church 11:00 am
Sunday Evening Services 6:00 pm
Wednesday Night Prayer Meeting 7:00 pm
Pastor J. C. Lauramore welcomes all


St. James Episcopal Church

Minnesota Ave. & 5th Street
Macclenny

Sunday Worship
5:30 pm

Paul Smith, Vicar **259-9198



^ First Baptist Church
of Macclenny
"It Feels Like Home"
372 S. Sixth Street at W. Minnesota Ave.


SUNDAY SERVICES
Sunday School 9:30 am
Worship 10:45 am
& 6:00 nm


WEDNESDAY SERVICES
Prayer & Bible Study 6:45 pm
Awana for Children 6:45 pm
Ynuith Grnin 6:45 nm


Dr. Edel M. Bone Directions from 1-10: Take Exit 335 N. Go 1.3 miles
enor North on Hwy. 121 - See steeple on left

Broadcast Live on WJXR 92.1 FM each Sunday Morning @ 11:00 am


270 US Highway 301 N.. Baldwin FL 32234
www.giddensreedfh.com


904-387-0055
Jacksonville


Arrangements made in your home or our facility
Fair & Reasonable Prices
Funeral & Cremation Services
Locally Owned & Family Operated




















join 0s his wee0


DINKINS NEW r
CONGREGATIONAL
IAETHODIST CHURCH
CP, 127 N. of Sanderson
Sunday School 10:00 am
Sunday Iorning Service 11:00 am
Sunday Night Service 6:00 pm
Wed. Night Service 7:50 pm
Pastor Allen Crews
Assistant Pastor Timothy Alford
'5Ass ______I*


MACCLENNY
CHURCH OF CHRIST
573 S. 5th St. 259-6059
Sunday Bible Study 9:45 am
Fellowship 10:30 am - 11:00 am
Worship Services

, ; 'O] Bbl n'Id,,,


904-266-2337
Baldwin





THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


'Retiring' as Ocean Pond camp hosts


Glen couple


relishes role

KELLEY LANNIGAN
FEATURES
features@bakercountypress.com
Many people look forward to retirement
as a time of relaxation and leisure or de-
vote their days to the pursuit of new hob-
bies or volunteering for worthy causes.
Others take on a second career and keep
working.
Retirees Cecil and Carol Davis of Glen
St. Mary were searching for a way to com-
bine all these aspects and found the perfect
solution - camp hosting.
They are two of four people currently
assigned as camp hosts at the Ocean Pond
campground in the Osceola National For-
est.
Camp hosting is a volunteer endeavor
and has become popular with retired cou-
ples. Hosts must provide their own trailer
and in exchange for certain duties, their
camp site and utilities are free of charge.
Those duties typically include provid-
ing information and assistance to camp-
ers, monitoring the camp ground for the
US Forest Service and doing some main-
tenance.
"I've been spending time at Ocean Pond
and in the Osceola National Forest since I
was a young boy," said Mr. Davis. "Carol
and I often camp here and when we found
out about the camp hosting position we
started checking into it and then decided it
was something we would be interested in."
The pace of a camp host's duties can
be leisurely or brisk, depending on the
amount of campers using the grounds. The
Davises say hosting appeals to them be-
cause they enjoy the physical activity and
the opportunity to interact with the public.
The recent July 4th holiday weekend
was active at Ocean Pond with a steady
influx of traffic into the campground. The
couple busily zipped around in their camp-
issued golf cart as they checked in campers
just arriving.
Greeting new campers is a mainstay of
their duties.
"We have a form to log the campsite as
occupied. Then we greet the campers and
inform them on the basic rules and regu-
lations of the camp and answer any other
questions they might have," said Ms. Da-
vis.


fee break," he
says.
After that,
any camp-
sites that
have already
been vacated
are cleaned
up for the
next campers
to come in.
"We police
the sites for
any trash left
behind and
clean out the
fire pits. I also
go through
and mow the
grass when
needed," he
said.
Camp
hosts may


PHOTOS BY KELLEY LANNIGAN
Above: Camp hosts Cecil and Carol Davis. Right:
Checking in campers.


For instance, campers need to know
things such as where parking is permis-
sible, the number of tents allowed on each
site and what hour the evening quiet time
begins. If there is a burn ban in effect,
campers may be advised not to build fires
at their campsites.
As Ms. Davis fills out the occupancy
form at campsite No. 42, a man passes by
on a bicycle. A small dog is sitting in the
basket on the handle bars. She smiles and
waves to him.
"It's amazing, people come here from all
over the place," she said. "That man there
on the bike, he's from South Africa."
Mr. Davis concurred.
"Recently there was a girl here who was
in the Canadian Royal Army," he said.
"She was making her way across the Unit-
ed States to Hawaii, staying in different
campgrounds. And some bikers showed
up in the middle of a thunderstorm the
other night. They were from Australia."
A typical day for Mr. Davis begins
about 7:oo am when he makes a quick run
through the camp section he is responsible
for and checks the status of the campsites
for occupancy. Then he cleans up the bath
house and rest rooms.
"I finish that about 9:30 and have a cof-


also work a select number of hours at the
camp's gate house.
At the beginning of their assignments,
which are typically six months long, hosts
are given a copy of The Forest Volunteer


Manual, which explains all policy for fed-
erally regulated parks and campgrounds.
The procedures at each camp may vary but
are all grounded in the established poli-
cies.
Throughout their assignments, hosts
keep in contact with recreation program
managers and have access to game war-
dens and forestry law enforcement officers
when the occasion for such support arises.
For example, in case of an accident or
injury, hosts call 911, inform game war-
dens and help guide in emergency vehicles
to specific locations if necessary.
Having grown up in the area, Mr. Da-
vis can easily tell visitors how to get to the
nearest store, what other recreational ac-
tivities are nearby and where restaurants
are located.
"Campers are always asking questions
and need to know things," said Mr. Davis.
"That's a main part of being a host."
"So far, it's been a really rewarding ex-
perience," said Ms. Davis.
As the 4th of July holi-
day began to wind down
and sunset descended over
Ocean Pond, the couple
kicked back at their camp-
site's shaded picnic table
to relax and enjoy the eve-
ning.
"The greatest thing
about doing this is being
in this beautiful place. And
S. - the wildlife you see - it's
. really special," said Mr.
Davis.
a He spoke of a fam-
-- ily of deer that recently
took up residence in the
Campground and the thrill
campers got when they
frequently spotted the doe
and her two fauns.
"We see hawks and
egrets and herons. Some-
times you can spot bear
prints on the ground and
once in a while a gator. I
love that everything here,
the plants and animals, are
protected," he said.
The area is special to
Mr. Davis for another rea-
son.
"This forest was named
for one of my Native American ancestors,
Osceola, so I have a special connection," he
said. "I love it here. I could spend the rest
of my life right here at Ocean Pond."


BCCS relocated
Baker Community Counsel-
ing Services has relocated to 56
North 2nd Street and will hold
a grand opening-open house on
July 11, 2011 from 11:00 am to
1:oo00 om. The public is invited
to attend to enjoy refreshments
and tours of the facility. BCCS is
a licensed outpatient substance
abuse treatment provider. It was
formerly located on East Mac-
clenny Avenue.


Sanderson
Congregational
Holiness Church
CR 127 N., Sanderson, FL
Sunday School 10:00 am
Morning Worship 11:00 am
Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 pm
Wed. Evening Prayer Serv. 7:30 pm
Pastor: Oral E. Lyons

Sanderson Chrsticin
RevlvCd Center
Pastor: Harold Finley
Sunday School 10:00 am
Sunday Service 11:00 am
Sunday Evening 6:00 pm
Wednesday Service 7:30 pm
Come see the exciting things
the Lord is doing.
\Corner of Sapp Rd. and CR 229



Out of town & miss your
local newspaper?


Trio of fires remain active here


Three wildfires totaling almost 26 acres remained
active in Baker County early this week, according
to an update from the Florida Division of Forestry
spokesman Kurt Wisner.
The largest at 16.2 acres is located near Moccasin
Creek, though smaller fires of 6.5 acres and 3 acres
are located near Possum Trot and Noel Road, re-
spectively.
All three wildfires were sparked by lighting, Mr.
Wisner said.
Throughout the Suwannee Forestry Center's op-
erational area, which includes Baker County, there
are 6,322 acres burning.
Officials continue to monitor and mop up the
Honey Prairie Fire Complex in southern Georgia
and the Impassable Bay and Kelley Fire Complex in
the Osceola National Forest.
Baker, Bradford, Hamilton and Union Counties
are still under county-imposed burn bans.
Some relief is on the horizon, however.
Mr. Wisner said that while heavy showers recent-
ly have lowered the drought index into the moder-
ate range, there remains the potential for "active fire
behavior."


I


-f


"The National Weather Service shows our area
currently in severe-to-extreme drought conditions,
but the forecast shows improvement through Sep-
tember," he added.
But showers can also mean thunderstorms.
"Even areas which have not received thunder-
storms in several days may still see new starts from
lightning as these fires may smolder until surface
conditions become dry enough to ignite," said Mr.
Wisner.
Statewide, wildfire activity is declining dramati-
cally as weather conditions turn toward seasonal
tropical patterns and more afternoon thunder-
storms, he said.
As of July 5, there were 96 active wildfires across
the state, which down from 440 fires two weeks ago.
Twenty-three of the fires are greater than too
acres in size.
Twenty counties continue to have burn bans in
effect.
Sightings of fire, flames or suspicious activity
should be reported to the Suwannee Forestry Cen-
ter, (386) 758-5700.


I This unique restorative cream moisturizes and nourishes through the careful blend-
\B ing of Glycerine, Vitamin E, AloeVera, Wheat Protein, Almond Oil, and Botanical
Extracts. Find the best hand cream in the nation exclusively at...


.'Southern Charm
S110 South Fifth Street ~ Macclenny ~ 259-4140


"In this day and time, when customer service is not common, we feel
very blessed to be a part of American Enterprise Bank. They always go
above and beyond their jobs to see that we are well taken care of."
-Sarah Rauch, RGMS/Burger King


Come and see the difference that is experienced by our customers today.


Thursday, luly 7, 2011


Page 11


cyoeldwwn





THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS




SOCIAL&SCHOOL


Page


12
JULY 7, 2011


SOCIAL NOTICE SUBMISSION INFORMATION CONTACT US
Bi th announcements, wedding notices and social events imilitaiy service notes and school gladuationsI must By phone at 904.259.2400 or by fax at 904 259 6502. You can stop by oui office located at 104 5. Fifth Stieet,
be submitted within four weeks of the event. All news and advertising must be submitted to the newspaper
office pilior to 5 00 p.m on the Monday piioi to publication, unless otherwise noted or alianged It is requested Macclenny, FL o01 mail your submission to PO Box 598, Macclenny, FL 32063
that all news items be typed o01 emailed to insure accuracy in print We are available online at vvwvvl bakeicountypiess.com


Vows June 25th
Kristin Ann Griffith and Mat-
thew Nicholas Simmons, both of
Macclenny, were wed Saturday
June 25 at Pratt's Resort in Lake
Placid, Florida.
The bride's parents are Chris-
tina and Sean Sullivan, and the
groom's parents are Carol and
Johnny Simmons, all of Macclen-
ny. Grandparents of the bride are
Joni and Harlo Sullivan of Mac-
clenny, Wanda and JR Smith of
Macclenny, Johnny Stratton of
Jacksonville and the late Edna
Stratton.
Following a honeymoon at
South Beach, Miami, the couple
resides in Macclenny.


Online -
COMMUNITY
CALENDAR
Let people know
what's going on-
post your special event online
bakercountypress.com1


'Elephants' has beauty, st
KELLEY LANNIGAN
FEATURES
features@bakercountypress.com


Wed June 25th
Robert Wayne Harvey and
Johnnie Patricia (Tricia) Crews,
both of Macclenny, were united
in marriage in a private ceremony
in Salt Springs on June 25.
Robert is the son of the late
J.W. (Bo) and Annie Ruth Har-
vey, and is employed by the City
of Macclenny.
Tricia is the daughter of Linda
J. Williams and the late Carlos L.
(Buck) Rodgers, and is employed
by Lender Processing Services of
Jacksonville.
After returning from a honey-
moon on Sanibel Island, the cou-
ple will reside in Macclenny.

Out of town & miss your
local newspaper?


Water for Elephants is one of
those movies, and there are a few
every year, that simply must be
seen on the big screen to be fully
appreciated.
This cinematically gorgeous
film can stand on the merit of its
sheer esthetic qualities alone.
Don't be fooled by all the
beauty. Set in the early years of
America's Great Depression, the
story is as gritty as it is uplifting.
Based on the novel of the
same name by author Sara Gru-
en, Water for Elephants revolves
around the memories of ninety-
three year old Jacob Jankowski
(actor Hal Holbrook) who once
worked as a veterinarian for the
struggling Benzini Brothers cir-
cus in the early 1930s.
Born to successful Polish im-
migrants, everything in Jacob's
world is idyllic, even in the midst
of the depression.
But unexpected tragedy pre-
vails and in the blink of an eye,
the only future he had envisioned
and planned for evaporates like
mist.
With no money and no di-
rection he impulsively hops a
passing train and his life, for the
second time in only a few days,
drastically changes.
Response from movie critics
for Water for Elephants has been
less than enthusiastic, which I
think is truly undeserved.
It has all the elements of a
great story - tragedy, persever-
ance against overwhelming odds,
forbidden romance, intrigue, vio-
lence, good and evil - all in a re-
markable setting that showcases,
as August, the antagonist of the


PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVID JAMES " AND � TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX FILM CORPORATION
Robert Pattinson and Reese Witherspoon with Rosie the elephant.


story so aptly says in one scene
"A life most suckers can only
dream of."
If Water for Elephants has
been dismissed by some media
naysayers, David Stratton, for-
mer film critic for the interna-
tional film industry magazine
Variety said "I think it's maybe
the best circus movie since The
Greatest Show on Earth."
Reese Witherspoon plays
Marlena, the sensitive and kind
wife of August, the circus' char-
ismatic but delusional and some-
times psychotic owner, aptly por-
trayed by Christoph Waltz.
Ms. Witherspoon's perfor-
mance in this movie has been
deemed unremarkable by critics.
But Marlena is not an "in your
face" character - she is gentle
and reserved, sensitive, a lover
of animals. If Ms. Witherspoon's
acting and interpretation of the
character seems unremarkable
it also seems accurate based on
how the character was written in


the novel.
Visually, she is the epitome of
glamour in the way actresses of
Hollywood's golden age were. In
that respect, I can't think of any-
one I would have liked better in
this part.
Although his role is not a large
one, Jim Norton, who plays Mr.
Mason in Harry Potter and the
Chamber of Secrets is wonderful
as Camel, the Jamaican ginger
extract drinking veteran circus
worker who befriends Jacob.
Rosie the elephant is as much
a star as the actors. She is amaz-
ingly smart and has a sense of
loyalty and justice. At one point
Jacob and Marlena nurture her
back to health after a severe beat-
ing and she doesn't forget. She
also loves a treat. The pink lem-
onade scene is a show stopper.
The movie is rated PG-13 for
sexual violence and sexual situ-
ations. The scenes of cruelty to
Rosie by August are brutal, but
necessary to tell the story. Those


;ory too
scenes, involving a tool called a
bull hook, are the only parts of
the movie where computer gen-
erated imagery is employed to
make it seem authentic.
Although there is sexual ten-
sion between Jacob and Marlena,
the director chose to allude to it
more than graphically portray it,
which is refreshing. Throughout
the film, attention to detail is no-
table, as is the realistic portrayal
of the life of circus performers
and workers at the time.
Two years ago, I visited the
Ringling Museum in Sarasota
which contains a comprehensive
exhibit on this subject and the
movie is an accurate parallel -
right down to the circus train.
Interesting trivia fact: The
novel Water for Elephants was
alluded to in another film The
Dangerous Days of Daniel X.
The protagonist, Daniel X, is
reading the book and comments
that it is "A honey of a story!"
If you love the circus, trains,
animals and a good love story in
a remarkable setting, Water for
Elephants is for you.

Samantha Wollitz
Happy First Birthday
July 7th
We thank God every day for giving
us one of His angels. We love you.


Nana S Papa
WolIitz, Lola
DeGutzman,
and great-grand
parents, Norma
Sr the late
Robert Wollitz
6 "'1.


United Christian Academy

28 W. Macclenny Ave.
(Midtowne Center)
259-1199


NOW ENROLLING K-12
United Christian Academy in our 14th year

* Quality K-12 Education with opportunities in
Drama
Photography
Music
& Much More


* Featuring A.C.E. curriculum
& dedicated A.C.E. certified teachers
* State-of-the-art computer lab
* Dual enrollment in partnership
with Florida Gateway College
* Accepts McKay (ESE & I.E.P)
Scholarship students, newly approved
Matrix #504 students and 'Step up for
Students' Scholarships
* Weekly dynamic life-changing
chapel services

Training, educating &

discipline today for

tomorrow's leaders.


Affordable tuition with a i
monthly payment plan.

Contact Pastor Mitch Rhoden for more info @ mitchellrhoden@nefcom.net or 305-2131


ALSO ENROLLING
Eagle's Nest School Readiness Center 1 6 wks. - VPKI 259-8466

U U Ag^^B^^^ ^^^ a^^^S^S^





THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


Land transactions recorded the last three months


The following land trans-
actions were recorded in the
Baker County courthouse
from April - June of 2011.
Values are derived from
documentary stamps. Many
descriptions are by S(ection)
T(ownship) R(ange). If acre-
age or price are not listed,
none were indicated in the
documents.
-------------
STITES, DARIN 0 to OVERSTAKE,
LYNN E in 33-2S-22E, $180,000
POLIQUIN, JAMES N to MCVAY,
PATRICIA A in LT 3,4 BLK 1
MACCLENNY HGHTS, $40,000
TYRE, WILBUR E to LANDMARK
FINANCIAL SERVICES INC in LT 5
BLK 3 COUNTRY ESTATES, $50,600
BAKER, JACK A JR to JOHNS,
SCOTT E in LT 67 OLD NURSERY
PLANT, $350,000
MILTON, TIMOTHY 0 to KING,
BRIAN E J in 25-2S-20, $55,000
GARRISON, HILDRICK L
to STEGALL, ADDISON JR in
32-25-22E, $126,000
SPENCE, MICHAEL to
YARBROUGH, WILLIAM BRIAN in
04-35-22E, $47,801
MULLINS, CAROL R to
RAYMOND, LESTER A in LT 7
WHISPERING PINES, $150,000
MARETH, JERRY P to BRIGGS,
MICHAEL in LT 14 HUNTERS RIDGE
GLEN PLANTATION, $215,000
SMITH, ALEXANDER G TRUSTEE
to KOLKE, BRIAN in SUBURBAN
HEIGHTS PB-2 PG-101 13-3S-21-
0134-0003-0010, $3,550
KING, DONALD ROY JR to
FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE
ASSOCIATION in 11-45-20E,
$157,398
JOHNSON, TOMMY DALE JR
to SMITH, BRYAN W in 20-3S-21E,
$235,000
GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC to
IRWIN, DAVID LEWIS in LT 16 BLK 1
MACCLENNY SOUTH, $42,000
YARBOROUGH, JAMES
M to PAYNE, LARRY L SR in
01/12-45-20E, $175,000
CANNON, JULIAN to MRC
ROMEO PROPERTIES LLC in 04-3S-
22, $185,000
PHILLIPS, GARY W to
WILLMOTT, CHARLES E in 30-2S-
22, $280,000
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION to
MILTON, CHRISTOPHER B in LT
13 COPPER CREEK HILLS UNIT 2,
$142,500
RAULERSON, ERIC to
HAYGOOD, GAIL LAVERNE in
33-25-21E, $2,800
MARKER, VERNA D to GAINES,
DONNIE R in LT 2 HILLS OF GLEN,
$130,000
DRISCOLL, KURT F to DUKE,
JEFFREY B in 23-3S-21, $300,000
SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND
URBAN DEVELOPMENT to ELLIS-
BAILEY, DEBORA in LT 12 BLK A
MACCLENNY II UNIT II, $135,500
WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL
SYSTEM FLORIDA INC to GRAY,
ROBERT F in 30-25-21E, $125,000
GOLF VIEW PROPERTIES LLC
to RHODEN, MESHELLE D in
30-25-22E, $20,000





"I FEEL LIKE

A FISH
WITH NO WATER."

-JACOB, AGE 5
DESCRIBING ASTHMA







a


GUERRA, DANIEL to
JUROVSCHI, CORNEL in 16-2S-21E,
$45,000
BENNETT, MICHAEL W to
HIGGINBOTHAM, MARY N in
LT 33 HUNTER RIDGE AT GLEN
PLANTATION, $193,000
TD BANK NA to NATIVE LANDS
LLC in 06-25-22E, $21,450
TD BANK NA to STONE,
ANDREW W in 07-25-22E, $2,860
TD BANK NA to FENNELL,TERRY
EDWARD in 33-1 S-21 E, $22,550
GROOMS, ROBERT E to BASS,
ERWIN D JR in 01-25-21 E, $64,000
MCVAY, PATRICIA A to MYNES,
TAYLORAin MACCLENNY HEIGHTS
LOT 3 AND 4 BLOCK 1, $55,000
HOMESALES INC to HARVEY,
KELLI D in 06-35-22E, $85,000
SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND
URBAN DEVELOPMENT to DAVIS,
TERRELL R in LT 5 RIDGE ESTATES,
$44,051
PALMERI, ANTHONY M to
DONKER, JACKG in 12-3-21E, $35
DMAC OF LAKE CITY INC to
JEFFERSON, CARLOS DAVON in
33-2S-21 E, $35,000
WYNNE, JAMES DANIEL to
STARLING, MICHAEL in LT 8 BLK A
EM BROWN PLAT, $12,000
LAND AND PROPERTIES OF
NORTH FLORIDA INC to PERKINS,
GWENDOLYN in LT 1 BLK 7 ER
RHODEN ADD, $85,650
HODGES, ROBERT B to
AMERICAN ENTERPRISE BANK OF
FLORIDA in 11-25-21E, $36,600
CASTLE, CLINT to PRIDE,
AUSTIN S in 11-2S-21 E, $200,000
WILSON, JERRY N to RICE, ERIK
H in 04-35-22E, $170,000
WHEATON, JAMES THOMAS
to SCOTT, JAMES in PAR 43
07-35-22E, $48,000
COUNTRY FEDERAL CREDIT
UNION to ROTHFELDT, BRIAN E in
05-25-22E, $69,000
ELIZABETH L DAVIS REVOCABLE
TRUST to COLEMAN, JAMES M JR
in 07-25-22E, $50,000
MACCLENNY PARTNERS
LLC to SOLIDA MANAGEMENT
CORPORATION in 05-35-22E,
$830,000
ADDITION TECHNICIAN &
MORE INC to CREWS, KASEY in 11-
2S-21, $20,000
MAYHALL, ANTHONY W to
RHODEN, ASHLEY in PART BLK 43
MACCLENNY, $30,000
DOBBS, GLENDA TIPPINS to
HOSFORD, JOHN A in LT 13 14 BLK
5 OWENS ACRES, $190,000
BARBOUR, MARK to LEE,
JEREMY in 09-35-22E, $100
REWIS, SHEILA D to NORTH
FLORIDA LAND EXCHANGE LLC
in LT 18 DEERWOOD ESTATES,
$25,000
DREES HOMES OF FLORIDA INC


to MANN, AMANDA A in 19-25-22E
LT 118 ROLLING MEADOWS,
$138,000
MACGLEN INC to NEUBAUER,
DUAINE D in PAR 31/32
BRIARWOOD, $7,700
FANNIE MAE to P & Y
PROPERTIES LLC in 05-25-22E,
$42,500
LEADBEATER, SUSAN W to
MORRIS, ARTHUR D in LT 76 OLD
NUSERY PLANTATION, $210,000
FANNIE MAE to LAWSON,
RONALD in LT 28 BLK B
MCCCLENNY II UNIT II, $128,000
SANXTER, PHYLLIS A to WATTS,
BARRY L in LT 46 COPPER CREEK
HILLS UNIT I, $184,000
HILL, JULIAN C to KIGHT,
JAQULEYN D in 26-2S-22, $54,900
DUVAL GUN AND PAWN INC
to WILLIAMS, MATT in 32-25-22E,
$185,000
LONG BRANCH FARMS LLP
to ROWELL, DAVID W in LT 32
LONGBRANCH, $37,500
MOSS, KURK to CARDOZA,
ADAM in LT 19 LONGBRANCH,
$125,000
US BANK NATIONAL
ASSOCIATION TRUSTEE to
HEMBREE, ASHLEY in LT 5 BLK 8
LABEUNA ESTATES, $112,900
SMITH, JIMMY M to TRIMM,
BRUCE in 14-45-20E, $20,000
LANHAM, BETTY JANE
to LANHAM, BETTY JANE in
07-35-22E, $34,800
TRIMM, BRUCE E to AUTUMN
INCOME PARTNERSHIP LLC in
14-45-20E, $100,000
GRIFFIN, LENA D to GREEN
TREE SERVICING LLC in LT 17
CONFEDERATE FARMS, $50,698
WRIGHT, GAYLE D to KIGHT,
MICHAEL S in 06-1S-21 E, $52,852
FREY, MELODY to SCHMEHL,
DANIEL L JR in LT N BLK 1
MACCLENNY, $115,000
HUNTER, ANNETTE H to
HUNTER, RANDALL J in BLK 6
MACCLENNY, $44,000
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL
TRUST COMPANY TRUSTEE to
HUNT, JESSICA in 32-25-22E,
$79,000
TD BANK NA to MACKIE, BRUCE
R in 08-25-21E, $160,000
GLEN PLANTATION LTD to
BALSAMO, CHRISTIAN B in LT 4
BEAR CREEK, $59,900
SCHORSCH, LAURIE to LUCAS,
VIVIAN E in 19-25-22E, $34,500
SIKES, ELAINE to PERRY,
STANLEY A JR in PAR 23 ALLEN
LANDS, $65,000
ROBINSON, JACQUELINE M to
YINGLING, JUSTIN in 20-35-21E,
$45,000
GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC to
WAYNE FRIER HOME CENTER OF
MACCLENNY LLC in 32-25-22E,
$30,000


GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC to
WAYNE FRIER HOME CENTER OF
MACCLENNY LLC in 20-25-22E,
$35,000
ROBERTS LAND & TIMBER
INVESTMENT CORP to TD BANK
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION in 11-14-
15 TS3S- R20E, $1,235,000
PLUM CREEK TIMBERLANDS LP
to YOUNG, MARK J in 02-45-21E,
$157,600
WALL, PERRY L to MASTERS,
GLEN W in 12-25-21E, $122,500
DREES HOMES OF FLORIDA
INC to SMITH, BRINCE J in LT 79
ROLLING MEADOWS, $145,325
HODGES, ROGER to DUGGER,
KEVIN D in 08-35-22E, $110,000
KENNEDY, JESSICA ANN to
COLLINS, IRMA R in 07-35-22E,
$57,000
FISCHER, JASON AARON
to REED, JOHN P in LT 17
LONGBRANCH, $197,000
SEDA CONSTRUCTION
COMPANY to CRAWFORD, SIMON
P in LT 88 SANDS POINTE SUB,
$175,000
HURST, DAVID W to FIRST
FEDERAL BANK OF FLORIDA in LT
5 6 BLK47 GLEN ST MARY, $40,000
HARTLEY, ANDREW Kto PIPPINS
ALLEN P II in LT 23 MACCLENNY
ACRES, $135,500
SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND
URBAN DEVELOPMENT to CREWS,
JAMES in 36/15-IS-10E, $41,000
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION to
MILONAS, JOHN in 28-25-22E,
$97,500
WELLS FARGO BANK NA to
WILFORD, STEVE in 32-25-22E,
$35,000
AMERICAN GENERAL HOME
EQUITY INC to CREWS, DARRELL
in 32-1N-21E, $33,000
NEWMAN, JEFFREY H to
DREAMLAND PLAYSETS INC in,
$30,000
W H GROSS COMPANY to
KITTRELL, THOMAS J in 5-35-22E,
$260,000
ABC LIQUORS INC to
MACCLENNY PARTNERS LLC


5-35-22E, $490,000
FOURAKER, EARL LAMAR JR to
HAIR, DAVID 08-1 S-21 E, $39,271
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL


TRUST COMPANY to HYDE,
GREGORY L LT 13 CYPRESS POINT
UNIT I, $138,000


Re-Roofs * New Roofs * Leak Repairs
Torch Down Leaks * Roof Inspections

We specialize in problem roofs
Satisfaction Guaranteed


....-- - " 259-2563








Kindcerega rteni


Re istration

What: Kindergartern

Who: Childrer who will be 5 yrs. old by Sept. 1, 2011

When: Please register NOW, as we are placing
students in classes for the
2011 - 2012 school year!

Where: Baker County Pre-K/Kindergarten Center
562 South Blvd. East
Macclenny

The following documentation is required:
Froof of custody if not the birth parent
Child's birth certificate
SParent's driver License
Current shot record
Froof of residency
Physical

F For more information about
enrolling your child in Kindergarten,
please call 259 - 0405. We look
forward to hearing from you!


You know how to react
to their asthma attacks.
Here's how to prevent them.
I -866-NO-ATTACKS
EVEN ONE ATTACK IS ONE TOO MANY.
For more information log onto
www.noattacks.org
or call your doctor.

8 1&EPA


I itleCasrr B s (1


Thursday, July 7, 2011


Page 13







P----14-THE-BAKER-COUNTY--------ThurIday, July 7, 2011


Classified ads and notices must be paid in
advance, and be in our office no later than
4:00 pm the Monday preceding publication,
unless otherwise arranged in advance. Ads
can be mailed provided they are accom-
panied by payment and instructions. They
should be mailed to: Classified Ads, The Bak-
er County Press, P.O. Box 598, Macclenny, FL
32063. We cannot assume responsibility for
accuracy of ads or notices given over the tele-
phone. Liability for errors in all advertising will
be limited to the first publication only. If after
that time, the ad continues to run without no-
tification of error by the person or agency for
whom it was published, then that party as-
sumes full payment responsibility. The Baker
County Press reserves the right to refuse ad-
vertising or any other material which in the
opinion of the publisher does not meet stan-
dards of publication.





GE XL 44 gas stove, self-cleaning oven,
extra large, with timer and clock, $125,
259-3134. 7/7p
Seven 6' trusses, tin and 6"x6"x12' posts,
$325,259-5970 or 612-3420. 7/7p
2003 Fifthwheel camper, 38', 3 slides,
fireplace, washer hookup, new tires,
still has warranty until December 2012,
$14,000, call 904-259-3763 or 904-509-
7550. 7/7p
Lift chair, only used 3 months, excellent
condition, paid over $1000, will sell for
$600, call 553-4165. 6/30-7/7p
Big Tex trailer, 5'x8', heavy duty, $600, call
cell 318-9127 or 699-0691. 6/30-7/7p
Sweet corn and watermelons for sale.
259-5828, Derek Harvey. 6/23-7/7p
GE Smooth top stove with warming eye
and stove cord, $250, 904-237-7703.
7/7p
2005 Carriage Carri-Lite Fifthwheel with
5 slides, sleeps 6, lots of extras, 1 owner,
no smoking/children/pets, garage kept, ex-
cellent condition, $45,000,904-237-7703.
7/7p
Office Supplies, printer and fax cartridges,
rubber stamps and much more. We special-
ize in hard to find items. The Office Mart,
110 S. 5th Street. 259-3737. 4/28tfc
Livingroom table set, medium oak with
brown glass inserts on wheels. Storage
space underneath with large beige and
pastel table lamps. $125. Call 275-3007,
leave message. 5/19tfc
Bankruptcies, divorce, wills and any oth-
er court documents prepared, notary ser-
vice. Call John Swanson at 257-9033.
6/17tfc
Oak livingroom table set, 2 end tables, 1
coffee table with two lamps. Great condi-
tion with glass inserts and storage. $125.
275-3007. 6/2tfc
Artists. Oils, acrylics, water colors,
Canvases, drawing pads and much more.
On sale now. The Office Mart, 110 S. Fifth
Street, 259-3737. tfc
Landscaping mulch. While supply lasts.
259-2900. 4/28tfc
Camille Beckman hand cream, Root
candles, unique gift items. Southern Charm
110 S. 5th Street. 259-4140. 4/28tfc





2000 Ford Explorer SUV, V6, automatic,
new tires, brakes and air, clean, $3,200,
call 904-571-0913. 7/7p
1997 Cadillac STS, very clean, low miles
(42,000), like new tires, adult owned,
$8000, 653-2157 or 314-4762.
6/30-7/7p
Now accepting bids, contact Beth at 653-
4453. 1994 Savanna fifth-wheel travel
trailer with two slides. 6/23tfc





Thomas Family Daycare Home, days or
nights, 24 years experience, licensed, hot
meals and snacks, Episcopal accepted. Call
Cathy 259-3678 or 742-4980. 7/7p
Inshore fishing charters with Captain
Austin Pride. Fish North Florida's waters for
red fish, trout, flounder and more. Licensed
and insured. Call for summer specials. 321 -
303-2447. 6/30-7/14p
Christian mom will clean your home or
business. Have references and nearly 20
years experience. Call 259-8144. 7/7p
Fritz's concrete service and more. 904-
507-1768. 4/28-7/14p





Dogs: all types from puppies to adults. Ani-
mal Control, $65 adoption fees will apply.
259-6786. 11/20tfc


Two sugar gliders and all accessories,
$200, male and female, great pets, call
259-4871. 7/7p





Found dog, male neutered tri-color hound
mix, approximately 50 pounds and 5-7
years old, on St. Mary's River Bluff Road
the morning of Saturday, July 2. Please call
904-246-3006 or 904-568-6245.


Check it out...
bakercounti press.coimi


Notice to readers:
The newspaper often publishes classi-
fied advertising on subjects like work-at-
home, weight loss products, health prod-
ucts. While the newspaper uses reasonable
discretion in deciding on publication of
such ads, it takes no responsibility as to
the truthfulness of claims. Respondents
should use caution and common sense
before sending any money or making other
commitments based on statements and/or
promises; demand specifics in writing. You
can also call the Federal Trade Commis-
sion at 1-877-FTC-HELP to find out how to
spot fraudulent solicitations. Remember: if
it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.
- The Baker County Press
Heavy duty diesel mechanic needed,
Travel Centers of America, Baldwin loca-
tion, 1024 US 301 South. Driver's license
required. Please apply to Mark Holmes,
Shop Manager. 904-266-4281, ext. 22.
10/1 ffc






St. Mary's Cove, 2011 season - a decent
place to go. 1909 Steel Bridge Road, Mac-
clenny. 259-9980. 11/13ffc
Need club members, still hunt, 2277 acres
in Glen St. Mary. Phone 259-3580, cell 327-
6433. 7/7p
Wanted, property to lease for 2 horses.
Fenced with at least run in shed. Please
email tlg0607@aol.com. 7/7p





Pay Day Loan Buster, $500 no credit
check, six months to repay, active checking
account required. 904-206-7861. www.


mypaydayloanthatpays.com


2/10tfc


Notice to Readers
All real estate advertising in this newspa-
per is subject to the Fair Housing Act which
makes it illegal to advertise "any prefer-
ence, limitation or discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin, or an intention to
make any such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status includes
children under the age of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodians, pregnant women
and people securing custody of children
under 18.
This newspaper will not knowingly accept
any advertising for real estate which is in
violation of the law. Our readers are hereby
informed that all dwellings advertised in
this newspaper are available on an equal
opportunity basis. To complain of discrimi-
nation, call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-
9777. The toll free telephone number for
the impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

FSBO, beautiful brick home, Copper Creek,
3 BR, 2 BA, eat-in kitchen, separate dining
room, split floor plan, many extras. Asking
$190,000. Call 904-553-4165 for appoint-
ment. 5/26-7/28p
1 acre +/- in Branford near Suwannee
River and close to boat ramp. Has septic
for 3 BR/2 BA, 4" well, power on lot, lots of
deer and turkeys, priced to sell at $18,000,
call 904-259-3763 or 904-509-7550.
7/7p
3.46 acres, north Sanderson, set up for
mobile home $42,000. Owner financing.
Call 904-813-1580. 2/10tfc
1/2 acre residential lot in gated community,
$38,500. Owner financing. Call 904-813-
1580. 2/10tfc
1-10 acres, high and dry, fish pond, creek
or river front, homes/mobile homes, set-up.
Owner financing. 912-843-8118 or 904-
699-8637. www.landyes.net. 6/30tfc






3 BR, 2 BA brick house on city lot, 471 Jon-
athan Street, Macclenny, $950/mo, $500
deposit, 334-0971. 7/7-7/14p
3 BR, 2 BA 1600 SF home on dead-end
road, newly remodeled, new carpet, shed,
$850/mo, $850 deposit, 904-397-0094.
7/7p
3 BR, 2 BA home, large garage, two miles
inside Georgia line, $700/mo, $700 deposit,
904-629-1779. 7/7tfc
4 BR, 2 BA house, central air/heat with
den, screened patio, 350 SF concrete
block workshop/storage building, backyard
swing and picnic table. Close to pre-K and
middle school in Macclenny. $1,100/mo.
First month's rent and $900 deposit. Ser-
vice animals only. Available August 1. 259-
5699. 7/7p
2 BR, 1 BA, $385/mo, $385 deposit, gar-
bage/water/sewer/lawn care included,
912-843-8165 or 904-219-2690. 7/7tfc
3 BR, 2 BA DW mobile home, St. George,
1800 SF, excellent condition, wood deck,
kitchen equipped, 1 acre fenced, $750/mo,
will sell with owner financing. 904-879-
2143. 7/7p
3 BR, 2 BA house with bonus room, Mac-
clenny. Service animals only. $800 deposit
and $775/mo. References required. Call
259-3387. 7/7p
4 BR, 2 BA mobile home, Cuyler area,
$800/mo, first/last and $300 security de-
posit, 614-7336. 7/7p
3 BR, 2 BA double-wide in Sanderson. 275-
2136. 7/7p


THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS





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Monday - Friday 9:00 am - 5:00 pm
by phone

904-259-2400

online

www.bakercountypress.com

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classifieds@bakercountypress.com

by mail
Send a copy of the ad exactly as it should appear, payment and
phone number where we can reach you.

PO Box 598, Macclenny, FI 32063



Placement, correction or cancellation of ads may be phoned
in anytime before Monday at 5 p.m. for publication on
Thursday.


3 BR, 2 BA mobile home on half acre,
$700/mo, first/last and $300 security de-
posit, 614-7336. 7/7p
2 & 3 BR mobile homes, central H/A,
washer/dryer hook-up, garbage, water,
sewage and lawn care included. $485/
month, $485 deposit. 904-219-2690 or
912-843-8165. 6/2tfc
2 BR, 1 BA duplex, all appliances includ-
ing washer/dryer $675/month, $675 de-
posit. 259-3300 or 591-2790. 5/12tfc
Mobile homes. 2 and 3 BR, A/C, service
animals only, $500-$575 plus deposit.
904-860-4604. 3/17tfc
Mobile home in Sanderson, 3 BR, 2 BA,
$750 security deposit, $750/month. Call
904-259-2255 or 904-813-1580. 5/12tfc
2 BR, 1 BA mobile home in Cozy Corners,
$545/month, first, last and $300 deposit.
Water, trash and lawn service included,
central H/A. 259-7335. 4/7tfc
3 BR, 1 BA brick home, fenced yard, W/D
hookup, corner lot, tile throughout, first and
last plus deposit, $850/month. 904-264-
1875. 6/9-7/14p
2 BR, 2 BA MH, very private one acre lot,
$700/month, $700 deposit, 509-2280.
6/16tfc
Efficiency apartment, $525/month, first
last and $300 deposit. Electric, water, trash
and lawn service included. 259-7335.
4/7tfc
2 BR, 1 BA apartment in downtown Mac-
clenny, washer/dryer included. $650/mo,
$650 deposit. 509-7246. 6/30-7/7p
3 BR, 1 BA house with front porch and
large yard. $750/month plus deposit. 259-
6849. 7/7p
Nice 3 BR, 2 BA, $995/mo, first and last
month's rent, no smoking. Fox Ridge, North
Blvd, Macclenny. Call 904-608-9859 or
904-370-0365. 7/7p
3 BR, 2 BA doublewide on one acre on
corner of 125 and Mudlake Road. Service
animals only, includes lawn maintenance.


$750/month, $1050 deposit. 259-9066.
5/12tfc
3 BR, 2 BA, half acre private lot, kids can
catch bus on your corner lot, $650/mo and
$500 deposit, reference required, 259-
5853. 6/30-7/7p
2 or 3 BR mobile home $385-550; half
acre, garbage, water, sewer, lawn provid-
ed, family neighborhood. 912-843-8118 or
904-699-8637. www.rentyes.net. 6/30tfc
2 BR, 2 BA duplex, washer/dryer, dish-
washer, front and rear porches, water/
sewer included, nicest in town, $725/mo
plus deposit, 718-8898. 6/30-7/7p





Smoky Mountain cabin, by trout stream,
near Cherokee, Gatlinburg, Pigeon Forge
and Dollywood, $350/week. 386-752-
0013. 6/2-7/21 p





Commercial space available, SR 121,
1300 SF of retail space $1000/month. Call
259-9022. 6/24tfc
Commercial offices and metal build-
ing in downtown Macclenny. 1) 500 sq
ft, $500/mo, 2) 1280 sq ft, $1300/mo, 3)
metal building with 400 amp 3ph electric
serv, 5000 sq ft, $800/mo. Deposit equal
to first month's rent required. 259-6546 or
259-4602. 6/23tfc





Manager special- 4 BR, 2 BA on your land
for only $291/mo. Call Cliff, (386) 719-
5641. 7/7-8/25c


YARD SALES


EwSOi I Friday, 8:00 am-4:00 pm, 1325 Copper Bluff
N Court, furniture, clothes, wheelchair, DVD/VHS mov-
ies, butcher block table, miscellaneous.
Friday & Saturday, 7:00 am-1:00 pm, 405 Linda
Street, men/women/junior/boy clothing (all name
brands), furniture and housewares.
Friday & Saturday, 7:00 am-?, 7507 W Madison Street, Glen St.
Mary, kids' clothes, a little bit of everything.
Saturday, 7:30 am-2:00 pm, 540 W Minnesota, clothes, shoes, cur-
tains, everything for kitchen, tons of stuff, Tupperware, Pyrex, Corn-
ing. Don't miss out!
Saturday, 8:00 am-?, East Tall Pine Road (off Lowder Street), huge
yard sale.
Saturday, 8:00 am-?, 12798 N SR 121.
Saturday, 8:00 am-?, Rolling Meadows, 5544 Huckleberry Trail,
huge yard sale, furniture, appliances, guns/ammo, little bit of every-
thing.
Saturday, 8:00 am-1:00 pm, Golf Course, multi-family, back to
school clothes of all sizes, household and miscellaneous items.


Foreclosure, 4 BR, 3 acres, call now, 904-
772-8031. 6/30-7/21c
Beat this one- 6 BR, 3.5 BA set up on your
land, only $468.72/month. Call Cliff, (386)
719-5560. 7/7-8/25c
Firecracker special- 3/2 DW for $221.41/
mo. Call Cliff, (386) 719-5560. 7/7-8/25c
New homes, no money down, call (386)
719-6578, Cliff, for qualifying. 7/7-8/25c
Trade in your old home for my 2012, all
upgrades included. Call Cliff (386) 719-
5560. 7/7-8/25c
New 2012 2 BR, $23,900, includes set-up.
Country wood floors. Call Jared @ 904-259-
4663 orjm martin23@yahoo.com.
6/30-7/21 c
Land/home package, 3 BR, 2 BA on
half acre, $55,900. 4 BR, 2 BA on 1 acre,
$69,900, remodeled, owner financing avail-
able. Call Jared or Greg, 904-259-4663.
6/30-7/21c
$8000 credit on your new mobile home, top
dollar on trade-ins, any shape, 904-772-
8031. 6/30-7/21c
Wanted, I buy used single and doublewide
mobile homes. Call Greg @ 904-259-4663
or 904-591-9873, anytime. 6/30-7/21c








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Watson Realty Corp. REALTORS�

PICTURES AND WORDS WILL NOT DO JUSTICE FOR
THIS HOME AND LAND - MLS# 576581 - 5BR/4.5BA,
2 bonus rooms; 8.24 acres of trees and water, 650 ft
artesian well; irrigation system throughout property; 3.5
cargarage. $520,000
PERFECT LOCATION FOR CONVENIENT STORE -MLS#
562455 - 50.41 acres on exit ramp located off 1-10 and
CR229. All permitsare in place, all acresare usable. Owner
financing available. Purchase all or part. $2,250,000
GREAT BUSINESS POTENTIAL - MLS# 557901 - Zoned
Open Rural. Perfect for horses, cattle, or just enjoying
the beauty as a home place. Property is fenced; 40 acres,
approx. 1 acre pond. $250,000
SO YOU WANT TO LIVE IN THE COUNTY? - MLS#
580902 - 5-acre lot already cleared and zoned for your
site built dream home or mobile home. Beautiful oak
trees; short walkto St. Mary's Riverfor lazy summer days
you want to spend fishing. $69,900
15 ACRES COMPLETELY CLEARED - MLS# 543540 -
Cleared and grassed for you to build your dream home.
Beautiful country setting. Located on paved road within
minutes from interstate and schools. This will make a
beautiful ranch. $215,500
SANDS POINTE SUBDIVISION - MLS# 539188 -
4BR/2BA on cul de sac lot. 42" cabinets, cathedral
ceilings, garden tub w/sep shower, security system,
irrigation system and much more. $165,000
CHARMING 2005 BRICK HOUSE - MLS# 543731 -
3BR/2BA/+2,1/2 BA. 2BR/1.5BA in main house. Upstairs
apartment over attached 2 car garage has kit, LR, BR, full
BA. Detached 40x40 3-cargarage/workshopw/office, w/
half bath. $240,000


Obituaries

Social Notices

School News

Classified Ads

www.bakercountypress.com

Have you checked
it out lately?



FLORIDA
o GATEWAY
COLLEGE
(Formerly Lake City Community College)
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR,
PRACTICAL NURSING
224 Duty Days Tenured Track
Conduct the learning experience
in the classroom, laboratory and/
or clinical area. Prepare for instruc-
tion - syllabi, lesson plans, tests;
use assessment strategies to assist
the continuous development of the
learner; use effective communication
techniques with students and others.
Demonstrate knowledge and under-
standing of the subject matter, use
appropropriate technology in the teach-
ing and learning process. Minimum
Qualifications Bachelor of Science
in Nursing degree and be licensed in
Florida or be eligible for licensure in
Florida. Three years experience as
staff nurse (acute care preferred).
Ability to present information in a
coherent manner and the ability to
fairly evaluate student retention of
that information. Desirable Qualifi-
cations: Computer literate. Teach-
ing experience. BSN required, MSN
preferred.
Salary: Based on degree and expe-
rience, plus benefits.
Review of applications will begin
Immediately.
Persons interested should provide
college application, vita, and pho-
tocopies of transcripts. All foreign
transcripts must be submitted with
official translation and evaluation.
Position details and applications
available on web at: www.fqc.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City Fl 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: humanr(fac.edu
FGC is accredited by the Commission on Col-
leges of the Southern Association of Colleges
and Schools VP/ADA/EA/EO College in Educa-
tion and Employment


1395 Chaffee Road

South, Jacksonville

904.772.9800

PERFECT FOR TOWN HOMES OR MOBILE HOMES
- MLS# 557398 - .090 acre vacant land in downtown
Macclenny. Walking distance from Keller Intermediate
School. Property can be subdivided. Zoned Residential/
Mobile Home. $99,000
ZONED FOR HOUSES/MOBILE HOMES - MLS#547499
-Vacant land; 11.87 acres. Minutes from 1-10, schools,
restaurants and shopping. $55,000
HOME ON CORNER LOT - MLS# 583100 - 3BR/3BA, 2
story brick accent, 2 car garage; private office or storage
room; bonus room upstairs. $221,000
GREAT HOME W/TONS OF POTENTIAL - MLS# 579587
- Brick house on 2.51 acres, 4BR/2.5BA w/office/bonus
room. Screened room overlooks inground pool. $229,000
GORGEOUS RIVERFRONT PROPERTY - MLS# 555947
- 4BR/2BA on 32 acres. Breathtaking views from every
angle. Fenced/cross-fenced; hay barn and barn with 4
stalls. $1,200,000.
PROPERTYON BOTH SIDES OF CR125-MLS#555974,
555976,555978 - Prime location for commercial growth
in Glen St. Mary. 36.27 acres ready to develop; 20 acres
left of CR 125; 16.27 acres on right. Will sell separately;
preferto sell together. $399,900
HORSE LOVERS-THIS IS YOUR DREAM LOCATION
- MLS# 575392 - 20.02 acres on two divided 10.01 acre
lots. Zoned AG for horses; perfectforsite-built or modular
home; no mobile homes allowed. 17-ft deep pond w/
well and power pole. $162,000
BREATHTAKING 2-STORY BRICK ESTATE - MLS#
580296 - 5BR/4BA on 5 acres. SS appliances, covered
porch overlooks inground pool; 3 car garage. Land
cleared; bring your horses. $399,400


News


THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


Thursday, July 7,2011


Page 14





THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


Ten minutes and 62 hotdogs


Since I'm writing this on July 4th, I have to ad-
mit to a guilty pleasure. I love the Nathan's Hot
Dog Eating Competition at Coney Island, NY.
The "cradle of competitive eating," as one over-
wrought commentator called it was once again the
place where Joey "Jaws" Chestnut
showed his stuff. FA T ]
Shoving hot dogs down his
throat, Chestnut outscored Pat
Bartoletti with 62 to his credit in ROBERI
10 minutes to take home the "cov-
eted" Mustard Yellow Belt. Chest-
nut holds the world record of 68, but didn't have
his chief competitor, Tokeru Kobyashi, who for the
second year running did not compete.
* Over the last eight years, Wimbledon has been
ruled by the Dynamic Duo of tennis, Swiss Rodger
Federer and Spaniard Rafal Nadal. They swapped
titles back and forth and in the process produced
some great matches.
But there's a new sheriff in town, a tall, laconic
Serb by the name of Novak Djokovic, who demol-
ished Nadal in four sets and sent legions of Serb
fans into a frenzy of partying in the streets of Lon-
don.
Serbs don't really need much of an excuse to
party hearty, but they got it on Sunday. Djokov-


L
FG


ic won the first set 6-4 and the second 6-1. Then
Nadal broke back to win 1-6. After that, Djokovic
tightened up and won the final set 6-3.
After winning, the Serb commenced a rather
strange celebration. He bent down and picked sev-
eral blades of grass and ate them.
Nadal was a familiar figure
A Y in the final, his fifth in six years.
Djokovic is no household name
ERARD like Nadal or Federer, but nobody
has had a better year. He recently
got the No. i ranking and Wimble-
don is his third Grand Slam win this year.
Pretty impressive for a guy most people don't
even know. Unless you follow tennis, there are
only a few big names. Federer and Nadal on the
men's side. Maybe Andy Roddick, the American.
On the women's side the Williams sisters and Ma-
ria Sharipova. Beyond that, probably no one.
Tennis has become a European sport as fewer
and fewer Americans are in the top flight. Since
Pete Sampras retired, there aren't many American
men competitive with the top-tier players from
Europe. You can never count out the Williams sis-
ters, though they are playing in fewer and fewer
tournaments.


Suns win two in 6-game series


BOB GERARD I SPORTS
It's been a rough week for the
Jacksonville Suns as they faced
off against division leading Bir-
mingham. The Suns started out
in third place with a chance to
narrow the Barons lead and per-
haps overtake them.
But the Barons showed why
they are the top team in the
Southern League this year,
handing the two-time defend-
ing champion Suns four losses
in the six game series and drop-
ping them to the South Division
cellar.
The Suns have a chance to re-
deem themselves next weekend
when they face off against the
Montgomery Biscuits in a four-
game home stand starting on


Friday. The Biscuits are a game
up on the Suns in the division
and there is nothing the Suns
would like more than to climb
up the standings on the backs of
their rivals from Alabama.
The Suns open the series at
7:05 pm on Friday and the first
2000 fans get a new Suns card
set. The San Diego Chicken will
be in town as well to entertain
fans. On Saturday the game
starts at 6:05 pm. Dress in your
favorite Caribbean shirt for the
return of Buffett Day. The first
3000 fans receive a bobble head
doll in a Hawaiian jersey. Jim-
my Buffett-style jerseys will be
auctioned off during the game.
On Sunday the game starts at
3:05 pm and kids receive Color
Me Magnets. There will also be a


concert after the game. Monday
wraps up the home stand with a
special 1:o5 pm game.


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5 AUCTION EVENTS* Hancock Bank is Offering Properties in Pensacola, Panama City,
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Anderson Quality ROOFING

Metal & Shingle Reroofs & Roof Repairs
New Homes * Remodels * Additions * Screen Rooms
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Macclenny Realty, Inc.
WE HAVE THE HOME FOR YOU
ave 533 S. 6th St. * Macclenny* 259-7709
11avne Combs, Lic. Real Estate Broker ~ Cell. 338-4528
Gary Taylor, Realtor'~ Cell. 568-4800


REAL ESTATE
2 lots in Glen St. Mary has 1980 DW
listed as NO VALUE. $45,000
COMMERCIAL GENERAL
Excellent business location. Four lots to-
tal 1.20 acreswithapprox.320ft.Hwy. 121
frontage. $239,900
Great location for retail business 1404
SF' .,,,1.1, I .... ... I, used as a car lot. No
sign on property. Zoned commercial gen-
eral. $250,000
Corner lot in excellent business location
on Hwy. 125 S. in Glen St. Mary. $49,900


Corner lot zoned commercial neighbor-
hood on Hwy. 121 North. (Adjoining
property available if needed) $79,900
Excellent corner for business. .92 acre
located on US Hwy. 90 zoned commercial
general. $219,900
VACANTLAND
1 acre lot with trees. High & Dry! In
Hunters Ridge. $29,900
REDU h &WjMn cres for
youtob IJ1i or pu ta
mobile home wner nanc n 37,500


Bu'siness C( - * lnvoies * Invi'ations l


THE OFFICE MART

110 South Fifth Street I Downtown Macclenny
259-3737


For Real

Pain Therapy...


COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Let people know what's going on- post your special event online
www.bakercountypress.com


I


57"", T i-GES�
HER) 31,


lie


Thursday, lulvy 7, 2011


Page 15





THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


SPORTS


Page


16
JULY 7, 2011


SPORTS NOTICE SUBMISSIONS CONTACT US
We welcome your spoi ts submissions foi youth league, traveling league or individual athletic achievements. By phone at 904.259.2400 or by fax at 904 259 6502. You can stop by ouL office located at 104 S. Fifth Stieet,
The papei reserves the light to publish submissions It is ecluested that all news items be typed o01 emailed to Macclenny, FL oi mail your submission to PO Box 598, Macclenny, FL 32063
Insule accuI acy illn p)1 int. We are available online at www bakeicountypless.com


Nods to Duke, So. Miss.


BOB GERARD I SPORTS
The Wildcat varsity football
team got off to an auspicious
start this past week as two of its
top players committed to Divi-
sion 1 schools.
Senior quarterback Thomas
Sirk committed to ACC up-and-
comer Duke, while Kendrick
Singleton committed to South-
ern Mississippi.
For Sirk, it was the opportu-
nity to work with Coach David
Cutcliffe that put Duke out in
front of Tennessee and FSU, the
two other front runners on his
dance card.
Sirk anticipates learning
the quarterback position from
someone who taught the famed
Manning brothers, Peyton and
Eli, both former Blue Devils.
"It is a special opportunity to
know that I can learn from that
same person," said Sirk. With
the commitment, Sirk will pass
on trips to FSU and Tennessee
this summer.
Sirk has played quarterback,
receiver and on defense, but
sees his future as a Duke quar-
terback. At 6'5" and 210 pounds
he has the size to see over de-
fenses.
The academic side also had a
lot to do with his decision.
"Duke obviously is one of
the top schools in the country,"
said Sirk. "I know I cannot go
wrong with a degree from there
whether my future continues in
football or it doesn't. That is a
degree that opens a lot of doors
and provides a lot of opportuni-
ties."
Singleton made his deci-
sion to become a Golden Eagle
after going to camp in Hatties-
burg. He liked the school and
the coaching he received during
the camp. "I loved the coach's
style and they are all just great
people. I love them all, they are
great guys and excellent coach-
es," said Singleton.


tionl for the
Wildcats, will
have to wait
until he gets
to school to
see where the
Eagles will
put him. But Thomas Sirk
he is not con-
cerned.
"I feel like Southern Miss is a
place where I can go and be suc-
cessful," said Singleton.
Like Sirk, Singleton is also
excited about the academic as-
pect. He has a special reason for
wanting a college education.
"No one in my family has ever
been to college, and to know
that they are giving me a chance
to get a degree and play football,
it is just a blessing. I am thrilled
about this opportunity," he said.
So, after this season Wildcat
fans will hopefully be able to
continue to follow the careers of
some their favorite players.


Sharks back after only second loss


The South Division arena
football champion Jacksonville
Sharks lost their first game since
March on the road to the San
Jose SaberCats on Saturday.
The 80-73 loss was only the
second of this season. Both
losses have come on West Coast
road trips.
The 13-2 Sharks will be back
in the friendly confines of the
Jacksonville Veterans Memo-
rial Arena on Saturday to face
off against the Dallas Vigilantes.
The 10-5 Vigilantes are in sec-
ond place in the Central Divi-
sion.
The Sharks, who have already
clinched home field advantage







begins in August


for the playoffs beginning at the
end of this month, have only two
games left on the schedule after
they face Dallas.
They travel to Kansas City to
take on the Command and are
back in Jacksonville for the final
regular season game against the
Spokane Shock.


The Sharks boast the best re-
cord in the Arena League. They
are tops in total offense and pass
efficiency. If they have a weak-
ness it is their defense, ranked
15th in the league. So far, how-
ever, they have been able to
match or better what their op-
ponents put up.


PHOTO COURTESY OF ROBIN WEBER
Pictured from left to right: Coach Kevin Wilson, Anna Bowen, Kelly Lawler, Ash-
ton Alford, coach Phillip Lefebvre (back), Lake Lewis, Angel Jackson, Kasey
Weber, Kaylon Golden, Madison Kennedy, Peyton Parker, Kelsey Strickland, Cal-
lie Paine, Mason Filosi, Peyton Staggs and coach Riley Strickland.


Major League girls


clinch district title

The Major League softball girls brought home the Little League's
District 11 title June 30 with a 13-3 pasting of San Mateo in San Ma-
teo. They were dominant throughout the tournament, defeating Yu-
lee in the semi-finals in a 20-0 shutout.
The Major League boys squad clawed their way through to the fi-
nal in controversial fashion from the losers' bracket. They survived a
contentious extra-inning quarterfinal match that saw players ejected
and a coach suspended for a game.
The boys won their way into the quarters with a 14-7 drubbing
of Yulee. But the game with Oakleaf on Saturday, July 2, went to 11
innings, saw an Oakleaf player ejected and the Baker County coach
forced to sit out a game.
The team lost to Oakleaf 10-7 but came back to defeat San Mateo
16-2 from the losers' bracket. Owen Register went the distance on the
mound and hit a grand slam home run in the win.
The boys' rematch with Oakleaf in the finals July 5 ended with a
one-run loss for Baker County 6-5.
Baker County's 9- to lo-year-old boys team was eliminated from
the losers' bracket tournament at the Knabb Fields in a 6-4 loss June
29, to NOL Blue.
The 9- to lo-year-old softball tournament in San Mateo saw two
Baker County teams squaring off. Baker County 1 beat Baker County
2 by a score of 17-1 June 28. The winner went on to beat Yulee 10-3 in
the semi-final but lost the rematch 9-6 in the final.
Baker County's lo0- to 11-year-old boys squad beat host St. Augus-
tine 11-10o June 30. They moved up with a lo0-9 win over NOL the fol-
lowing day before losing in the semi-finals 20-9 to Yulee.
Baker County's Junior League boys team was knocked into the los-
ers' bracket in Yulee with a 7-6 heartbreaker against San Mateo June
29.
They came back to beat St. Augustine 12-6 the following day and
came out of the losers' bracket with a 4-2 win over San Mateo on July
1.
Then July 2, San Mateo upended Baker County in the final 11-5.
The junior softball team from Baker County beat Hilliard 12-2 on
Saturday in San Mateo. They lost to the hosts 10-1 on July 4.


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SIGN-UIPS

Saturday ~ July 2- August 6
9:00 am - 1:00 pm




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