Group Title: Baker County Press (Macclenny, Fla. : 1929).
Title: The Baker County press
ALL ISSUES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00024160/00278
 Material Information
Title: The Baker County press
Uniform Title: Baker County press (Macclenny, Fla. : 1929)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Baker County Press
Publisher: Tate Powell
Place of Publication: Macclenny, Fla
Publication Date: May 27, 2010
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Macclenny (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Baker County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Baker -- Macclenny
Coordinates: 30.283333 x -82.116667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Apr. 12, 1929.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 39 (Jan. 2, 1931).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00024160
Volume ID: VID00278
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ADA7379
oclc - 33284409
alephbibnum - 000579533
lccn - sn 95047186

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17C AY 27


THURSDAY


THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS

81st Year, Vol. 5 Winner of 10 state awards for journalism excellence in 2009


Objects

to health

plan for

schools

JOEL ADDINGTON
NEWS EDITOR
reporter@bakercountypress.com
School board member Karen
McCollum cast the only vote
May 17 against a health insur-
ance plan that would increase
the Baker County district's
premiums
and de-
ductibles.
Ms. Mc-
Collum, a
licensed
insurance
agent, de-
cried the
"business
practices"
used to
choose
the plan Karen McCollum
and ques-
tioned the necessity of using an
insurance broker to negotiate
rates with insurance compa-
nies during the three-plus-hour
meeting that evening.
A committee charged with
reviewing plans presented by
the district's broker, Owens &
Associates of Jacksonville, was
not given enough information
on alternatives that may have
saved the district money, she
said.
The committee recommend-
ed a health insurance plan from
the district's existing carrier,
AvMed, which is accepted at
Fraser Memorial and the health
department. Under it, premi-
ums will rise by 9.2 percent
and deductibles will jump from
$500 to $2500 for individuals
and from $15oo to $5000 for
families.
After a motion to accept the
recommendation and a second
by other board members, Ms.
McCollum asked, "Can I get
some explanation as to why the
insurance committee decided to
go with AvMed?"
The district's finance direc-
tor, Marcelle Richardson, who
served on the committee, said
the group spent hours review-
ing plans from United Health
Care and AvMed, and though
the former had "a fairly decent
contract," the convenience of
not having to travel outside the
county to find providers that
accept United plans weighed
heavily on the decision.
Renewal of the district's cur-
rent AvMed plan, with $500
individual and $1500 family
deductibles, would've meant a
28 percent increase in premi-
See page 4))


Plans for

expansion

of Early Head

Start,

more

classrooms


Jury indicts teen for brother's death


The brother of a Baker Middle School
student shot to death outside his St.
George, GA home last fall has been in-
dicted by a Folkston, GA grand jury for
felony murder.
The jury decided last week that James
Tyler Sweatt, 15, a sophomore student
at Baker County High School, pulled the
trigger of a .12 gauge shotgun and killed
Tracy Earl Sweatt, 11, on October 25,
2009.
The younger brother was at the time in
the sixth grade here.
Both were among many school age
children living in the Georgia Bend above
the state line who attend school in Baker
County under a decades-old agreement


with Charlton
County, GA.
Macclenny is
closer to St.
George than the
county seat of
Folkston, where
the secondary
schools are lo-
cated.
The case
was presented
by assistant
prosecutor Alex
Markowich, and
according to Dis- James Sweatt
trict Attorney Rick Currie of Waycross, the


earliest the case
could reach trial
is September. If
not then, the
next trial term
in Charlton
County is Feb-
ruary, 2011.
The 23-mem-
ber jury met on
May 14 and the
presentation of
evidence took
about an hour,
according to
Tracy Sweatt Mr. Currie. The
panel deliberated "a while" bef-


L


ore returning the verdict. It also had the
option of charging the accused with invol-
untary manslaughter, and had that hap-
pened the case would have been handled
by a juvenile court.
The state also has not decided whether
it will oppose granting bond to the young
defendant, who until his arrest last week
continued to live with his parents.
Mr. Currie said he was not at liberty
to discuss details of the state's evidence
against James Sweatt other than it was
not an accident. The indictment indicates
that the younger brother was outside the
family's residence on Gordon St. and the
older brother was inside at the time of the
shooting.


0001


ILLUSTRATION BY JESSICA PREVATT
Pictured above is a sampling of the trees planned for the
arboretum. From left are an Eastern Hophornbeam, American
Hornbeam leaf, Black Walnut, Winged Elm leaf, White Oak and
Fringe Tree. Below is the master plan for the arboretum and teaching
gardens from a University of Florida landscape design class.


Stimulus money


for 'tree garden'
JOEL ADDINGTON
NEWS EDITOR
reporter@bakercountypress.com

T ne beginnings of an arboretum and teach-
ing garden are coming to the Ag Center in
the form of 54 new and varied trees that
will be planted in an open field north of the weath-
er tower just off US 90 in west Macclenny.
Alittle more than $19,000 from the Florida Forest Health Improve-
ment Initiative grant program and funded through the American Re-
covery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, commonly called the stimulus
package, is covering the cost of installing oaks, elms, pines and other
See page 5)


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Usual bidders for tax certificate sale June 1


The annual sale of delinquent
tax certificates set for June 1
hasn't generated any more in-
terest than usual, according to
Amy Griffis, the tax collector's
office manager.
About two dozen partici-
pants who regularly bid on the
certificates have registered as


well as a few newcomers.
"Whether or not they show
up is a different story," she
said.
The list usually grows by 5-
o1 participants each year.
The tax certificates will be
auctioned off at the county ad-
ministration offices, 55 N. 3rd


bakercountypress.com


ONLINE POLL RESULTS
Should constitutional officers such
as the sheriff, clerk of courts, etc. be
provided public vehicles or reimbursed
for travel in their personal vehicles?


47.9% Reimbursed
52.1% Public
vehicles


St. in Macclenny, beginning at
8:30 am. Participants willing to
pay off a delinquent tax bill, bid
an annual interest rate and the
lowest rates secure certificates.
Payment of the bill is due two
days after the sale.
Tax sale certificates do not
entitle the successful bidder to


ownership of the property and
they're not permitted to have
contact with the property owner
for two years.
Certificate holders are guar-
anteed a five percent return re-
gardless of when or if the owner
pays the delinquent taxes plus
the accrued interest. However,


certificate holders after two
years can pay $225 to apply for
a deed to the property.
The certificates become void
after seven years.
Registration for the tax sale
can be done by mail, phone or
in person at the Tax Collectors
See page 5)


904.259.2400 ** 904.259.6502 Fax
www.bakercountypress.com
bcpress@nefcom.net


Visit our website and vote each week in our online poll.


COVERING BAKER COUNTY SINCE 1929
The county's most professional and extensive source for news, classified, display and real estate listings


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Thursday Friday Saturday
9:00- 6:00 9:00-7:00 9:00-4:00


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ARUBA CHOCOLATE COLOR MICROFIBER SOFA AND LOVE SOFA Reg. $699.99...............
FULL SIZE SLEEPER SOFA Reg.$659.99....................... ......................
**^^ ^^^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^^^ ^ ^^^ ^^ ^ ^^^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^^^ ^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^^^ ^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^


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TRCLAS OFL INVENTORY HUE BEEN MOVED FROM OUR WAREHOUSE AND ~~~I ii II I'IillI ~ II II Y iIi~I
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. 1


THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


Thursday, May 27,2010


Page 2


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THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


OPINION


Page


3
MAY 27, 2010


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR CONTACT US
Letters are welcome, but must contain the signature of the writer, a telephone number and city of residence. By phone at 904.259.2400 or by fax at 904.259.6502. You can stop by our office located at 104 S. Fifth Street,
Letters must reflect opinions and statements on issues of current interest to the general public. Macclenny, FL or mail your submission to PO Box 598, Macclenny, FL 32063.
The newspaper reserves the right to reject any material which in the newspaper's judgement does not meet standards of publication. We are available online at www.bakercountypress.com


THE E

POR
Kelley La


tisement that
featured inexpensive reproduc-
tions of great works of art for
sale.
I used to study those images
intently each time a new maga-
zine found its way to our coffee
table.
The one that captivated me
most was Vincent van Gogh's
Sunflowers, undoubtedly the
most famous image in the world
of these majestic flowers.
Even the thumbnail-sized
image in the magazine carried
a significant impression of the
energetic brush strokes that
are synonymous with his work.
When I finally did see a print
that matched the actual scale of
the original painting, it was daz-
zling.
Keller Intermediate School
showcased the work of its fourth
and fifth graders on May 13 at
the school's annual art exhibit.
Visitors walked through hallways
covered in hundreds of studies of
sunflowers based on those made
famous by Van Gogh.
The students all used the
same color palette and basically
the same composition, but each
creation still contained subtle
and unique differences. It was
interesting how they all worked
together to form a unified whole.
The oranges, reds and yellows
blended in a wonderfully harmo-
nious way to form a warm and
cheerful mural.
Art teacher Kari Rhoden is to
be commended as well as the stu-
dents. The sunflower studies is
one of the most wonderful paint-
ing projects I've observed by ele-
mentary school age students and
I've seen lots over the years.
The difficulties of Vincent
van Gogh's personal life often
become the focus instead of the
wonderfully unique artistic style
he developed. Mention his name
in public and most folks will say,
"Oh, yeah. Isn't that the crazy guy
who cut off his ear?"
He did not cut off his entire
ear as has long been believed.
Van Gogh certainly did have


&A I problems. There
LACKl is evidence he
suffered greatly
SC H from depression
and may have
nnigan had epilepsy.
His artistic
style was openly criticized hard
enough to handle when you're not
depressed and he only sold one
painting in his short lifetime.
Still, something drove him to
paint, paint, paint everything he
saw around him in his daily life
in 19th century Holland, even in
the face of blatant ridicule from
the public.
Van Gogh produced countless
paintings and sunflowers were
the subject of twelve of them. In
1987, less than a century after
his death, one of his sunflower
paintings sold at auction for $39
million dollars. Today, with infla-
tion, that sum equals $77 million.
The current list of the 36 most
expensive paintings ever sold at
auction includes seven by Van
Gogh.
The struggling artist who only
sold one painting during his life-
time would be completely and
utterly astounded.
I'm glad to see Van Gogh's art
providing inspiration to young,
budding artists at Keller Inter-
mediate.
Every time someone paints or
plants a sunflower, it's a tribute
to this special artist who died
doubting his talent and never un-
derstanding the stunning artistic
legacy he left to the world.


As simple as an e-mail.....
If you have any information you
think we need to know, send it to:
editor@bakercountypress.com
THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS
104 South Fifth St.
904-259-2400


It's Fantasyland' no more


Elvis has left Fantasyland. Well,
maybe not Elvis, but I've left Fanta- Vi S
syland.
I spent a wonderful anniversaryT -
weekend with Kelley, my bride of 28 1THE
years, at Disney World.
Though Disney World may not ROBERT
seem the most romantic anniversary
getaway, we both happen to love it. When the kids
were little we had annual passes and discovered that
we enjoyed the parks as much as they did. We love
to people watch and stroll through Epcot looking at
the countries in the World Showcase, and even en-
joy the attractions at the Magic Kingdom.
So we took advantage of the Florida Resident deal
and the good rates at the hotels on site and had a
great time. Naturally, whenever you toss me in with
20,000 people I tend to notice stuff that other folks
might ignore.
It's been about to years since we went together to
Disney World and a lot has changed.
Some of the attractions have changed. One of our
favorites was The Tiki Room. I know, you are saying
that is the most boring event in the park. That's pre-
cisely why we liked it. We called it The Sleepy Room.
Whenever we were hot and tired we would go into
The Tiki Room and let the birds lull us in a blissful
doze for about 20 minutes.
Not any more. They've changed it all around with
new upbeat songs, rap and new characters. You can't
sleep in the Tiki Hut anymore. What a disappoint-
ment.
The number of tattoos has increased dramatically.
Not on Mickey or Minnie or even Donald, which is
surprising since he's a sailor, but on everybody else.
Everywhere we looked there were tattoos honking
tattoos that covered arms, backs, necks and legs.
The strange thing about them were that they were
across the board tattoos. It wasn't just teens and 20-
somethings, but people in their 4os, 5os and 6os
sported new ink.
The number of princesses and pirates has in-
creased twentyfold. Everywhere you look there are
tiny princesses and Jack Sparrows. Disney, always
keen to spot a moneymaking idea, has discovered
that every girl wants to be a Disney princess and ev-
ery boy a pirate.
For about $30 Disney hair and makeup artists


j Facebook fans


'What yo

We asked May 21: "How do you feel She looked like
about the high school selling seats to graduating sei
graduation on the field? Instead of selling more than four
them should those seatsjust be reserved for a great fundrai
the handicap or senior citizens 70 years or
older?" Here's what our Facebook fans had Tammy Cra
tosay: pay? Who gets
should go to t
Don Yonn: "I don't think it should be the handicap
allowed. People with disabilities should center section
be sat up front in the grandstands in the I attended my
handicapped section. As far as selling noise from th(
tickets to sit on the field is that legal for veryoffensivet
the county to do that? The field should be to hear our chi
for grads only. Talk about making the dis- loud talking ti
advantaged feel even more so when their each graduate
child is graduating and they don't see their cheer for then
parents there. How do you think that's go- name. Everyor
ing to make that child feel? Equality for all do everything:
or none."
Ed Davis:"
Karen Lucas Rambo:"The graduation is BS. Reserves
ceremony itself is free to anyone who and senior citiz
wants to attend. The seats on the field are I think the schc
for those who are willing to payfora better years (even be1
view. I remember nine years ago, sitting they were out
on the top bleacher in the stadium, trying the right to se
to get pictures of my graduating niece. having to pay


II

-L
F(


transform little girls into princesses.
DE OF All over the parks were little girls in
princess dresses with glittery hair
T and makeup and boys dressed as
ATFER pirates.
Strollers and scooters are every-
3E RAR D where! Disney marketing has taken
to renting motorized scooters for
$75 a day. I think that is a great idea for people with
limited mobility who still would like to visit the park.
I do, however, see designated stroller and scooter
lanes in the future.
Disney may be "The Happiest Place on Earth,"
but not everyone is happy to be there. Especially
when it is 93 degrees and the sun is beating down on
little heads and beaming off the pavement.
The number of squalling children and pinch-faced
or screaming parents rivaled the number of laughs
and smiles. If I had a dollar for every time I heard
"You straighten up or we'll go home right now," in
47 different languages, I could have afforded to stay
for another night.
Here are a couple of tips we noticed this week-
end.
If you want a great view of the Magic Kingdom
parade, go to very start of Main Street USA. That's
where the parade ends and there usually aren't very
many people there.
Before you make a room reservation, check the
resorts in the park. They are forever having Florida
Resident deals and we stayed in the park for what it
would have cost for a room near the park on 1-4.
Here's something else I noticed on this trip. I'm
sure it has been rattling around in my head on other
trips, but I just haven't been put together with thou-
sands of other husbands in one place before.
Once women get married, they must stop wearing
clothes with pockets. As soon as we parked my wife
handed me her lip gloss and cell phone and camera
to put in my pocket.
As I walked around the park I noticed hundreds
of other husbands with bulging pockets. I knew we
were in the same boat.
About an hour in we bought bottled water.
"Here, put these in your pocket."
"I can't."
"Why not? Then you won't have to carry them."
"I'm afraid my pants will fall down."


uhadto say...


e an ant! As the parent of a
nior, I only wish I could buy
seats on the field. I think it's
ser!"

wford McFarland:"Pay?Why
Sthe money and why? They
he graduates then enforce
only section. And save the
for the family. Also when
r nephew's graduation the
e crowd was so loud it was
to many. As parentswe want
Id's name, not bellowing or
throughout the service. Give
V's family time to clap and
n, then announce the next
ie seems to be in a hurry to


Selling seats to graduation
I areas for the handicapped
zens 70+ should be created.
iol taxes I have paid over the
fore I had kids, and also after
of school) have earned me
e my kids graduate without
, for a seat! Find out now


which school board members are for this
and vote them out at election time!"

Marsha Bennett:"While both my chil-
dren graduated from Baker County High
School, as well as myself and other fam-
ily members, I hope my grandchildren are
spared the type of messages being taught
by the Baker County school board and are
educated at a private educational institu-
tion. It would be a glorious thing if Baker
County had a facility large enough to hold
high school graduations, butthat's not like-
ly to happen. When i graduated in 1973, it
was held at the football field,when my son
graduated in 1991, it was held at the foot-
ball field, when my daughter graduated
in 2006, it was held at the football field.
Some things never change:'

Come join us on Facebook. Go to
www.facebook.com and register to
create your own Facebook page. Then
search for the Baker County Press and
click the "like" link to join the fun. We
update the page with news briefs and
ask readers for their feedback daily.


Sunflowers bloom


at Keller's exhibit


adults to look out for them!
Jessica Prevatt is a married mother
of two and the advertising director
for The Baker County Press.


Abusers,


enablers


both bear


the blame

JESSICA PREVATT
Child abuse. It brings horrible
pictures and stories to mind that
we see way too often in this day
and age. I watched a video re-
cently of a 4-year-old boy who
lived in Michigan with his moth-
er, who had a drug problem, his
older brother and his mom's boy-
friend.
Apparently they had only
recently moved in with the boy-
friend, who decided after nine
days he was tired of raising the
boy. When the child had an ac-
cident on the couch while eating
cereal one morning the boyfriend
began beating him. This went on
for four days. Four entire days of
beating and torture. The neigh-
bors heard the boy crying, but
did nothing because they didn't
want to get involved.
The mother was in and out of
the house, received a beating her-
self for trying to protect her son,
but she still didn't report it and
his grandfather and aunt are the
ones who finally found out and
went to try and help. The child
by then had severe brain damage
and was taken off life support a
short time later and died.
As a mother, I can not begin
to fathom how a mom can let
someone abuse their child like
that. I would die trying to protect
my children from a monster like
that and wouldn't hesitate to step
in if I saw someone else doing
the same to someone else's child.
I'm not advocating being a nosey
neighbor, but there are signs
when children are being abused.
I would never want to jump the
gun and accuse someone of
abuse without being absolutely
sure, but if I thought there was a
chance, I would be extra vigilant
until I had proof.
Abuse comes in more forms
than just beating or physically
harming kids. Kids who are
criticized constantly and never
praised have little self esteem.
It is sad to see children at school
whose parents never make an
effort to get involved. It's not
always easy when both parents
work, but at least making the ef-
fort for special events means the
world to kids. Of course, it ne-
gates the effort if you constantly
gripe to your kids about having to
take off or rearrange your sched-
ule to go to the school.
Pampering or spoiling kids
is a type of abuse too. It's obvi-
ously not as serious as physical
or emotional abuse, but it still
puts the kids at a disadvantage as
they grow into adulthood. A child
who gets everything he or she
wants expects that to continue
into adulthood. Children learn to
value what they have when they
earn it. Spoiled kids never gain
the independence they need to
be successful at a job or anything
else and have few friends.
How can a parent or adult turn
on a kid and beat them or leave
them alone in cars for hours?
Once someone is found guilty of
abuse or neglect, they should be
sterilized then locked away. Bet-
ter yet, let some adults give them
a taste of their own medicine.
Those people lost their right to be
a parent when they abused their
kids.
Anyone who knew of the abuse
and did nothing should receive
some kind of punishment also.
Because of the neighbors compla-
cency a child died in Michigan.
You don't have to place hero. No-
tifying the proper authorities can
save a child's life.
So, please be vigilant against
child abuse or neglect. Children
are too small to speak up for
themselves and it is our job as


In one of the
magazines my
mother bought
each month,
there was a long
running adver-


THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS
ff usps 040-280
Post Office Box 598
Macclenny, FL 32063
(904) 259-2400
The Baker County Press is published each Thursday by Baker County Press, Inc.
Periodicals postage paid under permit issued May 272, 1929 at the post office
in Macclenny, Florida.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
$25.00 a year inside Baker County; $35.00 a year outside Baker County;
deduct, $1.00 for persons 65 years of age or older, military personnel
on active duty outside Baker County, and college students living outside
Baker County. POSTMASTER: send address changes to The Baker County
Press, P.O. Box 598, Macclenny, FL. 32063.
Publisher/Editor
James C. McGauley editor@bakercountypress.com
NEWS EDITOR -Joel Addington reporter@bakercountypress.com
ADVERTISING/PRODUCTION Jessica Prevatt- advertising@bakercountypress.com
FEATURES- Kelley Lannigan -features@bakercountypress.com
FEATURES/COMMENT/SPORTS Robert Gerard
BUSINESS MANAGER- Karin Thomas kthomas@bakercountypress.com
CLASSIFIEDS & TYPESETTING Debbie Hansen classifieds@bakercountypress.com
This newspaper is printed on recycled paper.





THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


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*


COUNTRY FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
invites you to join at their newest full-service branch in


SANDERSON
9163 CR 229 Sanderson, Fla. 32087


COUNTRY FEDERAL


CREDIT UNION


2 Drive- Thru Lanes New ATM machine


DRIVE-THRU
HOURS:
Monday Thursday
7:30 am 5:00 pm
Friday 7:15 am 6:00 pm
Saturday 9:00 am 12:30 pm


LOBBY HOURS:
Monday Thursday
9:00 am 4:30 pm
Friday 9:00 am 6:00 pm
Saturday 9:00 am 12:30 pm


602 S. Sixth Street, Macclenny 259-6702

US Hwy. 90 West, Glen St. Mary 653-4401

100 S. Lima Street, Baldwin 266-1041 1
W.Cuntrfc.LENDERm
www.countryfcu.com


Board member, administrator clash on insurer MISS CFTHY
rdCimm r Dirlinn r, mn


(From page 1
ums, which Mrs. Richardson said
employees couldn't afford.
Considering the district's high
claims history, "we felt like that
[9.2 percent premium increase]
was probably better than fair
... With the drive you'd have to
make and the time lost, right now
this would be in the best interest
of the school district," she said.
Last year claims outstripped
premiums by 21percent, surpass-
ing them in all but two months of
the year, Ms. Richardson added.
Claims have been greater
than premiums for the last three
years.

A broken process
Two days before the meeting
Ms. McCollum received a noti-
fication letter from the district
regarding renewal with AvMed.
"How can we go ahead and
send out notifications to em-
ployees when it wasn't going to
be voted on by the school board
until tonight?
"Sending out notifications
prior to school board approval
basically takes away the author-
ity given by state statute to the
school board. It basically says
we're just here for a yes vote, or
rubber stamping a decision that's
already been made."
Her objections didn't end
there.
Because Owens is paid a
commission by AvMed based
on a percentage of the district's
premiums, Ms. McCollum said
there's an incentive for enrolling
employees in higher-premium
plans.
The county recently decided to
pay Owens a flat fee to avoid that
conflict. County Manager Joe
Cone is still negotiating the fee,
but according to a May 17 letter
from AvMed to the county, the
firm's commission in 2008-09
was just over $67,000 or about
four percent of the roughly $1.6
million paid in premiums.
Owens also received a close to
$23,000 bonus on the county's
group plan.
The same information was
submitted to the school district
May 25 following a request for it
from The Press. Ms. Richardson
said the letter showed Owens'
commission for 2009 at about
$73,000, or two percent of the
$3.9 million in premiums.
The firm's bonus for the


district's group was roughly
$36,000.
With the renewal deadline
not until August 21, Ms. McCol-
lum suggested during the school
board meeting that the district
take time to review its health
insurance practices and perhaps
request proposals from multiple
agents or consider negotiating
directly with insurance compa-
nies without a broker.
"I don't know why we can't
explore these other options," she
said. "I don't feel comfortable
making a decision when every
avenue was not explored. We
have an obligation to be stewards
of the taxpayers' money."
The premium increase at 9
percent impacts lower-wage em-
ployees like cafeteria workers and
bus drivers more than others.
"When you look at employees
paid barely enough to cover the
cost of family coverage, and the
only reason they come to work
everyday is because they have to
have health insurance, 9 percent
is huge," said Ms. McCollum.

Tempers flared
A contentious exchange soon
erupted between the board mem-
ber and Ms. Richardson.
"We are definitely on a time
line crunch," said the administra-
tor. "We've spent a lot of hours on
this and you've seen what we've
had to review ... We've always
made a recommendation and the
board has supported that com-
mittee."
"I don't think they were given
all the information," Ms. McCol-
lum said.
Ms. Richardson answered,
'They were given all the informa-
tion Ms. McCollum."
"Were they given what premi-
ums would be without the com-
mission in it, if we had negotiated
directly with the insurance carri-
ers?"
"Two percent is his commis-
sion, if that's what you'd like to
know ..." Ms. Richardson shot
back. "You are taking over this
board meeting and trying to cru-
cify me and it is wrong."
The women apparently had a
heated argument during a previ-
ous meeting, after which com-
munication between them broke
down and Superintendent Sher-
rie Raulerson took on the role of
mediator. Multiple times during
the evening's discussion, Ms.
Richardson apologized; at one


point for yelling at Ms. McCollum
during the previous meeting.
Mr. Owens also addressed the
board and Ms. McCollum that
evening.
"I appreciate your questions,"
he said. "But I think some of
those questions are limited in
your scope of how things basi-
cally work."
He explained that shopping
for an insurance agent isn't like
bidding out equipment or other
services, but more akin to choos-
ing a doctor or attorney.
"I don't recommend using
someone, or doing it yourself,
that doesn't have the experience,"
said Mr. Owens, who has close to
three decades of insurance indus-
try experience.
And since the district's claims
last year totaled more than its
premiums, he noted that his
commission didn't come from
premiums paid by the district,
but rather AvMed groups in other
locations that paid more in pre-
miums than they filed in claims.
Furthermore, Mr. Owens said
he fosters competition between
insurers and called the 9 percent
premium hike "incredible" given
the district's high claims in recent
years.

'Too late'to change this year
While some board members
and Superintendant Raulerson
agreed to review the district's
practices regarding health insur-
ance, they said it's not something
they wanted to do this year.
Patricia Weeks commended
Karen for her concerns about get-
ting the district the best deal pos-
sible, but given the complexity of
health insurance, "it's important
to have somebody with experi-


ence holding your hand."
"I don't think what you've said
tonight has fallen on deaf ears,"
added Dwight Crews. "I do think
we need to look at some things
you've talked about, but it's prob-
ably too late this year."
For Ms. Raulerson, the tense
exchange signaled a need for
greater cooperation among dis-
trict officials.
"We have to move past what
was said tonight," Ms. Raulerson
said. "We can't shut down on one
another ... We won't get done
what needs to get done. We're all
professionals."
Ms. Richardson echoed those
sentiments early this week.
"I can put my feelings aside
and do what's right for the dis-
trict," she said. "We can put our
difference aside."
The district's financial man-
ager also attributed the hurried
time line to the fact that many
employees leave for the summer
and the deadline to enroll is Au-
gust 21.

In other business
Also that evening, the school
board:
Voted 4-1 to approve a vol-
untary vision insurance plan
from United Healthcare. Again,
Ms. McCollum dissented, say-
ing that a better vision plan from
Humana had not been consid-
ered by the committee. She also
supplied Mr. Owens with a copy
of the plan.
Voted unanimously for a vol-
untary GAP insurance plan from
Allstate that offers insurance
to cover deductible and other
out-of-pocket expenses. It costs
between $3 and $12 a week de-
pending on age.


RENTALS oR SALES
Hufa Water? Rusty Water? SraLy Wafer
Iron Fillers and Conditioners !A
Water Treatment I

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Approved the purchase of
a $56,975 portable rest room
for the high school from Mobile
Modular as well as six portable
classrooms for $295,770 from
ModSpace. The prices come from
bids in St. Lucie and Suwannee
counties piggybacked by the dis-
trict.
BCHS Principal Tom Hill said
the new classrooms will help the
school meet requirements of the
class size amendment approved
by voters in 2002 and facilitate
a return to the seven-period day
next fall.


June 14-July16
Horses provided or bring your own
Glen St. Mary, FI 259-7752


First Baptist Church
of Macclenny
"It Feels Like Home"
372 S. Sixth Street at W. Minnesota Ave.


SUNDAY SERVICES
Sunday School 9:30 am
Worship 10:45 am
& 6:00 nm


WEDNESDAY SERVICES
Prayer & Bible Study 6:45 pm
Awana for Children 6:45 pm
Youth Grouo 6:45 Dm


Dr. Edsel M. Bone Directions from 1-10: Take Exit 48 N. Go 1.3 miles
Senior Pastor North on Hwy. 121 See steeple on left

Broadcast Live on WJXR 92.1 FM each Sunday Morning @ 11:00 am


It's not easy, but it's worth it.
Attend Diabetes Self-Management Classes
at the Baker County Health Department
June 3,10,17 & 24 from 5:00 7:00 p.m.
Come at 4:00 on June 3rd for a FREE Al C test
480W. LowderSt.
Call 653-5246 to register oL Mac rs
Baker County Heah Depament
Baker County Health Department


.0 0O a


*~


w


o


.C


-.4


- Q


-- '


Thursday, May 27,2010


Page 4


__


- bw amew


"Ion





THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


Arrest for assault,.


Police arrested a Glen St. Mary
man late on May 19 for attempt-
ing to run down an acquaintance
from whom he allegedly stole
prescription drugs.
Deputy Ben Anderson said
he noted tire tracks that ran the
length of a yard off Madison St.
in Glen where Daryl Tyson, 22,
allegedly drove his 1995 Chev-
rolet pickup at Corey Combs, 23,
who lives nearby.
Cpl. Anderson said he an-
swered a disturbance call and
stopped Mr. Tyson near Park St.
and CR 125 north about 11:20
based on a vehicle description.
He also noted that one Xanax pill
was visible on the front seat.
Mr. Combs later accused Mr.
Tyson of stealing his bottle of
Xanax pills, adding that the ac-
cused was aware of an unlocked
front door at his residence and
that the pills were inside.


Mr. Tyson was booked at
county jail for aggravated assault
and felony possession of the pill.
The next day, the same defen-
dant was arrested at county jail
and charged with grand theft for
stealing a camera valued at $500
from Brandon Long during the
day on May 18.
The camera was in a vehicle
belonging to the victim's sister
Celinda Long, an acquaintance of
the suspect. It was later returned
to Mr. Long by Mr. Tyson's fa-
ther.
In other battery incidents:
Robert (Robbie) Porterfield,
32, of Glen was arrested for ag-
gravated battery on Randall
Johns following a fight at Mac's
Liquors on US 90 in Macclenny
the night of May 17.
Mr. Johns and witnesses said
he was approached by the ac-
cused as he sat on a bar stool


The Town of Glen St. Mary de-
cided May 18 to postpone calling
for quotes on a new heavy duty
riding mower until it endorses a
bidding policy aimed at an "ap-
ples to apples" selection process.
Town attorney Joel Foreman
of Lake City suggested during the
Glen council's regular meeting
that evening a formula outlined
in the Florida administrative
code that gives bidders 72 hours
to respond to a list of specifica-
tions.
The objective is to collect input
based on a general set of specs
sent out by the town to "even out"
the choices when the town makes
a buying decision.
"Basically it gives the bidders
72 hours to study the general
specifications and object if the
specs are flawed," explained Mr.
Foreman.
If revisions result, all vendors
are advised and they then submit
their bids. Glen would reserve the
right to reject any or all quotes
just as before, however.
The subject arose after Mayor


Juanice Padgett indicated she
favors seeking bids from at least
the four lawn mower shops in
Baker County. Glen plans to hold
on to a diesel industrial mower
purchased in 2006, which reverts
to a backup.
The mayor indicated funds
will come from reserves resulting
from a reduction in payroll costs
last fall. The present mower was
in the $9000 range, she told the
board.
In other business from the
regular monthly meeting, the
council was advised a cycle opens
May 28 during which Glen St.
Mary will be considered for the
$600,000 CDBG grant it applied
for last year to fund the central
water project in several neigh-
borhoods north of US 90.
The town was passed up for
the grant last year and re-applied.
The grant consultant maintains
Glen has a better chance secur-
ing the money in 2010 since all
preliminary engineering is com-
plete.


felony possession
and punched in the face. Deputy was named in a battery corn
Jason Bryan said that version of plaint for an alleged attack o
events was affirmed by a surveil- Vanna Hamiton, 27, the mornin
lance video, of May 18.
Mr. Porterfield was arrested Ms. Hamilton told Deput
shortly after and admitted to Chris Walker that she went t
punching Mr. Johns. He said Ms. Johnson's residence off Hon
they had a dispute over money eysuckle Lane about 10:30 to col
owed to him. lect belongings.
Mr. Johns was treated at Fra- Ms. Hamilton said she wa
ser Hospital for a lip laceration, struck in the face and head al
Criminal complaints for ter calling Ms. Johnson a "crac
battery were filed against four head."
persons following a fracas on
the property of Country Federal M an cri
Credit Union in Glen during the VI crit
early morning hours of May 22.
Deputy John Hardin filed the A Glen St. Mary man was
complaints after hearing con- cally i n thrown fr
flicting versions of events. Ciege haly ins urning pi thrown fro
Parkin, 20, and Laci Norman, 20, his overturning picutrucklat
both of Macclenny, along with on May22 on SR 125 south
Melissa Baggett, 22, of Jackson- Crews Rd. .
ville, are accused of attacking The Florida Highway Patr
Dustin Heppner, 22, of Mac- sad teven G. Jones, 47, was nc
D ienny around 3 2o am. wearing a seat belt when he los
control of his northbound 200
He is accused of striking Ms. Ford pickup while passing an
Parkin and shoving Ms. Baggett other vehicle about 11:4o.
to the ground. The vehicle overturned several
t Similar complaints were e e orturnedse
S Similar complaints were times, said Trooper J.W. Hattli
filed against all parties following The sole passenger, Casey Jone
a melee outside Country Boy's
convenience store in downtown 24, also of Glen, remained in th
convenience store in downtown truck restrained by a seat belt and
Glen the evening of May 21. sustained minor injuries.
Deputy Hardin heard con-
Deputy Hardin heard con- Both occupants were trans
flicting versions of events from Both occupants were trans
Veronica Manning, 33, of Glen ported by rescue to Shands Jack
andCherrodi Wilcox,22, of Mac- sonville and the younger Jone
a enny in one group, 2was released shortly after.
In the other group were An Charges are pending, as i
In the other group were An- a determination whether al
gela Jackson, 36, Alta Ruise, 54 cool played a role in the acci
Sebrina Ruise, 26, and a 15-year- dent. Trooper Hattle estimate
old femaleall ofGlen1. dent. Trooper Hattle estimate
old Mary Johnson, 28,all of Glen$12,000 in vehicle damage.
Mary Johnson, 28, of Glen


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FPL I T
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R CKLES:',
A Dave amsey certijigtd financial counselor ,
904- -6571 ; .-
rosieni espfc ya6P .6 hn


'Tree garden' funds


(From page 1
types of trees.
A University of Florida land-
scape design class developed a
master plan for the 2-acre arbo-
retum and teaching garden that
includes the trees, pathways, a
picnic pavilion, butterfly garden,
flower beds and other features
that could be added in the future
as more funding becomes avail-
able.
The objective of the project is
to create a space where the pub-
lic visits and develops an appre-
ciation for urban forestry, while
learning about Florida's diverse
tree species and Florida-friendly
landscaping, which employs na-
tive plants requiring less water,
fertilizers and pesticides.
Many of the trees were select-
ed specifically because they're
not readily available in Baker
County. Promoting diversity and
encouraging the planting of what
Alicia Lamborn, the extension
office's horticulture agent, called
"under-utilized species" is one
the project's goals.
For instance, she said, the
American hornbeam and Eastern
hophornbeam are attractive trees
but not very well known through-
out the community.
Another unique tree, the black
walnut, emits a mild toxin to
ward off other plants competing
for water and nutrients in the


soil. "Most plants can't grow un-
der or around it," Ms. Lamborn
said.
A licensed landscape installa-
tion company will plant the trees
with mulch, tree guards and ir-
rigation bags and monitor them
during a 60-day grow-in period.
Master gardener volunteers, su-
pervised by Ms. Lamborn, will
be charged with maintaining the
trees in the long term.
The arboretum will also serve
as an educational venue for the
public and students, including
those in the Future Farmers of
America and 4-H organizations.
The Baker County Commis-
sion declared its support for the
project by passing a resolution
and accepting use of the grant
funds on May 17.


Bidders...
(From page 1
office, 32 N. 5th St., and partici-
pants must supply their name,
address, phone number and so-
cial security or federal ID num-
ber.
For more information contact
Ms. Griffis at 658-4518.


r^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^4


=MEN


W, at
*-*.


DD'S


presents

ith GRANDMA LEE

Finalist on America's Got Talent

Wednesday, June 23

at 8:00 pm
$10 Advance purchase tickets

Comedy Zone shows will be
moving to the last Saturday
of the month at 9:00 pm.
Reservations available
call 259-2222

Thanks to all who helped us
move to our new location!


EAGLE'S NEST

SCHOOL READINESS CENTER
Director: Shannon Smith Assistant Director: Reena Lanier
590 N. 7th Street, Macclenny 259-8466 or 305-2131

NOW ENROLLING
Infant 12 yrs. old Hours of operation: 6:30 am 6:00 pm


. FLOCS Certified
" ACTS Golden Seal Accreditation Standard
" Large, Christian childcare facility; 6,000 SF
sitting on 2 acres
* VPK Program
* Accepts Episcopal subsidies
" Certified teachers and staff with 50 years of
combined ministry to children

CURRICULUM
A-BEKA Links to Literacy A.C.E


United Christian
Church
MINISTRIES
Pastor Mitch Rhoden
mitchellrhoden@nefcom.net
305-2131


" Before and after school care for K- 6th grade
" Transportation to and from
Westside Elementary & U.C.A.
* Competitive rates
* Weekly chapel service
* Annual cap and gown graduation and
awards ceremony


HOME-COOKED MEALS:
Breakfast, Lunch, Healthy Snacks


Eagle's NestEXCI TING


KIDS SUMMER CAMP f
June 9 August 16
Cookouts Field Trips Swimming, Skating & Bowling
Ages 5-12 $200 plus weekly tuition Much More!


United Christian Church


& Academy

28 W. Macclenny Ave. (Midtowne Center)
259-1199


NOW ENROLLING
United Christian Academy in our 13th year
* Quality K-12 Education
* Featuring A.C.E. Curriculum
* Dedicated A.C.E Certified teachers
* Dual enrollment with Lake City Community College is available
* Accepts McKay (ESE & I.E.P) scholarship students and 'Step up for Students'
Scholarships.

Interested in quality, Christian education?
Affordable tuition with an easy payment plan.


k. United Christian Academy is offering

SUMMER SCHOOL TUTORING
June 14 July 14 9 am -1 pm Mon. -Wed.
SFor information or to sign-up call 259-1199 or 305-2131
$200 per person, Public, private & home-schooled welcome!


I id they sh1Ial~l mountIup witIhwg e s"ia[hK40:31i


TOWN OF GLEN ST. MARY

Considers change in

bidding procedures


HAS MOVED TO

364 W. Macclenny Ave.


Thursday, May 27, 2010


Page 5










Additional slots, new building Additional charges after
unruly youth gets to jail
Slated for Early Head Start center near Keller Sheriff's deputies made a times had warned Mr. Hines


JOEL ADDINGTON
NEWS EDITOR
reporter@bakercountypress.com

Plans by Episcopal Children's
Services to expand the Early Head
Start program to 16 more Baker
County infants and toddlers next
year and centralize all Head Start
operations at a single location are
underway with a lease agreement
to use school district property
expected for consideration next
month.
The Baker County School
Board met May 3 with Maria
McNair, the Jacksonville-based
non-profit's assistant vice presi-
dent of Head Start, to discuss
the changes, which as proposed
will mean replacing two aging
portables just north of the Fam-
ily Service Center adjacent to
Keller Intermediate School with
a new 6200-square-foot modular
building.
The building has been de-
signed to house 72 children in
seven classrooms with separate
bathrooms. The plan also in-
cludes office space and a kitchen
area.
Episcopal was approved for
a two-year, $3 million federal
grant last December to expand
Early Head Start here and in
other Northeast Florida counties
like Clay and Duval.
The federally-funded pro-
grams assist low-income families
in preparing their children for
school.
The roughly $400,000 project
in Baker County, funded through
the grant, will replace portables
that have needed extensive re-
pairs in recent years and become



Drugs,


cash and


safe taken

A Taylor man has been
charged with theft of a safe and
its contents from the residence of
his sister off Auzzie Harvey Rd.
during the afternoon or evening
of May 17.
The victim, Jennifer Rauler-
son, told Deputy Johnny Hodges
she returned to her mobile home
about 11:30 that evening after an
eight-hour absence and noticed
the safe had been taken, along
with $430 cash and seven variet-
ies of prescription medications.
She suspected her brother, 32-
year-old Richard Mann, because
he had suddenly left a hospital
emergency room where they had
taken her daughter earlier.
Ms. Raulerson also said she
discovered a taped message her
brother had inadvertently left on
her phone during which he gave
directions to her residence to a
second party.
The safe was later reported to
have been left near a residence
on the Crews farm near Baxter by
Bruce Johnson of Glen St. Mary,
who said he was tipped off to its
location. He placed it in a shed at
the residence of J.D. Hart on the
Crews property, and called the
sheriffs department.
Mr. Johnson and other wit-
nesses told sheriffs investiga-
tor Steve Harvey they overhead
conversations about Mr. Mann's
alleged involvement.
The investigator arrested the
suspect for burglary and grand
theft following an interview May
20 during which he confessed to
entering Mr. Raulerson's trailer
via a bedroom window.

Independence Day

celebration July 1
Make your calendars for July
1, the date of this year's annual
Independence Day Celebration
on the campus of Northeast Flor-
ida State Hospital.
The event runs from 5:30-9:30
that evening, culminating in the
annual fireworks display. Admis-
sion is free with lots of food and


entertainment by local artists.
The celebration is organized
by both the hospital and City of
Macclenny and sponsored by
local businesses and organiza-
tions.


PHOTO BYJOEL ADDINGTON
The portable buildings above will be removed and replaced with a new modular building to house
Head Start classes and staff.


expensive for Episcopal to main-
tain, Ms. McNair said in a letter
to the district.
Episcopal requested a lo-year
lease of the property on which
the modular building with a 20-
year life expectancy is planned.
The new facility will also replace
classroom space on South Bou-
levard that doesn't meet federal
requirements.
Episcopal has agreed to cover
all costs associated with the ex-
pansion and continued operation
of Head Start programs.
"Other than it being on school


board property, we're out of it,"
said the district's facilities direc-
tor Denny Wells.
More than 60 children are in
the programs today, with about
half in Early Head Start. Mean-
while, there are 62 children on a
waiting list for Early Head Start,
Ms. McNair said.
Concerns about what could
happen to the building should
Episcopal no longer administer
Head Start were also expressed
during the meeting. However,
Ms. McNair said federal rules
mandate that the structure can


only be used for Head Start ser-
vices, regardless of which entity
runs the programs.
Prior to 1999, when Episco-
pal took over the programs, they
were operated by Northeast Flor-
ida Community Action Agency.
Site improvements needed to
accommodate the modular build-
ing include paving and walkways,
canopies, landscaping, a drainage
system and retention pond.
The school board is expected
to consider the lease agreement
with Episcopal next month, Mr.
Wells said.


U1


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this non-native grass, called one of the world's worst weeds.
Increase land management options Protect your property value
Decrease fire hazard

For guidelines and application materials, contact your local Florida
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A message from the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Division of Forestry. Charles
H. Bronson, Commissioner.Funding supplied by the USDA Forest Service, an equal opportunity provider.


OPEN REGISTRATION
ENDS
August 20
(INCLU ES DUAL ENROLLMENT STUDENT

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ALL FEE5 ARE JE EACH DAY

Rellra6r Office Hours
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8 a.m4.30 p.m Friday

May 12- August 13
730 an -* 60 pm, Monday-Thursday


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numuler ou allestLS Le past week
for disorderly conduct, including
a juvenile male from Macclenny
who racked up several additional
criminal charges after he was
taken into custody.
Deputy Koty Crews said he
responded to a disturbance call
at the S&S convenience store on
South 6th about 2:00 am on May
22, and found the youth standing
in the parking lot of the nearby
Hardee's restaurant shouting
obscenities at people across the
street at the Waffle House.
The youth refused to calm
himself and, once arrested, re-
fused to enter a patrol car with-
out force.
He verbally threatened Dep-
uty Crews while being placed in
a holding cell at county jail, and
shortly after destroyed a fire
sprinkler on the ceiling.
Additional charges include re-
sisting police, assault on Deputy
Crews, criminal mischief and de-
stroying fire extinguishing equip-
ment. Both of the latter charges
are third-degree felonies.
In other cases:
Kevin Hines, 25, of Lake But-
ler was arrested the evening of
May 18 after cursing loudly and
causing a disturbance at Woody's
restaurant on South 6th.
Deputy John Hardin several


s to
J-- A


quiet lumselfl. He was intoxicatie
and complaining about an error
in his bill.
Deputy Chris Walker ar-
rested Joshua Bennett, 21, of
Macclenny after he refused to
remain quiet inside his residence
off Wheeler Dr. the afternoon of
May 22.
The officer responded to re-
ports of Mr. Bennett speeding in
a vehicle in the neighborhood,
and found him standing in the
roadway clad in a bulletproof
vest. Mr. Bennett remained un-
ruly when ordered into his house,
and started an argument with his
girlfriend.
Antonio Lee, 24, of Glen St.
Mary was arrested on a warrant
for aggravated battery the after-
noon of May 22.
Deputy Patrick McGauley
said he found Mr. Lee hiding on
a roof off Thompson Rd. in Mar-
garetta about 3:oo pm. Moments
earlier, the suspect fled from the
officer, who then released his K-9
dog that tracked him to the resi-
dence.
Deputy Crews arrested
George Armstrong, 38, of Colum-
bus, Ohio on May 18 at a Crews
Rd. address on a Pasco County
warrant for violating probation
for domestic battery.


PUBLIC NOTICE
The quarterly meeting of the Baker County Local
Mitigation Strategy Task Force will take place at
10:30 a.m. on Monday, June 7th, 2010, at the Baker
County Emergency Operations Center, located at
1 Sheriff's Office Dr, Macclenny, Florida. All inter-
ested persons are invited to attend.
5/27
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIR-
CUIT, IN AND FOR BAKER COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE NO.: 02-2010-CA-0102
IN RE: GENE HARVEY, as
TAX COLLECTOR OF
BAKER COUNTY, FLORIDA

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Delinquent Taxpayer Receiving This Notice
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a Petition for Vali-
dation of Tax Warrants issued for unpaid 2008, Bak-
er County Personal Property Taxes has been filed by
Gene Harvey, Baker County Tax Collector, in which
you are named as a party for nonpayment of 2008
Personal Property Taxes as assessed against you.
Upon ratification and confirmation of the petition by
the Court, the Tax Collector shall be authorized to
issue atax warrant against you, and levy upon, seize
and sell so much of your personal property as nec-
essary to satisfy the delinquent taxes, plus costs,
interest, attorney's fees, and other charges.
YOU WILL BE DISMISSED AS A PARTY TO THIS
ACTION WITHOUT ANY COURT APPEARANCE BY
YOU IF YOU PAY SAID DELINQUENT TAXES OWED
BY YOU AND COSTS TO THE TAX COLLECTOR AT:
32 North 5th St., MACCLENNY, FLORIDA 32063,
PRIOR TO THE FINAL HEARING SCHEDULED IN
THIS MATTER.
You are further notified that a Final Hearing will be
held in this matter on the 23rd day of June, 2010,
at the Baker County Courthouse in Macclenny, Bak-
er County, Florida, at 11:50 a.m. before the Honor-
able Phyllis M. Rosier, Circuit Judge, at which time
any, to issuance of the Tax Warrant against you. The
amount of the assessment oramount of taxes levied
have been paid or not.
A copy of the Petition filed herein may ne obtained
at the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court in Mac-
clenny, Baker County, Florida, upon request.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on this
29th day of April, 2010.
LIST OF DEFENDANTS
1.08-5001805
FIBERSTEAM CARPET CLEANING
6166 Adams Rd.
Macclenny, FL 32063
2.08-05003285
MACCLENNY LIQUORS, INC.
303 Macclenny Ave
Macclenny, FL 32063
3. 08-5003298
MACCLENNY PEDIATRICS
28 Macclenny Ave. W.
Macclenny, FL 32063
4.08-5004790
TAYLOR INSURANCE
PO. Box 988
Macclenny, FL 32063
5.08-5005524
L & L COUNTRY CLIPPERS
43 W. Macclenny Ave.
Macclenny, FL 32063
6.08-5005551
BATY PAINTING
16038 Stokes Rd.
Macclenny, FL 32063
7. 08-5005561
BEST BUY INSURANCE SERVICES
209 E. Macclenny Ave.
Macclenny, FL 32063
8.08-5005711
EROSION STOPPERS
7600 Nutty Butty Ln
Glen St. Mary, FL 32040
9.08-5007443
KC EARTHMOVERS INC.
7600 Nutty Butty Ln
Glen St. Mary, FL 32040
10. 08-5007538
DAVI NAILS
2097 West 3500 South
Salt Lake City, UT 84119
11.08-5007608
YMA ENTERPRISES OF NE FL INC
6080 Copper Dr
Macclenny, FL 32063
AL FRASER,
As CLERK OF THE COURT
BY: Jamie Crews
Deputy Clerk
5/27-6/17


ALL SAFE MINI STORAGE
190 SOUTH LOWDER STREET
MACCLENNY, FLORIDA 32063
904-259-3565
The following units containing household items
such as furniture, appliances, etc., will be sold by
public auction at 9:00 am June 5, 2010 to satisfy
back rent. The following tenants can claim their
property back if rent is paid before this date:
Name Unit #
Stephaine Griffis 31
5/27-6/3
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 8th JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR BAKER
COUNTY
Case #: 2009-CA-000090
Division #:
UNC:
LSF6 Mercury REO Investments
Trust Series 2008-1
Plaintiff,
-vs.-
Estate of Willie Mae Wilcox, Deceased; Unknown
Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, Assignees, Creditors,
Lienors and Trustees of Willie Mae Wilcox, De-
ceased, and all other Persons Claiming By, Through,
Underand Againstthe Named Defendant(s); Brianna
Charis Wilcox; Theresa Ann Wilcox; Robert Lee Wil-
cox, Sr.; Virginia Reed Wilcox; Alex Wilcox; Leo F.
Jones, Jr.; Lonnie M. Wilcox, Jr.; Alvin Leon Wilcox;
William Paul Wilcox; State of Florida, Department of
Revenue; State of Florida Department of Revenue
Child Support Enforcement Office; Clerk of Circuit
Court, of Baker County, Florida; Unknown Parties
in Possession #1; If living, and all Unknown Parties
claiming by, through, under and against the above
named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead
or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim
an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or
Other Claimants
Defendant(s).

NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order
of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 2,
2010, entered in Civil Case No. 2009-CA-000090 of
the Circuit Court of the 8th Judicial Circuit in and for
Baker County, Florida, wherein LSF6 Mercury REO
Investments Trust Series 2008-1, Plaintiff and Estate
of Willie Mae Wilcox, Deceased; Unknown Heirs,
Devisees, Grantees, Assignees, Creditors, Lienors
and Trustees of Willie Mae Wilcox, Deceased, and
all other Persons Claiming By, Through, Under and
Against the Named Defendant(s) are defendant(s), I
will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ,AT
THE EAST DOOR OF THE BAKER COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE LOCATED AT 339 EAST MACCLENNY AV-
ENUE, MACCLENNY, BAKER COUNTY, FLORIDA,
AT 11:00 A.M. on June 17, 2010, the following
described property as set forth in said Final Judg-
ment, to-wit:
LOT TWELVE (12), BLOCK "B", OF WIL-
LIAM KNABB ADDITION TO THE CITY OF
MACCLENNY, FLORIDA, AS PER PLAT OF
SAID ADDTION ON FILE, IN PLAT BOOK 2,
PAGE 24, OF THE CURRENT PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF BAKER COUNTY, FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN
THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE
LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60
DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO
NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO
PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE EN-
TITLED, AT ON COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION
OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT Bak-
er County Courthouse, 399 East Macclenny Avenue,
Macclenny, FL 32063 WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS
OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE OF SALE: IF
YOU ARE HEARING IMPAIRED CALL: 1-800-955-
8771; IF YOU ARE VOICE IMPAIRED CALL: 1-800-
955-8770.
DATED at Macclenny, Florida, this 20th day of May,
2010.
AL FRASER
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Baker County, Florida
BY: Jamie Crews
Deputy Clerk
ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF:
SHAPIRO & FISHMAN, LLP
10004 North Dale Mabry, Hwy, Suite 112
Tampa, Florida 33618
09-124757
5/27-6/3
A, R&R, INC
10525 DUVAL LANE
MACCLENNY, FL 32063
Phone (904) 259-4774
The following vehicle will be sold at public
auction June 11, 2010 at 8:00 am at A, R&R INC,
10525 Duval Lane, Macclenny, FL 32063.
1983 Chevy Pickup
VIN# 2GCCC14D9D1166681
5/27


Legal Notices


pwk 'A- L'J Iu i I rt vr r, 1 1Mr1L L-r E

A Pilot Cost-Share Program for
Treatment of Cogongrass
2010 Sign-up Period:
MAY 20th through JULY 1st


FOR INFORMATION CALL
Registrar (386) 754-4205 Admissions: (386) 7544396



anfrew*hWab.v Thfea OIflktegthaB rrmfrsafWriwiinawardmfbetndaJdm
(aa S)b4.. lItp


THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


Thursday, May 27,2010


Page 6





THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


Giving

the gift of

blood at

the EOC
The Blood Alliance received 13
pints from local donors while
stationed at the Emergency
Operations Center on US 90
the morning of May 20. Nurse
Bonnie Powers (pictured at
left) said the blood came from
between 18 and 20 donors
during the three-hour drive.
"We had a good turnout and
did really well;' she said. Also
pictured is county paramedic
Chris Harvin.
PHOTO BY JOEL ADDINGTON


Another felony shoplifting


Two Jacksonville residents
were arrested the morning of
May 19 for felony shoplifting at
the Macclenny Walmart.
Travis Sampson, 45, and Tif-
fany Watson, 22, were watched
by store security as Ms. Watson
collected 28 video discs and later
stuffed them into a purse.
She also had several articles of
clothing in her possession when
she and Mr. Sampson attempted
to leave the store about 11:oo and
were stopped by a security em-
ployee. Value of the merchandise
was placed at $742, sufficient for
the felony status.
Deputy Rodney Driggers said
Ms. Watson admitted to the
thefts, saying she intended to sell
the discs to get money for food
and diapers for her children.


Fugitive

is caught

with teen

An Interstate 10 motorist
stopped for speeding the morning
of May 25 in west Baker County
turned up wanted in Tennessee
on charges relating to a juvenile
female in a stolen vehicle with
him.
Trooper J.M. Ford stopped a
2008 Chrysler driven by Chris-
topher Bounds, 18, of Clinton,
TN after clocking it at 89 miles
per hour and soon learned both
the vehicle and license tag were
reported stolen in Tennessee.
A computer check also re-
vealed the female passenger, age
13, was a runaway from Lenoir
City, TN, and that Mr. Bounds
was wanted on criminal charges
connected to her disappearance.
An FHP press release on the
10:3o am arrest did not specify
the exact charges against the
driver. Trooper Ford charged
him with possession of stolen
property and contributing to the
delinquency of a minor.
The girl was placed in a shelter
by the Department of Children
and Families to await the arrival
of her parents.
Mr. Bounds is expected to be
extradited to Tennessee.


Mr. Sampson reportedly made a
similar statement to the security
worker, but declined comment to
the deputy.
The couple's activities were
also recorded on a surveillance
video turned over to police.
It was the second case of a ma-
jor theft at Walmart in 10 days.
On May 10, three suspects got
away with over $2600 worth of
televisions and other electronic
equipment.
In other thefts:
Norman Fiano reported on
May 22 that a chain saw valued
at $400 was taken from a shed
on his property off Hopkins Rd.
near Glen St. Mary.
Police questioned his father,
who admitted to being on the
property but denied taking the
saw.
A cup containing $200-$300
was taken from under a counter
at the Country Club Lounge be-
tween 1:15-1:20 am on May 22. A
suspect initially named to police


was searched and cleared.
Barbie Olson, 32, of Satellite,
FL was named as a suspect in the
theft of a mini-refrigerator and
pillows from a room at the Trav-
elodge in Macclenny on May 19.
She had rented a room that
night, and when contacted later
admitted to stealing the pillows
but not the refrigerator.
David Johns, 27, of Glen was
accused by ex-girlfriend Sandra
Thompson of damaging a kitchen
table and other items during an
argument at her residence off SR
121 south the evening of May 21.
Ophellia Belford of Mac-
clenny said Tiara Roberson, 21,
of Macclenny damaged her 2006
Chevrolet SUV when she tossed
a beer bottle at it the evening of
May 22.
Ms. Belford said she was driv-
ing north on MLK Blvd. just
after 8:00 when the incident oc-
curred.


DUVAL PAWN
390 W. Macclenny Ave. Macclenny 259-9455


Ribbon Cutting Friday, May 28 @ 10 am
Free Coffee & Donuts

S 4 0 Saturday,
0 May 29
. Jewelry, A Free Hot Dogs
S Tools 4 11:00 2:00
& Knives

w307 Off, ,/

SMusical
/1 1 MSIO


VIDEO GAMES
& DVDs
XBox, PS2 & DVDs
$2 ea.
PS3 or Wii $14.95 ea.


All Guns On Sale


NEW GUNS
Kel-Tec .32 or .380


$289


North American Arms .22
Magnum SS $249
Kel-Tec 9mm $299
Ruger LCP .380 $389
USED GUNS


S&W Airweight .38


$479


S&W Model 66 SS .357
Magnum $489
S&W Model 60 SS .38$469
I nClt Trnnner 3.57


W Equipment Magnum $449
* 40' % O ff Remington 870 Express
Sf Super Magnum Camo
$339
P ^ Browning Lever Action
.308 w/Scope $439


HOURS: MONDAY FRIDAY 9:30 AM 5:00 PM SATURDAY 9:30 AM 2:00 PM


Starke

cops is

charged

May 13th
The state attorney's office has
filed a misdemeanor domestic
battery charge against a veteran
Starke, FL police officer who re-
sides in Baker County.
Keith Parker, 39, will be or-
dered to appear in court June 9
following the information filed
May 13 by assistant state attor-
ney Lorelie Papel.
Mr. Parker, who has been on
the Starke force seven years and
is a former Baker County deputy,
is charged with pushing and
injuring the hand of his ex-girl-
friend when attempting to yank
a phone from her the morning of
March 3.
According to the report by
Deputy Randy Davis, Mr. Parker
went to the residence of Tracey
Tharpe on Andrews St. in Glen
St. Mary to collect personal be-
longings after they split up two
days earlier.
She refused to let him in, and
he then allegedly broke a safety
chain off a garage door, entered
the residence and attempted to
wrest the phone away from Ms.
Tharpe, who called 911.
Deputy Davis noted "deep
scratches" on the ex-girlfriend's
hand. He then interviewed Mr.
Parker, who remained at the res-
idence, and he denied attacking
Ms. Tharpe.
Mr. Parker was suspended
with pay pending the outcome
of the case. He is one of several
Baker County residents on the
Starke department.


Relay for life
Mark your calendars for June
12 at the "duck pond" Memorial
Park in Macclenny for the annual
American Cancer Society Relay
for Life.
It starts at noon followed by
the 'Survivor Walk' and lun-
cheon. There will be a variety of
food, music and games.





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Fabulous Footwork Dance Studio

IS NOW ENROLLING!
Summer Tumble Classes Summer Dance Classes
Summer Cheer Camps
Competitive Dance Teams Ages 5 & Up

Fabulous All Starz is looking for new members!
Mini & Youth Cheer Squads ages 5 and up
COME CHEER WITH US!
Sign Up: Thursdays 6:30 8:00 pm
Located in Glen on US 90 across from Mercantile Bank
259-1818 dance@fabulousfootworks.com
fcbulousfootworks.com


FAIR HOUSING WORKSHOP

The Macclenny City Commission is a fair hous-
ing advocate. The Macclenny City Commission is
holding a workshop to explain the fair housing or-
dinance for all the protected classes (race, color,
familial status, handicap, national origin, religion
and sex). The public is invited to attend.
The workshop is scheduled for
Tuesday, June 8, 2010, at 5:45 p.m., in the
Maclenny City Hall -- Commission Meeting Room
Located at:
118 E. Macclenny Avenue, Macclenny, FL.

Any handicapped, visually or hearing
impaired person or non-English speaking person
needing special assistance at the meeting should
contact Ms. Melissa Thompson, Macclenny
Administrative Assistant, at 259-0972 at least five
days prior to the meeting and assistance will be
provided.
Fair Housing, Handicapped, Acces-
sible, Equal Employment Jurisdiction


NOTICE OF FIRST PUBLIC HEARING

The Macclenny City Commission is considering applying to the Florida Department of
Community Affairs (DCA) for a 2009/10 Small Cities Community Development BlockGrant
(CDBG) of up to $700,000. These funds must be used for one of the following purposes:

1. To Benefit Low and Moderate income persons; or
2. To aid in the prevention or elimination of slums or blight; or
3. To meet other community development needs of recent origin
having a particular urgency because existing conditions pose a
serious and immediate threat to the health and welfare of the
community and where other financial resources are not available
to meet such needs.

The categories of activities for which these funds may be used are in the areas of HOUSING, NEIGHBORHOOD, COMMERCIAL
REVITALIZATION, OR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT and include such improvement activities as acquisition of real property,
loans to private-for-profit business, purchase of machinery and equipment, construction of infrastructure,
rehabilitation of houses and commercial buildings, and energy conservation. Additional information regarding
the range of activities that may be undertaken will be provided at the public meeting.
FOR EACH ACTIVITY THAT IS PROPOSED, AT LEAST 70% OF THE FUNDS MUST BENEFIT LOW AND MODERATE INCOME PERSONS.
In developing an application for submission to DCA, the Macclenny City Commission must plan to minimize
displacement of persons as a result of planned CDBG activities. In addition, Macclenny is required to develop a
plan to assist displaced persons.
The public hearing to receive citizen views concerning the community's economic and community development
needs will be held at the Macclenny City Hall Commission Meeting Room on Tuesday, June 8,2010, beginning
at 5:30 p.m. For information concerning the public hearing contact Gerald Dopson, City Manager, Macclenny
City Hall; 118 E Main Street, Macclenny, FL 32063, Phone: (904) 259-0972.
The public hearing is being conducted in a handicapped accessible location.Any handicapped person requiring
an interpreter for the hearing impaired orthe visually impaired should contact Melissa Thompson,Administrative
Assistant, at leastfive (5) calendar days prior to the meeting and an interpreter will be provided. Any non-English
speaking person wishing to attend the public hearing should contact Ms. Thompson, at least five (5) calendar
days prior to the meeting and a language interpreter will be provided. To access a Telecommunication Device
for Deaf Persons (TDD) please call (904)259-0972. Any handicapped person requiring special accommodation at
this meeting should contact Ms. Thompson, at least five (5) calendar days prior to the meeting.

A Fair Housing, Equal Employment Opportunity, Handicapped
Accessible Jurisdiction


Thursday, May 27, 2010


Page 7





THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


Tucker Kinghorn as King Tut educates guests on ancient Egyptian culture.


Class brings Egyptian studies

to life with open house exhibit


KELLEY LANNIGAN
FEATURES
features@bakercountypress.com
The culture of Egypt came alive May 13 in the
classroom of Debbie Wilson, a teacher at Keller In-
termediate.
Her students recently completed a unit study ex-
ploring every aspect of Egyptian life from clothing,
food, agriculture and architecture to religion and
death.
During an open house, students explained differ-
ent aspects of the culture and gave demonstrations
to visitors.
Visitors were greeted as they entered the exhib-
its by none other than King Tut. The lid of a gold
sarcophagus, an Egyptian version of a coffin, would
slide aside with the aid of a helper.
Inside, wearing a gold robe and a splendidly
decorated death mask, was the mummified King
Tut impersonated by student Tucker Kinghorn. This
"reincarnated" King Tut described his early life and
rise to power at age 9, and his death at 19.
Nearby John Miller, wearing the black kohl eye
markings Egyptians used to deflect sunlight, dem-
onstrated examples of pyramid construction using a
variety of materials such as Legos and sugar cubes.
He also explained that Egyptians believed alligators
to be spiritual guardians of the kings' tombs and
used their representations in a lot of their artwork.
An archeological dig exhibit featured sections of


ruins covered with sand. Christopher Davis demon-
strated the instruments used to unearth and clean
artifacts. Visitors got to see objects such as a jewelry,
coins and mummies recovered from the ruins.
Javon Howard and Braiuon Ruise manned the
table where the mummification process was taking
place. Using a model kit, they explained the differ-
ent steps that priests, who performed the technique
would have taken. They showed how the body
would be washed and major organs such as liver,
lungs, stomach and intestines removed, wrapped
and stored in special "coptic" jars especially for that
purpose.
The body was then wrapped with magic amulets
tucked in for protection. The funerary mask was
placed over the face and food was provided for the
afterlife as well as money to pay the priests.
At the next table were hieroglyphics, or Egyptian
symbol writing. Logan Forman, Tyler Barnette and
Quinci Hand constructed sample paper cartouches
with visitor's names. A cartouche is an elongated
vertical oval shape that was reserved for the display-
ing of the name of a deceased king or queen.
Ms. Wilson made sure visitors got a taste of old
Egypt by providing a typical meal Egyptians would
have eaten, consisting of grain products and fruit.
But to celebrate the event, there was also a thor-
oughly modern cake with sugary frosting decorated
with a pyramid, palm trees, camels, an oasis and an
alligator.


Theatre

auditions

on June 1

The Baker County Community
Theatre will hold auditions for
the hilarious comedy Lend Me a
Tenor on Tuesday and Wednes-
day, June i and 2 from 6:00-8:oo00
pm in the BCHS auditorium.
The play is not a musical and
has roles for four men and four
women. The show will rehearse
over the summer and run in late
August.
The comedy, which is current-
ly on Broadway, revolves around
renowned tenor Tito Merelli,
known to his fans as "I1 Stupen-
do," who is scheduled to sing the
lead in Otello, produced as a gala
fund raiser for the Cleveland Op-
era Company.
Unfortunately, even before
the star leaves his hotel room, ev-
erything begins to unravel. Chaos
ensues when Merelli's wife, who
has mistaken an autograph-seek-
er hidden in his closet for a secret
lover, leaves him a "Dear John"
letter.
What follows is a chain-reac-
tion of mistaken identity, plot
twists, double entendres, innu-
endoes, and constant entrances
and exits through many doors.

Ch ec Siou..
e e r -


HOMES, INC.
GENERAL CONTRACTOR


* Custom Homes
* New Homes
* Additions
* Land Clearing
* Remodels


Reroofs
With any new contract in

2010 get a FREE golf cart!!!




Office: 259 5880
Cell: 904-759-7094
Fax: 259 5886 mtayx5@aol.com


Macclenny Nursing & Rehab Center is proud to announce the opening of a

BRAND NEW SERVICE

ILZAAKER COUNTY


,--- _nursing facilities i the UtT l State ssto n0 1facti i
NURSING & REHAB CENTER The aci' sar r L.-at SMtattiqlf- Florida.I


COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Let people know what's going on- post your special event online
www.bakercountypress.com


presents
Memorial Weekend Wildcat Butt Fundraiser
Perfectly smoked Wildcat Butts (Boston Butts)
By Brad Raulerson, Redneck Cookin'
Just in time for graduation weekend and Memorial Day weekend
Donation of $20 each
Saturday, May 29th at Memorial Stadium
Pick up: 4-6:00 pm
Please contact Trek McCullough at 904-838-9116 or Brian Smallwood at 904-349-6795
to purchase tickets.


I


Thursday, May 27,2010


Page 8


M-)T
LP 9





THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS




SOCIAL&SCHOOLS


Page


9
MAY 27, 2010


SOCIAL NOTICE SUBMISSION INFORMATION CONTACT US
Birth announcements, wedding notices and social events (military service notes and school graduations) must By phone at 904.259.2400 or by fax at 904.259.6502. You can stop by our office located at 104 S. Fifth Street,
be submitted within four weeks of the event. All news and advertising must be submitted to the newspaper
office prior to 5:00 p.m. on the Monday prior to publication, unless otherwise noted or arranged. It is requested Macclenny, FL or mail your submission to PO Box 598, Macclenny, FL 32063.
that all news items be typed or emailed to insure accuracy in print. We are available online at www.bakercountypress.com


I .f"


Reagan Davis
Born May 6th
Josh and Sherry Davis of
Glen St. Mary are proud to an-
nounce the birth of daughter
Reagan Marie Davis on May 6,
2010 at Baptist Medical Center.
Reagan weighed 5 lbs. 11 oz. and
was 181/2" long.
Grandparents are Les and
Sherry Huggard of Jacksonville,
Jeff and Sue Davis and Richard
Starn and Deborah Davis, all of
Glen St. Mary.


Ms. Sharpe Mr.Talbert

June wedding
Tony and Renay Talbert of
Macclenny are pleased to an-
nounce the upcoming marriage
of son Paul to Lauren Drew
Sharpe of Pelion, SC. The bride
is the daughter of Steve and
Brenda Sharpe of Pelion.
The wedding will take place
at 11:oo am June 27, 2010 in
Lexington, SC.
After enjoying a Jamaican
honeymoon, the couple will re-
side in Orange Park.


Retirement gala
BCHS art teacher Marilyn Har-
rell will be having a retirement
reception June 12 at the Glen St.
Mary Nursery main house from
5-9 pm.
All friends, colleagues and
past art students are invited to
attend and are encouraged to
bring some of their artwork along
for display during the reception.
Please RSVP via Facebook to Tif-
fanyArmoreda.
Starling reunion
The Abraham B. Starling fam-
ily reunion will be June 6 at the
Lake Butler Community Center.
Lunch will be served at approxi-
mately 1:oo pm. Ice and utensils
will be provided; please bring a
covered dish.
For directions or more infor-
mation please call Nadine Thorn-
ton at 964-6608 or Eleanor Lyons
at 259-2622.

Birthday party
The children of Jessie Lucas
of Macclenny invite everyone to
a birthday party in her honor on
June 13 at First Baptist Church of
Macclenny from 3:00-5:00 pm.
Miss Jessie will be turning 85
years young this year. Your pres-
ence will be your gift; she asks for
nothing else.


Jillian Adams
JU nursing degree
Jillian Brooke Adams of Mac-
clenny earned a bachelor's degree
in nursing from Jacksonville Uni-
versity May 1. Jillian is married
to Kyle Adams and the mother of
Cason, Makaira and Daylon.
She is the daughter of Brent
and Lisa Whitney also of Mac-
clenny.

Taylor reunion
The descendants of Gordon
Stewart and Eliza Lee Taylor will
have their 6oth reunion June 5 at
11:oo at the Taylor Community
Church.
Wear comfortable shoes, bring
your favorite foods and friends.


: PRESS CLASSIFIEDS
ONLY

$6.00 cash/check
Deadline Monday at 5:00 :
STHE BAKER COUNTY PRESS
: :

School Lunch Menu
May 31 June 4
Offered everyday:
Cold lunch plate of chef salad with
wheat roll or crackers and dessert (when
offered) 1% lowfat white milk, 12%
lowfat flavored milk, orange juice.
Monday, May31
Memorial Day, No School
Tuesday,June 1 -FridayJune 4


Tiffany Strait
Education degree
Tiffany Bryn Strait graduated
on April 30 from University of
North Florida, where she re-
ceived a bachelor of arts degree
in elementary education.
Tiffany is a 2006 graduate
of Baker County High School
and the daughter of Mark and
Ann Riceman of Macclenny and
John Strait of Michigan. She is
the granddaughter of Jackie and
the late Sam Fowler, also of Mac-
clenny.


Compares nd Slael


Prom dress

show June 2
The lovely ladies at the Coun-
cil on Aging will be participating
in a fashion show of their prom
dresses, and you are invited!
It will be held at the Senior
Center on Macclenny Avenue at
10:30 a.m. on Wednesday, June
2. Please join us and you are wel-
come to stay for a healthy, low
cost lunch.
Our "Real Senior Prom" will
be on Friday, June 4 at 7:oo at
the Agricultural Center. The
theme this year is "An evening
in Paris." Everyone over 60 is in-
vited, and if your date is younger,
that's okay.
There's a $5 charge at the
door to help pay for the catering.
Please RSVP so we can make the
appropriate arrangements.


PHOTO BY KELLEY LANNIGAN


Paul Talbert
Engineering degree
Paul Talbert of Macclenny
recently graduated from the Uni-
versity of Florida with a bachelor's
degree in civil engineering.
He is a 2005 graduate of Baker
County High School and is cur-
rently employed by Crom Engi-
neering and Construction Ser-
vices, Inc. in Gainesville.
Paul is the son of Tony and Re-
nay Talbert of Macclenny.


Kelsey Benton

Error made

in the names
Last week The Press incor-
rectly reported several division
winners in two recent pageants.
Kelsey Benton was crowned
queen of the Miss West Baker
County Pageant held this past
April.
In the Miss Baker County For-
estry Pageant preliminary, held
May 8, Bailey Pisani was crowned
the Junior Miss and Hope Finley
received the crown for Teen Miss.
Above: Kelsey Benton, Miss West
Baker County with pageant coach
Amanda Finley.


BCCS joins in effort

to feed needy families
Chris Thomas, drug court coordinator and CEO of Baker
Community Counseling Services in Macclenny, loads $130
worth of groceries into his truck after shopping for a needy
family last week. May is National Drug Counseling Month
and organizations like BCCS are encouraged to give some-
thing back to the communities they serve. "We found out
about a local family of four who was about to lose their
house and we took up a collection within the office;" said
Mr. Thomas. "We turned drug court into food court, so to
speak:'


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blaKe ana Jlla Bullara
welcome son, Brayden
William Bullard, April 1,
2010. Brayden was born
at 1:10 a.m. at Baptist
Medical Center. He was 5
lbs. 2 oz. and 173/4 inches
long.
Grandparents are Fred
and Diane Bullard, Dar-
rell and Nita Crawford.
Great-grandparents are
Marvin Bullard, Tommy
and Gayle Crawford, Ulys
Davis, Silas and Sarah Pit-
tman.


FAIR HOUSING WORKSHOP

The Macclenny City Commission is a fair hous-
ing advocate. The Macclenny City Commission is
holding a workshop to explain the fair housing or-
dinance for all the protected classes (race, color,
familial status, handicap, national origin, religion
and sex). The public is invited to attend.
The workshop is scheduled for
Tuesday, June 8,2010, at 5:45 p.m., in the
Maclenny City Hall -- Commission Meeting Room
Located at:
118 E. Macclenny Avenue, Macclenny, FL.

Any handicapped, visually or hearing
impaired person or non-English speaking person
needing special assistance at the meeting should
contact Ms. Melissa Thompson, Macclenny
Administrative Assistant, at 259-0972 at least five
days prior to the meeting and assistance will be
provided.
Fair Housing, Handicapped, Acces-
sible, Equal Employment Jurisdiction


SCHOOL ACTIVITIES
May 28 JOn 1
BCHS: Graduation," 7:00 BCH Student government
p.m. BMS: Accelerated reading elections KIS: KADET gradua-
points due. 8th grade awards tion ceremony
assembly, 8:00 a.m. Qheer- Jnei2
leading try-outs, 2:006 p.m. KIS: 51 grade awards cer-
WES: Positive BehavidrSup- emony
port club mtg. 8:00 a.m. Jnb"4
May 31 KIS: Talent show
District-wide: Memoriaray


"e





THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS




OBITUARIES


Page


10
MAY 27, 2010


CHURCH AND OBITUARY NOTICE INFORMATION CONTACT US
Obituaries must be submitted in a timely fashion and have a local connection. Pictures are printed with By phone at 904.259.2400 or by fax at 904.259.6502. You can stop by our office located at 104 S. Fifth Street,
obituaries free of charge. The newspaper reserves the right to publish photos based on quality. It is request- Macclenny, FL or mail your submission to PO Box 598, Macclenny, FL 32063.
ed that all news items be typed or emailed to insure accuracy in print. We are available online at www.bakercountypress.com


'Ma' Hinson,
76, of Glen dies
Madeline Virginia "Ma" Hin-
son, 75, of Glen St. Mary died
Friday, May 21, 2010 at Special-
ty Hospital
in Jack-
sonville.
A native
of Tampa,
Mrs. Hin-
son lived
in Glen for
a number of
years.
Mrs.
Hinson was
a switch-
board op-
erator for Madeline Hinson
Pacific Bell
Telephone Company while liv-
ing in California, and she also
was a foreman at Southern
States Nursery in Macclenny for
14 years.
Her survivors include sons
John David (Evon) Hinson of
Glen, Jack S. (Wendy) Hinson
of St. George, Ga and William E.
'Bill' (Jackie) Hinson of Lulu, Fl;
daughters Sharon Elaine (Larry)
Parrish and Elizabeth Marlene
(James) Holmes, both of Glen;
16 grandchildren.
The funeral service for Mrs.
Hinson was held May 23 at 3:00
pm at the chapel of Guerry Fu-
neral Home with Rev. Jim Cox
and longtime family friend Betty
Shirley officiating.

Heartfelt thanks
Thank you to everyone who
helped and supported friends
and family of Earl Bruckner.
Everyone's hospitality was very
much appreciated.
GOD BLESS You ALL,
THE BRUCKNER FAMILY

Sunday sing
St. John Baptist Church at Five
Churches Road in Sanderson in-
vites everyone to join them for
their fifth Sunday sing May 3oth.
Sunday school is at 9:30 am,
church at 11:30 am.


PRESS CLASSIFIEDS
ONLY

$6.00 cash/check
Deadline Monday at 5:00
STHE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


DINKINS NEW
CONGREGATIONAL
METHODIST CHURCH
CQ 127 N. of Sanderson
Sunday School 10:00 am
Sunday 'orning Service 11:00 am
Sunday Night Service 6:00 pm
Wed. Night Service 7:50 pm
Pastor Allen Crews
Assistant Pastor Timothy Alford
Youth Pastor Brian Poole


THE LORD'S
CHURCH
Intersection of CR 125 & 250 in
Taylor.. 259-8353
Sunday school: 10:00 am
Sunday service: 11:00 am
Wednesday Night Bible
Study: 6:30 pm
Family style dinner ~ 1st Sunday of
the month following service
'4 church alive is worth the drive!'


Alice Wynne, 68,
funeral May 24th
Mary Alice Wynne, 68, of
Macclenny died Friday May 21,
2010 at her home. She was born
in Union
County to
the late
English
and Net-
tie Finley
Carter and
had lived
most of her
life in Baker
County.
Along
with her
late hus-
band Dutch MaryWynne
Wynne, she
owned and operated Dutch's
Pizza in Macclenny for a num-
ber of years. She enjoyed all of
the time she had to spend with
her family and grandchildren,
and enjoyed growing flowers in
her garden at home.
Survivors include sons Mi-
chael Leslie (Teri) Starling
and James Daiel (Mary Robin
Thornton) Wynne; daughter
Shirley Ann (Cecil) Wilkerson,
all of Macclenny; brothers Shel-
ton Carter of Macclenny and Al-
vin "Junior" Carter of Glen St.
Mary; sister Esther Clemmons;
11 grandchildren; six great-
grandchildren.
The funeral service for Ms.
Wynne was held May 24 at 2:00
pm at the Christian Fellowship
Temple with pastors David and
Timmy Thomas officiating. In-
terment followed at Oak Grove
Cemetery. Guerry Funeral Home
was in charge of arrangements.

Benefit car wash
United Christian Youth is
having a car wash fund raiser
this Saturday beginning at 8:00
am at the Exxon on the corner of
Lowder and Highway 90.
Proceeds will go to a youth
camp in Chattanooga, TN. Cost
will be donations only.


MACCLENNY
CHURCH OF CHRIST
573 S. 5th St. 259-6059
Sunday Bible Study 9:45 am
Fellowship 10:30 am -11:00 am
Worship Services
11:00 am
,J ', Wed. Bible Study
S 7:30 pm
I, Minister
S Sam F. Kitching

Sanderson
Congregational
Holiness Church
CR 127 N., Sanderson, FL
Sunday School 10:00 am
Morning Worship 11:00 am
Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 pm
Wed. Evening Prayer Serv. 7:30 pm
Pastor: Oral E. Lyons(



First Baptist Church
of Sanderson
CR 229 S., Sanderson FL
Sunday School ....... 10:00 am
Sun. Morning Worship. 11:00 am
Sun. Evening Worship .. 6:00 pm
Wed. Eve. Bible Study .. 7:00 pm
Pastor Bob Christmas
http://www.fbcofsanderson.org



The Road
to Calvary
Corner of Madison & Stoddard
Glen St. Mary
Rev. Tommy & Doris Anderson
Youth Director Margie Howard
Phone: 904-259-2213
Sunday School:........... 10:00 am
Sunday Morning Service .... 11:00 am
Sunday Evening Service ..... 6:00 pm
Wednesday Night.......... 7:30 pm

1-u- - - - 4


23-A to Lauramore Rd. & Fairgrounds Rd.
Sunday School 9:45 am
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 am
Sunday Children's Church 11:00 am
Sunday Evening Services 6:00 pm
Wednesday Night Prayer Meeting 7:00 pm
Pastor J. C. Lauramore welcomes all

Come and magnify the Lord and worship with us
Glen Friendship Tabernacle
Clinton Ave. Glen St. Mary Home: 259-3982 Church: 259-6521
WJXR Radio Service Sunday .... 8:30 am
Morning Worship Service....... 10:30 am
Children's Church ............. 11:30 am
Evangelistic ................... 6:00 pm
Bible Study (Wed.) ............. 7:30 pm
Rev Albert Starling www.myspace.com/glenfriendshiptabernacle





Jesus: The Way, The Truth and The Life
Sunday School 10:00 A.M. Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 PM.
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 A.M. Wed. Eve. Worship 7:30 P.M.
Pastor Rev. Shannon Conner
North 6th Street Macclenny 259-3500


Mt. Zion N.C.
Methodist Church
121 North t 259-4461
Macclenny, FL
Pastor Tim Cheshire
Sunday School 9:45 am
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 am
Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 pm
Wednesday Prayer Service 7:00 pm
I I 1a / A


Jesus answered, "Verily, verily I
say unto thee, except a man be
born of water and of the Spirit,
he cannot enter into the king-
dom of God." John 3:5


ADVERTISING DEADLINE IS
Monday at 5:00 pm


St. James Episcopal Church
Minnesota Ave. & 5th Street
Macclenny

Sunday Worship
5:30 pm
PaulSmith, Vicar .259-9198
*-S -- -


270 US Highway 301 N. Baldwin FL 32234
www.giddensreedfh.com
904-266-2337 904-387-0055
Baldwin Jacksonville
Arrangements made in your home or our facility
Fair & Reasonable Prices
Funeral & Cremation Services
Locally Owned & Family Operated
PrulySr ingNrhatFoid


CHRISTIAN

FELLOWSHIP

TEMPLE
Senior Pastor Independent Pentecostal Church
David Thomas e .
2594940 Seventh St. & Ohio Ave., Macclenny


Sunday School
Sunday Morning Worship
Sunday Evening Worship
Wednesday Night Service
Radio WJXR 92.1 Sunday

Youth Proarams


Sunday School
Common Ground Sunday
Common Ground Wed. (Teens)
God Kids Sunday
God Kids Wednesday


Associate Pastor
Tim Thomas
2594575


10:00 am
11:00 am
6:00 pm
7:00 pm
9:15 am


10:00 am
11:00 am
7:00 pm
11:00 am
7:00 pm


Youth Pastor
Gary Crummey


www.christianfellowshiptemple.com


Sj Calrary Badis Ciurch

Si-&&ah lo orm-i


p KJLkhku ftJln


11W0om


p- Snerb llktS fto pn
wIaduim "rwm 7nm pm


523 North Boulevard W.
Four blocks north of Hwy. 90 in Macdenny
Pastor Dannie E. Wiiamns *+ 259-4529





THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


TraumaOne pilot and paramedics visit Macclenny during national EMS Week.


PHOTO BY KELLEY LANNIGAN


EMS week observances

Treated to birds-eye view of area


KELLEY LANNIGAN
FEATURES
features@bakercountypress.com
Emergency medical services
workers were recognized across
the country during EMS week
May 16-22 and Baker County's
paramedics and EMTs were no
exception.
They observed their special
week in part by speaking about
EMS's role in the community at
the Baker County Rotary Club's
weekly meeting May 19, where
club president James Cardozo
honored them with plaques.
Later that afternoon there was
an informal open house for fam-
ily and friends at the EMS head-
quarters on West Macclenny Av-
enue. An arranged visit from the
TraumaOne helicopter based in
Lake City topped off the celebra-
tion.
After visiting on the ground
and enjoying cake and drinks
with the pilot and TraumaOne
medics, attendees were able to
sit inside the specially fitted inte-
rior of the EC 135 helicopter for
a close-up look. EMS personnel
and civilians were then able to
take advantage of a rare treat a
helicopter ride over Maclenny.
County EMS workers were
also invited to dinner at the
county administration office on
N. 3rd St. May 21 and presented
with certificates of appreciation,
T-shirts and backpacks.
Paramedic Buddy Jacobs,
who will retire this year after 11
years of service with the county,
received a $30 gift certificate to


PHOTO BY KELLEY LANNIGAN
Derrick Spitzer, husband of Baker County EMT Rebecca Spitzer, shows daugh-
ter Olivia the inside of the TraumaOne helicopter.


Ace Hardware.
Mr. Jacobs was described by
EMS staffers and administrators
as a good friend, both on and off
duty.
County Manager Joe Cone,
Commissioner Alex Robinson
and Sheriff Joey Dobson recog-
nized the cooperative spirit of
emergency medical services in
the county and praised the skills
and level of commitment of its
employees.
"I don't think you folks get the
level of recognition you deserve,
since most of us don't cross paths
with you unless it's an emer-
gency," said Sheriff Dobson.
"But thank goodness you're there
when we need you. I want you to
know how much I appreciate ev-
erything that you do."


Woodlawn Kennels
Quality Professional Care
GROOMING 259-4757 BOARDING

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Complete Bath, De-flea & Groom ....... $20-$25


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Mr. Cone and Mr. Robinson
shared similar sentiments.
Part of being a paramedic is
always being prepared for the
unexpected.
When asked about memorable
calls they had responded to in the


Bath, De-flea & Nails Clip
Boarding (per actual day) .....


............ $10-$15


PHOTO BY KELLEY LANNIGAN

Keller hosts Living Museum
Hotel magnate Henry Flagler, President Andrew Jackson, former attorney general Janet Reno and French explorer Ponce
De Leon were just a few of the historical characters that have played a part in Florida's past and were present during
Keller Intermediate School's Living Museum May 13. Students dressed as people that have been significant to Florida's
history and recited facts about their lives and careers for visitors as they passed through the museum exhibits. From left:
Lake Lewis as Ms. Reno; Griffin Hinson as refrigeration inventor Dr. John Gorrie and Hailee Rodgers as pilot Jacqueline
Cochran, the first woman to break the sound barrier. Visitors to the school were also treated to the student art exhibit
and other classroom projects on display.


past, paramedics Ken Church and
Karen Dolan recounted some of
the more unusual situations they
have faced.
"I went on a call one night for
some guys who got drunk and
crashed their plane into the top
of a tree," said Mr. Church. "They
thought they were on the ground,
so they crawled out the plane
window, walked out on the wings
and jumped off. They ended up
breaking their legs."
Ms. Dolan's unusual call in-
volved, of all things, a turtle.
"A big turtle had clamped onto
a baby's face and would not let
go. I tried everything to get the
jaws apart, even pliers," she said.
"A vet ended up putting the turtle
to sleep to get it off the child."


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Our x-rays are computer generated allowing up to 90% less radiation


The Baker County Pre-k/Kdg. Center would like to
thank the following businesses/people for helping to
make our Teachers Appreciation Week a Success
Smarty Pantz, Jack Baker, Red Nails,
Woodys, A Touch of Spring, Starbucks,
Goody 2 Shoes, Mr. John Gainey
and St. Johns Crystal River.
Because of your generosity our staff had a wonderful
week that they will always remember.


DIABETES
D^bHeart SUPPORT

GROUP

Learn to manage & take control of your diabetes
Feeling overwhelmed & uncertain of how to
properly manage your Diabetes?







Each monthly meeting will address a new discussion topic
Questions? Call Kathy Castro at (866) 295-5955
ext. 104 or email at Kathy_castro@hpcnef.org

Sponsored by the Baker County Health Department and the
St. Johns River Rural Health Network
Sure to be a fun and educational event!

Baker County Health Department
-480 W. Lowder St.
Macclenny
259-6291


r
FARM,


Thursday, May 27, 2010


Page 11





THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


SPORTS 4


Page


12
MAY 27, 2010


SPORTS NOTICE SUBMISSIONS CONTACT US
We welcome your sports submissions for youth league, traveling league or individual athletic achievements. By phone at 904.259.2400 or by fax at 904.259.6502. You can stop by our office located at 104 S. Fifth Street,
The paper reserves the right to publish submissions. It is requested that all news items be typed or emailed to Macclenny, FL or mail your submission to PO Box 598, Macclenny, FL 32063.
insure accuracy in print. We are available online at www.bakercountypress.com


Benefit softball game
The Macclenny Food Lion is
organizing a charity males versus
females softball game on July
17, with proceeds going to the
Children's Miracle Network and
Wolfson Children's Hospital in
Jacksonville.
The store is seeking sign-ups
now from teams and individu-
als. See Laura or Brittany at Food
Lion for more details.


PHOTOS BYJUDJOHNSON
Above Fallon Lee runs the ball during last week's Red and White scrimmage. At right is Kendrick
Sampson looking to pass.


Cats 'air it out' in


spring scrimmage


BOB GERARD I SPORTS
A large and enthusiastic crowd
was treated to an entertaining
preview of the new Wildcat foot-
ball team May 21 at the annual
Red and White game.
One of the largest crowds to
see the game in years watched
Coach Ryan Sulkowski's debut
as head football coach and fans
responded well to the new-look
Wildcats.
What they saw was the ball in
the air more than its been in over
a decade. Both of the top quar-
terback prospects were airing it
out and Sulkowski has obviously
discovered a crop of potentially
sure-handed wide receivers.
"I felt pretty good about what
I saw on Friday night," said
Sulkowski. "We showed just a
little of what we're all about and
put on a good show for the com-
munity."
The crowd responded with lots
of cheers. They seemed to enjoy


the more wide-open offense. The
coaches were enthused as well as
by how far the team has come af-
ter just three weeks of practice.
"They are learning new
schemes and a whole new vo-
cabulary," said Sulkowski, "and
I was happy that we didn't have
very many mental mistakes."
It has been a learning expe-
rience for players and coaches
alike. Everyone involved had to
buy into Sulkowski's more bal-
anced offensive system and with
only three paid coaches it has
been a heavy work load for the
new comer and assistants Scott
McDonald and Jamie Rodgers.
Thankfully, he's had a lot of vol-
unteers to help carry the load.
Though Sulkowski was gener-
ally positive about what he saw,
he knows that there is a long road
ahead before the season starts.
"Some guys have a long way
to go to compete," he said. "We
have a lot of toughening up to do
over the summer."


Sulkowski ;-
has been able
to identify his
"top 11" play-
ers and he
experimented
with them a lot
during the game. He started most
of his top group on defense and
finished with them on offense. It
was pretty clear why they were
top of the heap.
The coach is optimistic about
his defense and enthusiastic
about his quarterbacks and wide
receivers. He believes that the
talent is there to move the ball
through the air, but that Kendrick
Sampson and Jeremy Wanamak-
er need to work on mechanics to
become consistent.
"It's about moving your feet
and being in the right position
and that's going to take a lot of
work before it becomes muscle
memory," said the coach.
Sampson and Wanamaker are
both intent on winning the start-


PHOTO COURTESY OF BAKER BOYZ

Baker Boyz win championship
Baker Boyz 13 years old and under traveling baseball team defeated a top-ranked team from Sarasota, Florida by more
than eight runs to secure the USSSA's Northeast Florida championship in the eight-team single elimination tournament
held May 22 in Columbia County. The Baker Boyz went 5-0 in the tournament and beat Meteors Baseball in the final
game. That team was the highest-ranked team of 480 across the nation in the USSSA's 13 and under boys baseball ma-
jor league. The win will push the Baker Boyz to No. 17 in the national rankings. They're heading to Myrtle Beach, S.C. in
August for the Cal Ripken Experience baseball tournament. The Baker Boyz 13 and under team consists of Jacob Milton,
Cameron Wilson, Jared Crews, Chase Drury, Zack Rafuse, Levi Hollingsworth, Brandon Vining, Clint Duke, Andrew Wil-
liamson, Kevin Larusa, JT Turner, Zack Miller, Hunter Alexander and coaches Dave Williamson and Sal Larusa. The team
has amassed 80 wins and 41 losses since January 2009.


ing job and will continue to com-
pete throughout the summer.
Either is capable of running the
team, and according to Sulkowski
it will simply be a matter of which
one steps up and claims the job
as his own.
One group that he's hop-
ing shows improvement is his
running backs. "I thought the
running game could have been
better. We have guys that can be
difference makers but time will
tell," he said.
A lot of progress has been
made in a short time, but it will
be a long hot summer before
Sulkowski molds these players
into the team with the ability to
challenge for the district title.


McDonald

top coach
Scott McDonald was named
Baker County High School's
Coach of the Year at the 2010 Se-
nior Awards
ceremony
May 24 in
the BCHS
auditorium. r
McDon-
ald led the
Wildcat
weightlift-
ers to a state
title. Two
Wildcat lift-
ers, Ethan
Munson Coach McDonald
and Cody
Wheeler, also captured individu-
al state crowns.
McDonald had the unenvi-
able task of following Bobby
Johns, who won the two earlier
titles. But instead of having a re-
building year in his first season
as head coach, McDonald built
on what was already there and
captured the title for the third
straight year.
The Wildcats battled through-
out the state finals to take a one
point win over Arnold High
School.
McDonald is also an assistant
football coach.


er Baseball C ps
14. /
erent age groups each week:
1-12 and 13 & up.
ed space available.
n contact us at -



K~lirfl~faii ^!S-


6 M '. BHalr County
SPLASH "


June 1-5
Tue 5:00 5:30 pm SupRJ
Wed 0 Frl 4:00 pm
4:30 pm
Thu 5:00 5:30 pmr sgLFI


Contact the YMCA for more
Informaion- 259-0898
98 West Lowder Street
Macclenny


Course
- --


Ages 5-14 No -Is

Summer r ing
-- s'uu su-
Strong Kids 5K u entry),.
Bounce Houses Blood Bank e Painting
Starbucks Cookout Swim Testing





















ATTORNEY

David P. Dearing
former Baker County Prosecutor

SERIOUS INJURIES CAUSED BY
NEGLIGENCE OF ANOTHER
AND
CRIMINAL DEFENSE

Jacksonville (904) 399-8989 Macclenny 259-1352
Toll Free (888) 211-9451
All initial consultations are absolutelyfree.
The hiring ofa lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon
advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information
about our qualfications and experience.


Custom Printing
Stationery
Invoices
Business Cards
Envelopes
Invitations

THE OFFICE MART
110 South Fifth St. 259-3737


SWe pay cash $225 & up
for junk vehicles
No title necessary I Licensed
Also remove any kind of scrap metal
Free pick-up 386-867-1396


Woodpecker Mud Bog
1 Yr. Anniversary Memorial Day Celebration
Located White Springs, Fl
Competitions Cornhole & Horseshoe $100 Team Prize
Kids Games & Bounty Holes Cash Payout
Saturday, May 29 8:00 am 8:00 pm
Sunday, May 30 12:30 pm 6:00 pm
Monday, May 31 8:00 am 8:00 pm
More info 386.438.9253





THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


BCHS Junior ROTC members at the United Sates Capitol.


Students awed in D.


While touring Capitol landma


KELLEY LANNIGAN
FEATURES
features@bakercountypress.com
Twenty-four Baker County
High School Junior Air Force
ROTC students and their chap-
erones boarded a chartered
bus May 5 to spend four days in
Washington D.C.
For nearly all, it was their first
time in the nation's capitol. The
following Sunday, tired but ex-
tremely happy, they rolled back
into Macclenny at 2:30 in the
afternoon.
Earlier this week, ROTC stu-
dents and instructors gathered
at BCHS after regular hours to
share details of their Washington
trip with The Press. The general
consensus of the students was
that visiting the nation's capital
was a magnificent experience
and worth every penny it took to
pay for it.
Instead of a hotel, the group
found accommodations at Bol-
ling Air Force Base. Among the
highlights of their trip were visits
to the Washington Monument,
Lincoln Memorial, Arlington
Cemetery, National Air and Space
Museum, World War II Memo-
rial and Holocaust Museum.
ROTC instructors Major Jo-
seph Chiofolo and Master Ser-
geant Elizabeth Law-Wallace
said they were especially proud
of their group.
"What was so rewarding was
the reactions they got from other
people everywhere we went,"
said Ms. Law-Wallace. "For two
of the days, they were in uniform.
People complimented them
numerous times on their sharp
appearance and their respectful
behavior."
According to the master ser-
geant, even the drivers of the
chartered buses likewise compli-
mented the students, saying they
were the best group they had ever
driven for.
"People also thanked the stu-
dents for their possible future
military service to their country
and even photographed them,"
said Major Chiofolo.
Some of that attention was due
to the single file marching forma-
tion the ROTC students utilized
as they moved around the city,
making them stand out among
the throngs of other people and
tourists.
"Washington is so very dif-
ferent from Baker County," said
ROTC student Matthew Morris.
"About as different as you can
get. It was amazing. Seeing all the
monuments just brought all the
history of the country together
for me. It really puts things in
perspective."
The most moving part of the
trip for student William Har-
rison Knapp was the visit to the
World War II Memorial. There,
the young man ceremoniously
presented the Purple Heart
earned by his great uncle William
Knapp.
"He did not live to see his Pur-
ple Heart medal in person, so it
was very significant for me to be
able to take it to the memorial,"
he said.
Scott Burkhart was impressed
by the beauty of the memorial
and the fountains that grace it.
"The image of the fountains
will stay with me. That was truly
beautiful," he said.
Student Alexandra Rohde was
thrilled to go to the Lincoln Me-


morial.
"I've always admired Presi-
dent Lincoln. He is one of my
favorite historical characters and
it was really special to see the
monument that honors his life
up close."
'The Arlington National Cem-
etery, that did it for me," added
Brandon Whitener.
"Did you know the Arlington
House at the cemetery was once
the home of General Robert E.
Lee?" asked Matthew Morris.
The students also visited the
Library of Congress and the Cap-
itol. They were awed by the archi-
tectural splendor of the building's
rotunda with its painted murals
depicting significant events from
U.S. history, from its discovery
by Christopher Columbus to the
establishment of the 13 original
American colonies and finally the
flight of the Wright Brothers.
They toured the underground
chambers where arches support
the upper stories and a brass star
in the floor marks the exact cen-
ter of Washington, D.C.
At the Holocaust Museum,
each was given a small booklet
which held a photo of a Holocaust
victim and told the story of their
life. The highlight of the visit was
meeting author Miriam Winter,
a Holocaust survivor who was
present at the museum signing
copies of her book "Trains."
During their sightseeing for-
ays around the city, the students
encountered visiting World War
II veterans and had meaningful
conversations with them.
"I wouldn't trade that experi-
ence for anything," said Colton
Ellison.
"They told me if they were
active military today, they'd be
proud to serve next to us," said
Mitchell Butler.
It took nearly a year to plan
and raise funds for the trip to
Washington.
The ROTC students sold pizza
and beef jerky at school. They
hawked a clever concoction
called 'Taco in a bag" at any event
where they were allowed to vend,
from the Lighted Christmas Pa-
rade to the Battle of Olustee. They
also sold and performed "sing-
ing grams" at the high school on
Valentine's Day.


Finally, the day foi
parture arrived. They
their bus and left at
Some slept. Some we
cited.
Seating on the bu
exactly designed to cc
fit someone with a 6
frame.
"There is one thing
sure you of," said Mat
ris, who is ajunior ROT
"Fourteen hours on a
was not meant for a g
feet tall. And my feet
hang off of beds, sofa
about anything I trie
on during the trip. Th
a running joke."
The students coul
a little fun with Major
during the trip. The
not seen his nephew, I
Yoblick, in nearly eigh
Major Yoblick happ
in the area and decide
up with the group to se
but did not show up
pointed time. Major
thinking him lost, was
parking lot talking wit
cell phone and trying
nate their locations.
Major Yoblick bo
bus, hanging out wit
dents. They all had f
ing Major Chiofolo pa
parking lot, trying to
"lost" nephew to their
Frustrated, he bo
bus only to come face t
his nephew. According
dents, the dumbfound
the major's face was pi
Major Chiofolo loo
group, all laughing at h
and grudgingly admitt
you got me."
On the tour wer
Barnes, Scott Burhar
Bussey, Mitchell B
Stormi Clouse, Tiffa
Jean Marie De-Nice
Dennard, Megan Don
Ellison, Briana Ferna
ana Grotton, James
Jeffery Johnson, Willi;
James Juster, Damon
Manning, Matthew M
tanny Namwises, Alex
hde, Lonnie Sansoucie
Shope and Brandon W


Let's go over some bad finan-
Scial moves:
Bad idea #1: Taking out a
loan on your 401(k). Not cool.
Unless you or a loved one will
die without this money, don't
take out a loan on your 401(k).
If you suddenly quit your job or
get fired, the balance of the loan
is due in full immediately, or else
you'll be hit with significant fees
PHOTO SUBMITTED and penalties.
This could leave you feeling
chained to a company that you
may not even want to work for
anymore, simply because of a
C loan you took from your retire-
ment account. Ouch!
r s Many people justify borrow-
rKl s ing from their 401(k) because
when they pay it back, they are
r their de- paying themselves back plus 7
y boarded percent interest or so. They don't
midnight. realize that 7 percent is a crum-
*re too ex- my interest rate to be paying on
their money. If the amount they
s was not are paying themselves back every
)mfortably month was put in a good growth
5-foot-plus stock mutual fund, it would be
making about 12% interest. In-
g I can as- stead they are selling themselves
thew Mor- short.
rC student. Bad idea #2: Having no life
a tour bus insurance. Did you know that
uy that's 6 one-third of American adults
seemed to carry no life insurance? This sta-
is and just tistic wouldn't be so appalling if
d to sleep life insurance wasn't so darn easy
at became to get for most adults. When you
die, your loved ones will have
dn't resist enough to handle do you re-
r Chiofolio ally want them worrying about
major had how they will pay for your final
Major Tevy expenses?
t years. If you are the primary wage
)ened to be earner of your home, will your
ed to meet spouse and children be able to
*e his uncle replace your income? At least get
at the ap- enough to cover funeral expenses.
Chiofolo, And for the primary wage earner,
South in the I recommend getting eight to ten
h him on a times your annual income. For
to coordi- stay-at-home moms, get enough
to cover childcare and other ex-
arded the penses that will come about if
h the stu- you are gone.
un watch- It's not fun to think about, but
cing in the it's the responsible thing to do.
Guide his And I promise it's not as intimi-
location. dating as it sounds. Life insur-
arded the ance is necessary and affordable.
o face with Get it. Shop around at our many
to the stu- local insurance agencies here in
ed look on Baker County and find a good
riceless. deal on a simple term life insur-
)ked at his ance policy.
ais expense Bad idea #3: Depending on
:ed "Okay, someone else to take care of your
retirement (I'm talking to every
e: Adams single one of you able-bodies
dt II, Sam out there who are still of work-
utler III, ing age). Never assume that the
ny Davis, current programs will be intact
ola, Brent when you reach retirement age
ley, Colton especially Social Security!
ndes, Adri- It is up to nobody except you to
Hodgson, make sure that you can retire with
am Knapp, dignity. Not the government. Not
Lee, David your children. Not your wealthy
[orris, Bri- brother-in-law. Save and invest
:andra Ro- your own dollars and make a
e, Maurice plan for when you stop earning
rhitener. money. This rule is for everyone,
at every income level.


Do you work for a company or
a government agency that prom-
ises to provide your retirement?
Great! But there's still no reason
you can't put a chunk of change
away every month towards the
golden years. I'm sure many re-
tiring employees of General Mo-
tors wish they would have done
just that.
Can you afford to put $75 a
month towards retirement? Set
it up to automatically go into a
mutual fund that makes an aver-
age 12% annual return. Do this
until you retire in, say, 30 years
and you'll have $264,743. Better
than nothing, eh?
Don't know where or how to
start a mutual fund? It's easier
than you think. Email me at ros-
ienicklespfc@yahoo.com and I'll
point you in the right direction.


PRESS CLASSIFIEDS
* .
ONLY

S$.00 cash/check
Deadline Monday at 5:00
THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS
SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS


PHOTO BY KELLEY LANNIGAN

Flutist to

perform

in 'The Wiz'
Kim Nelson, 13, of Glen St. Mary
has been chosen to play the role
of Glenda the Good Witch in the
Davis Performing Arts Center's
production of "Music from The
Wiz" June 20. The program will
be a presentation of Jackson-
ville's Friday Musicale which
for decades has showcased the
theatrical abilities of young per-
formers. For her role, Ms. Nelson
will also play the flute and sing
two selections from "The Wiz,"
a Tony Award winning musical
based on the"Wizard of Oz"mov-
ie and originally made famous
by Michael Jackson. Ms. Nelson
is a member of the Baker County
Middle School Marching Band.


1 0I .6 ,


Macen
259563


The Baker County Pre-k/Kdg. Center would like to
extend its gratitude to the following
businesses/community members for their
generosity throughout the year in supporting our
Positive Behavior Support Program:
Food Lion, Matthew Barfield,
Susan Canady, Wendy's, Walmart,
and Walmart Distribution Center


AutoCrafters Collision Repair
180 S. Lowder St., Macclenny
259-3001

* Lifetime Warranty on all repairs
* 10 Locations thru out Florida
* Free Computerized Estimates
* State of the art equipment
* We are a Direct Repair Provider for most
Major Insurance Companies
* I-Car and ASE Certified

Let Us Be Your
Collision Repair Specialist
"IT'S OUR BUSINESS"


NO SALES TAX*

S MILITARY, FIRE DEPARTMENT

& LAW ENFORCEMENT APPRECIATION SPECIAL


10% OFF ENTIRE STOCK
Discount for all active duty or retired military or law enforcement personnel with ID.
*Discount equivalent to 7% sales tax. Macclenny store only.


14 SOUTH FIFTH ST. MACCLENNY 397-0405 OPEN MON.-FRI. 10-6, SAT. 10-5 I


IC L -R- f-I F -I -L-D


Thursday, May 27, 2010


Page 13







- I FI -


Classified ads and notices must be paid
in advance, and be in our office no later
than 4:00 pm the Monday preceding
publication, unless otherwise arranged
in advance. Ads can be mailed provided
they are accompanied by payment and
instructions. They should be mailed to:
Classified Ads, The Baker County Press,
P.O. Box 598, Macclenny, FL 32063. We
cannot assume responsibility for accuracy
of ads or notices given over the telephone.
Liability for errors in all advertising will be
limited to the first publication only. If after
that time, the ad continues to run without
notification of error by the person oragen-
cy for whom it was published, then that
party assumes full payment responsibility.
The Baker County Press reserves the right
to refuse advertising or any other material
which in the opinion of the publisher does
not meet standards of publication.





Murray 30" 12 hp. Riding mower $300.
Cash only. 210-4839. 5/27p
1 gallon blueberry plants $2 up. Mus-
cadine grapes $1.50 up. Pomegranates,
fruit trees apple, pear, plum, pecan, fig.
Thornless black berries at low prices. Del
available 904-845-2686 Hilliard.
5/20-7/29p
Got roaches? Buy Harris Famous Roach
Tablets or Powder. Eliminates roaches or
your money back, guaranteed. Available
at Bennett's Feed. 10/15tfc
Sliding board, galvanized frame, stain-
less steel slide the old Kingsley Beach
slide -$500. 652-5724. 5/27-6/3p
Bankruptcies, divorce, wills and any
other court documents prepared. Call
John Swanson at 257-9033. 5/27p
Artists! Oils, acrylics, water colors,
Canvases, drawing pads and much
more! On sale now. The Office Mart, 110
S. Fifth Street, 259-3737. tfc
Sweet corn for sale. Derek Harvey 259-
5828. 5/27p
Golf cart, club car carry all II, 48 volt,
new batteries, dumpbed, lift kit, new
tires, $2600. 591-2640. 5/20tfc
2008 Yamaha Raptor 700 ATV, like new,
garage kept $4200. 904-226-5898.
5/27p
Daylilies blooming, Sands Daylily Farm
6698 Sands Dale Road. Lowder Street
North to Bob Kirkland Road, left to sign.
259-6891. 5/27-6/17c
Plant sale, Friday and Saturday, 9:00
am-1:00 pm across from Richard's mar-
ket. Yellow and Dallas red lantana, Ger-
ber daisies $3 each, morning glorytrees,
golden rain trees, duranta, hydrangea,
lots more. Dept. of Ag #4800569. The
Plant Ladies. 5/27p
Bass boat, Lowe 180 W Stinger 2002,
excellent condition with 150 Yamaha
V-Max. Asking $7500. To see call 275-
2450. 5/27p



Autombile


Junk car $150. 259-4476.


5/27p


Horse or pole barns custom built. We
offer material packages or labor and
material packages. Also do porches and
decks. 259-2900. 5/27-6/3c
Babysitting in my home, any hours, all
ages, CPR certified, references available.
904-838-2287. 5/13-5/27p
Grand opening Friday 9:30 5:00 pm,
Saturday 9:30 2:00 pm at Duval Pawn
in Macclenny, 390 W. Macclenny Avenue.
Free hot dogs. Huge sale! 527p
Fly-in swap meet, renegade squadron in
Lake City. Food concessions, restrooms,
electricity, no landing fees. All welcome.
June 12, gates open 7:30 -till. Contact:
Dan 386-984-1063 more information.
AMA charter 4951. Address 1004 SW
Wendy Terrace. 5/27-6/1Op
Professional cleaning, home, office or
move outs. Before and after party ser-
vices available. Highly referred. Licensed
and insured. Melissa or Jacqueline. 904-
259-5260, 904-259-1468. 5/20-6/10p
Retired man will mow your grass rea-
sonable. 259-3599. 4/1-5/27p
Patriots Bailouts Disappointment
* Czars Internet control Fearful *
Trillions GM Illegal Aliens Grand-
children Socialism Join Bakercoun-
tyTeaParty.org 5/27p





Dogs: all types from puppies to adults.
Animal Control, $65 adoption fees will
apply. 259-6786. 11/20tfc





Hunting dog, young female found on 121
between Glen St. Mary and St. George.
446-7613. 5/27
Large Lab, found 5/22 at Lacy's store
in Moniac. Neutered male, very friendly,
very well cared for. 904-259-1927. 5/27


L Check it out
. T . T Z2.11K


No hassle hunting club needing mem-
bers, Bryceville area, still hunt only,
$650. Call Mike 904-237-8289, evenings
904-879-4760. 5/27p
Trail Ridge Hunting Club, located north
of US 90 between Macclenny and Bald-
win, 7,853 acres for still-hunting and
dog-hunting. Whitetail deer, turkey and
small game are present. 904-608-3281,
259-4368. 5/20-6/13p





Notice to readers:
The newspaper often publishes clas-
sified advertising on subjects like
work-at-home, weight loss products,
health products. While the newspaper
uses reasonable discretion in deciding
on publication of such ads, it takes no
responsibility as to the truthfulness of
claims. Respondents should use caution
and common sense before sending any
money or making other commitments
based on statements and/or promises;
demand specifics in writing. You can also
call the Federal Trade Commission at 1-
877-FTC-HELP to find out how to spot
fraudulent solicitations. Remember: if it
sounds too good to be true, it probably is.
- The Baker County Press
Adult Case Manager- work with men-
tally ill adult clients in Baker County. A
Bachelors degree in a human service
field and a minimum of one year experi-
ence with adults diagnosed with severe
and persistent mental illness is required.
Offers a competitive salary and benefits
package. Email resume to April Ray-
mond at april_raymond@dcf.state.fl.us
or call 904-259-6211 ext. 1157 for Baker
County application. NEFSH CBHS is an
EEO employer and does not discriminate
on the basis of race, color, national ori-
gin, disability or age. 5/27p
Heavy duty diesel mechanic needed,
Travel Centers of America, Baldwin loca-
tion, 1024 US 301 South. Driver's license
required. Please apply to Mark Holmes,
Shop Manager. 904-266-4281, ext. 22.
10/ltfc
Insulator apprentices, Insulator train-
ees, applications to the Jax. Heat & Frost
Insulator Joint Apprenticeship Training
Program. Now available year round sec-
ond Tuesday and third Monday of each
month, 3-5 pm. Also 9:00 am- 12 noon
on Saturday June 5th and 12 at 3647
Gilmore Street, Jacksonville, Fl. Cut off
date 2010-2011 school term is August
9th, 2010. Call 904-388-1601.5/27-6/3p





Notice to Readers
All real estate advertising in this news-
paper is subject to the Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal to advertise "any
preference, limitation or discrimina-
tion based on race, color, religion, sex,
handicap, familiar status or national
origin, or an intention, to make any such
preference, limitation or discrimination."
Familial status includes children under
the age of 18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and people
securing custody of children under 18.
This newspaper will not knowingly ac-
cept any advertising for real estate which
is in violation of the law. Our readers are
hereby informed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are available on
an equal opportunity basis. To complain
of discrimination, call HUD toll free at
1-800-669-9777. The toll free telephone
number for the impaired is 1-800-927-
9275.
One acre lot, Macclenny II, reduced.
904-234-3437. 5/27-6/10p
2.89 acres in Macclenny II on cul-
de-sac, homes only, partially cleared
$73,000.904-610-9974. 5/20-5/27p
22 acres on Orbey Rhoden Road in Cuy-
ler. 259-7389. 5/13-5/27p
Beautiful one acre lot with trees, dry,
zoned for home or mobile home, close
to 1-10, Macclenny, $26,900. 904-259-
5972 or 904-304-6294. 5/13-6/3p
Building/mobile home lot acre $7900.
Eric Raulerson Construction. 483-8742.
4/29tfc
10 acres of land with triple wide
$165,000. 904-275-3522. 5/27p
1 BR house on approximately two acres
on Bluebird Lane. May rent to own. 259-
7389. 5/13-5/27p
FSBO, 7.5 20 acre tracts starting at
$3500 an acre, owner financing avail-
able. 904-613-8128. 5/6-5/27p
FSBO, 2500 SF brick home on five acres.
Hills of Glen 11536 Confederate Lane. 4
BR, 3 BA, great room with wood burning
fireplace, double garage and detached
garage workshop. Asking $239,000. Call
259-9582 or 553-4165. 4/22-5/27p
3 acres, high and dry, fish pond, homes
or mobile homes, set-up included, owner
financing. 912-843-8118. 2/22tfc


36 acres of land, well, septic, horse barn,
utility barn, ponds, Oaktrees, completely
fenced with big nice aluminum gates.
$175,000. Serious inquiries only. 697-
7258, 275-3522. 5/27p
2003 3 BR, 2 BA mobile home, walk-in
closet, garden tub, great room, utility
room with washer/dryer. 464 W. Railroad
Ave., Macclenny. Call Jennifer at South-
east Realty Group. 904-408-1007.
5/13-5/27p
1.63 acres with 3 BR, 2 BA doublewide
open floor plan, very nice location, needs
a little TLC, $79,000, make me an offer.
Possible owner finance with 15% down.
904-259-3763. 5/20-5/27p


THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS





Classifieds


offer a world of values!




20 words, 1 week........... $6.00 cash/check

20 words for $7.00 Visa/MC
20C each additional word




15 words, 1 week........... $8.00 cash/check

15 words for $9.00 Visa/MC
20C each additional word




Monday Friday 9:00 am 5:00 pm
by phone

904-259-2400

online

www.bakercountypress.com

or

classifieds@bakercountypress.com

by mail
Send a copy of the ad exactly as it should appear, payment and
phone number where we can reach you.

PO Box 598, Macclenny, Fl 32063



Placement, correction or cancellation of ads may be phoned
in anytime before Monday at 5 p.m. for publication on
Thursday.


3 BR, 1 BA house, large city lot, quiet
neighborhood, no smoking, service ani-
mals only, $775/month. 259-8444.
5/27tfc
2 BR, 1 BA apartment, central H/A,
washer/dryer hook-up, carport $495/
month, $495 deposit. 259-6488. 334 N.
5th Street, Apt. #2. 5/27p
3 BR, 2 BA in Macclenny, two car ga-
rage, hot tub, grill, furnished or not,
very nice, $1200/month, $1200 deposit.
904-608-6456. 5/20-5/27p
3 BR, 2 BA acre private lot, $650/
month, $500 deposit. Reference re-
quired, available June 1st. 259-5853.
5/20-5/27p
3 BR, 2 BA brick home, 18 month lease,
$850/month, $800 deposit. No smok-
ing. 714 Chipshot Drive. 259-9797.
5/27tfc
Beautiful 3 BR, 2 BA Cypress Pointe
home for rent, screened-in porch over-
looks large pond and trees, large living
room and dining room, two car garage,
$895/month. 407-252-4387. 5/27-6/3p
2 or 3 BR mobile home for rent on 1
acre. Service animals only, garbage
pickup, sewer, water and lawn main-
tenance provided, rent $385-$550,
family neighborhood. 912-843-8118;
904-699-8637. 10/29tfc
3 BR, 2 BA brick house, $775/month,
first, last and deposit. 259-9022.
5/20tfc
3 BR, 2 BA in the city, $800/month, first
last and $300 security. 259-2563.
5/27tfc
Near Glen St. Mary, 3 BR, 3 BA, livin-
groom, dining room, fireplace, 2000 SF


block home, carpet on one acre, fenced
yard, five minutes from 1-10 and shop-
ping $1150/month, small security and
light deposit. 904-327-7124, leave mes-
sage. 5/6-5/27p
Homes and mobile homes for rent
from $750-850 monthly. 259-2255 or
813-1580. 11/13tfc
Quiet and peaceful, 3 BR, 2 BA double-
wide mobile home on 2/ acres in Glen
St. Mary, $800/month, $500 deposit.
Call Bruce 838-3130. 5/27p
3 BR, 1 BA house in the country. Ser-
vice animals only, $600/month, $500
deposit. Call 923-2191. 5/27-6/17p
Mobile homes. 2 and 3 BR, A/C, service
animals only, $500-$575 plus deposit.
904-860-4604. 3/17tfc
3 BR, 2 BA home has two-car car port,
large den. On ten acres fenced and
cross fenced, lots of oak trees, many
extras, $225,000. Only nine miles from
city limits. Serious inquires. 259-7968
or 904-697-7258. 5/27c
Mobile homes for rent from $475 to
$525, garbage, water, sewage and lawn
care included. 904-219-2690, 912-843-
8165. 1/14tfc
4 BR, 2 BA brick house on one acre. Call
476-0995. 5/27-6/3p
2 BR, 1 BA duplex, central H/A, new
carpet in bedrooms, ceramic tile in
common areas, washer/dryer hook-up,
$545/month plus security deposit. Mili-
tary and senior discount. Located on W.
Minnesota Avenue directly behind First
Baptist Church. 904-703-6306.
5/27p
Like new, 3 BR, 2 BA trailer, new front
and rear porch $700/month, $600 de-
posit. Cedar Creek Drive, Sanderson.
904-251-4130. 5/27-6/3p
2 BR, 2 BA mobile home, $600/month,
$500 deposit. Call Brandon 233-7727.


III_1_1_1


5/27-6/3p





Smoky Mountain cabin, with trout
stream near Cherokee, Maggie Valley,
Gatlinburg, Pigeon Forge and Dollywood,
$350/week. 386-752-0013. 5/13-7/1 p





Large commercial rental space, ap-
proximately 650 SF in Glen St. Mary
$500/month plus tax, $250/deposit. 259-
2707. 5/20-6/13c
Office space, 500 SF, Macclenny Ave-
nue, $450 rent, $450 deposit. 259-6546.
4/15tfc
Commercial space for lease with office,
lobby and outside display area at Country
Federal Credit Union Glen Branch on US-
90 in Glen St. Mary. Contact Brian Yar-
brough at 759-5734 for details. 4/29tfc
Professional office for rent, Crockett
building, downtown Macclenny, off-street
parking, conference room use included.
In business, first impressions are essen-
tial. Only $250/month, includes utilities.
Call 904-259-5361. 5/20-6/3p





Affordable housing, 3 and 4 bedrooms
to fit your budget. Call for information.
904-783-4619. 5/27-6/3c
2010 model 28x80 4 or 5 bedrooms,
2 bath, delivered and set up, skirting
included. Two sets mini decks included,
13 seerA/C installed. Free furniture with
2010 model, only $64, 995. Call 386-418-
0435. 13th Street Home Sales, Alachua,
FL. 5/6-5/27c
Limited time, special government loan
program for first time home buyers. $0
down if you own land or have family land.
2 years job time. Call for immediate quali-
fication. 772-8031. 5/20-6/13c




i~l~ 1Ei~lll


Maccle

533
Wayne Combs,


ZU / 4 JLK, Z LA I // f home in lac-
clenny II close to I-10 on 1 acre. Open
living room, large master with separate
shower and whirlpool tub, separate laundry
with additional closet space, screened back
porch. $228,900


REAL ESTATE
3BR, 2 BA2286SFhouse
built in 1976 with many
upgrades. Beautifully main-
tained with some tile. Large
yard with workshop, garage,
carport, storage building and
potting shed New roof a/c
and pump. See to appreciate.
$198,000
VACANT LAND
High and dry 7.5 acres for
you to build your dreamhome
on or put a mobile home.
Worth the ride! $64,900
1 acre lot with trees. High
& Dry! In Hunters Ridge.
$34,900


2010 doublewide delivery and set up is
included. 3 BR, 2 BA only $29,995. Will
build to suite your needs or buy stock
model. Call 386-418-0424. 13th Street
Home Sales, Alachua, FL. 5/6-5/27c
Doublewide starter home, starting at
$35,000. 1360 SF with lots of extras. Call
(904) 504-3986 for details. 5/13-5/27c
Only one left, $96900 delivered. In house
financing available. 772-8031.
5/20-6/13c
2010 16x80 3 BR, 2 BA $35,900 deliv-
ered. Only two left in stock. 772-8031.
5/20-6/13c
No money down, new USDA govern-
ment program. Minimum $1200/month
income, no bankruptcy in two years. Call
904-783-4619. 5/27-6/3c
Limited time only, we will pay off your
land and get you a new home. Zero down
and low payments. 772-8031.
5/20-6/13c
Never before titled, all factory warranties
apply. 3 BR, 2 BA, will move for free, only
$36,900. 904-783-4619. 5/27-6/3c
New home, 2254 SFwith fireplace, appli-
ances, on 3+ acres new CR 125 N. Home
reduced for quick sale, payments $682/
month. By appointment 904-504-3986.
5/13-5/27c
Dollar and a deed can get you a 2010 4
BR, 2 BA for only $360/month. 904-783-
4619. 5/27-6/3c
16 wide new 2010 model, 2 BR, 2 BA, in-
cludes delivery and set up, $25,995. Call
386-418-0438. 13th Street Home Sales,
Alachua, FL. 4/5-5/27c
Prestige Home Centers, every model
must go. Let's deal 866-605-7255.
9/10tfc
201016x80 3 BR, 2 BA only $270/month.
904-783-4619. 5/27-6/3c
Doublewide, 2010 3 BR, 2 BA, loaded
with options only $325/month. 904-783-
4619. 5/27-6/3c





Saturday 8am ?
6142 S. River Circle,
Macclenny
Furniture, Clothes,
Toys, Electronics

i 61 IIa lt a l


nny Realty, Inc.
NE HAVE THE HOME FOR YOU
S. 6th St. Macclenny 259-7709
_ic. Real Estate Broker- Cell. 338-4528
Anne Kitching, Realtor- Cell. 892-8064
Gary Taylor, Realtor ~ Cell. 568-4800


River front cabin. Private, secluded, very
quiet and overlooking the beautiful St.
Marys River A must see for a vacation
home, close to home on 2 acres! $129,900


Updated old style house
with new wiring and panel
box, tile with 5 rooms
plus bath. Perfect for of
ces. Zoned commercial.
$119,900
Excellent business location.
Fourlos total 1.20 acres with
approx. 320 Ft. Hwy 121
frontage. $419,000
Great location for future
development. 5 acres zoned
commercial general or PUD.
$235,000
Excellent corner for busi
ness..92 acre located on US
Hwy 90 zoned commercial
general. $219,900


fect location
home. Lots o
15 yr old plar
es welcome. (
available $84,
Beautiful 7..
mature oaks;
Seller will div
COMMEI
GENERA
Great local
business 14
ing current
lot. No sigi
Zoned conm
$250,000


for your new
wildlife and 12
ted pines. Hors-
)wner financing
900
3 acre lot with
nd nice pasture.
de. $120,000
ICIAL
L
ion for retail
04 SF build-
used as a car
I on property
nercial general.


Secluded 1 acres located
minutes front 1-10. The per


I


I


THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


Thursday, May 27,2010


Page 14


I


w usmw





THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


New 4 BR home on 5 acres with well, sep-
tic, power, starting at $605/month. Call
904-504-3976 for appointment.
5/13-5/27c
Never before titled, 4 BR, 2 BA, will move
for free. Only $46,900. 904-783-4619.
5/27-6/3c

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sL, LAKEil CITY

STAFF ASSISTANT I
PUBLIC SERVICE TRAINING
CENTER
The Staff Assistant I, Public Service
Training Center, serves a dual role,
supporting both the Criminal Justice
Training Center and the Emergency
Medical Services program. The Staff
Assistant handles telephone and email
inquiries, performs typing and filing,
and maintains detailed records for all
programs in these areas. High School
graduate or equivalency plus two years
clerical experience. Additional education
may be substituted on a year for year
basis for required experience in related
area. Special consideration will be given
to applicants with an associate's degree
or certificate in a related area.
SALARY: $20,583 annually, plus
benefits.
APPLICATION DEADLINE: 6/10/10
College employment application
required. Applications and full position
details are available on our website
www.lakecitycc.edu
Inquiries: Human Resources
149 SE College Place
Lake City, FL 32025
Phone: (386) 754-4314
Fax: (386) 754-4814
E-mail: humanr@lakecitycc.edu LCCC
is accredited by the Southern Association of
Colleges and Schools
VP/ADA/EA/EO College in
Education & Employment


Reacts to new offense


FAT LADY
ROBERT GERARD

If Friday night's Red and
White spring scrimmage was any
indication, Wildcat football fans
will have get used to a whole dif-
ferent way of moving the football
next fall. After a decade of pound-
ing the ball on the ground and
passing attempts in the single
digits, look for a much more bal-
anced offense in the fall.
Coach Ryan Sulkowski, a devo-
tee of the spread offense, opened
up his bag of tricks and started
moving the ball through the air.
Many of the team's top athletes
are moving to the receiver posi-
tion and rather than being a third
running back, the quarterback is
airing it out.
Wildcat fans haven't seen that
brand of play since the days of
Buffy Mallory and Henry Reed in
the 198os. From the reaction of


a r,-h 1 1 p
Mr41-w -r pm o
b e"mh ML P4H,
"" r I" F~o
1M w C.-*y


fans at the scrimmage, they liked
what they saw.
In fairness to the running
game of Bobby Johns, Carl West
and George Dean, a 50-yard
dash by Harold Moore is just as
quick a strike as a pass play. It's
whatever works, and Sulkowski
is convinced that using both ends
of the spectrum are better than
one.
Of course, much of the suc-
cess of the passing game hinges
on the kind of protection the of-
fensive line gives quarterbacks
Kendrick Sampson and Jeremy
Wanamaker.
Also, judging from Friday
night, the running game will have
to step up a little to reach the level
of proficiency shown in the past.


Time will tell.
If you haven't seen the South-
ern League champion Jackson-
ville Suns, this would be a good
weekend to troop out to the
Baseball Grounds. The division-
leading Suns face off against the
Chattanooga Lookouts in a five-
game home stand.
The Suns are four games up in
the South Division and lead the
league with a 28-16 record. They
also have the league's top hitter
in Osvaldo Martinez, who sports
a .364 average. Outfielder Bran-
don Tripp is third in the league at
.358.
Games are Thursday through
Sunday at 7:05 pm. Call 358-
2846 for ticket information.


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1395 Chaffee Road

South, Jacksonville

wam Fev COXp RXFAT? 904.772.9800


THIS ISA FIXER-UPPER! MLS#529124 Large 3BR
3BA brick home situated on 3.5 acres. Large open
formal living rm, sep. dining rm, kitchen w/breakfast
bar. 2 rooms have been painted. 2 fireplaces.
$211,000
GREAT FIRST TIME BUYER! MLS#501875 4BR 2BA
SWMH on just over 1 acre of land. Large wooden
porch, also included is a large 12 x 20 shed. Home is
conveniently located in town on paved road. $64,000
START YOUR OWN BUSINESS! MLS#494925
Car wash conveniently located in town on a highly
trafficked main road. Property has 110 ft road
frontage. 3 useable bays, 1 storage bldg. Large
parking lot and the potential of becoming a successful
business. $140,000
COUNTRYHOME!- MLS#530336This4BR2BA 1,949
SF hm isfull of charm &sits on almost 5 acres. Features
spring fed fully stocked pond. Hm has lifetime metal
roof, 2 brand new AC units, water softener. Over sized
detached garage would hold 5 + cars, attached 2 car
garage. $334,900
BEAUTIFUL BRICK! MLS#513343 Custom hm
includes vaulted ceilings, walk-in closets, great rm
and lots of extras. Runner's & bikers dream location,
adjacent tothe Baldwin RailstoTrails. $299,000
WHAT A DEAL! MLS#496329 Great home for the
price. 4BR 2BA concrete block home. Currently rents
for $925 month. $94,900
REMARKABLE HOME! MLS#529356 This 3BR 2BA
hm sits on 2 acres. Bright & open floor plan with
many extras. Eat-in kitchen w breakfast bar. Lots of
upgrades. Seller can close quickly! $199,999


LOOK NO FURTHER! MLS#473434 Lookingfora place
to call home orsummer retreat...this is it! Navigable
river front property located near public boat ramp.
Gorgeous land with Bellcrest 2000 DWMH. $158,000
JAX RANCH CLUB MLS#452129 Get away from city
by owning this spectacular vacant lot of 2.53 acres.
Come canoe and ride horses. $65,000
LOVELY BRICK HOME! MLS#488789 This 3BR 2BA
hm features newer carpet, countertops, hardware,
screen back porch, double pane windows & much
more. $116,900
A MUST SEE! MLS#514241 Beautiful corner lot,
former Richmond model. 4BR 2.5 BA, tile fir, Ig
family rm w built-in bookcases. Crown molding,
corain countertops, work desk off kitchen. Covered &
screened back porch. $232,000
GREAT VALUE! MLS#494460 Less than $3,000
per acre. Investors & developers must see. Located
in beautiful Glen St. Mary. Endless possibilities.
$278,000
LOTS OF CHARM! MLS#496310 Looking for wide
open spaces? This is it! Great 1.5 acre parcel of land
with adorable 3BR 1BA home. $168,500
FEELS BRAND NEW! MLS#503350 This 3BR 2BA
home sits on 2 city lots, fenced in back yard. Home
is IMMACULATE. Prewired surround sound. 2 car
garage with additional parking behind home. PRICED
TO SELL! $145,000
ABSOLUTELY ADORABLE! MLS#501902 2BR 1BA
home on 1 acre of land. Leave the city behind & enjoy
your peaceful surroundings from the front porch.
Gorgeous trees adorn property as well. $77,000


Thursday, May 27, 2010


Page 15











DELINQUENT PROPERTY TAXES

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on the 1st day of June, 2010 at the hour of
eight-thirty A.M. at the Baker County Administration Building, 55 North 3rd
Street, in Baker County, City of Macclenny, State of Florida, Tax Sale Certificates
will be sold on the following described land to pay the amount due for the 2009
taxes herein set opposite the same, together with all advertising costs of sale.


Instructions on Identifying Property
Property Parcel Number (PPN)
Example: (PPN) 01-1S-22-1001-0102-0010
01- Represents the Section where the property is located.
IS- Represents the Township where the property is located.
22- Represents the Range where the property is located.
1001- Represents the Subdivision where the property is located.
0102- Represents the Block where the property is located.
0010- Represents the Lot where the property is located.
SEE CURRENT TAX ROLL FOR COMPLETE LEGAL DESCRIPTION.


Delinquent 2009 Property Tax Supplement
Published May 13,20 and 27, 2010





THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


ALEXANDER MICHELLE &


Page 17


Thursday, May 27, 2010






THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


& RENEED&


XL M&W


OX JOYCE F&


Page 18


Thursday, Mav 27,2010




THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


ENNETH J &
22-0040-00
GLAS E JR
22-0040-00
Y& ROAXANI


Band man to tour
JOEL ADDINGTON
NEWS EDITOR
reporter@bakercountypress.com
Jeremy Pietrowski's in store
for many firsts this summer.
The tuba player in Baker
High's band will fly alone for the
first time, perform before the
largest audiences of his life and
tour the nation with the Boston
Crusaders drum corps, the sev-
enth-ranked corps in the coun-
try.
The junior from Glen St. Mary
will pack his bags next week for
New Hampshire where he'll
spend three weeks training with
the Crusaders before starting the
seven-week tour, which culmi-
nates in mid-August with Drum
Corps International's World PHOTO
Championships in Indianapolis. Jeremy Pietrowski.
"I was pretty excited because it band," explained Jeremy. "Every-
was my first time being in some- thing works up from there, low to his mu
thing really, really big," he said. high... Kids nowadays think,'this work, h
"Especially comparedto our high instrument is stupid. It has no games.
school band. It was a really big good parts.' But think about how Jere
move. important you really are to the musician
Jeremy auditioned for the Cru- entire song. Most times the tuba minute
saders last fall in Bradenton, FL
and was among 16 tuba players
chosen to attend once-a-month
camps that started in February.
The 75-year-old corps has 150
members from across the nation
and overseas. They're divided
into three groups the color
guard, front ensemble and horn
line.


SU


ii
hi
a
1


is friends and even video
any's advice for young
ns: practice at least 30
;day. His mother agreed,


AdetsinDadin


the country
has the root of the adding that a child's success in
chord and that's extracurricular activities is bol-
the most impor- stered by the involvement and
tant thing. That's support of their parents.
my opinion." "It will make them perform
According to better and make them better
his mom, playing people," she said.
music changed Then there's the financial sac-
her son by grow- rifices.
ing his confidence The cost for the Crusaders'
and improving his camps and this summer's tour
grades. Before the total several thousand dollars,
band, he kept to not to mention the high school's
himself, turning band dues.
in homework was "It's very expensive," Ms. Pi-
a struggle and etrowski said. "My husband and
he ran with the I had to realign some things and
wrong crowd. pay off some things to afford it."
"He's defi- The impact that music has had
nitely a different on Jeremy Pietrowkski's life, and
kid," said Ms. the opportunities it will present
JBMITTED Pietrowkski. "He this summer, however, make the
has become very effort well worth it.
good at balancing "It definitely saved my son,"
sical talents, his school his mother said.


Notice to Bidders:


Persons who have not

participated in the

Tax Certificate Sale

in the past should

prc-register with the

Baker County Tax

Collector's office

beforeJune 1,2010.


hIf f


Thursday, May 27, 2010


Page 19




THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


Badcock*
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Page 20


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