Group Title: Baker County Press (Macclenny, Fla. : 1929).
Title: The Baker County press
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00024160/00247
 Material Information
Title: The Baker County press
Uniform Title: Baker County press (Macclenny, Fla. 1929)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Baker County Press
Publisher: Tate Powell
Place of Publication: Macclenny Fla
Publication Date: October 29, 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Macclenny (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Baker County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Baker -- Macclenny
Coordinates: 30.283333 x -82.116667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Apr. 12, 1929.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 39 (Jan. 2, 1931).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00024160
Volume ID: VID00247
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ADA7379
oclc - 33284409
alephbibnum - 000579533
lccn - sn 95047186

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150 OCTOBER 29


THURSDAY


THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS

80th Year, Vol. 26 Winner of 9 state awards for journalism excellence in 2008



Community theater

presents 'Steelar -


See page 9


Bank overdraft fees: a local survey


Fees mostly

same; some

policies differ
JOELADDINGTON
NEWS EDITOR
reporter@bakercountypress.com
Bank fees for spending more money
than you have are universal, but the
amount of those penalties and how
they're assessed are not.
Here's a look at what local banks
charge their customers for having insuf-
ficient funds to cover a purchase or pay-
ment and what it costs to use overdraft
protection, a service that automatically
transfers funds from one account to cover
the deficit in another.
Some of the highest fees in the county
are found at First Federal Bank, Mer-
cantile Bank and Country Federal Credit
Union.
First Federal charges a $36 fee for in-
sufficient funds, plus $6 per day until the
account has a positive balance. The bank
has the county's lowest overdraft protec-
tion fee at $3.50, but some banks don't
charge anything.
Being overdrawn at Mercantile Bank
costs $34 for the first three transactions
leaving a negative balance. Any more and
the fee increases to $36. Avoiding those
fees with overdraft protection costs $8


JOEL ADDINGTON
NEWS EDITOR
reporter@bakercountypress.com
Students at Baker County
Middle and Keller Intermedi-
ate will be returning next year
to new sidewalks around their
schools as part of the Florida
Department of Transportation's
[FDOT] Safe Routes to Schools
Program.
FDOT, with assistance from
the school district, is finalizing
the scope of improvements,
which include walkways on
South Boulevard and S. 9th
Street in Macclenny.
Scott Lent, FDOT's District
2 safety director, said last week
the federally-funded program
administered by the state offers
cash for sidewalks, signs and
pavement markings.
The new sidewalk expected
at the middle school will run
from CR 228 east to East Bou-
levard on South Boulevard, but
it's unknown yet which side of
the street it will go.
There's already a sidewalk
running along the south side of
South Boulevard.
"We're doing some final nail-
ing down to figure out the best
way to do it," said Mr. Lent,


Meet

BCHD's

newest


VyStar-
Cnr Unm


WALJHOVIAI


$20


$22 $24 $26 $28 $30


$32 $34 $36


Note: All fees above are for the first overdraft. Fees may increase for additional transactions resulting in a negative balance.


per transfer.
Country Federal doesn't charge for
overdraft protection, but limits transfers
to six per month. Its insufficient funds fee
is $35.
"It started out as courtesy to custom-
ers, so checks wouldn't be returned,"
said Mercantile President John Kennedy
on why transactions are even approved


PHOTO BY JOEL ADDINGTON
Eighth graders Taylor Matthews, 13, and Tyler
Doley, 15, walking home from the middle school
October 27.
adding the end result will likely
be pavement on only one side or miso si
the other, not both. ms
The sidewalk will then turn


when there's not enough cash available
to cover them. "But then people started
taking advantage of it, so the banks have
to say, 'You're going to pay for it."'
Wachovia Bank, American Enterprise
Bank and Vystar Credit Union have some
of the least expensive insufficient funds
fees in the county, however; using over-
draft protection runs $10 at Wachovia


north onto East Boule-
vard and continue to US
90 where a cross walk
maybe located. Mr. Lent
said the department is
working with the school
district on stationing a
crossing guard there.
Near Keller Interme-
diate, the new sidewalk
is planned to run from
the west end of South
Boulevard north to Min-
nesota Avenue on S. 9th
Street.
The Macclenny City
Commission recently
approved an agreement
with FDOT to move for-
ward with the improve-
ments.
The agreement
makes the city respon-
sible for maintenance
of the sidewalks once
they're complete and
rants the department per-
on to work in city owned
See page 4>>


Middle school boy

fatally shot at home
Tracy Sweat, an 11-year-old However, the previous da3
sixth grader at Baker County Special Agent Mike McDanie
Middle School, was killed by of the bureau's Kingsland office
a shotgun blast at his Gordon said a relative pulled the trigger
Street residence in St. George, inside the family's home aboul
Ga. on October 25. 1:30 pm.
Exactly what circumstances "It was not self-inflicted," he
led to the fatal shooting were said. "There was another fam-
not being released by the Geor- ily member there who had the
gia Bureau of Investigation as of gun."


See page 2)>


and $5 at American Enterprise. That ser-
vice is free at Vystar.
Wachovia also has the lowest insuffi-
cient funds fee at $22, but it's only good
for the first overdraw. The fee jumps to
$35 for each debit thereafter resulting in
a negative balance.
See page 2>>


Behaviors always


change with time
KELLEY LANNIGAN I FEATURES
features@bakercountypress.com
Love it or hate it, daylight-saving time takes effect again this week-
end. The switch will occur November 1 and clocks are due to "fall
back," as the reminder goes, one hour at 2:00 Sunday morning.
The practice of daylight-saving time (DST) has a colorful, chaotic
and often controversial history. The Press asked some local residents
their opinion on the practice.
Dr. Kyle Brown, who has devoted his career to horticultural science,
says that the switch back to standard time in the fall is not exactly wel-
comed by gardeners. The change can be abrupt and disconcerting.
'"The main reason is that gardeners do a lot of their fall prepping
See page 4>>


Probes


possible


drug use


bynurse
A sheriffs investigator said
this week more information will
be collected before a decision
is made on criminal charges
against a school nurse who al-
legedly took controlled drugs
from the Fraser Hospital emer-
gency room, where she is also
employed.
Rochelle Bennett, 45, of Glen
St. Mary was found unconscious
in her office at Baker County
Middle School the afternoon
of October 19 and taken to the
Fraser emergency room where
Valerie Markos, the hospital's
nursing chief, said she matched
lot numbers of medication
found near Ms. Bennett's purse
with those logged out from the
inventory at the emergency
room the previous day.
Ms. Bennett later said she
had taken the three bottles each
containing a milliliter of the
drugs from the inventory, but
forgot they were in her posses-
sion when she left work. She
claims one patient refused the
medication but could not ex-
plain why the two other bottles
were in her possession.
The report by Deputy Koty
Crews notes that a drug screen
test was administered to the
nurse, and none of the drugs
were found in her system.
They were identified as hy-
dromorphone, promethizine
and meperidine, controlled
drugs used as a morphine alter-
native, a sedative and for pain
relief, respectively.
Ms. Bennett, a longtime
emergency room nurse who
has been a school nurse for six
years, said she had an adverse
reaction to drugs taken for
other conditions, plus was suf-
fering from exhaustion.
School Superintendent
Sherrie Raulerson said no dis-
ciplinary action has been taken
against the nurse, who Ms.
Raulerson says has an unblem-
ished work record.
Chuck Brannan, chief of in-
vestigations for the BCSO, said
the results of his investigation
will be passed on to the state
attorney's office for a decision
on possible charges.
"We still have a number of
people to interview at both the
middle school and hospital
- people who we hope can shed
some light on what happened,"
said Maj. Brannan.
In another recent case,
Douglas Rutherford, 26, of
Macclenny was arrested for
misdemeanor marijuana pos-
session after he was questioned
for riding a bicycle in traffic on
Ray Phillips Rd. the evening of
October 22.
Deputy Larry Clark said he
responded to a complaint about
7:45 that a cyclist was interfer-
ing with traffic. The officer said
Mr. Rutherford's bike had no
lights or reflective equipment.
See page 2>)


bakercountypress.com
ONLINE POLL RESULTS
Is there a fire 70% Yes
extinguisher in your 30% No
home?
Visit our website and vote each week in our online poll.


COVERING BAKER COUNTY SINCE 1929
The county's mostprofessional and extensive source for news, classified, display and real estate listings


904.259.2400 .. 904.259.6502 Fax
www.bakercountypress.com
bcpress@nefcom.net


6 8907641111 81 8


Magnolias'


School sidewalks project


mid-week.


doctor



See page 9


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THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


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Available from Commercial News Providers"

.' 1


COUNTRY FEDERAL


CREDIT UNION


602 S. Sixth Street, Macclenny 259-6702

US Hwy. 90 West, Glen St. Mary 653-4401

100 S. Lima Street, Baldwin 266-1041

www.countryfcu.com


Overdraft fees...


( Vystar's overdraft fee is $32
and American Enterprise's is
$30.
The order in which transac-
tions are posted can also impact
how many times customers get
penalized.
Bank of America, which has no
local branches, recently settled a
class-action lawsuit by agreeing
to pay $35 million to current and
former customers. The suit al-
leged harmful business practices
that included processing daily
transactions from the highest
dollar amount to the lowest, in-
stead of chronologically.
For instance, if a customer
with a $500 balance made four
debits in the following order -
$15, $10, $150 and $450 three
overdraft fees could be charged
instead of one by posting the
largest transactions first.
According to Bank of Amer-
ica's Web site, the practice is
the result of customers' desires
to have their bills usually the
largest debits paid first.
Wachovia President Helene
Guest said her bank re-orders
transactions similarly and began
doing so in 1997 for the same rea-
son.
"The way the system was pay-
ing, as the debits and smaller
checks came in, it could possibly
leave a car payment unpaid," she
said. "That's why they changed
to go from highest to lowest. Of
course, that also creates more
fees."
Wachovia began in September
the process of amending its over-
draft policy, but details have not
yet been released.
"We are making changes in
the near future," said Ms. Guest.
"I'm sure it's in response to [the
Bank of America settlement] at
the corporate level ... They're
very positive changes. We want
to make it fair and do what's best
for our customers."
American Enterprise and Mer-
cantile Bank also post debits in
descending order, from highest
to lowest. Country Federal Credit
Union and Vystar Credit Union
process transactions in the order
they're made.
"We don't do any rearrang-
ing," said Terry West, Vystar's
CEO. "We think that's the fairest
thing to do for our members."
Bank of America has already
made changes to its overdraft
policy.


Beginning October 19, the
Charlotte, N.C.-based bank
stopped charging overdraft fees
when accounts were overdrawn
by less than $10 in one day. A
$35 fee will still apply if the ac-
count holds a negative balance
after five days.
Also, the bank has limited the
number of possible overdraft
fees per day to four down from
to established earlier this year
- and now allows customers to
opt-out of the overdraft capabil-
ity.
"I'm sure Bank of America is
getting pictured as the villain,"
said Mr. Kennedy, the presi-
dent of Mercantile's Macclenny
branch. "But a lot of people don't
keep up with their spending. If
they did, they wouldn't have to
deal with overdraft fees."




Seduslttr


Probes possible use


( The suspect had a knife visible
in a pants pocket and consented
to a search, during which Dep-
uty Clark said he found a small
amount of pot.
Two other suspects walk-
ing in traffic late the following
evening ended up in jail charged
with disorderly intoxication.
Deputy Tony Norman said he
questioned Keif Barton of Glen
St. Mary and Michael Jewell of
Sanderson, both 18, after getting
a report about 10:20 that they
were flagging traffic on North 6th
St. in Macclenny.
The two said they had been
drinking at the football game
earlier that evening, and were in
the roadway trying to slow traffic,
which they claimed was moving
too fast.
When quizzed on where they
obtained alcohol underage, the
suspects said they didn't know.
Deputies arrested two per-
sons on outstanding warrants,
including Christopher Jones, 42,
of Macclenny, who is wanted in
Columbia County for failure to
comply with a judge's order. He
was stopped on Thomas Sweat
Rd. near Sanderson for a traffic
violation late on October 23.
Windi McDuffie, 30, of Mac-
clenny was picked up on MLK


Dr. late on October 19 on a Clay
County warrant for violating pro-
bation.

Trick or Treat on
Main Street
Downtown Macclenny busi-
nesses are sponsoring a Trick or
Treat on Main Street Saturday,
October 31 from 1:oo-3:00oo pm.
There will be signs in the win-
dows of the participating busi-
nesses.


n J
LENDER


Gunshot kills student...


( An autopsy was performed by
a GBI medical examiner in Ma-
con, Ga. Tuesday.
Mr. McDaniel characterized
the case as a "death investiga-
tion," not a homicide investiga-
tion, but wouldn't elaborate.
"We don't want to speculate,"
the agent said, citing the ongoing
investigation.
News of the tragedy began
spreading Monday morning at
the middle school.
Principal David Davis said


grief counselors were on hand
to help students and faculty and
they will remain as long as need-
ed.
"The sympathies and prayers
of our school and the whole sys-
tem go out to that family," said
Principal Davis. "You can imag-
ine what they're going through."
The Baker County school sys-
tem for years has had a pact with
Charlton County, Ga. to enroll
students from the Georgia Bend
up through St. George, some 14
miles north of the state line.


f


Baker County Health Department

Vaccination Clinic for H1N1


October 31, 2009

9:00 am 2:00 pm

at the Baker County High School gym
1 Wildcat Drive Glen St. Mary, FL 32040

Cost: Free and no appointment
*** If you have private insurance, Medicaid or Medicare please bring your information.
Your insurance carrier will be charged the administration fee. ***

The Baker County Health Department will be offering the H1N1 (Swine Flu) vaccine ac-
cording to CDC guidelines to the following population:
Pregnant women
People who live with or care for infants younger 6 months of age
Healthcare and emergency medical personnel
Anyone from 6 months through 24 years of age
Anyone from 25 through 64 years of age with a chronic medical condition or
a weakened immune system

***These groups are most vulnerable to the H1N1 virus***

ADDITIONAL VACCINATION CLINICS will be scheduled as vaccine is
received. It is expected that vaccine will be received on a weekly basis. Please contact the
Baker County Health Department for further information on vaccination clinic dates and
times at 904-259-6291 ext. 3001. Please do not contact the Baker County High School.


You may also access information from the following
www.myflusafety.com or toll free H1N1 information
line 1-877-352-3581.


Page 2


thursday, October 29, 2009


tomed ow *WWI 4 one


~I





THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


OPINION


Page


3
OCTOBER 29, 2009


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR CONTACT US
Letters are welcome, but must contain the signature of the writer, a telephone number and city of residence. By phone at 904.259.2400 or by fax at 904.259.6502. You can stop by our office located at 104 S. Fifth Street,
Letters must reflect opinions and statements on issues of current interest to the general public. Macclenny, FL or mail your submission to PO Box 598, Macclenny, FL 32063.
The newspaper reserves the right to reject any material which in the newspaper's judgement does not meet standards of publication. We are available online at www.bakercountypress.com


Murder close to home


IMPRESSIONS
Jim McGauley
News of the murder of 7-year-
old Somer Thompson of Orange
Park last week went nationwide,
and since Baker and Clay are
neighboring counties in this cor-
ner of Florida, it packed a bigger
punch for a lot of people here.
Her disappearance on the way
home from school in middle class
Orange Park, the discovery of her
body in the Chesser Island land-
fill just up the road in Charlton
County, Ga., the realization that
convicted sex offenders live in
close proximity to her home all
that's pretty local stuff.
No suspects who are also sex
offenders have been named in the
case that captured the nation's at-
tention, but the fact that so many
now live [and are known because
they are required to register] in
places like Orange Park, Middle-
burg, Macclenny and elsewhere
in our region is making many
people especially the parents
of younger children nervous.
There's no wayto measure how
the Thompson murder affected
parents in the Florida Crown on
things like allowing their chil-
dren to walk home from school,
or from the school bus stop. My
guess is many of them are re-as-
sessing or have re-assessed what
they let their children do.
We could go on about how
things have changed since old
geezers like me were in grade
school and everybody walked or
rode bikes to and from school.
Such musing is pointless to par-
ents today facing a world that has
changed so much. Parents always
had to be vigilant; today they are
wise to be more so.
Baker County schools were this
week dispensing safety tips for
young students how to avoid
strangers and sound the alarm if
one approaches. The school dis-
trict and sheriffs department put
on several programs on Tuesday
and Wednesday at the elementa-
ry schools and at the pre-K, kin-
dergarten school [though I can't
imagine parents letting children
that young do anything by them-
selves].
They're striking while the
iron's hot. The memory of Somer
Thompson and the anguish of her
mother reflected in both video
and print are fresh on everyone's
mind.
It's ironic all this is taking
place before Halloween, the night
parents take their children door-
to-door after dark. Though many
parents now shun the neighbor-
hood trick or treating for more
controlled and seemingly safe
- alternatives, there's still con-
siderable activity in places like
north Macclenny with its "safe"
subdivisions.
Even if the Somer Thompson
murder never happened, parents
of younger children who let them
out on Halloween night unsuper-


vised ought to be examined for
negligent stupidity. There's such
a thing as placing someone in the
throes of peril.
Contemporary parents are
sometimes the subject of ridi-
cule for being too protective of
their kids, and maybe some of
that is justified. They're called
"helicopter parents," as in hov-
ering too closely over their kids.
I sense most parents in normal,
stable homes have a sense that


the world is a bit more ominous
in 2009 and they are best advised
to sort through real versus per-
ceived threats when it comes to
their young children.
"Reality checks" don't get
any blunter than the aftermath
of a young and innocent child's
death. If any good comes from
it, it'll be resolve on the part of
Baker County parents that their
kids will be surrounded by pro-
tective arms.


A gradual lessening of trust


THE BACK

PORCH
Kelley Lannigan
In the early-to mid-decades of
the 20th Century the world was
simply not the dangerous place
for children that it has become.
My father walked to school
during the depths of the Depres-
sion, as did scores of children.


They walked because they had
no choice. With precious few ex-
ceptions, everyone walked. They
didn't mind because they didn't
know any different.
There weren't any school bus-
es. Cars were a luxury item. Peo-
ple were lucky to have a steady
job, much less a car. Traffic was
infrequent and so was serious
crime.
My father was young, the same
age as Somer Thompson, who
was kidnapped and killed walk-
ing home from school last week


Why do they want to be vampires?


Halloween is
coming and I'm
trying to decide
what I should be
for Halloween.
I don't usually
dress up but I'm
kind of in the
mood this year.


MY SI

THE MR
ROBERT G


One year I was former Gator
head football coach Ron Zook..
He had just been sacked, so I
wore orange and blue (some-
thing I never, do by the way) and
a sign that said: "Will coach for
food." Tasteless I know, but kind
of funny.
The phenomenon of adults
dressing in Halloween getup
is something that seems to be
increasingly popular lately. Hal-
loween rivals only Christmas in
the number of decorations sold


THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS
usps 040-280
Post Office Box 598
Macclenny, FL 32063
(904) 259-2400
The Baker County Press is published each Thursday by Baker County Press, Inc.
Periodicals postage paid under permit issued April 12, 1929 at the post office
in Macclenny, Florida.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
$20.00 a year inside Baker County; $35.00 a year outside Baker County;
deduct, $1.oo for persons 65 years of age or older, military personnel
on active duty outside Baker County, and college students living outside
Baker County. POSTMASTER: send address changes to The Baker County
Press, P.O. Box 598, Macclenny, FL. 32063.
Publisher/Editor
James C. McGauley editor@bakercountypress.com
NEWS EDITOR -Joel Addington reporter@bakercountypress.com
ADVERTISING/PRODUCTION Jessica Prevatt- advertising@bakercountypress.com
FEATURES- Kelley Lannigan -features@bakercountypress.com
FEATURES/COMMENT/SPORTS Robert Gerard
BUSINESS MANAGER- Karin Thomas kthomas@bakercountypress.com
CLASSIFIEDS & TYPESETTING Debbie Hansen -classifieds@bakercountypress.com
This newspaper is printed on recycled paper.


each year.
DE OF Of course,
adult Halloween
ER costumes can
1 1 ER get a little racy.
iERARD If Cinderella ac-
tually wore the
dress I saw on
one costume site it's no wonder
the prince ignored everyone else
at the party and made a beeline
for the girl in the glass slippers.
The most popular costumes
this year will probably be vam-
pires. With the popularity of the
Twilight series of books and the
opening of New Moon as well as
television shows like True Blood
and The Vampire Diaries, the
blood sucking creatures of the
night are this year's hot ticket.
These aren't your parents' and
grandparents' vampires. Edward
Cullen from Twilight bears no
resemblance to Bela Lugosi's
strange Teutonic count. Lugosi
was creepy and aloof, while Cul-
len radiates a kind of cool sexual-
ity.
Modern vampires lean to
the sexy rather than the scary.
Though Lugosi had a certain
charm and Frank Langella's
Count Dracula in the 7o's reincar-
nation of the film and Broadway
show was certainly a charmer,
the real transformation started
with Tom Cruise. His vampire in
the film adaptation of Ann Rice's
The Vampire Lestat was definite-
ly hot blooded.
Robert Pattison's Edward Cul-
len, Cruise's Lestat and Stephen
Moyer's vampire Bill Compton
from HBO's True Blood have
added some attraction that Lu-
gosi, Christopher Lee and com-
pany could not.
People want to be them, and
I don't understand the allure of
vampires. I never have.
I've directed Dracula several
times in the past at both the high


school and the community col-
lege and we've always had our
share of vampire lovers show up
looking creepier than the people
on stage.
There are people who actu-
ally would like to be vampires,
though I don't get the attraction.
Drinking blood? Sleeping in a
coffin filled with dirt? Turning
into a bat? Not for me.
That whole immortality thing
is kind of appealing, but not if all
I could have for dinner was steak
tartar. I don't like my meat rare
and certainly wouldn't like it that
rare.
I also get sleepy around to
o'clock and would be in danger
of sleeping through the night and
waking up to find myself turning
to dust as the sun came up.
In recent vampire movies
and television shows they dance
around all that. Cullen can wan-
der around Washington State
because it's usually overcast and
rainy. Vampires like him wouldn't
do nearly as well in Arizona.
I wonder what Alaskan or
Scandinavian vampires do? They
would be great during the six
months of darkness, but the six
months of daylight would play
havoc with their sleep cycles.
I've heard that some people
actually pretend to be vampires,
sleeping all day and staying up all
night. I can see that. If you work
a night shift somewhere you'd
get used to that. The rest, well, I
would think that would be pretty
hard to do. Maybe they take turns
biting each other. If not, I bet it's
dangerous to be one of their pets.
Rover would have to stay pretty
quick to keep from the entr6e on
the evening meal. Lends a whole
new meaning to the phrase "pup-
py chow."
The Florida/Georgia Blood
Alliance should have a Twilight-
themed Halloween party. All


their workers dress as characters
from the movie and people at the
party give blood.
Or maybe I'll be a Twinky or
a Crayola crayon. That seems
harmless enough and I wouldn't
have to carry a box of band-aids
trick or treating.


As simple as an e-mail.....
If you have any information you
think we need to know, send it to:
editor@bakercountypress.com

THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS
104 South Fifth St.
904-259-2400


in Orange Park. So now, the mes-
sage to kids is this: Walking to
school is dangerous. What does
that say about our society when
even walking to school has be-
come a danger for our children?
I heard some Duval County
school bus drivers talking about
the missing child last week as
they ate lunch in a Baldwin res-
taurant. If not for the two-mile
rule, they said, the incident may
not have happened.
I wasn't familiar with the rule
and asked them for an explana-
tion that I later confirmed on the
Internet. To save on fuel costs,
"courtesy riders" or students who
live within two miles of the school
they attend, are not transported
by bus. They find some other way
to get there or they walk.
I watch Macclenny children
walking to the middle school
everyday from all directions and
the situation with the Thompson
child has made me think about
what they deal with.
Close to the school, they pass
through busy intersections and
crossing guards help them ne-
gotiate the traffic. Away from the
school it's a different story. For
instance, many cross US 90 on
their own without aid of a cross-
ing guard.
Some routinely use College
Street because it's a straight shot
to the back of the middle school
campus. Now that way is blocked
by the two fences CSX erected
when it closed the College Street
railroad crossing last summer.
The students must circum-
navigate the fences and walk half
a block around them. Some climb
over them to avoid the detour.
I was told that CSX wanted to
eliminate potential liability at the
crossing. In my opinion, a differ-
ent sort of liability was created
when they blocked easy access to
school for the students.
Two years ago, I went to the
aid of a young girl on her way to
school who became frightened
by a stray dog that was loose and
behaving aggressively.
I didn't hesitate because a
child needed help, so I left the
house and ran off the dog. Be-
cause the girl was so shaken up, I
offered to walk her to school.
From that morning until
school ended for the summer
four weeks later, she knocked on
my door and I walked her to the
back gate of the school.
My point is, many children are
already dealing with challenges
walking to school. It seems so
unthinkable that potential kid-
napping and murder should be
added to the list.
I have no knowledge of any
child in Macclenny meeting this
fate while walking to school.
Hopefully, it never happens.
As I write this, Somer Thomp-
son's funeral is taking place and I
think of the message to her killer
that her grieving mother made
to the media: "We're coming for
you."
I was glad when that one
young girl walking on my street
trusted me enough to allow me to
help her, but such gestures could
become a thing of the past.
It saddens me that a day may
dawn when a child can't ask an
adult they don't know for help
because that adult might poten-
tially be a killer.



-'erisi.2Daln


38 E. Macclenny Avenue 259-5040

'AjQL~i^&^


'e watch the
P iorgia game
ue provided by
Red eck Cooking along
with all of our usual menu.








Views vary on time change Eldersource seeks bidders


((From page 1
procedures, especially pruning,
after they get home from work. A
lot of planting, especially of bare
root plants like fruit trees, is done
in the fall also. It's usually more
comfortable to work outside in
late afternoon during this time
of year. When the time changes,
there's not much daylight left at
5:30 pm.
There will be more light
in the morning of course,
but it is much colder. ,
"I'd prefer it if they went
back to standard time and
just left it that way," said b
Dr. Brown.
He's not alone in those
sentiments. ar
Ann Peeler is employed
by the Duval County school
system and drives a school
bus in Baldwin. She wishes
they'd leave DST one way or
the other.
"I don't care for the switching
back and forth. I like the longer
daylight hours of the spring and
summer schedule and I think
they should make it permanent.
Other countries do it."
Presently, it's still dark when
kids catch the school bus in the
morning. According to Ms. Peel-
er, it's actually good for the driv-
ers although parents worry more
about road safety.
"When it's dark, the kids on
the bus are quieter," said Ms.
Peeler. "Many of them actually
go back to sleep during the ride
to school."
Before 2006 in the United
States, DST ended a few days
before Halloween. Statistics
showed that children's pedes-
trian deaths occurred four times
higher than usual on Halloween
than any other night of the year.
In 2007, DST was extended to
the first day of November to pro-
vide more visible light to accom-
modate children who were trick
or treating.
Baker County Middle School
language teacher Melody Hood
says that she and fellow teachers
notice a distinct change in be-
havior of students with the time
change each fall and spring.
"It's common, that first week
the time changes, to see differ-
ences in the students' behavior
patterns," she said. "They stay
up too late, then get up early, so
they're tired. Emotions can be
on edge. We've even noticed that
fights seem to escalate at that
time. Teachers have learned not
to schedule anything major dur-
ing that week, because they end
up repeating the lessons later."
Owner Terry House of Calen-
dar's Pizzeria in Maccenny says
the time changes have a definite
effect on her business.
"We get a much later dinner
crowd in the spring and summer.
People don't even start thinking
about eating supper until around
7:30 pm or even later," she said.
"They've been out working in the
yard or garden or they've been at
a ball game. They stop and eat on
the way home."
The time switch in the fall
changes that. People are in the
restaurant for supper by 5:30 be-
cause it's getting dark. According
to Ms. House, customers are in a


bigger hurry to get home when
it's dark and don't linger at the
restaurant the way they do when
the daylight lasts until nearly
nine o'clock.
"I also had a time getting my
children to go to bed when they
were younger," said Ms. House.
"Even though it was their normal
bedtime, the fact that it was still
light outside just threw every-
thing off."


d prefer it if they went

ack to standard time

d just left it that way.

Dr. Kyle Brown
Madccenny resident

A U.S. Law Enforcement As-
sistance Administration study
found crime to be consistently
reduced by as much as 10-13
percent during DST than during
comparable standard time pe-
riods. More light in the evening
hours is beneficial, as crimes such
as muggings take place most fre-
quently after dusk.

Fun Facts about DST:

Benjamin Franklin is credit-
ed with first proposing daylight-
Saving time in his 1784 essay,
"An Economical Project."
President Woodrow Wil-
son signed the Daylight-Saving
Time bill on March 19, 1918. The
rationale was that it was needed
to help the United States in the
World War I effort. It was expect-
ed that the extra hour of daylight
would conserve coal.
The New Castle News on
March 20, 1918 printed the fol-
lowing: "Make plans at once to
devote that extra hour of day-
light working in war gardens or
at some other out of doors labor
that will aid in helping to win the
war."
DST has been adapted and
suspended many times since
then.
During World War II, it was
called "war time."
Congress passed the Uni-
form Time Act in 1966. This set
the start and end dates for day-
light-saving time, but still left the
decision to observe it up to the in-
dividual states and localities. The
act mandated that DST begin on
the last Sunday in April and end
on the last Sunday in October,
with the changeover to occur at 2
am local time.
The Energy Policy Act of
2005 changed both the starting
and ending dates which went into
effect in 2007. DST now starts on
the second Sunday in March and
ends on the first Sunday in No-
vember.
DST has long been observed
by other countries. In Britain,
during the summer, it was known
as "double summer."
DST is observed in most of
the country, except for Arizona,
Hawaii, Puerto Rico and the Vir-
gin Islands.
While Arizona does not ob-
serve DST, The Navajo Indian


NOTICE OF CERTIFICATION

OF 2009 TAX ROLL


Pursuant to Section 193.122, Florida
Statutes, I, Timothy P Sweat, Property
Appraiser of Baker County, hereby give
notice that the 2009 tax roll for Baker
County was certified to the tax collector
on the 21st day of October 2009, for the
collection of taxes.


October 21, 2009


Timothy P. Sweat, CFA
Baker County Property Appraiser


Reservation, part of which is lo-
cated within the state, does. Odd-
ly, the Hopi Reservation, located
within the Navajo Reservation,
does not.
Alaska is considering the
abolishment of DST during its
2009-10 legislative session.
The state of Indiana has long
been a hotbed of contention re-
garding DST. Some parts of the
state are unevenly divided be-
tween the Eastern and Cen-
tral Time Zones. The clus-
ters of counties that may or
may not observe DST are
scattered across the state,
further adding to the con-
fusion. The state adopted
one DST practice in 2006 to
standardize the situation.
Historically, farmers
S have been among the big-
t gest opponents of DST in
5 Indiana reasoning that they
had to rise before dawn re-
gardless of the season and saw
the measure as pandering to
'"sleepy heads who never both-
ered to milk a cow."
Whether you're for it or against
it, the debate over the benefit of
observing DST is ongoing. Under
federal law, any state legislature
can declare itself exempt from
DST. There is actually a Web site
called FloridahatesDST.org that
urges residents to contact their
state legislators in Tallahassee
and request an end to DST.


To administer some senior services


JOEL ADDINGTON
NEWS EDITOR
reporter@bakercountypress.com
Eldersource, the agency re-
sponsible to the state for over-
seeing elderly care in Northeast
Florida, is seeking proposals
from parties interested in becom-
ing the lead agency for managing
senior services in Baker County
next year.
As the lead agency today, the
Baker County Council on Aging
administers a roughly $181,000
Eldersource contract, but that
could change in the future de-
pending on who else submits a
proposal and who is eventually
chosen by Eldersource's board of
directors in March 2010.
The new contract is for one
year, with an option to renew
annually through 2016, and cov-
ers management and delivery of
in-home care that prevents pre-
mature nursing home placement
as well as community-based
programs like adult day care and
meals delivery; among other ser-
vices.
Until now the contract period
had been for three years.
The Council on Aging's Direc-
tor Mary Baxla approached the
Baker County Commission ear-
lier this month, asking the board
to send Eldersource a letter ex-


Attack pregnant teen


Criminal complaints were
filed against three persons for an
alleged attack on a pregnant 16-
year-old who attempted to break
up a fight between two other ju-
veniles on Quail Lane in south
Macclenny.
The incident took place the
afternoon of October 20, and the
teen said she was attacked and
pushed to the ground by Chris-
tina Jones, 20, Jeremiah Jones,
27, and Leona Jones, no age
listed. Deputy Koty Crews did
not specify in his report how or
whether the three are related.
The trio denied the teen's ac-
cusations, saying she came on
the scene after they broke up the
fight. Deputy Crews noted several
conflicting statements were also
taken from other bystanders.
The complaint is for aggravat-
ed battery because of the teen's
pregnancy.
In other cases:
A complaint for battery was
filed against a 42-year-old male
patient at Northeast Florida State
Hospital for striking two employ-
ees in the eye with a food tray.
Elliott Haire, 24, of Macclenny
said he and James Wright, 20, of
Sanderson were serving lunch
to patients in Building 13 on the
hospital campus when the patient
became angry and waved the tray
in Mr. Wright's face, striking him
in the left eye.
Mr. Haire intervened and was
also struck in the left eye. Deputy
Kevin Jenkins said he did not
interview Mr. Wright, who was
taken to the hospital because his
wound required stitches.
Matthew Eddins, 32, of Mac-


clenny was arrested early on Oc-
tober 24 for battery of Michael
Harvey, also 32 and from Mac-
clenny, during a fight at Mac's
Liquors downtown.
Deputy Robert Simpkins said
Mr. Eddins denied the allegation,
but a trio of witnesses corrobo-
rated Mr. Harvey's statement
that he was struck in the mouth
from behind by Mr. Eddins. The
incident happened just before the
2:00 am closing time.
A complaint alleging bat-
tery was filed against jail inmate
Forencio Montesino, 64, for
shoving and resisting handcuff-
ing by jail officer Jeremy Vanvac-
tor the morning of October 20.
The incident began when the
inmate refused several requests
to quiet himself.


Sidewalks

( rights-of-ways.
Originally, the project in-
cluded walkways along Lowder
Street west of CR 121 to US 90,
however; that work was added to
the county's repaving of the same
stretch.
The Lowder Street improve-
ments are being funded by FDOT
with federal stimulus funds.
The reduction in scope will
also reduce the overall cost first
estimated for the sidewalks,
about $837,000.
"It's probably very high," said
Mr. Lent. "It will come down as
the scope in finalized."


1I660S.6S
259566


Ek

4YII 0~


pressing interest in becoming the
lead agency.
The Council on Aging {COA]
showed its interest as well, sub-
mitting a letter, but Ms. Baxla
anticipated letters from the
private sector, too, and hoped
the county's involvement might
dissuade companies like United
Healthcare from pursuing the
contract.
"It does not commit you to bid
or commit you to anything," she
said. "It just protects the Council
on Aging's funding."
However, according to Elder-
source Director of Operations Bill
Hardy, the county's letter may
have the opposite effect, because
it opened the selection process to
entities outside Baker County.
He said that no letters of inter-
est were received from the private
sector in any of the seven coun-
ties under Edlersource's purview,
but that doesn't prohibit them
from responding to the request
for proposals [RFP].
Had only one entity public,
private or nonprofit shown in-
terest in the contract, Eldersource
would've bypassed the RFP pro-
cess and moved to negotiate an
agreement with that party.
"If it's two or more [interested
parties], it goes to the RFP pro-
cess," said Mr. Hardy.
Part of the misunderstanding
may have been that before this
year, preference was given to mu-
nicipalities interested in serving
as a county's lead agency. That
preference was removed by the


Florida legislature this year with
the change taking effect July 1.
"We have received guidance
from the Department of Elder
Affairs that we can no longer en-
ter into a sole source negotiation
with an interested party simply
because they are a governmental
body," Mr. Hardy said last week
in an e-mail to local officials
across the region.
Furthermore, a majority of
county commissioners expressed
no interest this week in replacing
the Council on Aging [COA], only
saying they wanted to keep the
senior center open and its pro-
grams running.
"I just don't want it to close,"
said Commissioner Mark Hart-
ley. "It just provides so many
good things."
Proposals are due to Elder-
source by February 1.

BWPN meeting
The Baker Women's Political
Network will be having its next
meeting on Tuesday, Novem-
ber 3 at 6:30 at the Chamber of
Commerce. Everyone is invited to
attend. Further information con-
tact Janet Harvin, the network
president, at 707-6415.


4 GRE4? L4CE FOR 4 TI 4I)T4D4Y PA4TY!
ROLLER @I 4?E

Call us for available times for private parties-
Tuesdays, Thursdays & Fridays 9:00 am 7:00 pm
i Just west of1-75 offUS 90


357 NW Hall of Fame Dr.


ake City 386-755-2232A


I www.bakercountypress.com



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Wednesday night 7:00 pm
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THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


thursday, October 29, 2009


Page 4






THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


GLEN ST. MARY



Glen pledges $50K


as part of water grant


to use for connect fees


The Glen St. Mary Town
Council on October 20 voted to
pledge $50,ooo from its reserves
to finance connection fees in the
event it lands a $600,000 grant
for water service to the town's
north sector.
The motion and two others
having to do with the grant ap-
plication constitute what is likely
the final fine tuning the town will
do before it learns whether a fed-
eral Community Development
Block Grant [CDBG] is approved
to finance the bulk of the water
project, which also includes a
second deep well.
The $50,000 pledge gives
Glen St. Mary's grant application
some added points toward the
award decision, but less than the
$100,ooo initially recommended
by its consultant Jordan and As-
sociates of Orange Park.
In workshops earlier this
fall, a majority of the five-mem-
ber council balked at taking
$100,000 from its diminished
$220,000 in cash reserves, de-
spite the fact that the consultants
believe it would have put Glen St.
Mary well into the final running
for the grant.
Instead, the board affirmed
(Councilman Woody Crews was
absent) last week to formalize its
$50,000 commitment.
Glen's bid for a grant was re-
jected last year, a fact that could
count in its favor this year since
the engineering phase is already
complete and the project is ready
to go. If the money is secured,
the town hopes construction bids
will come in lower than expected
based on the fact that contractors
are desperate for work in a sag-
ging economy.
The consultants have already
completed an income assessment
on the north side since the CDBG
grants are primarily for low and
moderate income people. The
town will use the $50,000 pledge
for the $1ooo connect fee to each
residence as long as homeown-
ers opt to do so during initial
construction next year and up to
90 days after the project is com-


Alleges



violation



of order

A criminal complaint was filed
October 20 against a retired min-
ister for violating a court order
to stay away from his wife and
daughter.
The injunction has been in
effect since shortly after Charles
Edward Anderson, 43, was ar-
rested October 12 for an alleged
attack on his wife Tina, 42, and
their 17-year-old daughter at
their residence on SR 23A. He
is out on bail charged with twin
counts of domestic violence bat-
tery stemming from the incident
fueled by the suspect's anger over
the daughter's performance on
household chores.
Tina Ashley, a child protection
investigator, told Deputy Kevin
Jackson that Mr. Anderson was
at the residence when she went
there for an announced visit the
afternoon of October 20. He left
when informed that the court or-
der forbids his presence there or
contact with the wife and daugh-
ter.
Violating the order is a first-
degree misdemeanor.
A similar complaint was made
October 24 by Jason Byrd, 39, of
Macclenny accusing his ex-girl-
friend Laurie Lee, 31, of Jack-
sonville of having contact with
their young child. Mr. Byrd told
Deputy Koty Crews the mother is
allowed only supervised visits.
A complaint for assault was
filed against James Clements,
23, of Jacksonville alleging he
made death threats against ex-
girlfriend Shannen Millard, 28,
of Macclenny.
Ms. Millard told Deputy Pat-
rick McGauley on October 22
that her mother relayed threats
from Mr. Clements, including


that he was coming to Macclenny
to carry them out. The mother
reportedly later had another con-
versation with the suspect and
talked him out of it.


plete.
After that, the town has com-
mitted $500 per residence as
long as connection takes place
between the 90-day deadline and
one year.
A third element of the ap-
plication approved last week
shaves an estimated $6500 off
the construction cost by having
Glen's two maintenance workers
furnish labor and equipment for
sodding.
In other business that evening,
the town's code enforcement of-
ficer Donna Loadholtz reported
two pending cases have come
into compliance after being cited
for excessive refuse.
Ms. Loadholtz, who serves in a
dual capacity as Glen's secretary,
indicated she will re-file against
landlord Ronnie Kirkland for
refuse and neglected mowing
around a rental trailer on the
town's north side.
The defendant came into com-
pliance on adjoining property
after the county's Code Enforce-
ment Board found it in violation
for refuse and trash.
Ms. Loadholtz said at the time
she was not aware of the condi-
tion of the second tract, and she
was advised by town attorney
Joel Foreman of Lake City that
she can re-file against Mr. Kirk-
land without beginning the com-
plaint process all over again.


Fright


Nights...

Halloween fright nights at
the old county jail continue this
weekend on Friday and Satur-
day, October 30 and October 31.
The Baker County Historical So-
ciety and the Baker County High
School History Club have teamed
up again to bring you the scare of
your life!
All proceeds from the haunted
jail, tours and refreshment sales
contribute to the History Club's
annual trips, and the Old Jail's
preservation and restoration. A
less frightening candlelight tour
of the former sheriffs office and
quarters next door offers inter-
esting history about the Old Jail.
Come and join us each night
for an experience you won't for-
get at West 42 McIver Street next
to the Taber Library!



Airlifted



from 1-10

David Brian Cullum's Ford
utility truck burst into flames
after it struck a tree on I-io
near the Columbia Countyline
in west Baker County about
9:oo am October 22.
According to the Florida
Highway Patrol, the vehicle
was traveling east at mile
marker 317 when it drifted
off the road for unknown rea-
sons.
Mr. Cullum, 50, of Orange
Park was flown to Shands with
serious injuries. He was wear-
ing a seat belt and the crash
was not alcohol related, said
FHP Trooper A. Cummings.
The totaled truck's value
was estimated at $18,ooo.




-- - liii.


Legal Notices


REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS RFQ #09-03
The New River Solid Waste Association
(NRSWA) is soliciting letters of interest and state-
ments of qualifications from those individuals or
firms interested in providing General Counsel and
Legal Services to the NRSWA. Attorney(s) to be
assigned to NRSWA account must be a member in
good standing with the Florida Bar Association.
Respondent must have an office located within
the counties of Baker, Bradford or Union County,
Florida. DEADLINE for receipt of submittals or
alternate submittals in response to this request
is November 10, 2009 at 5:00 p.m. Propos-
als should be mailed to NRSWA, P.O. Box 647,
Raiford, FL 32083, or hand delivered to: Lydia
Greene, NRSWA, 24276 NE 157th Street, Raiford,
FL 32083. NRSWA is located 2.5 miles north
of Raiford, Florida on State Road 121 in Union
County, Florida. Submissions must be in a sealed
envelope clearly marked Request for Attorney/Le-
gal Counsel, RFQ #09-03 with nine (9) copies
enclosed. The proposals for selection of Attorney/
Legal Counsel will be heard by the NRSWA Board
of Directors at their November 12, 2009 regularly
scheduled board meeting at 5:30 p.m. Submis-
sions by fax or other electronic media will not be
accepted under any circumstances. Late submis-
sions will not be accepted, but will be returned
unopened to the sender at the sender's expense.
10/22-10/29
ARRA/Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assis-
tance Grant (JAG)
Baker County is proposing to renovate the old
Baker County Jail, 56 North 2nd Street,
Macclenny, FL 32063, using funding from the
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA)
and the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance
Grant (JAG) program.
A public meeting will be held for the purpose
of discussing the project as proposed in the ap-
plications. The meeting will be held at the Baker
County Commission chambers, 55 N. 3rd St., Mac-
clenny, FL 32063 on Thursday, October 29, 2009,
at 2:00 p.m.
According to the Americans with Disabilities
Act, persons needing a special accommodation
or an interpreter to participate in a public hearing
should contact the Administration Department at
(904) 259-3613, at least 48 hours prior to the time
of the hearing.
10/22-10/29
HIGGINBOTHAM'S TOWING & RECOVERY
7611 WEST MT. VERNON
GLEN ST. MARY, FL. 32040-1120
Phone (904) 259-4375 FAX (904) 259-6146
The following vehicle will be sold at public
auction November 13, 2009 at 10:00 am, at Hig-
ginbotham's Towing & Recovery, 7611 West Mt.
Vernon, Glen St. Mary, FL. 32040.
1998 Freightliner Tractor
VIN #1FUPCSZB3WL888359
10/29
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIR-
CUIT, IN AND FOR BAKER COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 02-2009-CA-0229
AMERICAN ENTERPRISE BANK
OF FLORIDA,
Plaintiffs,
vs.
COREY J. GRIFFIS,
And YOLANDA D. GRIFFIS,
Defendant.

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: COREY GRIFFIS, not known to be dead or
alive
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Verified Mortgage
Foreclosure Complaint has been filed against you
on the following described property:
Parcel ID# 01-2S-21-0000-0000-0061
A part of Government Lots 14 & 15, Sec-
tion 1, Township 2 South, Range 21 East,
Baker County, Florida, and being more
particularly described as follows: Begin at
the Northwest corner of said Government
Lot 15; thence N 8915'40" East, along
the North line of said Government Lot 15,
82.35 feet; thence South 0044'20" E,
312.25 feet; thence South 8915'40" West,
158.62 feet to a point of Easterly bound-
ary of lands described in Official Records
Book 13, page 605, of the public records
of said County; thence North 0044'20"
West, along said Easterly boundary of Of-
ficial Records Book 13, page 605, 312.25
feet to the Northeast corner thereof;
thence North 8915'40" East 76.27 feet
to the Point of Beginning. TOGETHER
WITH AND SUBJECT TO AN EASEMENT
for ingress and egress; A part of Gov-
ernment Lot 15, Section 1, Township 2
South, Range 21 East, Baker County, Flor-
ida, and being more particularly described
as follows: Commence at the Northwest
corner of said Government Lot 15; thence
North 8915'40" East, along the North line
of said Government Lot 15; 240.97 feet;
thence South 0044'20" East, 624.50 feet
to the Northerly right of way line of James
Britt Road (a 60.00 foot right of way);
thence South 8915'40" West along said
Northerly right of way line 133.62 feet to
the Point of Beginning; thence continue
South 8915'40" West, along said North-
erly right of way line 50.00 feet; thence
North 0044'20" West, 268.95 feet to a
point of non tangent curve being concave
to the South and having a radius of 50.00
feet; thence along and around said curve
an arc distance of 261.80 feet said curve
being subtended by a chord bearing and
distance of North 8915'40" East, 50.00
feet thence South 0044'20" East, 268.95
feet to the Point of Beginning.
TOGETHERWITH that 2001 HOMD Double-
wide Mobile Home VIN HM01GA0115864A
& HM01GA0115864B.
and you are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on FRANK E. MA-
LONEY, JR., PA., Attorney, whose address is 445
East Macclenny Avenue, Macclenny, Florida 32063;
(904) 259-3155, within thirty (30) days after the
firsl publication of Ihe notice and on or before
the 30th day of November, 2009, and to file the
original with the Clerk of this Court either before
service on FRANK E. MALONEY, JR., PA., attorney
or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relieve demanded in
the Complaint or Petition.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on
this 23rd day of October, 2009.

T.A. "AL" FRASER
CLERK OF COURT
By: JAMIE CREWS
Deputy Clerk
10/29-11/19


S RENTALS oR SALES

Had Wae Rusty Waer? Smefly Waaee r

Iron Filters and Conditioners

o W LT
Water Treatment

Free Water Tests

Well & Pump Supplies


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
8TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR BAKER
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 02-2009-CA-000023
ARCH BAY,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOHN W. FARRELL, etal,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:
WRIGHT EDWARD NOBLE
LastAddress Unknown
Current Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Fore-
closure of Mortgage on the following described
property:
A parcel of land in the Northwest Quarter
of Section 8, Township I South, Range 21
East, Baker County, Florida, being more
particularly described as follows:
Begin at the intersection of the Westerly
right of way line of State Road No. 127
(100 foot right of way) and the Northerly
boundary of Section 8, Township I South,
Range 21 East, Baker County, Florida, run
thence S 6014'45" W along said Westerly
right of way line a distance of 268.35 feet
to the beginning of a curve to the left hav-
ing a radius of 3,869.83 feet and being
concave to the Northeasterly, run thence
along the arc of said curved right of way
line a distance of 331.19 feet through a
central angle of 454'12.5", run thence
S 88052' IT' W, parallel with the North-
erly boundary of said Section 8, a dis-
tance of 706.40 feet, thence N 101'43"
W, a distance of 595.98 feet to a point
on the Northerly boundary of said Sec-
tion 8, thence N 88052' 17" E, along said
Northerly boundary a distance of 769.26
feet to the point of beginning. Subject
to a 20 foot easement for ingress and
egress along the Southerly boundary of
the above-described
property.
LESS AND EXCEPT:
A part of those lands conveyed in Official
Records Book 92, Page 293, Section 8,
Township I South, Range 21 East, Baker
County, Florida, being more particularly
described as follows:
As a point of reference commence at in-
tersection of the Westerly right-of-way line
of State Road No. 127, a 100 foot right of
way as now established, and the North
line of Section 8, Township I South, Range
21 East, Baker County, Florida, said point
being the Northeast corner of those lands
conveyed in Official Records Book 92,
Page 293, thence along said Westerly right
of way line of the following two courses;
S06014'45" W, a distance of 267.61 feet
to the point of curvature of a curve con-
cave to the Northeast having a radius of
3869.19 feet, thence along the arc of said
curve 332.0 feet, said arc being subtended
by a chord bearing of S 03o42'27" W and
a chord distance of 331.00 feet to the
Southeast corner of aforesaid lands con-
veyed in Official Records Book 92, Page
293, thence along the South line of said
lands S 88052'17" W, a distance of 706.57
feet to the Southwest corner of said lands,
being the point of beginning, thence N
01009'34" W, along the West line of said
lands, a distance of 290.40 feet, thence
N 88052'17" E, a distance of 150.00
feet, thence S 01009'34" E, a distance of
290.40 feet, thence N 88052'17" E, a dis-
tance of 150.00 feet, thence S 01009'34"
E, a distance of 290.40 feet to the South
line of aforesaid lands, thence along said
line S 88052'17" W, a distance of 150.00
feet to the Point of Beginning.
ALSO LESS AND EXCEPT:
A part of those lands conveyed in Official
Records Book 92, Page 293, Section 8,
Township I South, Range 21 East, Baker
County, Florida, being more particularly
described as follows:
As a point of reference commence at in-
tersection of the westerly right-of-way
line of State Road No. 127, a 100 foot
right of way as now established, and the
North line of section 8, Township 1 South,
Range 21 East, Baker County, Florida,
said point being the Northeast comer of
those lands conveyed in Official Records
Book 92, Page 293, thence along said
Westerly right of way line the following
two courses; S06014'45" W, a distance
of 267.61 feet to the point of curvature
of a curve concave to the Northeast and
having a radius of 3869.19 feet, thence
continuing along said right of way line
along the arc of said curve 145.40 feet
said arc being subtended by a chord bear-
ing of S 05005'20" W 145.40 feet, thence
N 62o30'26" W 125.30 feet thence N.
0107'04" W 349.95 feet to the North
line of aforesaid lands, thence along said
North line N 88052' 56" E 160.02 feet to
the Point of Beginning.
AND ALSO:
Begin a the intersection of the Westerly
right-of-way line of County Road No. 127,
a 100 foot right of way as now
established) and the North line of Sec-
tion 8, Township 1 South, Range 21 East,
Baker County, Florida, said point being
the Northeast corner of those lands con-
veyed in Official Records Book 92, Page
293, thence along said Westerly right of
way line S 0614'45" W 267.61 feet to
the Point of Curvature of a curve con-
cave to the Northeast and having a ra-
dius of 3869.19 feet, thence continuing
along said right of way line along the arc
of said curve 145.40 feet, said arc be-
ing subtended by a chord bearing of S
0505'20" W 145.40 feet to the Point of
Beginning. From said point of beginning
continue along said curve with radius of
3869.19 feet through a central angle of
0008'53" for an arc distance of 10.00
feet (chord = S 0358'36" W 10.00 feet),
thence N 6226'24" W 124.30 feet, thence
N 01 01'04" W 10.00 feet, thence run S
6230'26" E 125.30 feet to the Point of
Beginning.
has been filed against you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Marshall C. Watson, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff,
whose address is 1800 NW 49TH STREET, SUITE
120, FT. LAUDERDALE FL 33309 on or before
November 12, 2009, a date which is within thirty
(30) days after the first publication of this Notice
in the (Please publish in BAKER COUNTY PRESS)
and file the original with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief demanded in the
complaint.
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY
WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER
TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU
ARE ENTITLED AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE
PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE
CONTACT (AL FRASER) CLERK OF COURT OF
BAKER COUNTY, FLORIDA AT 339 E. MACCLENNY


AVENUE, MACCLENNY, FLORIDA (904) 259-3121
WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF
THIS NOTICE OF HEARING, IF YOU ARE HEARING
OR VOICE IMPAIRED CALL 1-800-955-8771.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court
this 12th day of October, 2009.
Al Fraser
As Clerk of the Court
By Jamie Crews
As Deputy Clerk
10/22-10/29


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR BAKER COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 02-2009-CA-000184
DIVISION:
CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC,
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
JOHN LAURAMORE ETAL,
DEFENDANTSS.

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:
JOHN LAURAMORE
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
425 LINDA STREET
MACCLENNY, FL 32063
CURRENT ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN
JESSICA LAURAMORE
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
425 LINDA STREET
MACCLENNY, FL 32063
CURRENT ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM-
ING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS)
WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM
AN INTEREST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN
CURRENT ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose
a mortgage on the following property in BAKER
County, Florida:
THE SOUTH 1/2 OF LOT 1, BLOCK 7 OF
E.R. RHODEN'S ADDITION TO THE TOWN
OF MACCLENNY, FLORIDA, AS RECORD-
ED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 4 OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF BAKER COUNTY,
FLORIDA, AND BEING MORE PARTICU-
LARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COM-
MENCE AND BEGIN AT THE INTERSEC-
TION OF THE NORTH LINE OF LINDA
STREET, A 50 FOOT RIGHT OF WAY,
WITH THE WEST LINE OF JOHN STREET,
A 50 FOOT UNIMPROVED RIGHT OF WAY
AND THENCE RUN NORTH 3 DEGREES
06 MINUTES 48 SECONDS WEST ALONG
THE SAID WEST LINE, A DISTANCE OF
99.78 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 87
DEGREES 48 MINUTES 00 SECONDS
WEST, NOW DEPARTING FROM THE
SAID WEST LINE, A DISTANCE OF 97.57
FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 3 DEGREES
10 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 99.36 FEET TO THE SAID
NORTH LINE; THENCE RUN SOUTH 87
DEGREES 48 MINUTES 00 SECONDS
EAST ALONG THE SAID NORTH LINE,
A DISTANCE OF 108.50 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written defenses
within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on
Florida Default Law Group, PL., Plaintiff's attorney,
whose address is 9119 Corporate Lake Drive, Suite
300, Tampa, Florida 33634, and file the original
with this Court either before service on Plaintiff's
attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the Complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once each week
for two consecutive weeks in the The Baker County
Press.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court
on this 12th day of October, 2009.
Al Fraser
Clerk of the Court
By: Jamie Crews
As Deputy Clerk
Invoice to & Copy to:
Florida Default Law Group, P.L.
PO. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
CHASEDIRECT-CONV--abiven-F09087028
10/22-10/29
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
TIMBER SALE ST. MARY'S SHOALS PARK

The Baker County Board of Commissioners
is seeking lump sum proposals from qualified
individuals or firms to cut and remove trees at St.
Mary's Shoals Park in Baker County, FL. The timber
sale will include approximately 386 acres of 3rd
row thinning with a select cut and 5 acres of clear-
cutting. Lump sum proposals will be accepted until
Friday, November 6, 2009 at 3:00 pm.
Two (2) copies of the proposal shall be submit-
ted to the Baker County Board of Commissioners,
Baker County Administration Building, 55 North
Third Street, Macclenny, FL 32063 on or before the
aforementioned date and time. Submittals should
be marked "Timber Sale RFP" on the outside of
the proposal. All prospective bidders/respondents
are hereby cautioned not to contact any County Of-
ficial other than the specified contact person. Any
questions regarding the project should be made to
David W. Richardson at (904) 259-3613.
The Board of County Commissioners reserves
the right to reject any and all proposals, to waive
any informalities and irregularities in the proposal
process, and to award the contracts) in the best
interest of the county. All contracts will be fash-
ioned so as to protect the county's interest.
EOE/ADA/FAIR HOUSING JURISDICTION
10/22-10/29
NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING
The North Florida Broadband Authority
("NFBA") announces a public meeting to which all
interested persons are invited. The NFBA is a legal
entity and public body created pursuant to the
provisions of Section 163.01, Florida Statutes,
and an Interlocal Agreement among: Baker, Brad-
ford, Columbia, Gilchrist, Hamilton, Jefferson,
Levy, Madison, Putnam, Suwannee, Taylor and
Union Counties and municipalities of Cedar Key,
Cross City, Lake City, Live Oak, Monticello, White
Springs and Worthington Springs, Florida. The
regular meeting will be held at 2:30 p.m. E.D.T.
on Friday, October 30, 2009 at the Lake City
Community College, Medical Center Auditorium,
Building 103, 132 S.E. Foundation Place, Lake
City, Florida. The NFBA Board will address general
operating issues of the NFBA. If a person decides
to appeal any decision made by the NFBA with
respect to any matter considered at the meeting,
such person will need a record of the proceedings
and may need to ensure that a verbatim record is
made, including the testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is to be made. In accordance
with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons
needing special accommodations or an interpreter
to participate in this proceeding, or if you have any
questions regarding this meeting, please contact
the Clerk to the NFBA Board at (877) 552-3482,
at least two business days prior to the date of the
meeting.
10/29



PRESS


CLASSIFIED

ONLY

$6.00 cash/check

Deadline Monday at 5:00

THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS
* S 5666666666eeeeeeeee S S


Registration of Fictitious Names
I the undersigned, being duly sworn, do here-
by declare under oaththat the names of all persons
interested in the business or profession carried on
under the name of Out of the Box whose principle
place of business is: 10189 N. Sherman Avenue,
Glen St. Mary, Florida 32040 and the extent of the
interest of each is as follows:
NAME EXTENT OF INTEREST
Mary E. Stewart 50%
Lesia A. McKinnon 50%
Mary E. Stewart
Signature
Lesia A. McKinnon
Signature
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF BAKER
Sworn to and subscribed before me this 27th
day of October, 2009.
Al Fraser
Clerk of Court
Baker County, Florida
By: Jamie Crews
As Deputy Clerk
10/29p
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 8th JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR BAKER
COUNTY
Case #:07-000119-CA
Division #:
UNC:
U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for the
C-BASS Mortgage Loan Asset-Backed Certificates,
Series 2006-MH1
Plaintiff,
-vs.-

Henry L. Ellis and Elizabeth L. Ellis, his wife; Baker
County Housing Rehabilitation Program; State of
Florida, Department of Revenue;
Defendantss.

AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an
Order rescheduling foreclosure sale dated October
22, 2009 entered in Civil Case No. 07-000119-CA
of the Circuit Court of the 8th Judicial Circuit in
and for Baker County, Florida, wherein U.S. Bank
National Association, as Trustee for the C-BASS
Mortgage Loan Asset-Backed Certificates, Series
2006-MH1, Plaintiff and Henry L. Ellis and Eliza-
beth L. Ellis, his wife are defendantss, I will sell to
the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE EAST
DOOR OF THE BAKER COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT 339 EAST MACCLENNY AVENUE,
MACCLENNEY, BAKER COUNTY, FLORIDA, BE-
TWEEN 11:00 A.M. AND 2:00 PM., November 17,
2009, the following described property as set forth
in said Final Judgment, to-wit:
PARCEL "A":
PART OF THE WEST HALF OF GOVERN-
MENT LOT 18 IN SECTION 36, TOWN-
SHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 20 EAST, BAKER
COUNTY FLORIDA MORE PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE
AT NW CORNER OF SAID LOT 18 AND
THENCE N.87 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 48
SECONDS E., ALONG THE NORTH LINE
OF SAID LOT 18 A DISTANCE OF 330.00
FEET TO THE NW CORNER OF LANDS
PREVIOUSLY DEEDED TO PHILLIP M.
AND BLONZELLA K. RUISE; THENCE
CONTINUE N.87 DEGREES 13 MINUTES
48 SECONDS EAST, STILL ALONG SAID
NORTH LINE 330 FEET TO THE NE COR-
NER OF SAID RUISE LAND; THENCE S.00
DEGREES 24 MINUTES 51 SECONDS E.,
ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID RUISE
LAND, 647.11 FEET; THENCE CONTINUE
S.00 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 51 SECONDS
E., 3.37 FEET; THENCE S.87 DEGREES 13
MINUTES 48 SECONDS W., PARALLEL
TO THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID LANDS,
220.00 FEET; THENCE N.00 DEGREES 24
MINUTES 51 SECONDS E., PARALLEL
TO WEST LINE OF SAID RUISE LAND,
53.48 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING; THENCE S.87 DEGREES 13 MIN-
UTES 48 SECONDS W., PARALLEL TO
THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID RUISE LANDS,
110.00 FEET; THENCE N.00 DEGREES 24
MINUTES 51 SECONDS W., 105.00 FEET
TO THE NW CORNER OF A 210 FEET BY
110 FEET PARCEL EXCEPTED FROM SAID
RUISE LANDS; THENCE N.87 DEGREES
13 MINUTES 48 SECONDS E., 110.00
FEET; THENCE S.00 DEGREES 24 MIN-
UTES 51 SECONDS E., 105.00 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING TOGETHER
WITH;.
PARCEL "C":
PART OF THE WEST HALF OF GOVERN-
MENT LOT 18 IN SECTION 36, TOWN-
SHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 20 EAST, BAKER
COUNTY, FLORIDA, MORE PARTICULAR-
LY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE NW CORNER OF
SAID LOT18 AND THENCE N 87 DEGREES
13 MINUTES 48 SECONDS E, ALONG THE
NORTH LINE OF SAID LOT 18 A DIS-
TANCE OF 330.00 FEET TO THE NW COR-
NER OF LANDS PREVIOUSLY DEEDED TO
PHILLIP M. AND BLONZELLA K RUISE;
THENCE CONTINUE N 87 DEGREES 13
MINUTES 48 SECONDS E, STILL ALONG
SAID NORTH LINE 330.00 FEET TO THE
NE CORNER OF SAID RUISE LAND;
THENCE S 00 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 51
SECONDS E, ALONG THE EAST LINE OF
SAID RUISE LAND, 647.11 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE HEREIN
DESCRIBED LAND; THENCE CONTINUE S
00 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 51 SECONDS
E, 3.37 FEET; THENCE S.87 DEGREES 13
MINUTES 48 SECONDS W., PARALLEL
TO THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID LANDS,
220.00 FEET; THENCE N.00 DEGREES 24
MINUTES 51 SECONDS E., PARALLEL TO
THE WEST LINE OF SAID RUISE LANDS,
53.48 FEET; THENCE S.87 DEGREES 13
MINUTES 48 SECONDS W., PARALLEL TO
THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID RUISE LANDS,
110.00 FEET; THENCE N.OO0 DEGREES 24
MINUTES 51 SECONDS W., 105.00 FEET
TO THE NW CORNER OF A 110 FEET BY
210 FEET PARCEL OF LAND EXCEPTED
FROM SAID RUISE LANDS; THENCE N.
87 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 48 SECONDS
E., 60.00 FEET; THENCE N. 24 DEGREES
45 MINUTES 28 SECONDS E., 99.88 FEET;
THENCE S.85 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 22
SECONDS E., 28.54 FEET; THENCE S.41
DEGREES 00 MINUTES 15 SECONDS E.,
305.61 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING.

TOGETHER WITH DOUBLEWIDE MO-
BILE HOME, YEAR: 2005, MAKE: FLEET-
WOOD, VIN#GAFL475A76055AV21 &
VIN#GAFL475B76055AV21, PERMANENTLY AF-
FIXED THEREON.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN
THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH-
IN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.

DATED at Macclenny, Florida, this 25th day of
October, 2009.
AL FRASER
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Baker County, Florida
By: Jamie Crews
Deputy Clerk
ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF:
SHAPIRO & FISHMAN, LLP
10004 North Dale Mabry Hwy, Suite 112


Tampa, Florida 33618
10/29-11/5


lbursday, October 29, 2009


Page 5





THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


LAND PLANNING AGENCY


Setback variance okayed

For convenience store at state line


JOEL ADDINGTON I NEWS EDITOR
reporter@bakercountypress.com
The northeast corner of Johnny's Snack n' Gas
north of Macclenny just south of the Georgia state
line sits on the property line and the roofs eve
protrudes over it about two feet, which before last
week's Land Planning Agency meeting put owner
Richard Madsen's property out of compliance with
the county's 15-foot setback rule.
Mr. Madsen told the agency board members the
evening of October 22 that he attempted to buy
some of the adjacent access easement north of the
store from Larry Sigers, the store's previous owner,
but it wasn't for sale.
Use of the easement is shared by the store and a
neighboring nursery. It leads east to Mr. Sigers' 40
acres of cropland.
Mr. Madsen requested a variance on the setback
from the Land Planning Agency [LPA] in anticipa-
tion of selling the store to his tenant. Typically banks
won't finance such purchases unless the property is
in compliance with land regulations.
"No one's asked for it, but I know they will," he
said after LPA unanimously granted the request.
The simplest way to correct the matter was apply-
ing for the variance.
"You can get the variance, move the building or
move the property line, so the variance is the easi-
est," explained Ed Preston, the county's planning
director, who recommended granting the request.
Exempting the structure located on the east
side of SR 121 from the required setback still left
unresolved the roofs overhang into the easement.
Members of the county's Development Review
Committee, a group of department heads that offer
recommendations to the LPA, feared that if the ac-
cess easement ever became a roadway, the overhang
could present a safety hazard.
"They had heartburn with this," Mr. Preston said,
adding the committee recommended denial of the
variance.
The planning director disagreed though, saying
the 60-foot easement was wide enough for two lanes
of traffic, plus drainage ditches on either side; and
still wouldn't impede vehicular flow.
Also approved by LPA board members last
week:


Michael and Judith Westberry's request for a
special exception to use their Macclenny II home for
business purposes.
Mr. Westberryis starting a data retrieval business
and told board members he would not create any
additional traffic from customers or deliveries. He
said that digital storage devices like hard drives will
arrive at a Jacksonville location where he intends to
pick them up on his way home from work.
'The only thing different the neighbors might no-
tice is me carrying in a few more boxes from my car,"
said Mr. Westberry.
Nonetheless, two neighboring Birch Street resi-
dents said they were concerned about additional
traffic the business could draw.
"I worry about setting a precedent in our neigh-
borhood ... and who might enforce these promises,"
said Robert Griffis, who lives across the street from
the Westberrys.
Board chairman C.J. Thompson said that if ex-
tra traffic, signs or other problems arise, they can
be resolved through the county's code enforcement
board.
The special exception expires in two years.
"Of all the home businesses you can have, this
seems like one of the better ones," board member
Pat Collier said.
To ensure timely consideration of future re-
quests, the LPA also recommended having an alter-
nate board member available to fill in when the body
lacks a four-member quorum.
Meetings in the past have been re-scheduled and
re-advertised because two board members couldn't
attend.
Board member Amy Rios was absent from last
week's deliberations.
Earlier this month, after appointing two new
LPA members, Jesse Davis and Allison Broughton,
the Baker County Commission instructed Mr. Pres-
ton to draft an ordinance establishing an alternate
member for the five-person LPA to stand in when
the grouped lack a quorum. Larry Porterfield was
identified as the alternate.
The newly-constituted LPA recommended ap-
proval of the ordinance, but added that Mr. Porter-
field should attend each meeting and participate in
discussions, but only vote when needed.
Mr. Porterfield favored the arrangement as well.


Law office, portable damaged


An attorney's office, school
portable and water fountain at
Northeast Florida State Hospital
were all vandalized this past week
with combined damage estimates
totaling more than $2200, most
of which was for the water foun-
tain.
Deputy Kevin Jenkins re-
sponded the morning of October
21 to the hospital where he said a
27-year-old male patient admit-
ted he damaged the wall-mount-
ed fountain September 30. It was
valued at $2110.
That morning John Staples,
principal of the Alternative
School, reported an unknown
person broke into a locked por-
table classroom on the W. Min-
nesota Ave. campus overnight.
Desk drawers were found ajar


and a garbage can turned over,
but teacher Jack Spencer said
nothing of value was missing ex-
cept a bag of chips and possibly
some can sodas.
Deputy Tracie Benton noted a
broken window, a chair outside
the classroom next to the win-
dow, and drug-smoking pipe by
the chair.
The case was forwarded to in-
vestigations.
Police were alerted to a
break-in at the law office of Man-
niko and Baris, 527 W. Mac-
clenny Ave., in the early morning
hours of October 23.
There they found a rear door
unsecured and hole in the ceiling,
apparently where the intruder
had fallen through and set off
the alarm. Entry was likely made


through an outside attic door
next to which a five-gallon bucket
was located.
No items appeared to be miss-
ing.

Halloween at Wells
W. Frank Wells Nursing Home
invites everyone to its annual
Trick-or-Treat activity Saturday,
October 31 from 6:00-8:00 pm.
This is one of the residents' fa-
vorite activities and to ensure its
continued success, we are asking
that anyone interested in helping
to please bring candy donations
by the activity office.


Motorist had no license


The driver of a car that at-
tempted to leave the parking lot
of the Country Club Lounge fol-
lowing a fight was arrested early
October 24 for having no license.
Deputy Trent Page said he and
several other officers arrived at
the bar on South 6th about 12:20
am and saw Charles Unartel, 21,
of Glen driving at high speed
leaving the property. According
to the officer, the suspect's 1998
Dodge nearly struck a patrol
car assigned to Deputy Robert
Simpkins, and when hailed by
the deputies, Mr. Unartel put the
vehicle in reverse as they chased
him down on the property.
A computer check determined
the absence of a license, and Mr.
Unartel was arrested, as was pas-
senger Leonard Brock, 30, of
Glen, who refused repeated com-
mands to cease cursing at others
gathered at the scene.
Deputy Page also noted Mr.
Brock initially resisted being
handcuffed.
Deputies the past week ar-
rested five other motorists for
driving on licenses that had been
suspended.
Tracy Motes, 38, no address
listed, was stopped near US 90
and Lowder St. in west Mac-
clenny about 2:30 the morning
of October 20. Deputy Simpkins
said her Nissan matched the de-
scription of a vehicle parked for
some time behind the Macclenny
Waffle House on South 6th.
Restaurant workers called po-
lice after becoming suspicious,
and Deputy Simpkins said he
made the traffic stop minutes
later.
Ms. Motes'license has ten pri-
or suspensions and she has been
declared an habitual offender.
She told the officer she was at the
wheel because a male passenger
she met earlier was too drunk to
drive.
The license of James Hack,
33, of Jacksonville was suspend-
ed 16 times, Deputy Chris Walker
learned after stopping him near
South 6th and US 90 in Mac-


clenny about 7:30 the evening of
October 20.
The deputy said he made the
stop because Mr. Hack's 1988
GMC truck had a headlight out.
The driver was also wanted in
Nassau County for a child sup-
port offense.
Lynwood Kirk, 33, of St.
George, Ga. was jailed late on
October 24 after the 1995 Chev-
rolet he was driving was stopped
on US 90 west in Macclenny after
he was spotted driving without a
seat belt.
Deputy Walker learned the
driver had five prior suspensions
for failure to pay fines, failure to
appear in court and drunk driv-
ing.
The officer noted Mr. Kirk
threatened bodily harm while be-
ing taken to jail and after arrival,
saying "he was a convict from
way back and knew how to work
the system."


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He was also charged with hav-
ing the wrong license tag on his
vehicle.
Deputy Simpkins said he
responded to a suspicious behav-
ior call at Zaxby's restaurant in
south Macclenny about 9:45 the
evening of October 24 and found
Tyler Payne, 23, of Glen St. Mary
seated at the wheel of a Saturn in
the drive-through lane.
Mr. Payne was jailed due to
two prior suspensions, one for
drunk driving.
The license of Robert Thomp-
son, 20, of Macclenny had four
prior suspensions when he was
stopped at the wheel of a 1992
Chevrolet the evening of October
24 for having no tag light.
Deputy Walker made the stop
at Ohio and 8th Sts. in north
Macclenny about 7:45. The sus-
pensions were for failure to pay
court fines.


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Page 6


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Thursday, October 29, 2009


THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


COURT


Five
A Baxter man wi
year prison term a
no contest in circui
ber 26 to multiple c
including trafficking
scription pills and n
Michael Wayne
was adjudicated gi
be liable for a $50
cause of the quan
involved in two coi
made by the sheriff
in November, 2008
In the first case,
sold 5.2 grams of m
informant for $25.
purchase, also at 1
off CR 127, Mr. Rho
marijuana and hydi
A third set of cha
when police went
with arrest warrant
found 37 young pot
cultivation on a por
amount inside that t
had been smoking.
Judge James N
all sentences to rui
ly, and gave Mr. R
for 206 days alrea
county jail. The de
a criminal record
drunk driving, n
drug possession, d
toxication, theft an


years for multiple drug sales
11 serve a five- of drug paraphernalia, made in west Macclenny. in April with conspiring with an
after pleading In another sentencing this Ms. Walker gets credit for 143 employee of his and an employee
it court Octo- week involving a drug seller, days in county jail. of the Dollar General store in
drug offenses, Yolanda N. Walker of Macclenny Kevin Marquee Johnson Macclenny to steal at least $300
g in both pre- got nearly 29 months after plead- pleaded no contest to violating in merchandise.
marijuana. ing no contest to eight counts of probation for felony driving on Store security tapes caught
Rhoden, 36, Mr. Rollins and accomplice
guilty and will Mickey Turner bringing items
,ooo fine be- to the check-out counter, where
tity of drugs Mr. Turner's wife Roberta Mills
ntrolled buys placed them in bags without
's department scanning them.
3. The original charge against
Mr. Rhoden Mr. Rollins was felony theft. A
marijuana to an restitution hearing is set for next
In the second month.
his residence *Jerame Barber admitted vio-
den sold both lasting probation for felony theft
rocodone. and will serve a year in jail minus
arges resulted Michael Rhoden Yolanda Walker Tommy Rollins 78 days already served. Judge
to his trailer Nilon revoked his probation.
s in April, and sale and possession. a suspended license in 2007 and Troy Glover made a similar
t plants under Ms. Walker, 40, will be on was given a year and three days admission and got to months in
ch and a small drug-offender probation two in prison less 229 days already jail less 148 days. He had been on
the defendant years following her release from served. The sentence is concur- probation for sale and possession
prison, and is liable for nearly rent to a prison term Mr. John- of synthetic narcotics.
ilon ordered $11oo in court costs. Judge Nilon son is already serving. Judge Nilon ordered a two-
n concurrent- adjudicated her guilty. Tommy Rollins of Olustee, a year probation for Chester Jeffer-
hoden credit She was arrested following part time minister and owner of son after he pleaded no contest to
idy served in three undercover buys arranged a downtown Macclenny garage, forgery counts. He was ordered
defendant has by sheriffs investigators in June pleaded no contest to a reduced to pay nearly $500 restitution
that includes of this year. The drugs involved charge of petty theft and was and the sentence is concurrent to
misdemeanor were crack cocaine and the pre- placed on less restrictive admin- one in Bradford County.


disorderly in-
id possession


scription medicine clonazepan,
and the controlled buys were


istrative probation for one year.
Mr. Rollins, 55, was charged


Took property from a U-Haul


Police arrested a Macclenny
woman October 23 on bur-
glary and grand theft charges
after discovering in her south
Macclenny home some of the
estimated $7000 worth of
property stolen from a U-Haul
trailer at the Travelodge two
days before.
"Thus far Cindy Pearce [the
suspect] has not been coop-
erative and continues to ham-
per my efforts to recover the
remaining stolen property,"
states a report from sheriffs
investigator John Hardin.
Other officers first made
contact with Ms. Pearce,
45, shortly after finding the
empty rental trailer at nearby
residence on Glen William-
son Road and hearing from a
neighbor that two loads were
taken from the moving truck
to Ms. Pearce's address.
Police were responding to
reports of loud music when
they found the U-Haul match-
ing the description given by
the victim earlier in the day.
According to police, Ms.
Pearce consented to a search
of her home and changed
her story several times about
where the stolen items came
from before admitting she'd
taken them from the U-Haul
to the residence.
The looted items included
two flat screen televisions and
a child's "power wheel" Jeep.
They belonged to Kevin
Corrigan of New Jersey, who
was staying at the S. 6th St.
motel with his family. He re-
ported that the 5- by 8-foot
trailer disappeared between
10:00 pm and 8:oo am on Oc-
tober 20-21.
In other thefts reported this
past week:
Samuel Johnson of Jack-
sonville spent the night at a
Macclenny residence October
17 and discovered $60 and a
debit card gone from his wal-
let the next morning. A dog
and hunting bow were miss-
ing from his truck.
Two days later Deputy
Koty Crews met the victim at
the sheriffs office where Mr.
Johnson said he gave a "fe-
male acquaintance" a ride to
William Padgett's residence
on Cary Barber Rd. where he
was invited to stay the night in
a spare bedroom.
The victim's missing Eng-
lish bulldog was valued at
$2500 and his Buckmaster
bow with quiver and arrows at
$750.
Mr. Padgett denied any
knowledge of the theft when
confronted by Mr. Johnson,
who didn't noticed the miss-
ing cash until attempting to
buy coffee later. Police said
Mr. Johnson returned to the
house again, but Mr. Padgett
was not there and his wife de-
nied involvement in the thefts
as well.
Kristin Lundquist report-
ed a $7000 diamond ring sto-


len from her vehicle sometime
between noon October 22 and
11:00 pm October 23 at 351 S.
College St.
She said the onlytwo people
with access to the vehicle were
Zachary Smallwood and Jus-
tin Pearce, both 25, according
to Deputy Robert Simpkins'
report.
In another jewelry theft,
Bruce Thorton of 11310 Deer-
wood Circle in Macclenny
reported roughly $550 worth
of his wife's property taken
from a jewelry box sometime
between August 1 and October
24.
The victim said there were
no signs of forced entry into
the home and that only two
people other than he and his
wife had access to the resi-
dence.
Crystal Mullis' $450 lap-
top computer disappeared
after she returned to her resi-
dence at 4283 Deerfield Road
from a hospital visit about
9:30 the evening of October
22. The victim said she left the
house in a hurry and forgot to
lock the doors.
George Hills of 9164 Dol-


phin St. in Sanderson report-
ed October 22 that more than
$3000 worth of video game
equipment and accessories,
CDs and movies were taken
from his Jeep and home the
evening of October 17 while
he was away. Deputy Dan-
iel Nichols noted no signs of
forced entry into the vehicle
or residence.

Cancer relay kickoff
The 2010 kickoff party for Re-
lay for Life of Baker County will
be held at the Woman's Club at
144 S. 5th Street from 6:30-8:00
pm Thursday, November 12.
To RSVP or for more informa-
tion call 904-264-6039 ext. 3459,
or wendy.hamlin@cancer.org

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As simple as an e-mail.....
If you have any information you
think we need to know, send it to:
editor@bakercountypress.com
THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS
104 South Fifth St.
904-259-2400


Page 7


Weatherization $$$
The Northeast Florida Community Action Agency [NFCAA] cel-
ebrated weatherization day October 27 in Baker County with an event
at Hagan Ace Hardware in Glen St. Mary.
For fiscal year 2009, NFCAA has just over $1 million for its weather-
ization program, which funds home repairs that improve the energy ef-
ficiency and safety of homes for eligible residents living in Baker, Duval,
Flagler, Nassau and Putnam counties.
NFCAA's weatherization program provides free energy audits and
weatherization services to qualifying individuals with gross incomes
below 200 percent of Federal Poverty Income Guidelines.
Weatherization services include improvements such as caulking and
weather stripping doors and windows, replacing door threshold replace-
ments, repairing duct systems, adding insulation to attics and walls and
making minor repairs to floors and ceilings.
Funding for the program is provided bythe U.S. Department of Ener-
gy and the Florida Department of Community Affairs. In 2008, NFCAA
received $453,000 for the program. This year, the agency's budget is
$1,038,240 and an estimated 536 homes are expected to be complete
before the end of 2010. In the coming month, NFCAA expects to receive,
based on performance, an additional $4 million for the program as a
result of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.
"Most low income families spend 17 percent of their total annual in-
come on energy, while the average for most homes is 4 percent. That
means many folks forego basic necessities to keep their homes heated
and cooled during peak seasons," said John Edwards, executive direc-
tor of NFCAA. "By weatherizing homes, low income families can realize
both short- and long-term savings on their utility bills."
Baker County residents interested in learning more about the weath-
erization program should call the NFCAA at (904) 259-4481, ext. 24.



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THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


Principal an 'armadillo wrangler'


He's now the man to see about critter removal


KELLEY LANNIGAN I FEATURES
features@bakercountypress.com
Baker County Middle School Principal Da-
vid Davis can now add another qualification to
his dossier as an educator and administrator.
The man is a bona fide armadillo wrangler.
One of the armor-plated mammals man-
aged to infiltrate the middle school in the
early hours of the morning October 16 when
only Mr. Davis and a few staff members were
at the school.
"I was in my office about 7:00 am when I
heard Ms. Finley shouting," he said.
"Mr. Davis! There's a giant armadillo in the
front office!"
Since teachers and staff joke with each
other often, Mr. Davis took the strange an-
nouncement in stride.
"Giant armadillo. That's a good one!" he
shouted back.
In moments Ms. Finley appeared at his
door with a frantic expression on her face.
"I'm not kidding! There is an armadillo out
there in the front office! A giant armadillo!"
According to Mr. Davis, a corner of the en-
trance hall rug had doubled up and gotten in
the way of the door which kept it from clos-
ing. The big armadillo entered and promptly
turned right, making its way into the front
office and startling the daylights out of poor
Ms. Finley.
What followed was a chaotic, high-spirited
attempt by Mr. Davis and staff members as
they chased the beast around with brooms
in an attempt to direct it back out the front
door. The crafty creature foiled that attempt
by wedging itself under the sofa.
So Mr. Davis moved the sofa. The arma-
dillo then raised itself up and bared its teeth.
Meanwhile, one of the ladies got a window
open and shouted for Mr. Davis to move the
critter toward it.
One glimpse of the open window and the

'Safe Side' ru
The importance of teaching
kids how to react to strangers
has taken on greater urgency in
the wake of 7-year-old Somer
Thompson's disappearance last
week as she walked home from
school.
The same day the girl's re-
mains were laid to rest near her
Orange Park home, the sheriffs
office and school district were
teaming up here to launch a new
stranger safety program from
The Safe Side Company.
Sheriff Joey Dobson and Su-
perintendent Sherrie Raulerson
presented the DVD-based pro-
gram at the PreK-Kindergarten
Center the morning of October
27 and Deputy Tracie Benton did
so at Westside Elementary that
afternoon.
The program moved to Mac- sentatior
clenny Elementary the following the "stra
day. ming use
"It's OK to tell an adult 'no' "We v
sometimes," Deputy Benton told that," sa
students packed into Westside's
cafeteria during a pause in the
DVD, which used light-hearted
themes to express the importance
of stranger safety.
Shortly thereafter, the officer
didn't just have them practice
saying no, she had them scream
it as loud as they could. They also
got ample practice yelling things
like, "You're not my mommy.
You're not my daddy!"
The Safe Side Company pro-
gram was developed by John *
Walsh of America's Most Want-
ed and Julie Clark, founder of the *
Baby Einstein Company, to be
interactive and educational.
Sheriff Dobson said the pre- *


PHOTO BY KELLEY LANNIGAN
The "Davester" armadillo poster.
frantic but highly relieved armadillo bolted
through it to freedom and disappeared into
parts unknown.
Meanwhile, the newly emboldened prin-
cipal stood at the window shouting, "Run
you coward! If you ever want a piece of the
Davester again, you know where to find me!
Ha!"
The story spread around the school like
wildfire, of course. Math teacher Beth Davis
(no relation) was inspired to get on the com-
puter and put together a fun graphic poster.
Later that day, the poster advertising a free
Saturday night armadillo wrestling event fea-
turing "The Davester" appeared in the office.
This wasn't the first time Mr. Davis has had
an encounter with an armadillo at the middle
school.


les stressed to


nwas ai
anger d
ed prev
wanted
id Mr.


PHOTO BYJOELADDINGTON
Westside students "scream" ways to say No!
n improvement to turning from Clay County to at-
anger" program- tend Somer's funeral. "This one
iously. doesn't use scare tactics."
to get away from The Safe Side program tells
Dobson after re- kids to identify "Safe Side Adults"


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The principal was in his office one day
when a couple of students came in to report
a suspicious looking "tail" protruding from a
large drain pipe outside the school office.
When Mr. Davis investigated he also saw
a pair of clawed feet hanging out as well. He
could hardly believe what he was seeing.
He grasped the leathery tail and tried to re-
move the creature. Frightened, it dug its front
claws in and held tight. Mr. Davis pulled. The
armadillo held fast. He pulled again and the
armadillo didn't budge.
This battle of man against animal went on
for a while and teachers began bringing their
students out to watch the bizarre tug of war
taking place on the school grounds.
The two reached an impasse, with no prog-
ress at either end.
Meanwhile, middle school coach Jon Mo-
bley showed up carrying a large trash recep-
tacle.
"Okay, coach!" shouted Mr. Davis. "On the
count of three, I'm gonna yank this thing out
and you're gonna catch it!"
Coach Mobley got into position.
"At this point I'm grasping this armadillo's
tail in both hands and have my right foot up
on the wall to brace myself," said Mr. Davis. "I
could just imagine the thing clawing me when
it came out."
He counted to three and yanked as hard
as he could, pulling the armadillo free and
slinging it through the air at Mr. Mobley, who
jumped up with the trash can and caught it
like it was a basketball.
They let it go in the field across the road
from the school.
"I think the armadillo last Friday was the
same one as before, just bigger and bolder,"
said Mr. Davis with a laugh. "It will be inter-
esting to see if it ever comes back. If nothing
else, the teachers got a tremendous laugh out
of it. I'll probably be hearing armadillo jokes
for a while to come."

earlygrades
with their parents or guardians
and learn to avoid other adults
or "Don't Knows" when the Safe
Side Adults aren't around.
Some of the tips offered dur-
ing the program:
Keep your Safe Side Adult
close. If you can see them, they
can see you.
S* Never open the door without
your Safe Side Adult.
Never go anywhere with
anyone, unless you ask your Safe
Side Adult first.


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NOTICE


TAX IMPACT OF VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARD


BakeuiCounty Tax Yfew 2 0 0 9

Mombbof hON Bosd
Honvuible MkJe lCrm BoSwi do Cawiy C onmmwswm Ds. Drict No. 1
HonombWe G rkn Crm Bwr of Comy Conimw msi., Disir No. 3
Hororrabie Puaid ubber SdoA I &w. D~ic No. 4
Cidizr, Member Ja&k Baker Busa s6 aemer hin f w school diict
Cireni Member Fred Raules, rHoeslead prop1yc oner

The Value Adjustm'ent Boerd (VA] mee*s each year to hbea peqicms and make decisions relaing
to property tax 85sCm5flaIts, exeniptio s. s Fibons, 8rd tax deferrals.
Summary of You's ActOrm
Mffbew ollPPrce lRacdan In SfM In
Ty"pe ot Propt, EeNmabou: Tmkb M* Tam
Gr~ e:Amed RdwM e Wutd Wfmn DAe 10 Board OW1 06 0arw
Grvls Ferws R~w~d Fbrqusl d
Residmntial 0 0 5 $ O4 0
Comnrmeriel 0 0 a 0 0 5 $ Qs 0
Indwlrilmecad 0 0 0 0 $ 0S 0

Agincuha l c0a0 S
dassiused use
Hi hwe*t Wrecwge a a 00 $ 0$
HNituri ownmerm 0 0 00 S
or nonP"ol
DwsirK= rnchir a 0 0 1 $ 0$
awd equipment
Vauantloi and 0 000Q

TOTALS 0 0 0 a 11 $
AlM vm should be county tuable wahm School aW olhe Lumng adIorlY values nay Mdter
Indude transfer oF osfewnnt dif~eiemm (poreiidy) msts.

U you have a 1m abuA tha U tse o wrat, th chair or ft C4kw ol 1m Vaiuu Ads Aonit Boawd.
Chagrs name Gordon Crews Phone 90d.2593613 3 x
Clew snoe j Fraser Phone K4-259-US3 x


Page 8


Thursday, October 29,2009





I Monday 5:00 pm


- W;ON il,-,





THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


Veteran pediatrician at BCHD


The latest addition to the medical staff at
the Baker County Health Department is a pe-
diatrician and he's a lot more.
Dr. Bruce McIntosh is a retired Naval Re-
serve captain who came to the Jacksonville
area from Portsmouth, VA in 1980 as chief pe-
diatrician at the Jax NAS naval hospital. Four
years later he was out of the active Navy after
a dozen-year stint and moved to St. Vincent's
Medical Center, where Dr. McIntosh would
spend the next quarter century teaching chil-
dren's medicine to interns.
Along the way, he acquired a sub-specialty
detecting and treating victims of child abuse,
first with the Navy and then in Jacksonville,
assisting in the formation of the Child Protec-
tion Team. It was the first one in Florida and
became a model for many others across the
United States.
To this day, Dr. McIntosh remains in that
role as an independent consultant to the De-
partment of Children and Families in Jack-
sonville.
Oh yes, and he's got a passion for scuba
diving that's taken him around the world to
locales in the South Pacific, the Caribbean
and, within the last month, to Egypt and the
Red Sea.
At the local health department, he will
maintain a general pediatric practice limited
to Monday and Fridays about 16 hours a
week. Dr. McIntosh, a 1966 graduate of Em-
ory University medical school in Atlanta, is
rounding off a staff that already includes two
family practice physicians, a women's health
nurse practitioner, a family practice practi-
tioner and several dentists that fill in during
regular hours.
"This is a good fit for me at this time of my
life," said the 65-year-old physician from Or-
ange Park. "It wasn't a hard decision for me
because Baker County Health Department
has such a good reputation for treatment pro-
grams in this region."
Health department director Kerry Dun-
lavey appreciates that nod, then turned it
around saying Dr. McIntosh's reputation


Dr. Mclntosh examines a patient at the health department.


makes him, "a missing piece that fits well into
our program."
"The great thing was he approached us and
we have common ties with the First Coast Ob-
stetrical Group and they spoke highly of us to


PHOTO BY JIM MCGAULEY


him," said Ms. Dunlavey. "He wanted to do
more clinical practice after retiring from St.
Vincent's and said he really wanted to come
into this community. It fits very nicely."


When you come to see the Bak-
er County Community Theatre's
production of Steel Magnolias
this weekend, you will not only
be seeing the first production of
the Baker County Community
Theatre in over a decade, you'll
see the show that will represent
the state of Florida at the South-
eastern Theatre Conference in
Lexington, Kentucky in March.
Rick Kerby, chairman of the
Community Theatre division,
made the selection on Monday.
The play will be performed at the
Florida Theatre Conference in
Lakeland the afternoon of Nov. 14
and then move on to compete as
Florida's representative against
productions from Alabama,
Georgia, Louisiana, Tennessee,
North Carolina, Mississippi,
South Carolina and Kentucky in
March at SETC, a gathering of
over 6000 theatre students and
professionals from around the
South.
The group is in its second week
presenting Steel Magnolias, and
it re-runs this Thursday and Fri-
day at 7:30 pm and Saturday and
Sunday at 2:00 pm in the BCHS
Auditorium. Steel Magnolias is


ALICIA LAMBORN
HORTICULTURE AGENT
Baker County Extension Service
With the change in weather
comes a change in landscape wa-
tering needs and a new watering
restriction schedule. Starting No-
vember 1 (the beginning of East-
ern Standard Time), the water-
ing restriction schedule changes
to only one day a week until the
second Sunday in March when
we switch back to Daylight Sav-
ings Time.
The St. Johns River Water
Management District's water-
ing restrictions are designed to
ensure the efficient use of water
for landscape irrigation and al-
low enough water to maintain
healthy landscapes year-round.
The mandatory restrictions
specify the time when watering
may occur, the amount of water
that can be applied, and the days
when watering can occur for
residential and nonresidential
locations.
These days depend on wheth-
er the address ends in an odd or
even number, and the time of
year.
Irrigation limitations apply to
water withdrawn from ground


one of those rare plays that are
able to run the full gamut of emo-
tions. Audiences laugh and cry
sometimes within the space of
minutes.
Based entirely in Truvy's
Beauty Spot, an enclosed garage
turned into neighborhood beauty
salon, the play centers on the lives
of six women who are all friends
as well as customers at the salon.
Truvy (Niki Knight) is the
sassy beauty shop owner who
not only does the hair of the lo-


or surface water, from a private
well or pump, or from a public
or private utility. Residential
homes (including houses, mo-
bile homes, and multiple hous-
ing units) with odd numbered
addresses (ending in 1,3,5,7,9)
can water on Saturdays; homes
with even numbered addresses
(ending in 0,2,4,6,8) may water
on Sunday; and non-residential
properties (these include com-
mercial properties, hotels, public
medians and right-of ways) may
water on Tuesdays.
In addition to only watering
one day per week, there are other
restrictions. Irrigation is limited
to no more than three-quarters
of an inch of water per zone per
irrigation day. Use a tuna can or
rain gauge to measure how much
water is applied in a 30-minute
period and adjust the run time
as needed, but do not allow the
irrigation system to run for more
than one hour per zone per day.
Watering should be done only as
needed to meet the landscape's
needs.
There are exceptions to these
restrictions which are more le-
nient for new plantings, pesticide
applications, irrigation system
maintenance and repairs, the


cal ladies, but also listens to their
problems and victories. Her as-
sistant Annelle (Leah Wheeler)
is a gawky young girl who Truvy
takes on like she would a stray
puppy. Over the course of the
play, Annelle grows to fit in with
the group of friends.
M'Lynn Eatenton (Kelly Reg-
ister) is a successful career wom-
an, whose daughter Shelby (Sara
Beth Gerard) is getting married
and comes to the salon to have
her hair done for the wedding.


use of micro-irrigation systems
and the use of reclaimed water.
You can also water with a hand-
held hose equipped with a spray
nozzle if plants are dry and it's
not your day to water.
For a detailed list of excep-
tions to these regulations visit
www.sjrwmd.com or contact me
at the Baker County Extension
Office with questions by calling
259-3520 or email alamborn@
ufl.edu.


OI() 01 toull & Iliss o1r1
kxill t,,"v.pi|)ll .


Shelby has type 1 diabetes and it
is around her illness that much of
the drama takes place.
Clairee Belcher (Nancy Ma-
son) is one of the town socialites
and the former mayor's wife. Her
best friend is the cranky but lov-
able Ouiser Boudreaux (Kelley
Norman) and their comic banter
keeps the play moving at a fast
pace.
It is the relationships between
these women that make the play.
They are all different ages, for-
tunes and temperaments, but
Truvy's makes them feel at home
and safe much like any beauty
shop anywhere.
Tickets are $5 at the door. Sat-
urday's matinee is a fund raiser
for the Edward Kramer Fine Arts
Scholarship. There is no evening
show on Oct. 31.
Because this is a community
theatre and not a high school pro-
duction and because of the added
cost of competition, school activ-
ity passes will not be honored for
admission.


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Janice F. Del Toro, Ph.D.
CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNERTM
Serving Baker County Residents since 2001.
Experienced with:
FRS Pension and Investment Plans
Florida Optional Retirement Plan
State of Florida Deferred Compensation Plan
Other Governmental 457 (b) Deferred Compensation Plans
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'Magnolias' in 2nd week; going to state


I


PHOTO COURTESY OF BOB GERARD
From left Leah Wheeler, Kelly Register, Kelley Norman, Sara Beth Gerard, Niki
Knight.


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Time change and cooler weather

mean shortened watering times


lbursday, October 29, 2009


Page9





THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS




OBITUARIES


Page


10
OCTOBER 29, 2009


CHURCH AND OBITUARY NOTICE INFORMATION CONTACT US
Obituaries must be submitted in a timely fashion and have a local connection. Pictures are printed with obituar- By phone at 904.259.2400 or by fax at 904.259.6502. You can stop by our office located at 104 S. Fifth Street,
ies free of charge. The newspaper reserves the right to publish photos based on quality. It is requested that all Macclenny, FL or mail your submission to PO Box 598, Macclenny, FL 32063.
news items be typed or emailed to insure accuracy in print. We are available online at www.bakercountypress.com


Johnnie Morris, Mr. Washington
54, of Macclenny dies October 20th


Johnnie Frank Morris, 54,
of Macclenny died October 22,
2009 at his residence. Johnnie
was born in Miami to the late
Franklin D. Morris and Eugenia
R. Florence Morris on June 27,
1955. He moved to Baker County
recently and loved to play pool.
Johnnie will be greatly missed
by his family and friends.
Survivors include children
Franklin (Rachel) Morris of
Norfolk, VA, Robert (Lauren)
Morris of Plantation, FL and
Michelle Morris of Palm Beach;
grandsons Jett Morris and Max-
well Morris; sister Linda Wor-
thy.
Ferreira Funeral Services is
in charge of arrangements.

Mrs. Thompson,
61, ofJacksonville
Mardie Betty Thompson, 61,
died Sunday, October 25, 2009
at a local hospital. Mrs. Thomp-
son was a
native of
Jackson-
ville, a Bap-
tist and a
1966 gradu- ,
ate of Bald-
win High
School.
She loved
spending
time with
her grand-
children Mardie Thompson
and the
neighborhood kids, and was a
dedicated employee of the Du-
val County clerk of courts office.
Mrs. Thompson was preceded in
death by her first husband and
father of her children, Leonard
R. Timmons Sr. in 1977.
Survivors include husband
Wade J. Thompson; mother
Betty J. Frisbee; children Leon-
ard R. Timmons Jr., Debra
(Sheldon) Scott, Lendy Tim-
mons (Jimmy) Arlington-Costa
and Marya (William) Thornton;
sisters Lilly Kent and Wanda
(Doug) Corbin; brothers Waine
(Earlene) Frisbee Jr. and J.C.
(Donna) Frisbee; five grandchil-
dren; four great-grandchildren;
sisters-in-laws Gladys Campbell
and Frances McKay; brothers-
in-law Sonny, Roy, Ralph and
Lewis Thompson and a number
of nieces, nephews and extend-
ed family.
A celebration of life service
was held at 11:oo am on Octo-
ber 29 at Brandy Branch Bap-
tist Church in Bryceville with
Revs. Herb Phinazee and Rusty
Bryan officiating. Interment fol-
lowed at the church cemetery.
Peeples Family Funeral Homes
in Jacksonville was in charge of
arrangements.

Sanderson
Congregational
Holiness Church
CR 127 N., Sanderson, FL
Sunday School 10:00 am
Morning Worship 11:00 am
Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 pm
Wed. Evening Prayer Serv. 7:30 pm
Pastor: Oral E. Lyons t

MACCLENNY
CHURCH OF CHRIST
573 S. 5th St. 259-6059
Sunday Bible Study 9:45 am
Fellowship 10:30 am -11:00 am
Worship Services
11:00 am
S.r Wed. Bible Study
,.w 7:30 pm
S- Minister
l..:Ia Sam F. Kitching

SDINKINS NEW
CONCGECATIONAL
METHODIST CHURCH
Ckr 1)7 N. of Sanderson
Sunday School 10:00 am
Sunday Porning Service 11:00 am
Sunday Night Service 6:00 pm
Wed. Night Service 7:50 pm
Pastor Allen Crews
Assistant Pastor Timothy Alford
~h Youth Pastor Bryan Poole


Ernest (Big Wash) Washing-
ton, 77, of Macclenny died on
October 20, 2009. He was the
son of the late Deacon Willie
J. and Josie Bell Washington,
and was predeceased by broth-
ers Willie C., Rufus (Beaky), Joe
(Pooky) Washington and sisters
Betty Jean Reed and Willa Jean
Washington.
Mr. Washington is survived
by daughter Sandra Washing-
ton-Tyson (Wade) of Macclen-
ny; sons Ernest Washington Jr.
of Fort Lauderdale and Johnnie
B. Washington of Lake Butler;
sisters Ruby Lee Stewart and
Elizabeth (L.J.) Williams, both
of Macclenny; sister-in-law Pau-
line Washington of Macclenny;
six grandchildren, six great-
grandchildren; step children
Kenneth Akins of Daytona, FL,
Betsy (Neil) Manning, Cynthia
Surrency and Hidies Akins, all
of Macclenny; a host of nieces
and nephews.
The funeral service for Mr.
Washington was held on Sat-
urday, October 24 at St. James
Baptist Church in Macclenny.
Interment was at Mt. Herman
Cemetery in Macclenny.


Fish fry, gospel sing
A combination fish fry and
gospel sing will be held on Sat-
urday, October 31 at the New
River New Congregational Meth-
odist Church on SR 125 in Union
County.
The meal is at 5:30 and sing-
ing begins at 7:00. Featured
group is "Rushing Wind."




Memorial

Services

A memorial service
has been set for Nancy
Tart Raynor. Nancy was
the daughter of the late
Ransom and Hariette
Raynor, founders of
Raynor Pharmacy and a
1927 graduate of Baker
County High School.
The service will be
held at the First United
Methodist Church in
Macclenny October 31,
2009 at 11:oo am.


23-A to Lauramore Rd. & Fairgrounds Rd.
Sunday School 9:45 am
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 am
Sunday Children's Church 11:00 am
Sunday Evening Services 6:00 pm
Wednesday Night Prayer Meeting 7:00 pm
Pastor J. C. Lauramore welcomes all




NE-

270 US Highway 301 N. Baldwin FL 32234
904-266-2337 904-387-0055
Baldwin Jacksonville
Arrangements made in your home or our facility
Fair & Reasonable Prices
Funeral & Cremation Services
Locally Owned & Family Operated








Glen St. Mary
D9t4LCTEIONA FOR B VID


CHRISTIAN

FELLOWSHIP

TEMPLE
Senior Pastor Independent Pentecostal Church
DaiSd Thomas
2594940 Seventh St. & Ohio Ave., Macclenny


Sunday School
Sunday Morning Worship
Sunday Evening Worship
Wednesday Night Service
Radio WJXR 92.1 Sunday

Youth Proarams


Sunday School 10:00 am
Common Ground Sunday 11:00 am
Common Ground Wed. (Teens) 7:00 pm
God Kids Sunday 11:00 am
God Kids Wednesday 7:00 pm


Associate Pastor
Tim Thomas
2594575


10:00 am
11:00 am
6:00 pm
7:00 pm
9:15 am


Youth Pastor
Gary Crummy


Family grateful
The family of Virginia Jones
Long expresses its deepest
thanks to everyone who shared
love and friendship for our
Mom, especially during her ill-
ness. Thanks to Ferreira Fu-
neral Services for their care; to
Souls Harbor Church of God for
the wonderful service, for the
kind loving words spoken by
her pastor Shane Smith and his
precious family; for words of in-
spiration spoken by her beloved
former pastor Rev. James Scott
and wife Diana; for the special
memories shared by Rev. David
Thomas.
The songs sung by Ronda El-
lis were simply beautiful and so
appropriate of Mom's life and
work for the Lord. Her church,
Souls Harbor Church of God,
went beyond love and caring
and gave so much of them-
selves, and provided a delicious
meal for the family. Gratitude
also for the other meals given
in love from the Assembly of
God ladies, and from the friends
who just cared enough to bring
food or send a card, to visit or
make Mom smile with a phone
call. To those who sent flowers
or said a prayer, may God bless
you. It was such a tribute to her.
To share of your life and love is
life's greatest blessing.
Mom loved to go to church,
she loved her church family and
she was blessed to have some
very special people in her life.
We will always have a special
place in our hearts for those peo-
ple. Thanks to Sheila Thomp-
son, who became a great friend
to Mom and was so much help
in the end, and especially to Lar-
ry and Wanda Prevatt who were
so special to her, who showed
that once in a lifetime friend-
ship that was much more than
friendship. You helped carry her
to the end of her journey here
on earth and were there to give
that love as her days ended here.
You will never know how much
your support meant to our fam-
ily. To those of you who came by
and sat by her bed, Mrs. Lucas,
Gaye Hart, Jean Jones and oth-
ers, we love you and thank you
so much for the love that you
gave. Mom is at peace now and
we can know that. God bless you
all is our prayer.
The family of Virginia Jones Long
Norma Key (Johnny), J.F. and Sharon
Beavers, Gary and Charlotte Cook,
William (Billy) Jones, Grandchildren,
great-grandchildren, great-great
grandchildren and their families

Mt. Zion N.C.

Methodist Church
121 North t 259-4461
Macclenny, FL
Pastor Tim Cheshire
Sunday School 9:45 am
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 am
Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 pm
Wednesday Prayer Service 7:00 pm







Jesus answered, "Verily, verily I
say unto thee, except a man be
born of water and of the Spirit,
he cannot enter into the king-
dom of God." John 3:5


w I hodChyBurcsth


The Road
to Calvary
Corner of Madison & Stoddard
Glen St. Mary
Rev. Tommy & Doris Anderson
Bro. Edward McDonald, Co-Pastor
Phone: 904-259-2213
Sunday School:............10:00 am
Sunday Morning Service .... 11:00 am
Sunday Evening Service ..... 6:00 pm
Wednesday Night.......... 7:30 pm
I~i'


r



Jesus: The Way, The Truth and The Life
Sunday School 10:00A.M. Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 PM.
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 A.M. Wed. Eve. Worship 7:30 PM.
Pastor Rev. Shannon Conner
North 6th Street Macclenny 259-3500


THE LORD'S CHURCH
Intersection of CR 125 &250 in Taylor .. 259-8353
Sunday school 10:00.m
Sunday service 11:00 .
Wednesday night BibleSil,


Come and magnify the Lord and worship with us
Glen Friendship Tabernacle
Clinton Ave. Glen St. Mary Home: 259-3982 Church: 259-6521
WJXR Radio Service Sunday .... 8:30 am
Morning Worship Service. ...... 10:30 am
Children's Church ............. 11:30 am
Evangelistic ................... 6:00 pm
Bible Study (Wed.) ............. 7:30 pm
Rev. Albert Starling www.myspace.com/glenfriendshiptabernacle









a MS NTt


sn"- noa


10o)o


PIa swu M- 1m llm
sud Nlot SOik t0 pm


a-ibwle tlyfk


7;00 ps


523 North Boulevard W.
Four blocks north of Hwy. 90 In Macclenny
Pastor Donae E. WiWamrs + 259-4529


lewcome
First Baptist Church
of Sanderson
CR 229 S., Sanderson FL
Sunday School ....... 10:00 am
Sun. Morning Worship. 11:00 am
Sun. Evening Worship .. 6:00 pm
Wed. Eve. Bible Study .. 7:00 pm
Pastor Bob Christmas
],1"1I I. !,11*,d! I.==k -.*.*, ,,O


www.christianfellowshiptemple.com





THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


A Halloween festival of hats

And other fall themes at Women's Club


Hat contest winners Mamie Cole, left, and Lane Altom.


PHOTO BY KELLEY LANNIGAN


KELLEY LANNIGAN
FEATURES
features@bakercountypress.com
What's more fun than a barrel of mon-
keys? A hat full of bats!
The Macclenny Women's Club found
that out during its October 15 meeting
when members held a hat decorating
contest.
Since it's October, Halloween was the
natural choice for the theme. The result-
ing parade of head gear was a riot of
pumpkins, gourds, bats, skulls, bones,
garland, spider webs, ribbons, feathers
and pipe cleaners.
The grand prize winner and
second runner-up were Mamie
Cole and Lane Altom, respec-
tively. Ironically, both utilized
wreaths in their designs.
Ms. Cole's hat was construct- --
ed of two grapevine wreaths that
encircled her head. Fixed atop was a
tower of twigs that supported a cluster of
gourds and leaves. Her creation was se-
cured by a yellow ribbon tied under her
chin.
Ms. Altom's hat supported a scarecrow
wreath held in place by two supporting
plates.
Some ladies went all out, scouring the
dollar stores and thrift shops for mate-
rials. Others looked no farther than the


children's toy box for inspiration.
"That's where I found mine," said
member Cheryl Lunn, who was sporting
a tall black felt wizard's hat emblazoned
with white symbols. "I remembered my
granddaughters had some hats in their
toy box and I dug through it this morn-
ing."


Bernadine Hicks' Graveyard Hat.
She enhanced her trickster's hat with
large orange cat earrings with legs and
tails that dangled when she moved her
head.
Club president Trilby Crews presided
over the meeting wearing a Mad Hatter's
hat a monstrous black top hat with evil
looking red and black spikes protruding


from the side.
Linda Green's black cowboy hat had
a changeable band. She rotates the band
decoration throughout the year to match
the holiday or occasion. For this Hal-
loween, she used her needlework skills
to create a stylized band decoration that
said BOO!
There were many "witches" at the
event and each one put her particular
spin on her hat. Some sported a lining of
net ruffles, others fluttered with a myriad
of gracefully draping feathers. Still others
glowed with glittery silver spiderwebs.
Possibly the most interesting de-
sign was the "Graveyard Hat,"
fashioned by Bernadine Hicks.
"I used my old mowing hat,"
she said. "And I intend to leave
the decorations on it and wear it
to mow the grass after this."
.. The striped straw hat is cov-
ered with skeletons, bony hands,
orange scorpions and black spiders
- all weaving in and out of a mass of leaf-
less vines. Just what one might expect to
see on a spooky fall Halloween night in a
haunted graveyard.
"I had to get out the glue gun to do
this, something I don't do very often and
now I know why," she said. "Boy, that
stuff will stick your fingers together if you
don't watch it."


wo tu a"aau A







WRIM A 2918t1 hmt41 lb Ii EAlSq Lb
I l k-. J*- "w .. .?
- 44%4 -.- C+1- 4r C
47 r0'-. DS.r.-$ + I- -

~.a i. M --


FALL FESTIVAL


and Bible Trail

Saturday, October 31
6:00 9:00 pm
First Baptist Church of Cuyler


HUIUT BY KLLLLTY LAIMIMIAIN

Women's Club inducts new members
Nine new members were inducted into the Macclenny Women's Club during its October 15 meeting. Dur-
ing a formal ceremony the women were given roses and each held a lighted candle. Inductees were famil-
iarized with the mission of the club and its departments as well the charitable efforts and programs it sup-
ports such as Operation Smile and Heifer International. From left: Yvonne Newmans, Pat Fish, Helen Suggs,
Mamie Cole and Janice Bessenger. Not pictured: Jennie Yearty, Sylvia Brown, Mary Lyons and Nazarene McKinney.


OR THE HUNGRY PRESENTS


I+BRAMDONHEATH


WITH SPECIAL GUEST
II F CARAMKSA BA1TTISTELLI
m annaA WWSSETSKEY wwacuin1nsi



Saturday, Nov.7th at 7:00 p.m.
Baker County Fairgrounds Macclenny,Florida
TICKET PRICEMT Gmups d 10 or mnor l1 2.. Gerra Adwision AdOwe 15.00. Alt he $2D l
Ticks~ at b p Jd~aMsd frm n mtM r eft our webait wwmwHyrdaumdnet
Tct c aW tbe purchmnsd at leeW Ctin StimsE hn Jalsornrv al ttt St JleM's Town Cw a w
Oawdef Tbwn Center In Maodrny, tickets ane mflal a SpoD Shak


tp-nw


lbursday, October 29, 2009


Page 11





THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


r


J


Classified ads and notices must be paid
in advance, and be in our office no later
than 4:00 pm the Monday preceding
publication, unless otherwise arranged
in advance. Ads can be mailed provided
they are accompanied by payment and
instructions. They should be mailed to:
Classified Ads, The Baker County Press,
P.O. Box 598, Macclenny, FL 32063. We
cannot assume responsibility for accuracy
of ads or notices given overthe telephone.
Liability for errors in all advertising will be
limited to the first publication only. If after
that time, the ad continues to run without
notification of error bythe person oragen-
cy for whom it was published, then that
party assumes full payment responsibility.
The Baker County Press reserves the right
to refuse advertising or any other material
which in the opinion of the publisher does
not meet standards of publication.





S Green leather couch and loveseat $275
OBO, oak glass coffee and end tables,
$75.259-7856. 10/29p
2002 25' Coachman travel trailer, like
new $6,000. 259-6491. 10/22-10/29p
Beautiful Victorian mahogany side-
board, very old, reduced to $395. Can
be seen at Southern Charm. 259-4140
or 259-3737. 9/24-10/29p
25'x36' garage trusses $1500 OBO.
259-3300. 3/12tfc
Piano, great for beginners $450 OBO
259-7856. 10/29p
Seasoned Oak firewood, cut and split
to fit modern heaters and fire places.
Can deliver, full size long bed truck load
$100, you pick up $90. 653-1149.
10/22-10/29p
Got roaches? Buy Harris Famous Roach
Tablets or Powder. Eliminates roaches or
your money back, guaranteed. Available
at Bennett's Feed. 10/15tfc
Craftsman 24 hp. twin cylinder like new
with rear cart, used one summer, paid
$2100, asking $1350. Air compressor,
20 gallon tank, 4 hp. direct drive, no belt,
$175. 259-7856. 10/29p
Artists! Oils, acrylics, water colors,
Canvases, drawing pads and much
more! On sale now. The Office Mart, 110
S. Fifth Street, 259-3737. tfc
Custom built desk, 1984 Chevy truck
front end with working parking lights
wrapped around a five drawer desk,
$1295 OBO. 259-7856. 10/29p
2 infant car seats with bases, one blue
and beige, one black and tan, $30 each.
588-3628. 7/23tfc
Cherry dining room table with six
chairs, 87"x43" with two leafs, custom
table pad cover $800, oak dining table
with pedestal foot with four chairs, $200.
259-7856. 10/29p
Antique furniture: mahogany desk,
Victorian love seat, French chair, nest-
ing end tables, console table, bamboo
plant stand and more; pictures, mirror,
glassware, dishes, baskets, plants, etc.
Southern Charm 259-4140 or 59-3737.
9/24-10/29p
2001 Kawasaki Prairie 400 four wheel-
er, automatic, gun rack and ramps, runs
great, $1200 OBO. 904-238-2423, 904-
653-1987. 10/29p
Discounted steel buildings, big and
small. Get the deal of deals. Placement
to site. www.scg-grp.com Source #1 EL.
Phone 904-746-4743. 10/15-11/5p
Kobota four wheel drive 3029 hydro-
static transmission with approximately
700 hours with front end loader and 5'
bush hog, $13,900. Also, covered lawn
service and landscaping trailer with
equipment and tools $2500. 591-2916.
10/29p
Living room furniture sofa, chair, cof-
fee table and two end tables (glass top,
walnut grain wood) $425; marble top
antique cherry wood table $250, antique
vanity and wardrobe, blonde wood set
$300, round maple 40 year old table
$65. Contact 910-5665 for appointment
or 259-6794 after 4:00 pm, leave mes-
sage. Estate sale. 10/29p
2002 Keystone Springdale 40' camper
with two slide-outs, $11,500 OBO. 259-
8000 or 864-4106. 10/29p
Thomasville bedroom suite $2000,
Thomasville dining room set: hutch,
sideboard table with two leafs and eight
chairs $3000, red leather couch $500,
two red leather chairs $500 each. 626-





2000 Subaru Forester with many extras,
very clean and always serviced regularly.
Priced well below book value at $4500.
Work 904-786-4041, home, 912-843-
2706. 10/29p


Looking for a new or used vehicle? Eighth Judicial Circuit Court Admin-
Please call Mike Dees at 904-237-0646. istration Court Program Specialist II
10/15-11/5c (Pro Se Case Manager)(Baker, Bradford,
2001 Dodge 3500 dually extended cab, Gilchrist, Levy and Union Counties) Sal-
sport model, turbo diesel, 168,000 miles, ary: $36,115/annually (hiring at base).
loaded, runs great, looks great. $18,000. Position open until filled. For detailed
259-8282. 10/29p information, visit our web site at: www.
....nnn .. r... -....A ...- ..-.....-. circuit8.org 10/29-11/5c


"UUU UUuY UKiUai4 WIIeell UIIVt LIUU;K,
$4900 OBO. Black, two door with a sec-
ond seat, runs good, 139,000 miles, bed
liner, flowmaster muffler, AM/FM CD/
MP3 sound system. Call 904-210-6543.
10/22tfc
Auto and truck repair, and head liners,
give me a call. 571-0913. 10/22-11/12p





Experienced childcare in Christian
home, meals provided, snacks, pre-
school curriculum taught. Hurry now,
only four spots available. Call Sherrie
Taylor Stradman 904-514-7111.10/29p
Celebrating Home Catalog Party, f/k/a/
Home Interiors. $200 retail order, free
$140, $24.95 tax and shipping. Call:
Reginia 259-6630. Shop online www.cel-
ebratinghome.com/sites/reginiastarling
Call me with the item numbers to receive
the free home decor. Expires 10/31/09.
10/1-10/29p
Housekeeping will clean business or
residence, can provide references and
work experience. Fees are bases on size
and what jobs need to be performed. Will
come to your place of business or home
to give an estimate. Call 904-259-8467 or
904-259-9386. If no answer please leave
a message and we will return your call.
10/29-11/5p
Only $10 to start your own Avon busi-
ness. 904-298-4423. 10/29-11/5p
A weekend day care, Niesha. Episcopal
and non-Episcopal accepted. Cell 860-
2061, home 275-2479. Leave a mes-
sage. 10/29p
Kristina, blonde and beautiful. I met you
at Walmart, will you please call Daniel.
904-910-1110. 10/29p





Yorkie-Poos, last two adorable puppies
need good, loving homes. Call and let's
make a deal. 259-6488. 10/29p
Dogs: all types from puppies to adults.
Animal Control, $65 adoption fees will
apply. 259-6786. 11/20tfc
Kittens, I have five 9-week old kittens
that need a good home. Please call 904-
207-4829 if interested. 10/29p






Notice to readers:
The newspaper often publishes clas-
sified advertising on subjects like
work-at-home, weight loss products,
health products. While the newspaper
uses reasonable discretion in deciding
on publication of such ads, it takes no
responsibility as to the truthfulness of
claims. Respondents should use caution
and common sense before sending any
money or making other commitments
based on statements and/or promises;
demand specifics in writing. You can also
call the Federal Trade Commission at 1-
877-FTC-HELP to find out how to spot
fraudulent solicitations. Remember: if it
sounds too good to be true, it probably is.
- The Baker County Press
Part-time nanny, some meal preparation
and housekeeping required, a few nights
a week. Call for appointment. 307-8442.
10/29tfc
Class "A" industrial mechanic. Must
have five years sawmill experience.
We are an EECC drug free workplace.
401K, health/dental/life insurance, paid
holidays/vacations. Apply at Gilman
Building Products, Sawmill, 6640 CR
218, Maxville, FL 32234 or fax resume
to 904-289-7736. 10/22-11/12c
We are looking for a creative person
with above average literacy skills to fill a
part-time graphics position. Knowledge
of Adobe Creative Suite and Mac skills a
must. Send resume with references (and
work product examples if available) c/o
Graphics, P.O. Box 598, Macclenny, FL
32063. 10/15tfc


Heavy duty diesel mechanic needed,
Travel Centers of America, Baldwinloca-
tion, 1024 US 301 South. Driver's license
required. Please apply to Mark Holmes,
Shop Manager. 904-266-4281, ext. 22.
1 0/1tfc
Skilled A/C mechanic, must have experi-
ence in service work, ductwork, and A/C
installation. Apply at dependable32063@
nefcom.net 10/15tfc





Notice to Readers
All real estate advertising in this news-
paper is subject to the Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal to advertise "any
preference, limitation or discrimina-
tion based on race, color, religion, sex,
handicap, familiar status or national
origin, or an intention, to make any such
preference, limitation or discrimination."
Familial status includes children under
the age of 18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and people
securing custody of children under 18.
This newspaper will not knowingly ac-
cept any advertising for real estate which
is in violation of the law. Our readers are
hereby informed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are available on
an equal opportunity basis. To complain
of discrimination, call HUD toll free at
1-800-669-9777. The toll free telephone
number for the impaired is 1-800-927-
9275.
FSBO, lease or rent, 4 BR, 3 BA double-
wide mobile home, central H/A with fire-
place, sits on 3/4 acres land with own well
and septic in Macclenny II, $900/month.
Must have references. 904-591-2916.
10/29c
1.63 acres south of Glen St. Mary on
Keith Griffis Circle, has two wells, septic
and power, very nice property and loca-
tion, $42,500 OBO. 904-259-3763.
10/22-10/29p
Tired of paying lot rent for your mobile
home? Or looking to build a home?
Perfect piece of property: one acre with
24'x24' concrete block garage, vinyl sid-
ing, shingled roof, located on Ben Rowe
Circle, appraised at $57,400, make legiti-
mate offer, serious inquiries only. 268-
7668. 10/29p
4 BR, 2 BA doublewide, 1 1/8 acres
in Glen St. Mary, corner lot, swimming
pool, fenced in, call for appointment.
386-984-1063. Priced to sell, $85,000.
10/8-10/29p
FSBO, 7 acres on quiet dead-end
road, mature oaks, zoned conventional
or mobile home, one acre per dwelling,
$112,500. 259-5877. 6/18tfc
3 BR, 2 BA brick with rec room, two car
garage, 1800 SF on 1%/4 acres, work shop
and fruit trees, in Hills of Glen. Call 259-
6540. 10/15-11/5p
MacGlen Builders, Inc. Brick homes in
Macclenny from $145,000-$210,000.
813-1580. 11/13tfc
Reduced 3 BR, 2 BA home for sale, 1252
SF living, built in 2002, Fox Ridge Sub-
division, open living/kitchen/dining area,
two car garage, privacy fence, $130,000
negotiable or willing to pay some closing
costs. All offers considered. 904-338-
6104. 10/29-11/5p
One acre in Branford, FL near Suwan-
nee River and boat ramp, 4" well with
septic system and power, real nice lot,
$25,000forfast sale. 904-259-3763.
10/22-10/29p
Two lots in Copper Creek, Unit III. Call
813-1580. 12/1ltfc
FSBO, 3 BR, 2 BA house on one acre in
north Macclenny. Owner pays closing
costs, double garage, two workshops,
$184,500.259-7997. 10/29-11/5p
3 acres, high and dry, fish pond, homes
or mobile homes, set-up included, owner
financing. 912-843-8118. 2/22tfc
Three + acres in Sanderson. 259-6961.
10/22-10/29p
FSBO 4 BR, 2 BA brick home approxi-
mately 2100 SF on 2.82 Acres. Fire-
place, tile, plantation shutters, 20x20
workshop, many upgrades, very nice.
Neighborhood restricted to homes only.
$286,000. By appointment only. 237-
0060 or 259-3963. 5/14tfc


$8,000 TAX CREDIT
AT GREYSTONE BY
Move in November!
3/2/2 Full Warranty! COLLIN
$143,708
www.collinsbuilders.net
Model open Monday Saturday 10-6
.. 904-397-0322 CRC1326552


2001 modular home, 2400 SF, 4 BR, 2
BA on four acres, mile from 1-10 on
125 South, completely remodeled, best
deal in town, $133,000. 334-4987.
10/29p
3 BR, 2 BA house, 1500 SF heated, two
car garage, three years old, on 2.77
acres, one mile from 1-10, $165,000.
904-545-0687. 10/15-10/22p





3 BR, 1 BA house in the country, deposit
$500, rent $600. 923-2191.
10/29-11/19p
3 BR, 2 BA, $850/month, 813-3091.
10/29tfc
3 BR, 2 BA with fireplace, 2000 28x60
doublewide, excellent condition, first
and last months, $850/month. 904-371-
0649. 10/29-11/5p
Beautiful doublewide, spacious rooms,
master bedroom has garden tub, 3 BR,
2 BA, washer, dryer, dishwasher, utility
building, recently refurbished, country
living. $800 plus deposit, service animals
only. 653-2157, 314-4762. 10/22-11/5p
For rent or sale, 3 BR, 2 BA home, single
car garage, screened back porch, at end
of cul-de-sac, $900/month plus deposit.
904-237-3554. 10/29-11/19p
4 BR, 2 BA mobile home on Big St.
Mary's River $850/month. 813-3091.
10/8tfc
3 BR, 2 BA mobile home, extra clean,
$650, first and $650 deposit. Also 2 BR,
1 BA mobile home, extra clean, $550,
first and $550 deposit, mobile commu-
nity, Glen area. 259-2121. 10/29tfc
Homes and mobile homes for rent from
$750-850 monthly. 259-2255. 11/13tfc
1 BR, 1 BA, $300 deposit, $380/month,
2 BR, 1 BA, $300 deposit, $575/month.
259-2787. 10/29-11/5p


FOR RENT
2 bedroom, 1 bath, no smok-
ing, $600 a month up front,
$300 security deposit, south of
Sanderson, 838-0598 cell.


2 or 3 BR mobile home for rent on
acre. Service animals only, garbage
pickup, sewer, water and lawn mainte-
nance provided, rent $385-$550, family
neighborhood. 912-843-8118; 904-699-
8637. 10/29tfc
2 BR, 1 BA, washer/dryer hook-up, 980
SF, 351 N. Lowder, $700/month, $500
deposit, 12 month lease required. 259-
9797. 10/29tfc
2 BR, 1 BA apartment inside city limits,
$600 deposit, $600/month. 259-6616.
10/22-10/29p
2 and 3 BR mobile homes, central H/A,
service pets only, water, lawn, garbage
included. First, last and deposit required.
259-7335. 4/30tfc
3 BR doublewide trailer for rent. 275-
2136. 10/29p
Mobile homes. 2 and 3 BR, A/C, service
animals only, $500-$575 plus deposit.
904-860-4604. 3/17tfc
2 BR, 2 BA mobile home in the city,
$485/month, $350 deposit. 259-5126.
10/29-11/5p
3 BR, 1 BA house in city limits, central H/
A, washer/dryer, fenced yard, shed with
electric, $850. 904-376-4157.
10/22-10/29p
Mobile homes for rent from $375 $575.
912-843-8165, 904-219-2690. 10/29c
2 BR, 1 BA mobile home in Glen area,
$125/week. 910-5434, Nextel beep
160*132311*2. 10/29c


500 DOLLARS

& DEED
is all you need to
move into your
new Manufactured
& Modular Home






CALL 866-605-7255
Murray


GREAT OPPORTUNITY
FOR AN ENERGETIC SELF-STARTER
in an established Macclenny retail business

Includes: General Office Work
Customer Service
Computer Skills
Sales Experienced preferred
Accuracy and pleasant personality a must


Part time to start
SEND RESUME TO:
T.O.M., PO Box 598, Macclenny, FL 32063
Fax to 904-259-3060 Email: officemart@nefcom.net


M YARD SALES

i Thursday and Friday, 8:00 am-?, 7349 W. Madison
Street in Glen St. Mary.
fit E Friday, 8:00 am-1:00 pm, 933 Red Fox Way, Fox
Ridge Subdivision. I am in a clean out mood so
come for a good variety at good prices.
Friday and Saturday, 8:00 am ?, George Hodge
Road, follow signs.
Friday and Saturday, 9:00 am-2:00 pm, 16476 CR 125 North just
passed Otis Yarborough Road. Name brand men and women's
clothes, women's bottoms sizes 0-13, men's bottoms sizes 32-34,
boy and girl toddler clothes, baby clothes, breast pump and baby
accessories, home decor, toys, TV stand, dresser chest, motorcycle
jackets and helmets, books, movies and more.
Friday and Saturday, 8:00 am ?, 8042 Plantation Road, Old Nursery
Plantation. Estate sale antiques, collectibles, Thomasville furniture,
home decor, wool rugs, kitchen items. Inside, rain or shine. 626-
8878.
Friday 8:30 am 4:00 pm, and Saturday, 8:00 am-1:00 pm, 1125
Copperfield Drive. Lots of infants clothes, boys and girls clothes, lots
of household items, computer desk. Multi family.
Saturday, 8:00 am-1:00 pm, 1328 Copper Oaks Court. Garage/studio
sale everything from A Z, all nice. Get an early start on Christmas
shopping. Gift baskets for men and women, great prices. Two family
Saturday, 8:00 am-noon, 447 N. 6th Street, Macclenny on 121. Lots
of goodies. No early birds.
Saturday, 8:00 am-?, 1143 Copperfield Circle. Baby items, small
appliances, furniture, girls clothes and toys. Prices so low they're
scary!
Saturday, 8:00 am-4:00 pm, 10152 River Oak Circle in Glen. Yard
equipment sale. Reconditioned chain saws, trimmers, blowers, edg-
ers, hedgers, tillers and bush hogs. Great prices. 259-8122.
Saturday, 9:00 am-?, 440 E. Mclver. Estate sale.
Saturday and Sunday, 8:30 am-?, 4493 Scott Street. Barber Road to
Carey Barber Road to Scott Street. At dead end turn right, house on
right. Too much to list.


thursday, October 29, 2009


Page 12





Thursday, October 29, 2009

1 and 2 BR apartments now available, 1
BR $500, 2 BR $550. Quiet, established
neighborhood. Call for more information
259-8444. 9/10tfc
4 BR, 2 BA house, quiet neighborhood,
no smoking, service animals only, $900/
month. 259-8444. 9/24tfc
3 BR, 2 BA brick home with fenced yard
and utility shed in city, $850/month, first
and last plus deposit. 259-6849.
10/29-11/5p
2 BR, 1 BA all appliances including wash-
er/dryer and dishwasher, $675/month,
$675 deposit. 904-259-3300. 7/2tfc
3 BR, 2 BA on acre lot, front porch and
small shed in back, bus stop in corner of
yard, $650/month, $500 deposit refer-
ences required. 259-5853. 10/29-11/5p
3 BR, 2 BA on River Hills Road, Glen.
$800/month, $400 deposit, call after 6:00
PM. 259-3640. 10/22-10/29p
2 BR, 2 BA, washer/dryer hook-up, work-
ing dishwasher, central H/A, $750/month,
$350 security, Glen St. Mary. 912-843-
8139 or 904-228-2330. 10/29-11/5p
Downtown loft apartment, 2 BR, 1 BA,
700 SF, newly renovated, $595/month,
$595 deposit. Call Chris at 874-2058.
10/22-10/29p
3 BR, 2 BA doublewide mobile home,
fenced in backyard, close to 1-10, $850/
month, $850 deposit. 259-2900.
10/22-10/29c
2 BR, 1 BA house in Macclenny, no smok-
ing, service animals only, new wood and
carpet, $600/month, $400 deposit. 259-
5286. 10/29p





Office/warehouse space with tractor trail-
er loading dock, 848 SF office, 5500 SF
warehouse. 7574 W. Mt. Vernon in Glen
St. Mary. Rent negotiable. 259-5327.
10/22-12/10p
Small office space in downtown Mac-
clenny, $350/month includes utilities,
except phone. 904-629-5954.
10/15-11/5p
Office space for rent, prime location,
downtown Macclenny, $588.50 per month
plus deposit. Call 259-6546. 1/8tfc






3 BR, 2 BA 2000 model Oakwood double-
wide, 1647 SF, $18,900, good condition,
owner occupied. 259-2290.10/29-11/19p
Prestige Home Centers, every model
must go. Let's deal 866-605-7255.
9/10tfc
Doublewide on 312 acres, central H/A,
two ponds, barn, fenced, in Georgia Bend,
$62,000. Two for one: house, 2 BR, 1 BA
and trailer, 2 BR, 1 BA, both with central H/
A on 1/ acres in Georgia Bend, $50,000.
2 BR, 1 BA house, central H/A on S. Bou-
levard, $62,000. 259-6101. 10/29p


Up-and-down season ends


JOE DARASKEVICH I SPORTS

A season filled with ups and
downs ended on a down note
last Tuesday, October 27, when
the BCHS volleyball team lost to
Bishop Snyder 3-0 (25-13, 25-17,
25-21) in the district semi finals.
The Cardinals benefited from
a rowdy home crowd to defeat
BCHS for the third time this
year.
"We tried to game prep, but it
just wasn't there tonight," head
coach Chris Armoreda said after
the game.
'The hustle and tenacity from
the West Nassau game just wasn't
there against Bishop Snyder," he
said in reference to the previous
match.
The Lady Cats beat West Nas-
sau the night before in the quar-
terfinals 3-1(26-28, 25-21, 25-13,
27-25) to get a chance to face the
Cardinals in the north division
finals.
"Inconsistency was a problem
all season long and tonight was a
prime example," Coach Armore-
da said. "We were up and down
all year and apparently we were
on the bottom part of the roller
coaster tonight."
Losing to the Cardinals for
the third time left a sour taste in
the mouths of some seniors and
they're hoping their teammates
will get revenge next season.
"Next year they better come
out and beat Bishop Snyder,"
senior Brittney Alford said after
the final match of her high school
career.
'That's definitely one thing on
my mind right now," she said.
Armoreda hoped his team
would show more enthusiasm on
the final night of the season, but
he was happy with the way his
team played together throughout
the year.
"It doesn't take one or two
[girls], it takes all eight," Coach
Armoreda said. "They all stuck
together and banded together
through all the ups and downs.
They go up as a team and down
as a team, and no one is to blame
for nights like this."
The final loss was tough to
swallow, but the season was
filled with fond memories for the
seniors.
"Senior night was great," Kari
Harris said. "The crowd was into
it and we were playing focused
team volleyball in front of our


friends and families."
The girls beat Trinity Christian
3-0 on October 20 and also built


No. 12 Jordan Hand and teammate.


k E CTL LKE CTr
rlllEUNNUIIT IHE-II
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR,
MATHEMATICS
I lIenipIIi.i. Full-time for Spring 2010)
Teach college level and preparatory
mathematics; work with colleagues for
the advancement of departmental goals.
Position is a spring term appointment
with possible continuance based on
enrollment needs. Master's degree in
mathematics or Master's degree with
minimum of 18 graduate hours in course
work centered on mathematics required.
Ability to use technology in instruction.
Ability to teach online and distance
learning courses. Ability to work well
with others. Ability to learn from
colleagues and to share knowledge.
Ability to utilize various instructional
strategies to reach students. Ability
to present information in a coherent
manner and the ability to fairly evaluate
student retention of that information.
College teaching experience and ability
to teach college level and preparatory
mathematics desired.
Salary: Based on degree and
experience, plus benefits.
Application Deadline: 11/11/09
College application and copies of
transcripts required. All foreign
transcripts must be submitted with a
translation and evaluation. Position
details and application available on the
web at: www.lakecitvcc edu
Inquiries: Human Resources
Lake City Community College
149 SE College Place
Lake City FL 32025
Phone: (386) 754-4314
Fax: (386) 754-4594
E-mail: humanr@lakecitycc edu
LCCC is accredited by the
SouthemAssociaton of Colleges and Schools
VP/ADA/EA/EO College in Education &
Employment


camaraderie at tournaments
throughout the season.
"The Keystone tournament
was really good," Harris said.
'"That's when we really came to-
gether as a team."
Seniors Brittney Alford, Kari
Harris, Meagan Osteen and
Ashley Holton finished the sea-
son strong, but they will always
remember their volleyball team-
mates.
"I'm proud of how we played
this year," Meagan Osteen said.
"This is the most we've ever
played as a team and we're really
going to miss their [the under-
classmen's] spirit.
"I really loved what all the
younger girls brought to the table
this season."


COMMUNITY

CALENDAR

Let people know
what's going on-
post your special event online
bakercountvpress.com


PERFECT STARTER HOME! MLS#502034
Adorable &fresh, this 3BR 2BA has an open floor
plan w split BRs. Plenty of room to grow on this
1 acre lot. Located in MacClenny II Subdivision.
$164,000
ADORABLE HOME! MLS#502929 This 3BR
2BA hm is updated with fresh paint inside. Nice
kitchen w lots of storage & sep. dining area.
Come see foryourself. $139,000
LESSTHAN $3,000 PER ACRE!- MLS#494460
Investors and developers must see. Located
in beautiful Glen St. Mary, in one of the fastest
growing counties in Florida. Endless possibilities.
$278,000
GREAT INVESTMENT PROPERTY -
MLS#497431 Currently rents for $695. Almost 1
acre parcel! $49,900
HIGH & DRYACRES!- MLS#460640Waiting for
you to build your dream home. Zoned for houses
or mobile homes. Located on secluded rd &
corner lot. $80,000
GREAT POOL HOME! MLS#495023 This 3BR
2BA hm is away from main road, only 3 mins
from schools & 5 mins. From 1-10. Large open flr
plan. $99,500
JAX RANCH CLUB MLS#452129 Get away
from city by owning this spectacularvacant lot of
2.53 acres. Come canoe & ride horses. $89,000
BEAUTIFUL LAND MLS#459699 Perfect for
new development of duplex townhomes or
mobile homes. Corner lot..90 acre. Vacant land
in downtown MacClenny. $115,000
YOUR DREAM HOME MLS#489647 3900
SF of pure charm. 1.71 acres, large rms, family
custom sun rm & bonus. Grand master open
plan. $379,500
PRICED TO SELL! MLS#503350 This
immaculate 3BR 2BA all brick hm sits on 2 city
lots. WWC, tile firs in kitchen & fam. room. All
stainless steel appliances, prewired surround
sound and much more! $149,000


PHOTO BY JOE DARASKEVICH
The Cat's Logan Raulerson (left) and Meagan Osteen against West Nassau.


1395 Chaffee Road

South, Jacksonville

wnm ke> Corp RFMDTI' 904.772.9800


PERFECT LAND! MLS#408378 45.63 Acres! Great for
horses& agriculture. CR121. Has anolderhome&2 rental.
Close to St. Mary's River. $600,000
CUSTOM BRICK HOME MLS#466239 Beautiful 3BR
2BA on almost 2 acres. Large rooms. Enough rm in master
for office. 3 car attached garage & more! Detached 2 car
finished garage w/central heat & air, could be converted
into apt. $259,900
PERFECT TIME TO INVEST! MLS#473281 Gorgeous well
built Destiny mobile home up to all the codes & standards.
Located in beautiful St. Mary's River. New septic & power
as well. All new upgrades & completely remodeled.
$134,000
LOVELY ALL BRICK HOME MLS#488789 This 3BR
2BA hm features newer carpet, countertops, hardware,
screen back porch, double pane windows & much more.
$116,900
NEW RIVER PLANTATION! MLS#416057 Heavily treed
lots. No building timeframes. 2400 SF min. house. Build
barn with apt no smaller than 350 SF One house per acre
allowed. $189,000
BEAUTIFUL BRICK HOME! MLS#496654 This 4BR 2BA
hm is located on 1 acre w/stocked pond. Immaculate
landscaped yard. Swim in your beautiful screened solar
heated in ground pool. Lotsof extras. $279,900
EXCEPTIONAL NEWER HOME! MLS#482867 This 4BR
3BA hm includes spacious open fir plan. Situated on a full
acre with mature tress & luscious landscaping. Relax &
enjoythe sounds of nature. $224,900


5 ACRES & POOL! MLS#482330 You need to see this
one! Too many extras to list. Huge screened/heated pool.
Custom all brick. $475,000
GREAT HOME! MLS#496329 This 4BR 2BA 1,590SF
concrete block hm is a great price. Lots of possibilities. Call
today! $99,900
WANT TO SAVE ON GAS? MLS#489879 This adorable
brick 3BR 2BA hm situated on Ig corner lot with white fence
is what you are looking for. Walk to stores, restaurants,
banks & more. 2 car garage, plus RV parking. $155,000
BAYHAYA FIELDS GREAT FOR YOUR HORSES! MLS#
428488 High & dry 5.63 acres completely cleared & waiting
for you to build your dream home. Being offered at 2008
appraisal value. $154,000
COMPLETELY REMODELED! MLS#494548 This 3BR 2BA
DWMH sits on large 2.67 acre corner lot. Gorgeous wood
flooring throughout. Fresh paint, artistic light fixtures,
open floor plan. $115,500
BEAUTIFUL HOME! MLS#485896 Nicely landscaped 3BR
2BA. Beautiful palm trees in front & back. Build in 2005
with over 1300 SF. $138,000
MOTIVATED SELLER! MLS#503434 Adorable 3BR 1.5 on
1 acre in MacClenny II. Perfect for first time home buyer.
Split flr plan, cute kitchen with tile & lots of storage. Large
BRs. Roof is lessthan4 yrs old. $129,900
PERFECT FOR 1st TIME BUYER MLS#494862 This 3BR 1
BA isthe place to call home. Sits on almost 1/ acre. Closeto
rail trails, shopping and about 15 minutes from downtown.
$69,900


THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


Page 13





THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


SOCIAL


Page


14
OCTOBER 29, 2009


SOCIAL NOTICE SUBMISSION INFORMATION CONTACT US
Birth announcements, wedding notices and social events must be submitted within four weeks of the event. By phone at 904.259.2400 or by fax at 904.259.6502. You can stop by our office located at 104 S. Fifth Street,
All news and advertising must be submitted to the newspaper office prior to 5:oo p.m. on the Monday prior
to publication, unless otherwise noted or arranged. It is requested that all news items be typed or emailed to Macclenny, FL or mail your submission to PO Box 598, Macclenny, FL 32063.
insure accuracy in print. We are available online at www.bakercountypress.com


Akridge Sweat Padgett Morrison
November vows Wed October 19


The parents of Trista Gail
Akridge and Joshua Bryant
Sweat, both of Glen St. Mary,
are pleased to announce their
upcoming wedding on Novem-
ber 7, 2009 at the Raiford Road
Church. The bride is the daugh-
ter of the late Thomas Wayne
Akridge and Johnny and Barba-
ra Knight and Joshua is the son
of Robert and Samantha Sweat,
all of Glen.
Following a honeymoon
cruise to the Bahamas, the cou-
ple will reside in Jacksonville.


Enlow McMurray
Wed October 3rd
Carol D. Enlow of Callahan
and Robert J. McMurray of Glen
St. Mary were wed October 3,
2009 at 3:oo pm at Celebration
Park. Carol is the daughter of
Joseph and Jean Cook of Jack-
sonville and Robert is the son of
Paul and Mary McMurray of Ft.
Lauderdale.
After enjoying a Maryland
honeymoon, the couple returned
to Glen where they will reside.

School Lunch
MENU
October 26 October 30
Offered everyday:
Cold lunch plate of chef salad with wheat roll
or crackers and dessert (when offered) 1%
lowfat white milk, % lowfat flavored milk,
orange juice.
Monday, November2
Breakfast: Sausage Biscuit, peach slices,
milk
Lunch: Taco Salad with a homemade
wheat roll or grilled ham and cheese
sandwich, choice of two sides: golden
corn, lettuce and tomato blend, chilled
fruit juice
Tuesday, November 3
Breakfast: Cereal with slice of toast,
fruit juice, milk
Lunch: Mexican burrito with salsa or
chicken nuggets with a homemade wheat
roll, choice of two sides: green beans with
new potatoes, raw veggies with dressing,
chilled fruit and a homemade cookie (gr.
7-12 peanut butter)
Wednesday, November 4
Breakfast: Pancake and sausage on a
stick, fruit juice and milk
Lunch: sloppy Joe on a bun or beef
vegetable soup with a grilled cheese
sandwich, choice of two sides: baked
french fries, tossed salad with dressing,
chilled fruit juice
Thursday, November 5
Breakfast: Toasted cheese sandwich,
fruitjuice and milk
Lunch: Golden corndog or glazed ham
slice with macaroni and cheese and a
homemade wheat roll, choice of two
sides: baked beans, raw veggies with
dressing, chilled fruit juice and a roated
peanut cup (gr. 7-12)
Friday, November 6
Breakfast: Breakfast pizza, fruit juice
and milk
Lunch: BBQ ribbette on a bun or baked
Italian lasagna with a slice of homemade
Italian bread, choice of two sides: tossed
salad with dressing, steamed green peas,
chilled fresh fruit and a slice of homemade
cake, chilled fruit juice


Joshua Morrison and Deanna
Padgett were joined in marriage
on October 19 at the Sandals
Grande Resort in Ocho Rios, Ja-
maica.
The bride, daughter of Bo and
Valarie Padgett of Jacksonville,
graduated from Jacksonville
University with her bachelors
degree in nursing and is current-
ly attending the schools nurse
practitioner program. She is em-
ployed by Ed Fraser Hospital's
emergency room and Baptist
Medical Center.
The groom, son of Wayne
Morrison and Sheila Cope of
Macclenny, attended Baker
County High School and is em-
ployed by CSX Transportation
as a locomotive engineer.
After honeymooning in Ja-
maica, the couple is residing in
Macclenny.


FFAis


awarded


'star' title
It was a big week for the Baker
High School chapter of the FFA.
Greg Johnson and his Future
Farmers traveled to the National
Convention in Indianapolis
where they competed in the Na-
tional Poultry Evaluation and
also were recognized as a 2 Star
Chapter.
Kyndall Brooks and Bobby
Gage received the National Chap-
ter award.
'This was the second time this
chapter had ever competed in
this contest and my first," said
Johnson. "We definitely learned
a lot about this contest and how
different each state is across the
nation."
The poultry team had an out-
standing showing, finishing 13th
in the nation. Matt Cantrell was
a Gold Finalist, ending up 25th
out of approximately 152 stu-
dents competing from around
the country.
"We are extremely proud
of Matt. It was an outstanding
showing," said Johnson.
The remaining members of
the team, Austin Gibson, Chelsea
Crews and Timmy Gibson were
Silver Finalists.
"They did a good job and
learned a tremendous amount
about the national scope of these
contests."


Couple observes
60th anniversary
Dorothy and Ben Higginbo-
tham of Maxville will celebrate
their 6oth wedding anniversary
with family and friends Saturday,
November 7, 2009. A reception
will be held at the Fellowship
Hall of the First Baptist Church of
Maxville from 1:00-5:00oo pm.
Ben and Dorothywere married
on November 10, 1949 in Max-
ville. She is the former Dorothy
Harris. The have three daughters,
Marian (Dale) Tinsley and Con-
nie (Richard) Brown of Maxville
and Donna (David) Wilkinson
of Clay Hill. The Higginbothams
have four grandchildren, seven
great-grandchildren and a great-
grandchild on the way.

Adult testing
The adult test of basic skills
(TABE) will be given on Novem-
ber 5 and December 11, the final
two dates of 2009.
The location is the Family
Service Center next to Keller In-
termediate. Registration starts
at 8:30 am and the test a half
hour later. There is a $15 testing
fee (exact amount or check).
Any questions, contact Cheryl
Ward during business hours at
259-4110.

Need to look up the
phone number
for a classified ad
and don't have
the paper handy?

Coming soon
an all new
bakercountvoress.com


PHOTO BY KELLEY LANNIGAN

Classes visit the Pumpkin Patch
Teacher Emily Nafe, left, gets ready to lead her kindergarten class back to the PreK/Kindergarten Center after the children
visited the Pumpkin Patch during a morning field trip October 20. Proceeds from The Pumpkin Patch, an annual fund raising
project sponsored by the First Methodist Church of Macclenny, go toward the church's missions projects. A favorite fall activ-
ityfor children and adults alike is picture taking in front of the many colorful harvest displays that are a hallmark of the event.
Visiting school children are also treated to story time by a costumed church member and each receives a small token pump-
kin to take home. The patch is located
on North 5th St. in Macclenny and
open every day through Halloween. h 1 a r i


- Still nifty at 50!! .


Happy Birthday,
Sandra Canaday Crawford
Love, Lisa & Tqer

CvLu&UiKM',
Ich~RL JLVYL

-r A


!I: -

Graduated with honors from Everest
University on October 23, 2009 with a
diploma in Medical Assistance. We are so
proud of you and we know you will go far,
Love you, Momma, Tony & Baby T.J.


SCHOOL /
October 30
District-wide: Planning Day
/ Volunteer Forms Deadline
BCHS: "Steel Magnolias"
Drama Presentation, 7:00
p.m. Football-(H), 7:31p.m.
KIS: "Coins for a Cure" Proj-
ect
October 31
BCHS: "Steel MaghTlias"
Drama Presentation. 7:00
p.m.
November 2
District-wide: School'~oard
\lcvtin,'. 6:30 p.m., Istrict
School Board Room. B "\l I
Boys' Basketball Tryouts,


ACTIVITIES
2:30N :30 p.m.
November 3
BCHS: Vision and Hear-
ing Screening for 9th Grade.
BC S-.Boys' Basketball Try-
outs 20 4:30 p.m. WES:
SchOol Advisory Council
Mtg., S:00 a.m. Good Morn-
ing Show, 8:00 a.m. FCAT
Workshop for parents of 3rd
Graeps 6:00 p.m.
No eper 4
BCM4 Boys' Basketball
Tryouts, 2:30 4:30 p.m.
WES: "Just Say No!" Club
NMt. 8:00 a.m.

h$


PLANNING A SPECIAL EVENT?
HOLIDAY & PERSONAL PARTIES WEDDING REHEARSAL DINNERS BUSINESS MEETINGS & EVENTS


Banquet Room ,'
Facilities Available
$100/2 hours (basic fee)
SMALL TO LARGE
Will seat up to 100 people


NEW LIFE
CHURCH OF GOD
14271 N. SR 121, MACCLENNY
CONTACT RENEE STALER, COORDINATOR 275-2637


Freshly Baked
Fruitcakes &
Muffins
Call Faye Harvey at
259-5301 for pick-up
dates and prices


Privacy

Great Food

Ideal Location

Plenty of Parking


PUBLIC HEARING
Pursuant to an application submitted by Hugh D. Fish, Jr. /
Gateway Rifle & Pistol Club, Inc. as agent for Design Timber
11, LLC., to be granted a Special Exception on property located
on CR 229 North, in Section 16, Township 2S, Range 20 and
Section 17, Township 2S, Range 20, containing approximately
555 acres in Baker County, FL. The Baker County Land Planning
Agency (LPA), will consider the request at a public hearing
scheduled for Thursday, November 12, 2009 at 7:00 pm in the
County Administration Building, 55 North Third St., Macclenny,
FL. All interested parties may appear and be heard with respect
to the Special Exception request. The purpose of the request is
to be granted a Special Exception to the Baker County Land
Development Regulations in reference to Section 3.04.09.02.2
AG 10 Private Gun Club or Firing Range by Special Exception.
Written comments for or against the Special Exception may be
sent to Baker County Planning Department, 81 North Third St.,
Macclenny, FL 32063. Faxed comments may be sent to (904)259-
5057. Copies of the Special Exception may be inspected by
any member of the public in the Planning Department, address
stated above. According to the Americans with Disabilities Act,
persons needing a special accommodation or an interpreter to
participate in this proceeding should contact the Administration
Department at (904) 259-5123 at least 48 hours prior to the time
of the hearing.


PUBLIC HEARING
Pursuant to an application submitted by James Thomas Slattery,
to be granted a Special Exception on property located on River
Bend Road, in Section 21, Township IS, Range 21, containing
approximately 36.54 acres in Baker County, FL. The Baker
County Land Planning Agency (LPA), will consider the request
at a public hearing scheduled for Thursday, November 12, 2009
at 7:00 pm in the County Administration Building, 55 North
Third St., Macclenny, FL. All interested parties may appear
and be heard with respect to the Special Exception request. The
purpose of the request is to be granted a Special Exception to
the Baker County Land Development Regulations in reference
to Section 3.04.10.02.7 AG 7.5 District: Permissible Uses by
Special Exception and Section 3.05.24 Homestead Division.
Written comments for or against the Special Exception may be
sent to Baker County Planning Department, 81 North Third St.,
Macclenny, FL 32063. Faxed comments may be sentto (904)259-
5057. Copies of the Special Exception may be inspected by
any member of the public in the Planning Department, address
stated above. According to the Americans with Disabilities Act,
persons needing a special accommodation or an interpreter to
participate in this proceeding should contact the Administration
Department at (904) 259-5123 at least 48 hours prior to the time
of the hearing.


Q~n~g


N. I %%. I I C Y% SEDAN





THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


RTS 15
SPORTS OCTOBER 29, 2009

SPORTS NOTICE SUBMISSIONS CONTACT US
We welcome your sports submissions for youth league, traveling league or individual athletic achievements. The By phone at 904.259.2400 or by fax at 904.259.6502. You can stop by our office located at 104 S. Fifth Street,
paper reserves the right to publish submissions. It is requested that all news items be typed or emailed to insure Macclenny, FL or mail your submission to PO Box 598, Macclenny, FL 32063.
accuracy in print. We are available online at www.bakercountypress.com


Wildcats fall to Raines

Early lead, momentum lost after 1st quarter


BOB GERARD I SPORTS
Momentum can be a very fickle lady.
For a full quarter in the Wildcat's
crucial district matchup with Raines on
Friday night, it looked like Lady Mo was
securely on their arm. They had scored
quickly and the area's number one de-
fense had slammed the door on the
Raines offense.
The Lady smiled and flirted with the
Cats the entire first period, then a fluke
play early in the second tempted her
over to the Viking side of the field and
she never left. Raines capitalized on the
momentum shift and bested the Wild-
cats with a 34-14 win.
The start to the game couldn't have
been much better for BCHS.
Darvin Ruise took the opening kick-
off, caught wedge blocking up the middle
and returned the ball all the way down to
the 22-yard line of Vikings territory. Two
plays later, Rueben Jackson carried the
ball across and Kendrick Sampson con-
verted on the extra point for a 7-0 lead.
The defense was also ready to play.
Hunter Sullivan got a big hit on the kick-
off return and Raines could manage little
offense. The Vikings went three and out
for most of the quarter.
Quarterback Herman Tapley was ha-
rassed all quarter by Cody Wheeler and
the running game was a non-factor. Ta-
pley was also having trouble linking up
with his brother Sean, the Vikings' top
wide receiver. It looked as if the Wild-
cats were going to have their way with
Raines.
When the period changed, the mo-
mentum took a stroll across the field.
Early in the second quarter with the


defense blanketing Raines yet another
time, the Vikings punted to Harold
Moore. He feinted as if he was going to
receive the wobbly punt, but according to
the officials the ball took an odd bounce
and hit him.
Coach Bobby Johns was adamant that
the ball never touched Moore.
Raines' Kyor Sanders picked up the
ball and two plays later Sanders was in
the end zone for the tying score.
The freak play deflated the Cats and
from then on the game belonged to the
Vikings. They scored again on a quick
strike 55-yard pass from Herman Tapley
to his brother. The Cats blocked the extra
point to keep it close.
"The bottom line is that cost us the
ball game," said Coach Johns. "The mo-
mentum changed and they jammed us
up and we're down two scores to one.
Nothing ever changed the rest of the
night."
Even though the game was in reach
during the first half, the huge Raines
defense was heartened by the swing in
fortune and stood their ground against
BCHS. They basically put all 11 men in
the box and dared the Wildcats to run at
them.
"I told our team something bad will
happen to both teams during the game
and the team that wins will be the one
that handles it the best," said Johns.
Midway through the second quarter
that team was Raines.
The running game ground to a halt as
the Raines defensive line, which aver-
ages 290 pounds, controlled the line of
scrimmage.
"Physically, if they want to play, we're
in trouble," said Johns.


Harold Moore, who averages over loo
yards a game, was held to just 15 yards
rushing by the defense, led by Division
1 prospects Louis Nix, Raymond Maxey
and Tavadis Glenn.
Raines continued to put the pressure
on BCHS, scoring on a touchdown pass
and on a long drive capped by a 6-yard
Sanders plunge to give the Vikings a 27-7
lead.
But BCHS refused to give up and in
the third quarter Ruise dropped into
the shotgun and it forced the Vikings to
spread out. That allowed the running
game to be more successful.
With five minutes remaining in the
game, Ruise hit Moore on a pass close to
midfield. Ruise drove into Raines terri-
tory at the 26, and two plays later, Moore
scored from to yards out to narrow the
lead to 27-14.
It didn't come as a surprise to anyone
in the stadium that the Cats would try an
on-side kick. The ball hit and bounced
a couple of times, then Sean Tapley
scooped it up and dashed 48 yards for
the final score of the game.
The win put the Vikings in the driver's
seat for the district title. However, they
still have to face rival Ribault on Novem-
ber 6 and the Wildcats will be rooting
hard for the Trojans to win the game.
The Raines offense was about as bal-
anced as it gets with 131 yards rushing
and 130 passing, by far the most offense
allowed this season by the powerful
Wildcat defense.
The Cats only managed 95 yards rush-
ing and 77 passing.
BCHS will host Suwannee County in
another district clash this Friday at 7:30
pm in Memorial Stadium.


SIn the

Locker Room

with Coach Bobby Johns


We are now in a cor-
ner and I hope we come
out fighting!
We did not get it done
last week against Raines
and now we are no lon-
ger in complete control
of our playoff destiny. In _
a game that we had our
chances early to put '
some distance between
us and the Vikings, we
didn't take advantage of
the great field position Coach B
and opportunities to go
ahead two scores.
Penalties and lack of effort
caused us to get holding penal-
ties and false start penalties that
cost us a possible touchdown on
our second drive of the night and
then a terrible call on a muffed
punt changed the momentum of
the game forever.
I will never allow us to use of-
ficiating as an excuse for losing a
game. We had several chances to
regain our momentum and turn
the game back into our favor, but


obbyJohns


failed to execute when
needed and we allowed
Raines to keep it all
night. I knew they were a
much improved team as
this year has progressed,
and I also knew we were
severely out-matched.
I believe our chance to
win was getting them on
their heels early.
It was a game where,
in the end, their size and
speed wore us down. It


was the first time I be-
lieve that's happened since I've
been here. But our kids played
hard right till the end. I want to
thank the crowd at the game who
supported us and put their confi-
dence in us.
We need those people this
week as we fight to keep our play-
off hopes alive with a win over
Suwannee County. It is great to
be a Wildcat and we hope to see
you at the game. Go Cats!


Suwannee a 'must win' game


BOB GERARD I SPORTS
After their tough 34-14 loss
to the Raines Vikings, the Baker
High Wildcats hope to rebound
with a district victory over the
Suwannee Bulldogs this week-
end. With the loss last Friday to
district foe Raines, every district
game is a "must win."
The Wildcats defeated the
Bulldogs 54-21 last year in Live
Oak and Suwannee would like
nothing better than to avenge
that humiliating home loss by
returning the favor. A loss to ei-
ther Suwannee or Santa Fe in the
remaining district games would
almost surely keep the Cats out
of the playoffs.
Suwannee has had an up and
down season. They are 1-2 in
district play, defeating Santa Fe
and losing to Ribault and Raines.
They have split in last four games
with wins over Hamilton County
and Fort White and losses to
Taylor County and the powerful
Madison Cowboys.
Suwannee has already eclipsed
last year's abysmal 2-8 mark, a
record that was hard to swallow
for the former state powerhouse.
The Dogs operate out of a


triple option and Suwannee has
some talent in the backfield with
Greg Swinson, J. R. Bass, and
Andre Sander all able to pick up
yards. They have a solid kicker in
Austin O'Conner.
"They moved the ball bet-
ter against Raines and Ribault
than we did," said Coach Bobby
Johns.
The Bulldogs are known for
their blocking and it has im-
pressed Coach Johns. '"Their kids
play really, really hard," he said.
Defensively, Suwannee has
given up 25 points per game.
They are a young team with only
four senior starters, but Coach


Jerry Odom has the team mov-
ing in the right direction and
Coach Johns thinks they come in,
"thinking that they can beat us."



AllNew -
COMMUNITY
CALENDAR
Let people know
what's going on-
post your special event online
bakercountypress.com


Bassmasters

seek members
Potential members are in-
vited to a meeting of the Baker
County Bassmasters Club at Ex-
treme Outdoors in Macclenny.
It will be held on November
10 at 7:oo pm.
Anyone interested in apply-
ing for membership should at-
tend; the club is limited to 25
boats. Membership is encour-
aged but not required in fishing
tournaments.


Check it out...
b'7777yuTypITmfEBi
2 L -a,- -,- =M- _am__


A&R Truss Company
Pole Barns Garage Small Homes
Shed Trusses
Stock 24' Trusses $49.00


Opponents results


The Wildcats took one on
the chin Friday, losing 34-14 to
Raines in a key district game.
Here's a look at how Baker High
opponents past and future fared
this weekend.
Crescent City rebounded from
last week's loss to Melbourne
Central Catholic with a big 42-13
win over Daytona Beach's Father
Lopez. The victory gives the Raid-
ers a 5-2 record.
Trinity Christian was tested on
the road Friday by North Florida
Christian of Tallahassee before
winning 21-14. The Conquerors
are undefeated in all seven games
this season.
Bradford County got a big
13-10 win in Tallahassee over
Florida High, running its record
to 4-4.
The Ribault Trojans hosted
Suwannee County and handed
the Bulldogs a 28-7 district loss.
The Trojans are 5-2 on the cam-


paign.
Baldwin was defeated 33-6 in
a district matchup with Santa Fe.
The Indians are 2-5 while the Red
Raiders are 1-6 on the season.
The victory over BCHS gave
Raines a 4-3 record.
Arlington Country Day ran
its record to 6-1. The Apaches
crushed Mandarin Christian 64-
27.

News

Obituaries

Calendar of Events

Classified Ads

www.bakercountypress.com

Have you checked
it out lately?


PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE

Pursuant to an application submitted by Hugh D. Fish,
Jr./Gateway Rifle & Pistol Club, Inc., as agent for Design
Timber II, LLC, to be granted a variance to the Baker County
Land Development Regulations Article 3 Section 3.05.18.
D Firing Range, Small Arms, Private Gun Club Noise
Level The property is located on CR 229 North, in Sec 16,
Twn 2S, R 20 and Sec 17, Twn 2S, R 20 in Baker County,
Florida. The Baker County Land Planning Agency (LPA)
will consider the request at a public hearing scheduled for
Thursday, November 12, 2009, at 7:00 pm, in the County
Administration Building, 55 North Third Street, Macclenny,
FL. All interested parties may appear and be heard with
respect to the variance. Written comments for or against
the variance may be sent to the Baker County Planning
Department, 81 North Third Street, Macclenny, FL 32063.
Faxed comments may be sent to (904) 259-5057. Copies of
the variance may be inspected in the Planning Department by
any member of the public. According to the Americans with
Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation
or an interpreter to participate in this proceeding should
contact the Administration Department at (904) 259-5123
at least 48 hours prior to the time of the hearing.


PUBLIC HEARING
Pursuant to an application submitted by David Paulk, to be
granted a Special Exception on property located on RiverBend
Road, in Section 21, Township IS, Range 21, containing
approximately 33.78 acres in Baker County, FL. The
Baker County Land Planning Agency (LPA), will consider
the request at a public hearing scheduled for Thursday,
November 12, 2009 at 7:00 pm in the County Administration
Building, 55 North Third St., Macclenny, FL. All interested
parties may appear and be heard with respect to the Special
Exception request. The purpose of the request is to be granted
a Special Exception to the Baker County Land Development
Regulations in reference to Section 3.05.24 Homestead
Division. Written comments for or against the Special
Exception may be sent to Baker County Planning Department,
81 North Third St., Macclenny, FL 32063. Faxed comments
may be sent to (904)259-5057. Copies of the Special
Exception may be inspected by any member of the public
in the Planning Department, address stated above. According
to the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a
special accommodation or an interpreter to participate in this
proceeding should contact the Administration Department
at (904) 259-5123 at least 48 hours prior to the time of the
hearing.


PHOTOS BY
JOE DARASKEVICH
Above, a
Wildcat runner
being pursued
during Friday's
34-14 loss
against Raines.
At right is
another
running back
just before
colliding with a
Raines
defender.


Anderson Quality

ROOFING

Metal & Shingle Reroofs & Roof Repairs
New Homes Remodels Additions
Screen Rooms Door & Window Replacement





THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


Bottles decorate local yard

N. 5th St. 'tree' is home-made too


tree," which will take you to nu-
merous sites with great photos.
Be sure to watch the Bottle Tree
Ranch video on YouTube that
showcases bottle tree sculptures
along Route 66 made by welder
Elmer Long, who collected bot-


Lk
PHOTO BY KELLEY LANNIGAN
Jerri Maceda's bottle tree.
KELLEY LANNIGAN
FEATURES
features@bakercountypress.com
Two months ago, Rick Fisher
and Jerri Maceda erected a bottle
tree in the yard of their apart-
ment on north 5th Street in Mac-
clenny.
Sharp-eyed motorists passing
by may have observed the unique
structure which dramatically re-
flects the late morning sunlight.
Their project started when the
couple was out riding their mo-
torcycles along State Road 13 one
afternoon and spotted one in the
yard of a house. Intrigued, they
turned around and went back to
inquire. They soon agreed they
wanted one for their own yard.
"It was the first time I had
ever seen a bottle tree," said Ms.
Maceda. "I knew I had to have
one."
They checked at garden cen-
ters and discovered the "tree"
structures could be bought ready-
made. Most were constructed of
metal and cost about $30.
"We talked about it and finally
I said to Rick, 'why don't you just
make one?'" Ms. Maceda said.
It was simple. Mr. Fisher used
a four-by-four section of treated
lumber and attached long nails at
an angle down the sides. He then
anchored it in the ground.
"Collecting the bottles was the
most work," said Ms. Maceda.
"We needed about 50 for our tree.
It took a while to find them."
The couple shopped and found
that decorative bottles bought
brand new could be expensive.
They had luck at second-hand
and thrift stores where they could
be bought for as little as 50 cents.
They decided not to pay more
than $2 for a bottle.
Their tree consists mostly
of green and blue bottles with a
few other accent colors scattered
throughout. One unusual feature
is the star-shaped bottle used to
crown the tree.
"Blue bottles are my favorite,
but those are harder to find, for
some reason," said Ms. Maceda.
"Brown bottles, it seems, are all
over the place."
The bottle tree is a curiosity for
many people. Mr. Fisher and Ms.
Maceda often have people stop-
ping to ask questions about it.
"People seem to really like it,"
she said. "I want to eventually
build another one, this time solid
blue. Those are really beautiful."
Bottle trees have been around
a long time, but their popularity
has recently escalated again as
desirable lawn and garden orna-
ments across the United States.
Their origin is associated with
the Congo region of Africa.
Bottles were placed on the
ends of tree branches or hung in
the trees to protect houses and
their occupants.
It was believed that roving
evil spirits were attracted to the
shiny bottles and entered them at
night, becoming trapped inside.
In the morning, sunlight shining
through the glass dispatched the
spirits back to the netherworld or
destroyed them altogether.
To see examples of bottle trees
you can Google the words "bottle



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tles in his youth.
A bottle tree also featured
prominently on the property of
character Gloria Dump in the
movie Because of Winn Dixie.


PHOTO BY JESSICA PREVATT


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hair products to the Donna Deegan Foundation.





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thursday, October 29, 2009


Page 16




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