Group Title: Baker County Press (Macclenny, Fla. : 1929).
Title: The Baker County press
ALL ISSUES CITATION
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00024160/00188
 Material Information
Title: The Baker County press
Uniform Title: Baker County press (Macclenny, Fla. : 1929)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Baker County Press
Publisher: Tate Powell
Place of Publication: Macclenny, Fla
Publication Date: August 28, 2008
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Macclenny (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Baker County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Baker -- Macclenny
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Apr. 12, 1929.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 39 (Jan. 2, 1931).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00024160
Volume ID: VID00188
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ADA7379
oclc - 33284409
alephbibnum - 000579533
lccn - sn 95047186

Full Text










THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS


Paid circulation leader Winner ofl 4 tate awards forjournalism excellence in 2007


79th Year, Vol. 18 Thursday, August 28, 2008 Macclenny, Florida 50'





Storm finally 'Fay'ds


Rai nfa /Itops

0liritches over

the weekend
BY JOEI, ADDINGTON
Press Staff*
Although there were reports
S --- of some damage, the effects of
-- Tropical Storm Fay on Baker
County were relatively minor
two days after the storm passed
Through the northern portion of
the state late last week.
.7. .Director of the Emergen-
.F-. cy Operations Center (EOC)
... Adam Faircloth said official
damage estimates were still
being compiled by local, state
and federal officials August
26, but that a preliminary esti-'
mate on the cost of debris re-
moval, public safety response,
and road and bridge repair
from the Federal Emergency
Management Agency (FEMA)
totaled about $1.2 million.
Much of that cost will be re-
imbursed by FEMA, he said.
The heaviest rainfall and
harshest winds swept through
4 i.. .Macclenny four days before
with the weather tower at the
Ag Center recording close to
five inches of rain and a maxi-
mum wind speed of just over
32 mph on Friday, August 22.
From August 19-24, the sta-,
tion registered more than 10.25
inches of rain.
W!pp ~~ "We're still trying to get
a firm number on the dam-
age," said Mr. Faircioth, add-
Sing fhat damage assessments
would continue as water levels
dropped and residents returned
home.
_S . iogness.. hm
Fmpkrr/Bc..Bob Hathcox, the county's
essead Tris HarI r argh id building official, said he'd re-
Clir Smith .coop ior cratVdackL ceived reports that at least five
on Birdpond Rd .4 tree smashed homes sustained major Tlood-
through a mobile home oni Chst,m ing damagee as of August 26
Rd northet ol,acclen Jledamage as of August 2
Ruise ride is s bike in the ra,n a',d and that many residents near
the Country Club Lounge on Sti, (See page 2)
St. invites patrons August 20..

As Fay closed in, area residents plotted strategies to tough it out


BY KELLEY LANNIGAN
Press Staff
Conditions were blustery around Mac-
clenny last Thursday, August 21, during the
day and.some businesses were beginning to
close as a precaution for the possible damage
from impending Huricane Fay. However, the
Wal-Mart Supercenter and Woody's Bar-B-Q
were among two locations doing a brisk sup-
per time business.
The hurricane was the popular topic of
conversation as people prepared for the heavy
rains and wind expected when Fay meandered
over. Baker County.
"The items selling the most are bottled wa-
ter, potted meat and bread. Cashiers have also
been handing out Storm Watch Family Hur-
ricane Preparedness guides produced by Fed-
eral Emergency management Agency," said
Wal-Mart cashier Ann Barnette.
Macclenny resident Joanie Melton said,
"We already have flooding issues at our house
due to plumbing problems which get much
worse when it rains. I decided not to take the
chance of being caught in a flooded house
with no electricity. So me and my three kids


are staying tonight in the emergency shelter at
First Baptist Church in Glen St. Mary."
"We went out and bought a generator," said
Jan Schiner of Macclenny. "I just decided that
I didn't want to face two days without power if
I didn't have to. My husband boarded up win-
dows and we put in extra nails to help secure
the tin roofing on our barn because we don't
want that blowing off. The area where the
barn is tends to flood so we'll keep an eye on
that and move the horses if necessary. I didn't
used to be as concerned about the threat of a
hurricane, but that's changed since becoming
a home and land owner."
Woodlawn Road resident Gary Murch said
he and his wife researched Florida before
coming here last year.
"Baker County was the area least affected
by hurricanes and that's why we chose Mac-
clenny," he said. "I'm not really worried about
this storm, but you never know. Just in case,
we went to Wal-Mart and put together a hur-
ricane kit with enough food and water for two
days. I also filled our vehicle withgas. My
(See page 2)


Betty Sands protects patio furniture before the storm.


Michael Crews gets a hug from his 15-year-old daughter Christian outside the elec-
tions office Tuesday as results were read aloud

Crews beats incumbent


BY JOEL ADDINGTON
Press Staff
Michael Crews defeated two-
term incumbent Julie Combs in
the race for the District 1 Sand-
erson seat on the Baker County
Commission in the Republican
primary election held August
26.
The win means Mr. Crews
will face Democrat Phillip Jef-
ferson in the November general
election that will determine who
will represent Sanderson and
Olustee on the county board.
"We're halfway there," he


told a group of supporters whb'd
gathered at elections office on
Sixth Street to hear supervisor
Nita Crawford read the resutls
aloud. "If you can help us get
through November, we'll be
there."
It took unusually long for
the results to come in though,
due some technical difficulties.
Clint Shivers, of county infor-
mation services said Tropiadl
Storm Fay knocked out a few
(See page 6)


'Scariest thing in my life


says coach ofCats injury


By BobGerard
Press Sports
"It was the scariest thing that
ever happened to me in my life,"
Wildcat football coach Bobby
Johns said of the 13
minutes that he and
assistant head coach
Scott McDonald ad-
ministered CPR to
free safety Milton
Johnson after he
was injured at prac-
tice the evening of
August 19.
Johnson had just
made a hard tackle
and didn't get up off
the ground. Coach
Johns then rushed to
his side and realized
the young man was badly in-
jured. He knew there was dan-
ger in removing his helmet but
had no choice because Johnson
was not breath-
ing.
"It was an hl
easy choice *filaiw
.to make when N1
we saw that he a hI
wasn't breath- aeitoiJoh
ing. I'll see the m '
look on his face
as I started giv- 6'pcl t
ing him CPR 'll
the rest of my i
life," said Coach rC
Johns.
He and Coach
McDonald con-
tinued CPR until the rescue
squad, which had been at an-
other accident, arrived and took
over treatment.
"Once we got him back he


,lin
ioI]
Df


was back," said Mr. Johns. "We
: never lost him after that."
Johnson, 15, was transport-
ed by helicopter to the Shands
Jacksonville trauma unit where




stable and has no
fever.
Doctors plan to
do a tracheotomy
as soon as a slight
infection in the
lungs is controlled.
At that point they
will insert a feed-
ing tube.
hnson ^ Though John-
son remains on a ventilator,
there are indications that he
is getting some oxygen on his
own, a hopeful sign.
The in-
jury is to
[Fr ani the C-3 disc
San in his neck.
-moed Johnson is
S ac conscious
t te s ml and able to
. T gam respond by
m an diaboT b blinking his
gaie prce eds eyes.
i i llliehn "He's able
W tu fuat h to respond
n to his Mama
when she
talks to him
by blinking
his eyes," said assistant coach
Ron Lee.
"We sat hirth up in bed and
(See page 4)


Car nut'brings humor to hobby


BY KELLEY LANNIGAN
Press Staff
Earl Frazer pulls up to the parking lot in a vin-
tage truck. He kills the motor, opens the door and
hops out, wearing a T-shirt that bears the slogan
"Grumpy and Ugly. The same phrase is printed on
his hat.
Today he is wearing two different socks, one
bright red, the other striped blue and orange. His
sense of humor precedes him. The different socks,


like the slogan emblazoned shirt and hat, are on
purpose.
"If I couldn't laugh at things I'd have never made
it this far," he declares.
That same sense of humor and zest for living
has been a trademark of his favorite hobby of buy-
ing, refurbishing, enjoying and selling cars. And
not just any cars. These cars would make any seri-
(See page 4)


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COVERING BAKER COUNTY SINCE 1929
The county' mostprofessionaland extensive sourcefor news, classified, display and real estate listings
www.bakercountypress.com ** 904.259.24p0 ** 904.259.6502 Fax ** bcpress@nefcom.net 6 89076 48819 8


PHOTO BY KELLEY LANNIGAN







THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS, Thursday, August 28, 2008 Page 2

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TropicalStorm Fay: count


nowbaveto

(from page 1)
the St. Mary's River were still
accessing their homes by boat.
"The water is receding now,
which is good," he said.
But during the storm, as flood-
ing increased, so did the number
of road closures throughout the
'donty.
The total number of closed or
impassable roads grew from 35
on Friday to 68 by Sunday, and
then to 71 on Monday. And al-
though public schools re-opened
on Monday, buses could not trav-
el on flooded roads and students
unable to travel safely to school
were excused.
Mr. Faircloth also said Flori-
da Power & Light (FPL) report-
ed as many as 1400 customers
in Baker County were without
power at any given time during
.the storm. He said that the per-
centage of customer outages for
the two other power companies
operating here Clay Elec-
tric and Okeefenokee Electric
-- were likely similar.
Mr. Hathcox's office also
received a number of reports
of-fallen trees or tree limbs on
homes, but said the damage was
typically minor in most cases.
However, one mobile home
on Chestnut Road southwest of
Macclenny likely sustained the
worst damage in the county af-
ter two trees broke through the
roof.
Owner Shirley McKinney
returned to the home with her
husband the morning of August
22 after evacuating the previous
day.
"We're both medical patients
and we didn't want to get caught
in flooding," she said. "We
prayed about it and decided to
get out."
But as they drove into their
yard Friday, they saw the two
large trees laying across their
double-wide.
-',"It crashed right through the
dining room, leaving a gaping
hole, and in the living room on
Sone end," said Ms. McKinney
that afternoon. "It's really, re-
Sally wet. You can see daylight
Through the trusses."
She was thankful that no one
was home or got hurt.
"FEMA came first and Red


deawithdirt

Cross is going to help us get a
place to stay," she said. "My
nerves just can't take it. Emo-
tionally, I just have to get out of
here."
There were no injuries report-
ed anywhere else in the county
either, directly related to Tropi-
cal Storm Fay.
"We're very fortunate of that,"
said Mr. Faircloth. "I appreciate
all the responders the road
department, county and city fire,
EMS, and the volunteers at the
shelter. They did a fantastic job
throughout the event, and after,
trying to keep the public safe."
Elsewhere though, Fay has
been linked to at least a dozen
deaths, including a Macclenny
resident who died following a
car accident in Jacksonville.
John F. Bryan, 45, of Delong
Road was the only occupant of
a small pick-up truck that over-
turned after failing to negotiate
a right turn on a wet Acree Road
on August 21.
He was not wearing a seat belt
and was ejected from the vehi-
cle. Mr. Bryan succumbed to his
injuries later at the hospital.
Since the sheriff's office took
over management of the Emer-
gency Operations Center in late
2006, the EOC has only been
activated twice first for the
Bugaboo fires last year and this
year for Fay.
"We actually ran a little
smoother this.time having one
activation behind us," Mr. Fair-
cloth said, adding that overall the
effects of Fay, on the St. Mary's
River at least, was similar to thht
of the 2004 hurricane season.
"The river reacted the same,"
he said.
And while overall damage
was minor, county residents
were preparing for the worst last
week, buying up storm supplies,
securing their homes and even
planning parties.
Brandon Beckenbaugh, gen-
eral manager of the Wal-Mart
Supercenter, said his store was
more than ready for Tropical
Storm Fay with ample stocks of
supplies flashlights, batteries,
generators, gas cans, propane
tanks, lamps, food and water.
It's close proximity to the


y crews will


roadrepairs

Wal-Mart Distribution Center in
Macclenny and the company's
own emergency operations cen-
ter in Douglas, Ga made han-
dling Fay particularly easy.
"Our company can move
pretty quick," said Mr. Becken-
baugh.
After going through four trac-
tor-trailers of hurricane supplies,
two more were delivered within
hours.
"We sold out of water and two
more trailers came three hours
after we made the call," he said
Thursday afternoon. "And we
just ran out of D batteries."
But, of course, more were on
the way.
Shopper Lois Adcock and her
brother Larry Harvey, both'of
Glen St. Mary, were stocking up
on last minute supplies for their
families about that time.
Ms. Adcock pushed a cart
with six gallons of water, batter-
ies, propane and flashlights, all
of which were dwarfed by a 120-
quart cooler.
"This is it," she said, referring
to her storm preparations. "Just
last minute items."
Neither Ms. Adcock nor her
brother were anxious about the
approaching weather; they'd
been through this before.
Mr. Harvey said he lost power
twice during the storms of 2004,
but had a generator ready the
second time.
"I had a little money set aside
and after Bonnie in early August
I thought I better be prepared,"
he said.
Another Glen St. Mary father,
Danny Knight, was also making
preparations at Wal-Mart Thurs-
day, only his were for a party
that night.
His cart was filled with cases
of Bud Light, soda and char-
coal.
"If the power goes out, you
might as well sit around and have
some drinks," he said. "There's
nothing else to do."
The party shopping came
after a number of other precau-
tions, though.
Mr. Knight said his children's
toys were taken out of the yard,
patio furniture put in the garage,
and bathtubs were filled with
water in case power was lost and
his well no longer functioned.


Residents devised'toughout plans


(from page 1)


thinking is, if it's bad after two days, I don't want
to be here."
Betty Sands of Macclenny prepared by putting
her patio furniture in her pool.
"The umbrella always blows into the pool any-
way, so I decided to go ahead and put the rest of
the patio furniture in, too," said Ms. Sands. "This
morning, I talked to my daughter Kelly, who lives
in Orlando. She told me they had had two days of
cloudy weather with some rain and wind but noth-
ing too serious. Then she said it got really bad, so
I'm trying to prepare."
Wal-Mart employee Brantley Russel picked up
and moved before things got bad.


"I work here in the Wal-Mart Vision Center, but
I live at Kingsley Lake in an RV," he said. "There
are just too many big trees around the lake which
could fall on top of me so I drove the RV to work
today and I'll be living in the parking lot until it
blows over."
Tattoo shop owner Jim Curtis said his father and
step-mother recently moved to Macclenny from
New Orleans.
"They went through the whole Hurricane Ka-
.trina episode. They were lucky because they didn't
live in the areas of the worst devastation. My father
isn't that worried about this storm, but my step-
mother is pretty shaken up," said Mr. Curtis.


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1








THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS, Thursday, August 28, 2008 Page 3


Opinion


comment


SNot so fast on the
STHE ingt t


BAKERCOLNTY closings next time


PRESS

,. SPS 4:0-280
. rf ,lee.BoS598 "*, 1,04South 5; St:
'oi Ra :ieso p, 5s.lt
Ov O ny,'ini- h2s0:3le


JAMES C. MCGAULEY
Publisher/Editor
FEATURES- Kelley Lannigan
NEWS EDITOR- Joel Addington
ADVERTISING/PRODUCTION
Jessica Preyatt
FEATURES/COMMENT/SPORTS
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BUSINESS MANAGER
Karin Thomas
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Debbie Hansen

CONTACT US-
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I'









I



II


I opined in a column last
week about the recent complaint
by Fraser Hospital that the
Cedar Creek development will
put it out of business as more a
case of whining
than a point withrit.
merit. IMPR1
Well, I hate
to sound like a JIM M
whiner myself,
but why were
all the county offices closed last
Thursday as Tropical Storm Fay
played out in the Atlantic?
Was Thursday's predicted
weather a threat to people who
might have had important busi-
ness (important to them) in the
clerk of courts
office, or tax col-
lector, or property
appraiser?
Was Thurs-
day's predicted
weather a threat to The
county employees
going to and from wil
offices in Mac- Thurs
clenny? Due to
The answer to Please
on Frid
both questions is fur
no. rcgardit
Okay, there
were four inches
of rain in some
parts of Baker
County. At the ag
center reporting
station across US


worsened to the point that peo-
ple stayed at home, even public
employees. Many businesses
stayed open Friday as well.
The Wal-Mart Supercenter,
naturally, had
O s a pretty good
SSIONS day Thursday,
thank you
;AULEY very much.
And it wasn't
just batteries
and water (the liquor store did
about twice its normal business
thought you should know).
There was plenty of com-
merce going on under those fast
moving, gray skies on August
21. There just wasn't any public
business
transacted.
The school
system
shut down
Thursday and
:er County Friday, and
rthouse that's ex-
closed on pected with
August 21st 400 miles of
:her Conditions dirt roads and
tact our office the diffi-
August 22nd for the diffi-
nfonmation culty of early
ours of business dismissals
9-8113 should the
weather
somehow
worsen
beyond the
prediction.
.But with


But the same rules apply. The
weather over most (if not all) of
the Eighth Circuit simply wasn't
that bad. Court dates may have
to be cancelled if parties to the
cases are detained by bad weath-
er elsewhere, but there's always
plenty to do if you know where
to find it.
I'll tell you something if you
promise not to repeat it: some
(not all) judges are mbre than
happy to take the days off; it
more closely resembles their
normal schedule.
Back to the state attorney's
office, it continued to function
bhth Thursdav nnd Fridnv The


90 from the emergency services county offices, there's no such "blic didn't he a s to
public didn't have access to th
building in west Macclenny logistics problem. If the weather first-floor courthouse office,
about 3.2 inches were recorded, turns, just send everyone home. but they did business over the
The wind, measured at the I suspect much of the impetus phones and, according to an
sanne station, blew between for the closing order elsewhere empoyee, t a considerable
10-28 mph. That's not enough to stemmed from schools closing, employ, otrk d onderle
.. ....amountof work done.
knock down your barn or blow' I also stispect that's because' it Remarkably, th same em-
N our car off the road. created an instant child-care ployee confirmed that she and
Local weather services crisis. other workers in the office are
predicted about the same, so we If that's the case, why not this week alive and well.
didn't exactly have sufficient keep a partial workforce? So the next time this hap-
reason to flee in terror from Fay In fairness, some county pens, let's use some common
once she made landfall off the employees connected to emer- ense. Just because a hurricane
Atlantic in Flagler County. agency operations were on duty, or tropical storm is predicted,
Friday and Saturday were a many for long hours. Ditto road doesn't mean that public entity
bit of a different story, but still department employees. Thanks have to start taking days off
not that bad. for doing so, but it's also your until it moves out of this area.
Oddly, most private business- job. These people work for us,
es the ones whose property Court offices, except for the and we may just need them or
and sales taxes help pay to oper- state attorney (cheers!) were d
ate county offices opened on shut down by order of the chief rainy and windy.
Thursday and for many it was judge in Gainesville, a region
worth it. The weather hadn't predicted to get worse weather.


Fayparkedhersefat this onesfront door!


Chalk it up to being a little nai
through a hurricane before and w
cerned for my well-being regard
infinitely more versed in the pote
Nature can inflict when she is ha
Although Tropical Storm Fay,
wreak the extent of physical dam
Baker County as the multiple s
that ravaged this area several yea
S I was one Macclenny resident th
I I


ve. I,have not been
was not overly con-
ing Fay. I am now
ential fury Mother
having a bad day.
in general, did not
nage to


storms
rs ago,
iat did


THE

PO
KELLEY


meet her rage
up close. Many
are still dealing
with the after-
math of flood-
ing water from
the St. Mary's
River.
When I
opened my door
at 6:30 am Fri-
day morning, I
looked into an
impenetrable
wall of limbs
and leaves. The
open doorway
was completely
boarded over. I
couldn't quite
comprehend
what I was see-
ing, but one
thing was obvi-
ous I wasn't
leaving the
house that way.
Thank good-
ness there was a
back door.
A big tree in
the front yard


e










e
it
ies


r


near the sidewalk had uprooted and fallen, ripping
out the cable TV connection as it came down. Had
the wind been from a different direction and the
tree fallen 90 degrees to the right, it would have
smashed into the roof and done considerable dam-
age. Instead, it fell diagonally, and the tree's can-
K opy ended up wedged directly
BACK against my front door hence
creating the barricade. During
RC iits fall, the entire root sys-
RV H tem turned upright, thrusting
an eight-foot long section of
LANNIGAN sidewalk up from the ground
about 1 1/2 feet. That in turn
broke the city water pipe to
which the swimming pool is connected and wgter
was gushing into the street.
My landlady and I stood outside in the pelting
rain wondering what to do and who to call when a
couple guys came by in a white pick-up.
"Good Lord!" exclaimed the driver, his eyes
wide. "What can we do to help?"
Long story short Doug Hall and Eugene
Shaver came back with their chain saw and after
an hour, reduced the fallen tree to a considerable
pile of debris.
It's a mess, for sure, but we were lucky. The
house was not damaged and the power never went
off. From what I understand, others were not so
lucky. My most memorable image from the experi-
ence will be a submerged section of Birdpond Road
in North Macclenny. There, I photographed three
young boys in rubber boots, catching crawfish in
a place where a couple days before they had been
riding their bikes. Behind them, water was flowing
through a nearby chicken coop and the chickens
were still inside on their roosts, squawking up a
storm.
As an endnote, I want to say thanks to Mr. Nip-
per for coming along at just the right time and
pulling my truck out, which had gotten hopelessly
stuck in the mud. If not for you I would still be sit-
ting there getting eaten alive by mosquitoes. Some
angels don't have wings that show.


Adults, younger folks


take storms differently

Like most of the rest of Baker County, I'm damp.
Not me personally, although I do feel soggy, but damp because
of days of heavy and persistent rain. The air around me is thick with
water, the rooms in my house and my office at school are muggy with
humidity that will take days to go away. I kind of feel like the paper:
in my office printer that wilts when you pick it up.
I like rain, and as a general rule I enjoy rainy days. But there is a
limit.
I would rot do well in London or Seattle where it rains more days
that not. I like blue skies and drier air.
Not so, my children. They enjoy tropical storms and hurricanes;
and always have. Children don't feel quite the same way as their `
parents about weather events; to most of them it's an adventure. To
adults, who recognize the conse-
quences, it's more'of a worry.: E OF
I t doesn't matterhiha age M Y ID
they are, either. -ATTER
The worst weather event I can THE ATTER
remember since living in Mac-
clenny was the March storms of ROBERT GERARD
10 years ago. They were much
worse than Fay because the rain
was just as steady but heavier, and the temperature was in the high
30's or low 40's.
When the power werit out and stayed out for three days it was
freezing in the house. Luckily, I had a gas grill on the back porch and
a fireplace.
I was miserable. The kids loved it.
To them it was like camping out without ever leaving the house.,
My wife Kelley was in New York with the humanities group from the
high school experiencing unseasonable blizzards. We were huddled.
around the fireplace with candles everywhere playing board games..
We got very good at Monopoly, Yahtzee and Trivial Pursuit. We -
played poker, sang songs and told stories: During the day when there
was a brief respite from the pouring rain we bundled up and walked,
down the street to look at the storm's effects.
The road was completely covered in water. Branches had fallen 1
from the weight and one of our neighbor's houses looked like an
island in the middle of a lake.
We slept on the couch and huddled around the fireplace. I slept
very little since I had to wake up every so often to keep the fire going.
The children slept like logs.
This time around we were much luckier than many people. Our
power only went out for a few hours in the middle of the night so '
we weren't at all inconvenienced. For the most part, we sat around,
munched on "hurricane food" and watched the Olympics.
We didn't get away unscathed. We had some branches down, lost
a small tree and found a leak in the corer of our roof. The leak just
proved to me that it doesn't matter how old kids get, they still see a,
weather event as an adventure.
Spencer gathered around the leak and looked up at it. When we"
stuck a steak knife into the ceiling to drain the water, Dylan's re-
sponse was, "cool." I didn't think it was cool because I knew what.,
would come later.
Dylan is 19 and Spencer is 17. When the rain slacked off, Dylan.-
and his friend, Josh Wicker went outside to play water bottle golf..
"What is water bottle golf?" I asked.
"It's where you hit a water bottle from mud puddle to mud puddle
with a golf club."
"And why are we doing this?"
"It's fun."
Later that day, he and Spencer showed up in the living room in
shorts and soccer cleats.
"It's raining," I informed them, just in case they missed it.
"Mud soccer," said Dylan.
They came back from the soccer field soaked and pruney, covered
in mud but happy as clams.
Some things don't change with age.


Yo-tlo-I-'w4; F Ar o WE P
~r~i4LZL/ Fo'foiipte>Mrm>eister
,sQD


692. VaRoJ,5'adW 0
4E FAw 1A, fl3o20w0
0ql) 65334 F (x(q90) 65-i3?5
SPECIAL EVENTS
WEDDINGS GRADUATIONS
ANNOUNCEMENTS


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RUBBER STAMPS LABELS
INFO SIGNS BANNERS


PEgIALTY ADVERTISING
PENS BAG$ 4ATS
SHIRTS EMBROIDERY
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PAX GRAPHIC DESIGN '
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DIGITAL COLOR COPIES
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LAMINATING


Setter to


theEditor...

Dear Editor:
I am proud of the great ef-
forts made by the men and
women of the Postal Service
to deliver mail during Tropical
Storm Fay.
Just how good were we?
On Thursday, August 21,
we completed 99.84 percent of
4678 affected deliveries. The
next day at the height of the
storm, the percentage went to
99.25. On Saturday, we posted
98 percent of 3298 affected de-
liveries. Now that's service!
It was truly a team effort.
When other organizations may
have faltered, shutting down
operations and struggling to
deal with the storm, our team
gave platinum-level service.
Each postal employee was
truly "the bridge over troubled
waters." I could not be prouder
being a part of the Macclenny
team!
Fran Bentley
Acting postmaster-Macclenny


LE
cC


1


I









THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS, Thursday, August 28, 2008 Page 4



Funny man with funny cars...


(from page 1) One trademark of Mr. Fraz-
pg her's refurbished cars is their
ous collector's mouth water with playful colors. He doesn't hold
desire. They have also drawn a back when it comes to color and
hearty guffaw from spectators has painted cars pink, purple,
from time to time as well, such turquoise, egg-yolk yellow and
as the jumbo-sized Mexican everything in between. An ex-
sombrero hat that once graced ample is the 1951 Bullet Nose
the top of a 1969 Dodge Super
Bee he owned.
He gestures to the vehicle he
just arrived in.
"This here's my all purpose,
get around town pick'em up
truck I drive every day," he says
of his two-door, 1970 Dodge
"Camper's Special." The truck
has an extra external gas tank in ,,
the bed and still has its original
Phoenix Gold paint."
'According to Mr. Frazer, he
has learned a few things about
this pick'um up. Out on 1-10, at
65 miles per hour, he gets 16
miles per gallon if the tail gate
is.'up. If the gate is down he can
get 19.
: Mr. Frazer says he has always
been interested in cars, trucks
and other vehicles. The first one
to-capture his attention was the
bus he rode to school as a child.
Later, as a young man serving "Ont ,.y the lirct'-i iih'ie ldI'nras ,iCiLe
in the Navy, he was stationed
in Puerto Rico. While there, he Studebaker he painted bright
enjoyed driving his 1936 Chev- purple and the 1962 Cadillac
rolet. he decided to paint screaming
"If you were a certain pay pink. As it turned out, the Cadil-
gtade, and I was, the Navy would lac wasn't the only thing that got
ship your car over to the island, painted.
so that's what I did," he recalls. "My son had parked his black
Over the years, Mr. Frazer Datsun truck in the yard the day
estimates he has owned and re- I decided to paint the Cadillac.
furbished at least 250 cars and When he came back, the hood of
trucks. He takes before and after his truck was pink too. His only
photos that grace the wall of his comment was 'Well Daddy, all I
workshop, can say is I'm glad you ran out of
He has always gone to car paint when you did.'"
shows and dealt personally with The young Frazer drove his
private owners. Today, he com- pink-hooded truck for several
only uses Internet sites and years.
publications such as Autotrader "You could see it coming
t i-help him locate vehicles, from a mile away," Mr. Frazer
"I buy 'em, fix'em up, enjoy jokes.
'em and sell 'em. "I've had all This auto aficionado has a
sorts dating from about 1932 penchant for British-made cars.
forward. I don't care for any- He once owned a 1958 English
thing later than about 1975." taxi cab.; It cost him $1500 and



frmative action plan


to govern county hirings

BY JOEL ADDINGTON
fress Staff

': The Baker County Commission put in place an affirmative action
policy August 18 as part of an overall equal employment opportunity
plan needed for the sheriff's department to qualify for federal grant
funds.
- Chief Gerald Gonzalez of the Baker County Sheriff's Office said
the policy and plan where just one of the "hoops" the department
must jump through to get money from the federal government.
-:The plan states that county personnel, and those who work for the
County's vendors and contractors, will be employed, promoted, de-
nioted, transferred and compensated without regard to race, color, re-
ligion, political affiliation, sex, national origin, handicap, age or any
circumstances other than merit or qualification.
SHowever, the plan's policy statement reads, "This policy on non-
discrimination is not merely neutral, but will be implemented by a
positive, results-oriented program of affirmative action."
'- The affirmative action plan will essentially create two pools of ap-
plicants one for minorities, women and the disabled; the other for
everyone else.
:- Then when a vacancy opens up in a department where these groups
4re under-represented, affirmative action applicants are given prefer-
eince over equally qualified non-affirmative action applicants, most
likely white males,.
': County Manager Joe Cone will oversee the affirmative action
process and said it will mostly just mean more paperworlCfor the
county.
And while Mr. Cone contends the policy will not result in "quota
system" where the county would attempt to hire a specific number of
minority, female or handicapped employees, it does require he consult
the "affirmative action file" for names of qualified applicants to be
interviewed for vacancies in job classifications where these groups
are under-represented.
Furthermore, it is the long-term goal of the policy for the percent-
ages of women, minorities and disabled in the available labor force
approximately match those of the county's workforce.
Affirmative action remains a controversial subject to this day, with
both presidential candidates articulating their positions on the issue.
However, the notion of affirmative action began in the late 1970s
when the US Supreme Court upheld the use of race as one factor in
choosing among qualified applicants for admission to the University
of California.
And since then, a number of state courts and university governing
boards have set their own precedents by striking down affirmative
actions programs. For instance, a ban by the Board of Regents for the
University of California on the use of affirmative action in admis-
sions went into effect in 1998.


More recently in 2003, the Supreme Court held that University of
Michigan's use of race among other factors in its law school admis-
sions program was constitutional because the program furthered a
compelling interest in obtaining benefits from student body diversity
and provided for a holistic review of each applicant's file.
But the same year, the Court struck down another affirmative ac-
tion program used by the College of Literature that granted points
based on race and did provide for a review of each applicant's entire
file.

We publish obituaries & pictures FREE!


he drove it frequently around
Macclenny.
"I had trouble with the gas
tank for a while so 1 strapped a
gas can on the running board. I
ran a rubber gas hose from the
can straight into the carburetor
and it went along just fine."


The cab was black with a
bright red metal meter box at-
tached near one door. The open-
air side compartment was used
for storing luggage and the driv-
er was in a compartment sepa-
rate from the rest of the car.
"That car was fun," he said.
Even though the many ve-
hicles have come and gone un-
der his watch, Mr. Frazer can
remember details about most of
them, including a 1955 Buick
two-door hard top.
"That car rode like a dream,"
he said. "It literally floated over
bumps in the road."
A particular favorite was his'
1966 Sunbeam Tiger racing car.
He comes upon rare cars from
time to time, and he owned, for
a while, a 1962 Plymouth station
wagon which he says today are
"scarce as hen's teeth."


He has also come upon Ed-
sels, Mayer Manx dune bug-
gies, Avantis, Jaguars, Fiats and
such unusual models as Isatta's
and Robins, cars with only three
wheels.
The Isatta is so out of the or-
dinary, it more resembles a large
toy for a child than a legitimate
vehicle. BMW manufactured
them in the early 1960s.
Mr. Frazer's Isatta was bril-
liant scarlet red and weighed so
little he could lift the back end
of it off the ground by himself.
"Those cars got 60 miles to a
gallon of gas," he said. "People
would kill for 'em today with
gas being what it costs."
The 3-wheel Robin, made in
1969, was actually registered as
a motorcycle instead of a car.
Drivers not old enough to obtain
a license could get one to oper-
ate a Robin.
Mr. Frazer has also enjoyed
buying and selling early mod-
el Mini-Coopers, which are
smaller and not as broadly built
as their contemporary counter-
parts. He has recently been seen
zipping around town in one of
these distinct Minis painted red
with white stripes, but that car is
now history.
Seems somebody wanted it
more than he did, as he is fond of
saying when he sells/a car. And
that's the fun of his hobby the
variety. The cars are constantly
changing and he never knows
what he will stumble onto next.
His current project is a pair of
1976 Fiat 124 Convertibles, one
bright yellow, one navy blue. He
likes to point out that the parts
for nearly all the cars he works
on can be found at Napa Auto
Parts. What isn't stocked can
usually be ordered over night.
"That's a good thing, 'cause I
intend to keep doing this as long
as I'm able," he declares.


Outraged father smashes


three vehicle windshields


A Macclenny man incensed
about the treatment of his daugh-
ter was arrested the evening of
August 24 after he allegedly
broke out the windshields of
three vehicles belonging to an-
other man.
Tommy Hays, 54, admitted
to police when questioned later
at his residence off Deer Creek
Lane that he went to the resi-
dence of Avery Crawford, 29,
on Railroad Ave. in Macclenny
about 10:00 with the intention to
kill him with a shotgun.
Instead, Mr. Crawford sought
shelter next door at his grand-
mother's residence and called
police while Mr. Hays broke the
windshields of a 1991 Nissan, a
1999 Toyota and 1986 Chevro-
let, all pickup trucks belonging
to Mr. Crawford, with a sledge
hammer handle. He also dam-
aged the antenna on the Toyota.
Mr. Crawford told Deputy Je-
rard Peterson his girlfriend Kath-
erine Duncan, 20, initially yelled
"He's got a gun" when Mr. Hays
drove up to the residence. She
later told the officer that Mr.
Hays was armed with the taped
handle. She said she witnessed
the suspect vandalize the pick-
ups, then smash a screen door
window on their front porch.
Initially, Ms. Duncan said Mr.


Hays entered their house looking
for her boyfriend.
She is acquainted with the ac-
cused and identified him to Sgt.
Greg Burnsed, who also knows
Mr. Hays and went to his resi-
dence.
"I knew you'd be coming; I'm
ready to go to jail for what I did,"
the sergeant quotes Mr. Hays in
his report. "If I could have found
Alan, I'd be going to Raiford be-
cause I was going to kill him,"
he added just before he was ar-
rested.
The report describes Mr. Hays
as cooperative during question-
ing, and insisting he acted in
defense of his daughter Nichole,
22, who was allegedly dropped
off by Mr. Crawford in a remote
area of Charlton County, Ga
two days earlier following an
argument. She had been riding
around with him and Ms. Dun-
can during Tropical Storm Fay,
and Ms. Hays was picked up
by her mother about three hours
later.
The father told police his
daughter was abandoned on a
dirt road about six miles from the
nearest paved surface.
Sgt. Bumsed recovered the
sledge hammer handle, a shotgun
loaded with four shells and four
additional shells in Mr. Hays'
front pocket.


^17S IRACTOR WORKb


* Slag or Milling Driveways
* Delivered and Spread
* Tractor Work


I Il 111
cal a ,Ig


250-3681 or 838-6500


Injured Wildcat: holding


his own afier spinal injury

(from page 1) as when it happens on the field. I,
feel so bad for the kids who had
watched movies with him on to watch it. They were devas-:
Sunday," said Coach Johns. tated."
"The doctors really won't know Mr. Johns and his coaches are,
anything until the swelling goes convinced that getting back on
down. After that they'll fuse the the field will be the best thing:
bone. There's a hope and that's that could happen to the players.
what is important." "We need a game bad. Wei
Though not.identical, the in- need to get on the field," said'
jury is similar to that sustained Coach Johns. "It doesn't matter.
by Buffalo Bills tight end Kevin whether we win or lose on Fri-'
Everett, who was injured on a day, it's just... let's go."
kickoff coverage in a 2007 game Friday's game against West
against Denver. Everett required Nassau High School was moved:
substantial physical therapy but to the Municipal Stadium in,
walked onto the stage at this Macclenny due to flooding at'
year's ESPY Awards. The Ev- the West Nassau field and about'
erett case is sure to be a source 60 percent of the gate proceeds,
of hope for Johnson's family and will go toward Milton Johnson's
the Wildcats. medical trust fund at Vystar
The Wildcat football team Credit Union.
will take the practice field for Coach Johns said West Nas-:
the first time since the accident sau has pledged 15 percent of its
this week to prepare for their normal 35 percent of the gate/
Friday game against West Nas- the state high school athletics
sau in Callahan. The players association will give all of its 151
are taking it hard and so are the percent and Baker County Highl
coaches. School will donate all of its 45i.
"In my 15 years of coaching I percent of the gate less expens-,
A- ,' - _+,1 _


don t Know anyone tmis nas nap-
pened to so I don't know who to
talk to about it," said Mr. Johns,
the team's head coach. "I called
the coach at Fleming Island who
had a player killed in a car crash
last year and talked to him for a
long time, but it's not the same


"We're not just playing a
game Friday night," the coach
said. "We're trying to help out
Milton's family. We hope to get
as many people out there as we
can to help us do that."


Call Locally 259-2313 or
Toll Free 1-888-Dan Lamb
Our showroom is conveniently located at the intersection
lui& u cl Ce nter,1 of Hwy. 121 and U.S..90 in downtown Macclenny
The Easiest Place in the World to Buy a Car or Truck" www.lambsautoandtruck.com


Stned ,\\, Earl Fra:er.








THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS, Thursday, August 28, 2008 Page-'



Macclenny plans to cut budget by half million dollars


BY JOEL ADDINGTON
Press Staff
With the September 30 deadline ap-
proaching for the City of Macclenny to
adopt a new budget, city commission-
ers reviewed the proposed $6.2-million
budget for the upcoming fiscal year Au-
gust 19.
Overall the city expects to tighten
its belt by about half-a-million dollars
while still giving all employees a three-
percent raise, which amounts to an extra
$20,350 in the budget, said City Man-
ager Gerald Dopson.
Based on the city's highest possible
property tax rate $4.0927 per $1000
of taxable property value Mac-
clenny's general fund would shrink to
roughly $3.9 million, or $380,000 less
than in the 2007-08 budget.
The general fund includes all city de-
partments like the mayor and commis-
sioners, fire, roads, building, solid waste
(garbage) and law enforcement. The
city contracts with the Baker County
Sheriff's Office for the latter service.
Sheriff Joey Dobson proposed an
increase of $23,191 fr6m his $686,845
budget, which is about 3.5 percent. The
sheriff's contract also entitles the de-
partment to another $30,000 from city


impact fees for financing patrol vehi-
cles.
Mr. Dobson said most of the addi-
tional $23,191 requested came from a
three-percent raise in salaries ($11,000),
increased costs for insurance and retire-
ment contributions (about $4300) and
operating supplies ($6900).
A number of non-profit agencies that
the city regularly gives money to also
submitted budget requests.
Mary Baxla, executive director of
the Baker County Council on Aging,
asked the board the repeat its $47,424
contribution next year, which is used as
matching funds for grants used to feed
local seniors.
"What you give us is 10 percent of
what we get from someone else ... and
that feeds people," she said.
The Emily Taber Library also asked
for a repeat last year's contribution of
$1,728.
"These funds are used to purchase
books for our children's room and as-
sist in promoting the love of reading to
children in our community," wrote li-
brary director April Teel in a letter to
the board.
A letter from Executive Director
John Edwards Jr. of the Community Ac-


tion Agency wants the city to increase
its pledge from this year's $7500 to
$10,000 next year.
"In Macclenny alone we have served
1263 people with education, employ-
ment, electric [service] assistance, gas
assistance, rent or mortgage, food,
child-care, and transportation to
name a few," he wrote.
Baker Community Counseling Ser-
vices, which provides counseling to
defendants in the county's drug court
program, received $7500 this year.
CEO Chris Thomas requested in his
letter that, "due to constraints on our
funds at the local level that full amount
may not be able to be attained." He sug-
gested the city return to its 2006 fund-
ing level of $5000 if this year's contri-
bution couldn't be repeated.
Comprehensive Community Ser-
vices, which advocates for the disabled,
asked for an increase in funding from
5900 to $6345.
In addition, Episcopal Children's
Services of Macclenny hopes for the
$1350 donation it received in this year's
budget.
With Macclenny's total estimat-
ed revenue for 2008-09 down about
$518,000, and proposed spending drop-


ping by $613,000, its contingency fund
(reserves) will increase by just over
$94,000.
Some other figures in the proposed
budget were a bit less clear.
This fiscal year, insurance for city
commissioners was budgeted to cost
$9826, and city administrator Melissa
Thompson said $6787 had already been
spent for that purpose. However, the ex-
penditure was proposed to decrease to
$4557 in the 2008-09 fiscal year.
"I don't know why there's a reduction
in. that," said Marshal Mann, the city's
information services director.
"Let's double check that," Mr. Dop-
son said.
The city's general office budget,
which is the largest of all departmental
budgets this year at more than $900,000,
is also set for the largest reduction in
funding, losing roughly $470,000.
The reason: There will be no expan-
sion of city hall this year as previously
planned, said Mr. Dopson.
He said another large change came in
the proposed solid waste budget, which
would increase by about $56,000.
A major portion of that came from a
$26,000 increase in the cost for supplies
like fuel and tires.


Mr. Dopson said an accounting cor-
rection transferring of salaries of two
workers that pick up debris from thl
water and sewer department's budget
to the solid waste department's budget
- was also partially responsible for the'
change. :
Solid waste salaries reflected the
transfer, moving from about $180,000
in 2007-08 to the $207.500 proposed
for 2008-09.
.Macclenny will hold two public hear!'
ings on the proposed budget next month
before final adoption.

Ever been hard-pressed for
a number to a classified ad
without a paper on hand?
We can help.

We feature our classified ads online,
as well as polls and select articles

You can find it all at
www.BakerCountyPredd.com
'! r


Free hotdogs & drinks Saturday

Lake City

SW Deputy J. Davis Lane

386-752-3910

A


'~ 1'


Monday -Saturday

9:00 am 6:00 pm

Closed Sunday









THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS, Thursday, August 28, 2008 Page 6


Damaged


vehicle over


a cellphone
' A criminal mischief charge
was forwarded to the state at-
torney against a 19-year-old
Macclenny woman accused of
damaging a Sanderson man's
port utility vehicle because she
believed he was involved in the
$ieft of her cell phone.
' Steven Croft, 26, was at the
229 Club north of Sanderson
August 24 about 4:30 pm when
lihard a loud noise coming from
outside.
* iAccording to Deputy Christo-
pher Walker's report, Mr. Croft
aid he left the bar and found
Davisha Gearhers striking his
2004.Toyota with a beer bottle.
{e stated his windshield was
broken and there were two small
dents on the side of the vehicle.
SThe previous afternoon, Dep-
ity Paul Chance responded to a
ijsidence at 9794 N. CR 229 and
ipoke with.Ms. Gearhers, who
sid shortly after midnight Au-
tist 23 she was talking with Mr.
sitting in Mr. Croft's vehicle at
'ie address.
The deputy's report states
Ms. Gearhers accidentally left
jler phone in vehicle, and didn't
realize it until Mr. Croft was
driving away. She also said she
spoke with Mr. Croft and Mr.
Ruise, both of whom said they
pid not have the phone or know
where it was.
SIn a grand theft auto case in-
volving a juvenile, Robin Frame
of Sanderson accused her 16-
~ear-old son of using her truck
without consent while she was
away August 15-16.
SShe told Deputy Steven Jones
Jr. on August 18 that the vehicle
ht her residence off US 90 was
pot in the same spot she had left
it. She also said the gas tank was
empty when she left town, but
had gas when she got back.
Ms. Frame also alleged her
Qn took the vehicle's spare key
.nd would not return it.
,,Deputy Chris Walker located
tb son at his girlfriend's home
on Deerfield Circle in Mac-
lenny and the boy said he did
hot have the spare key and his
other was lieing.
: A grand theft auto charge, a
felony, was filed with the state
attorney's office against the son,
who is also on probation.
In other property crimes this
week:
Jack Byrd of Brandfqrd, Fla.,
a foreman for T.W. Byrd Log-
ging, reported more than $1000
in damage to vehicles left over-
)ight at the logging site August
39-20. Mr. Byrd said someone
had shot out the windows on one
Heavy equipment vehicle and
shot through the radiator of an-
other parked in the woods near
National Forest Rd. 231.
Baker County Middle School
officials reported the theft of a
DVD player and projector from
teacher's classroom August 20
about 9:30 am. The equipment
was valued at $1100.
Harvey Ball reported the
theft of about $500 in air-con-
ditioning and refrigeration tools
from a vehicle at his residence
at 22309 Eddy Grade Rd. over-
night August 17-18.

Crews wins...
(from page 1)
modems, which necessitated the
hand delivery of touch screen
ballot results from disabled vot-
ers.
The results were delayed to
about 8:30 pm, an hour and a
half after polls closed Tuesday,
but showed a victory for Mr.
Crews by 340 votes.
Ms. Crawford said 1586 of


Baker County's 4863 registered
Republican voters cast ballots
- 32.6 percent.
SThe only other candidates on
the local primary ballot were
Taylor resident Bobby Hart and
Fernandina Beach's Janet Ad-
kins, who faced off for the Re-
piblican spot in the District 12
Florida House race.
: While Mr. Hart carried Bak-
er County by about 500 votes,
he lost the district 38 percent to
Us. Adkins' 62 percent. The dif-
firence district-wide was 2954
votes.
2 Also, Ms. Crawford said Bak-
dr County was the first to report
its results to Tallahassee and to
the Associated Press.


'Umbrella 'theme mirrors weather atMWC meeting


BY KELLEY LANNIGAN
Press Staff

Amid a backdrop of blowing wind and rain, the Mac-
clenny Woman's Club held its annual membership coffee
for returning and prospective new members Thursday,
August 21.
GFWC State Secretary Barbara Mahaffey of Cres-
cent Beach and 1st State Vice President Pat Zazzarino of
Jacksonville Beach were the scheduled guest speakers for
the event, but were unable to attend due to the inclement
weather.
The coffee is an opportunity for current members to
renew their annual membership and for visitors to be in-
troduced to the Woman's Club and become acquainted'
with the club's mission and the many project areas they
can become involved in.
"Our special guests send their regrets," club president
Trilby Crews informed the ladies. "With the threat of
Hurricane Fay and the possible bridge closings in Jack-
sonville, they decided to play it safe today."
She also explained to first-time visitors that the small-.
er than usual number of regular members in attendance
was also due to the threat of bad weather.
"We have members that live at the end of dirt roads or
in the middle of large pastures and decided not to venture
out today in the uncertain weather conditions."
The theme of the coffee was friendship and the slo-
gan was "Under the Umbrella of Friendship." Colorful
umbrellas were arranged on the stage either upright or
overturned and covered or filled with bright flowers. An
umbrella design was also used to make name tags in a
variety of decorative papers.
A unique form of Bingo was played, allowing the la-
dies to learn some perhaps little known facts about each
other. This game listed talents,abilities or experiences in
the grid spaces instead of the usual letters and numbers.
The ladies had to consult each other and try to match


people with the characteristics.
Despite the weather, one special guest did attend the
membership coffee. Sariah Swartz, a graduate and the
valedictorian of Baker County High School's class of
2008, was invited to entertain during the program. She
accompanied herself on the piano and played the lovely
and fanciful Danse Romantique by composer Melody
Bober.
Ms. Swartz's mother Valerie, as well as her piano in-
structor Debbie Chase, were also present for her perfor-
mance. All four Swartz children have been piano students


woman s tauo Scnoiarsnip recipient .arian swarz enerrains aur-
ing reception.
PHOTO BY KELLEY LANNIGAN


under Ms. Chase.
The young Ms. Swartz is also the 2008 recipient of
an annual $500 scholarship sponsored by the Maccleniy
Woman's Club. She is enrolled at FCCJ's Kent Campus.
Since volunteerism is at the heart of all activities un-
dertaken by the Woman's Club, everyone attending was
presented with a Volunteer's Survival Kit stamped with
the GFWC emblem and the motto "Unity in Diversity."
The kits contained a tea bag, paper cup, rubber band,
Band-Aid, pencil, ruler, Tootsie Roll, crayon and a mint.
Ms. Crews explained-the significance of each iterr: "a
tea bag to remind you that you're TEA-riffic; a paper cup
for keeping things organized; a rubber band as a remind-
er to remain flexible; a Band-Aid to mend hurt feelings;
a pencil to make notes to help you remember; a ruler to
measure how much you are appreciated; a Tootsie Roll
to remind you how sweet you are; a crayon to color your
days cheerful and bright and a mint to remind you that
,we're thankful for your commit-MINT."
Members of the club participate in five main project
areas public service, home life, art, education and con-
servation and raise money through these activities for:a
variety of charitable organizations.



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Identity theft a fast-growing crime


officer suggests W

,~Y KELLEY LANNIGAN alerting me to the fact that he
,ress Staff suspected someone was com-
Many people have had the un- emitting fraudulent credit card
servingg experience of opening activity in my name," Dr. Weeks
their personal bank statement recalls.
-and discovering evidence of That began a long 22 year or-
rpharges, often in the thousands deal of trying to correct the situ-
of dollars, on their credit card action and laying in safeguards
accounts that did not originate against similar incidents in the
,with them. future.
;. When your personal identifi- A man in Gainesville, already
,ers (the buzzword for name, date on probation for identity theft,
;ofbirth and Social Security num- had gotten access to Dr. Weeks'
ber) are obtained by an outside personal identifiers and was pil-
!party without permission and ing up credit card charges right
used to instigate such activities and left. When establishing the
,as opening credit card accounts accounts, the criminal had giv-
and racking up whopping tele- en a Gainesville address. Since
phone charges, it becomes what bank statements were being sent
"known in the world of law en- there, Dr. Weeks had never re-
rcement as identity
'eft, also referred to B
s identity fraud.'
The website of Flor-
da's Attorney General
ill McCollum, my-
loridalegal.com, de-
fines identity theft as:
"The criminal act of
making a victim's iden-
ity for the purpose of
obtaining credit, credit
rds from banks and/
retailers, stealing
,iioney from the vic-
tim's existing accounts,'
applying for loans in
the victim's name, es-
.tablishing accounts
;.with utility companies,
leasing automobiles
rand residences, filing
Bankruptcy, and/or
rtven obtaining em- Investigator Harvey revi
Iployment."
r, "Identity theft is prob-
ably the most prevalent ceived records of those transac-
crime in the nation and getting tions.
worse all the time," said Steve "I've always been grateful to
Harvey, the Baker County Sher- the man from New York who
liff's Office investigator assigned called me. He didn't have to do
0to fraud. that. If he had not, I wouldn't
Investigator Harvey believes ha n thing was amiss
mubst victims t i dti s damage had been
a lnost n er h Weeks.
their personal intf e~ The man was arrested and
obtained." sent to prison again, but amaz-
Many .common places have ingly, continued trying to use
records of-personal information: Dr. Weeks personal .informa-
doctors, accountants, lawyers, tion to open credit card accounts
dentists, schools, places of em- while incarcerated.
ployment,: health insurance car- "If they have the informa-
tiers, etc. tion, all they need is access to a
SEven when people practice phone," Dr. Weeks said. I
discretion in releasing their He had to learn the hard.way
,information, it can still be ac- what one goes through after be-
cessed by, someone experienced coming an identity theft victim.
"in committing fraud. Endless letters to businesses and
. "No one is immune and the creditors along with appropriate
,elderly are a particularly vulner- documentation had be compiled
able group," says Investigator and sent out repeatedly to prove
lHarvey. "These folks grew up he had not authorized all the ac-
in an era when everyone took counts and charges in his name.
things at face value and trusted Countless hours of time were
each other. That practice just loged on the hone tt in to
'naturally carries over into their
current lies and sometimes it ET INSTANT
can them in a lot of trouble." THT
Information thieves often
work overthe phone, pretending Commercial c
Ito be employees of legitimate estate lawn c
businesses such as a bank. They Premium, ser
pall on the pretense of updatingsmoothquite
Records or offering special pro- Comfort featu
11otions and claiming they need MACCLENNY ac seatno
personal information. Anyone MOWER & SAW 3yea
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ted in a major way, because of Next to Pier248 6A O
their trusting nature. Cell: 904-466-3791 www.i
[ Investigator Hatvey describes
a particularly puzzling case he's
monitored for the last two years.
"The person, whose name I'll U10
i~ithhold for privacy reasons,
has never had a driver's license,
.bank account or other typical ig
sources that establish records COLL
with high visibility.
"Yet, somehow, and we can-
[not figure it out, someone got
hold of her SS.number and off
they went, activating numerous AutoCrafters (
credit cards in her name." 180 S. Lowde
Macclenny dentist George 25!
g Weeks remembers the day, near-
\ly ten years ago, when he got a
phone call at work. *: Lifetime Warranty
He was very busy, but the re- 10 Locations thru


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you need to take, Dr. Weeks." State of the art eq
S"The call came from an em-
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of resolving a case of identity
theft and clearing their name.
They are:
V Report the incident to the
fraud department of the three
major credit bureaus, which are
Equifax in Atlanta. TransUnion
in CalifoM ia aniiExpian A
Texas. 'a ; "''A, '
v Contact the fraud depart-
ment of each of your creditors.
V Contact your bank or finan-
cial institution.
V Report the incident to law
enforcement.
The process is lengthy and in-
volved, but the kit gives, you the
guideline to navigate. There are
subheadings under each step and
the kit thoroughly outlines these
procedures. It also contains ID
theft affidavit forms that can be
filled out and duplicated in or-
der to furnish information to the
many sources that will request it.
Having it already filled out and
ready to copy will save hours of
valuable time.
A fraudulent account state-

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THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS, Thursday, August 28, 2008 Page 7

VVANJIST T--I"E STEWS?
CH-ECIK JS OUT OJG LItNTE.
VVXA/W BAISKE RCOULJNTY'PRE S S .C)OIL


rays to hea

sort through the particulars. He
had to rearrange his daily work
schedule to accommodate the
time on the phone devoted to
trying to clear the problem.
"It literally disrupts a person's
whole life. I wouldn't wish it on
anyone," said Dr. Weeks. "It took
2V2 years before I felt my person-
al information was pretty, safe
again. I now have fraud alerts
and credit freeze protections on
my accounts and I won't ever be
without them again."
People contacting the Baker
County Sheriff's Office regard-
ing fraud are given a copy of
Florida's Identity Theft Victim
Kit. It outlines four major steps a
person needs to start the process


ment is also included. This is
a declaration that the accounts
in question and the charges in-
curred were established without
permission or knowledge of the
victim.
Investigator Harvey recom-
mends his own list of precau-
tions. Since most people have
their Social Security numbers
memorized, he advises against
carrying the card in a wallet or
purse. Lock it away in a safe, se-
cure place.
Be vigilant about your SS
number and don't hesitate to
withhold it if you don't feel the
information is necessary to an
outside party's request for it.
Be very familiar with your
financial accounts
and regularly
check the informa-
tion. .
Safeguard your
personal mail.
Banks and other
institutions'heavily
solicit new credit
card accounts.
Many people sim-
ply toss this as
junk mail. Shred-
ding such mail and
anything else with
any personal infor-
mation is a must.
Never dispose of
personal mail in a
public dumpster.
ID thieves are ha-
bitual dumpster
divers and go
looking for such
KELLEY LANNIGAN mail intentionally.
If you suspect your
personal mail has.
been stolen, report the incident
to-the nearest US Postal Inspec-
tion Service district office.
Check your credit report at
least once a year and immedi-
ately report any discrepancies.


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'THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS, Thursday, August 28, 2008 Page 8




Man drags wife from store


: A clerk at the Macedonia Grocery store inter-
Yened as a Glen St. Mary man attempted to drag
:his wife out of the store by her foot during a do-
mestic dispute August 24.
, Clerk Patty Peeples called police shortly after
pushing Darrell Barnwell Jr., 22, of Bertha Mae
JIarris Rd. out the door and locking it behind him.
': The husband returned to his vehicle and left the.
area.
Deputy Sgt. Greg Burnsed responded to the dis-
turbance call off CR 23C about 7:30 that evening to
,find Jillian Barnwell, 21, hiding with her two small
children in the store's bathroom.
The victim stated she and Mr. Barnwell had
been arguing that day and that he forced her to go
:to the store with him, driving erratically and mak-
ing "weird" statements along the way, the deputy's
report states.
Ms. Barntell said she was scared of her husband
;and asked the clerk to help her when they arrived
,.t the store. That's when Mr. Barnwell grabbed her
,left arm and began pushing her toward the door,
'causing her to fall down. She said he then began
'dragging her out of the store by the foot until she
-lung onto the door jam.
Ms. Peeples then shoved the suspect outside and
;.closed the door.
Deputy Burnsed noted bruising on the victim's
'elbow and scrapes on her right hip. He radioed for
otherr deputies to be on the look out for Mr. Barn-
:,well's white Dodge Dakota pick-up, which Lt. Da-
:rid Bryant spotted at SR 121 and CR 23D.
Deputy Bryant stopped the vehicle and arrested
,Mr. Barnwell for misdemeanor domestic battery.
'; A passenger in the truck, David Zipperer, 18,
,l4so of Glen, was seen by the deputy stuffing some-
,thing behind his seat.
;' The deputy advised Mr. Barnwell of what he
:'saw and the suspect lifted up the seat and handed
;'him a bag of marijuana. A further search turned up
,a cigarette pack with more of the drug, which Mr.
:Zipperer admitted belonged to him.
SHe was arrested and charged with misdemeanor
:possession.
Authorities were alerted to a domestic battery
:'that occurred August 21 in Sanderson when victim
Sabrina Wilson, 29, met with Deputy Claude Hur-
,,ly at the sheriff's annex.
SThe deputy said she appeared "visibly shaken,


crying and seemed upset" during the 2:30 pm con-
versation.
Ms. Wilson said that she had been having mari-
tal problems with her husband of 14 years, Robert
Wilson, 30, of Sanderson Circle, advising that she
and her two children moved out of their home a few
days prior.
She returned to pick up clothes and personal
items about 1:45 pm that day when she said Mr.
Wilson began calling her names and grabbed her
around the neck with both hands before bending
her over a porch railing.
Deputy Hurley noted redness and scratches on
the victim's neck.
The couple's nine-year-old daughter was pres-
ent during the alleged battery and backed up her
mother's statements.
Deputy Mike Riegel located the suspect at his
Sanderson residence and he was taken to jail.
A domestic battery complaint was filed with
the state attorney against Terry Rewis, 52, of Es-
tates St. in Macclenny by his wife alleging he
choked her until she nearly passed out. The 51-
year-old victim escaped the house August 20 about
8:30 pm through a window and ran to the Exxon on
South SR 121 for help.
Another complaint was forwarded to the state
attorney when a 12-year-old male juvenile alleged
another female and male.juvenile, ages 13 and 14
respectively, attacked him at the Macclenny city
park on 8th St. August 22 about 2:00 pm.
The victim told Deputy Steven Jones Jr. the pair
punched him in the jaw, kicked him in the ribs and
also took his cell phone. Charges of battery and
petit theft were filed against the alleged attackers.
Police are seeking a warrant for child abuse
against 20-year-old Anthony Hakes for allegedly
shoving the nine-month-old baby of a 17-year-old
woman in the head August 22 about 3:45 pm at his
residence on Anna Bell Place in Macclenny.
A complaint for violation of a restraining or-
der was filed by Arica Rhoden, 22, of Glen against
Abby Dupree, 23, also of Glen, after the suspect
allegedly made threatening statements to Ms. Rho-
den as she left the Macclenny Wal-Mart about 6:00


pm August 19.


Arrest after


man refuses


to go away

A north county man was jailed
for disorderly intoxication due to
disruptive behavior at the home
of a neighbor who had invited
both he and his girlfriend to stay
with her 'during Tropical Storm
Fay.
Deputy Randy Davis said he
arrested Steven Raulerson, 37,
following a disturbance call at
the home of Brenda Bumsed off
Carl Brown Rd. near Taylor late
in the evening of August 22.
The complainant and girl-
friend Susan Johns, 44, of Sand-
erson said Mr. Raulerson had
been drinking all day and became
threatening and abusive before
being asked to leave. When the
officer arrived about 11:00, he
noted the suspect's intoxicated
state and said Mr. Raulerson was
upset because the two women
would not allow him to see his
child.
fle was arrested when he re-
fused Deputy Davis' request
that he leave the residence. Mr.
Raulerson is a neighbor of Ms.
Burnsed.
In other arrests, Richard Ellis,
37, of Glen St. Mary was jailed
for' driving a motorcycle in the
early morning hours of August
20 on a license that had been sus-
pended 17 times.
Deputy Wayne Limbaugh said
he stopped Mr. Ellis on a 2000
Yamaha after seeing him about
2:00 am on the bike near US
90 and MLK Dr. in Macclenny
without eye protection.
A computer check revealed
the license had twice been sus-
pended as a habitual offender,
and also for failure to pay fines,
failure to appear in court and
failure to pay child support.
Chad Mallory, 29, of Sand-
erson was arrested the evening
of August 1.8 after he was found
hiding in the bathroom of a resi-
dence off US 90 east of town.
James Nettles summoned Depu-
ty Mike Lagle because of a tres-
pass warrant barring Mr. Mallory
from the premises.


k0etecoune
First Baptist Church

of Sanderson
CR 229 S., Sanderson FL
Sunday School ....... 10:00 am
Sun. Morning Worship 11:00 am
Sun. Evening Worship .. 6:00 pm
Wed. Eve. Bible Study.. 7:00 pm
Pastor Bob Christmas
http://www.fbcofsanderson.org


I~ I




Legal





Notices




IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
BAKER COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE NO.: 02-2008-CP-0025


IN RE: The Estate of
MARIE ANTOINETTE MERCEDES MILTON,


NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
(One PR)

The administration of the estate of MARIE
ANTOINETTE MERCEDES MILTON, deceased, File
Number 02-2008-CP-0025, is pending in the Pro-
bate Court, Baker County, Florida, the address of
which is: 339 East Macclenny Avenue, Macclenny,
FL 32063
The names and addresses of the' personal
representative and the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED
THAT:
All, persons on whom this notice is served,
who have objections that challenge the validity of
the will, the qualifications of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or jurisdiction of this court, are
required to file their objections with this court,
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF'THIS
NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All creditors of the decedent, and other per-
sons having claims or demands against the de-
cedent's estate, on whom a copy of this notice
is served, within three months after the date of
the first publication of this notice, must file their
claims with this court, WITHIN THE LATER OF
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent, and per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate, must file their claims with this court WITH-
IN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OFTHIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED
The date of the first publication of this notice
Is August 14, 2008.
TOM BARRETT Personal
Representative
FRANK E. MALONEY, JR., Esquire
Attorney for Personal Representative
445 East Macclenny Avenue
Macclenny, FL 32063
(904) 259-3155
Florida Bar No.: 142990.
8/14-9/4
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, EIGHTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR BAKER COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO: 02 008-CP-046
DIVISION: .....
IN RE: ESTATE OF
NARENDRAKUMAR AMBALALBHAI
PATEL a/k/a NARENDRA A. PATEL,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of NARENDRA-
KUMAR AMBALALBHAI PATEL, deceased, whose
date of death was May 6, 2007, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Baker County, Florida, Probate Di-
vision, the address of which is 339 E. Macclenny
Ave., MacClenny, Florida 32063. The names and
addresses of the personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney are set forth be-
low.
IAll creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's estate
on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF3 MONTHS AFTER THETIME OFTHE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE'OF
DEATH IS BARRED.
,The date of first publication of this notice is
August 21,2008.

Attorney for Personal Representative:
ROBERT N. MILLER, ESQ.
Florida Bar No: 042102
Fisher, Tousey, Leas & Ball
501 Riverside Avenue, Suite 600
Jacksonville, Florida 32202
(904)356-2600
Personal Representative
MANUBHAIPATEL
491 South 5th Street
Madclenny, FL 32063
8/21-8/28n
M & S MINI-STORAGE
127 Lowder Street
Macclenny, Florida 32063
Phone 259-6682
The following units containing such property.
as furniture, household goods, etc., will be sold at
public auction on September 4, 2008 at 4:00 pm to
pay back rent. Tenant has up until the time of the
sale to satisfy back rent.
Vivian Rhoades #62
Arcandis Dixon #45-76
Davaun Church #67
8/28-9/04


PUBLIC NOTICE
The quarterly meeting of the Baker County
Local Mitigation Strategy Task Force will take place
at 10:00 am on Wednesday, September 3, 2008,
at the Baker County Administration Building, 55
North 3rd Street, Macclenny, Florida. All interested
persons are invited to attend.
8/28'
NOTICE
Call for Letters of Interest and Statements of Quali-
fication to provide:
RFQ #08-04 Professional Independent Finan-
cial Consulting Services I
for the New River Solid Waste Association
(NRSWA), 24276 NE. 157th Street, Raiford, FL
32083. NRSWA invites professional financial con-
sulting firms to submit letters of interest and quali-
fication statements for providing financial con-
sulting services to the Association. The services
rendered will include potential investment advice,
support for the MAS 90 system, and other miscel-
laneous financial services. NRSWA is located 2.5
miles north of Raiford, Florida on State Road 121
in Union County, FL. Contact New River Regional
Landfill at 386-431-1000 or send request by mail
to NRSWA, P.O. Box 647, Raiford, FL 32083 to re-
quest a copy of the Request for Qualifications. The
DEADLINE for submittal in response to the above
RFQ is September 9, 2008, 5:00 p.m.
8/28-9/04
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
BAKER COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE NO.: 02-08-0073-CA

IONA FISH, un-remarried widow of Wassie
Fish,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CHARLIE WALDO and KATHY WALDO his
Wife and WACHOVIA BANK f/k/a SOUTHTRUST
BANK OF NORTHEAST FLORIDA, N.A. f/k/a CITI-
ZENS BANK OF MACCLENNY a National Banking
Association and BAKER COUNTY
Defendant

NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE is hereby given pursuant to an Order
of Final Judgement of Foreclosure entered in the
above-captioned action, I will sell the property situ-
ated in Baker County, Florida, described as follows:
Lands located In Section 33, Township
1 South, Range 21 East Baker County,
Florida, described as follows:
Begin at the Northwest corner of said
Section 33 and run N 88 deg. 40'01" E,
along the North line of said Section 33,
a distance.of 209.90 feet; thence run S
11 deg, 43'18" E, a distance of 558.00
feet; then run S 88 deg. .40'01" W, a
distance of 209.90 feet to the West line
of said Section 33, thence run N 1.1 deg.
43'18" W, along said West line of Sec-
tion 33, a distance of 558.00 feet to the
Point of Beginning; Subject to a 30 foot
Road Easement over, across and along
the Southerly 30 feet thereof. Containing
a total area of 2.64 aces, more or less,
when including 30 foot Road Easement,
and containing an area of 2.50 acres
more or less when 30 foot Road Ease-
ment is not included.
at public sale to. the highest and best bidder for
cash, at the front door of the Baker County Court-
house, Macclenny, Florida, at 11:30 a.m. on the
23rd day of September, 2008.
Thomas "Al". Fraser
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Bonnie Polleski
Deputy Clerk
8/28-9/04
PUBLIC NOTICE
New River Public Library Cooperative: It is the
intent of the Governing Board of the New River
Public Library Cooperative to designate the posi-
tion of director of the Cooperative as a senior
management position.
8/28-9/04
NOTICE TO BID
Notice is hereby given that the Baker County Board
of Commissioners will receive written, sealed bids
for the following:
S"Furnishing & Servicing PoraileT6iles"
Please designate a price unit per month for regu-
lar units and handicapped units. All bids must
be sealed and have "Portable Toilet Bid" clearly
marked on the outside of bid packet. All bids must
be received by 3:00 p.m. Wednesday, September
10, 2008. Bid may be mailed ,or delivered to the
Baker County Administration Building, 55 N. 3rd
Street; Macclenny, Florida 32063. For more infor-
mation call (904) 259-3613.
The Baker County Board of Commissioners reserve
the right to accept or reject any or all bids.
8/28-9/4
REQUEST'FOR BIDS
Notice is hereby given that the Baker Coun-
ty Board of Commissioners will receive written,
sealed bids for the following: "Uniform Rental
Services" to provide.rental uniforms for Baker
County Employees. Bid specifications are available
at the County Administration Office, 55 North 3rd
Street, Macclenny, Florida, 32063. All bids must
be delivered or mailed to the Administration Office
by 3:00 p.m. on Wednesday, September 10, 2008
marked "Bid Proposals for Uniform Rental Ser-
vice." The Baker County Board of Commissioners
reserve the right to accept or reject any or all bids.
8/28.9/4
NOTICE
Call for Request for Proposals (RFP)
New River Solid Waste Association (NRSWA) is
in need of the following services and technical
support:
1. RFP #08-02 Computer Maintenance
and Technical Services
2. RFP #08-03 Heavy to Light Equipment
Repair and Maintenance Services
3. RFP #08-04 Heating and Air Condi-
tioning Services
4. RFP #08-05, Electrical Construction
and Maintenance Services
5. RFP #08-06 Truck Scale Maintenance
and Repairs
6. RFP #08-07 Pest Control Services
NRSWA is located 2.5. miles north of Raiford,
Florida on State Road 121 in Union County, Florida.
Proposal packages and information can be picked
up at the New River Regional Landfill located at
24276 NE 157th Street, Raiford, FL 32083. All
proposals must be submitted on the Proposal
Form provided. Completed proposals are to be
mailed to the New River Solid Waste Association,
P.O.,Box 647, Raiford, Florida 32083-0647 or deliv-
ered to the NRSWA Administration Office. After the
RFP opening, the proposals will be examined for
completeness and preserved in the custody of the
Executive Director. New River Solid Waste Associa-
tion reserves the right to reject any or all proposals
or a portion thereof for any reason. Any proposals
received after the specified time and date will not
be considered. For additional information contact
NRSWA at 386-431-1000. The DEADLINE for sub-
mittal in response to the above RFPs is September
9, 2008,12:00 p.m. (noon).
8/28-9/4


NOTICE
Request for Proposals (RFP)
New River Solid Waste Association (NRSWA) is
calling for proposals for the following services:
RFP #08-08, Odt-sourcing Landfill Recycling Pro-
gram / Utllization of Existing Recycling Equip-
ment
NRSWA is located 2.5 miles north of Raiford,
Florida on State Road 121 in Union County, Florida.
Proposal packages and information can be picked
up at the New River Regional Landfill located at
24276 NE 157th Street, Raiford, FL 32083. All
proposals must be submitted on the Proposal
Form provided. Completed proposals are to be
mailed to the New River Solid Waste Association,
P.O. Box 647, Raiford, Florida 32083-0647 or deliv-
ered to the NRSWA Administration Office. After the
RFP opening, the proposals will be examined for
completeness and preserved in the custody of the
Executive Director. New River Solid Waste Associa-
tion reserves the right to reject any or all proposals
or a portion thereof for any reason. Any proposals
received after the specified time and date will not
be considered. For additional information contact
NRSWA at 386-431-1000. The DEADLINE for sub-
mittal in response to the above RFP is September
9,2008, 12:00 p.m. (noon).
8/28-9/4
NOTICE
Invitation for BIDS (IFB)
New River Solid Waste Association (NRSWA) is
extending an Invitation For Bids for the purchase
or lease of the following equipment:
BID #08-01, One (1) Heavy Duty, Four Wheeled
Landfill Compactor minimum operating weight
of 80,000 Ibs. / Buy back of existing landfill
compactor:
NRSWA is located 2.5 miles north of Raiford,
Floridaon'State Road 121 in Union County, Florida.
Bid packages and information can be picked up at
the New River Regional Landfill located at 24276
NE 157th Street, Raiford, FL 32083. All bids must
be submitted on the Bid Form provided. Completed
bids are to be mailed to the New River Solid Waste
Association, P.O. Box 647, Raiford, Florida 32083-
0647 or delivered to the NRSWA Administration
Office. After the IFB opening, the bids will be
examined for Eompleteness and preserved in the
custody of the Executive Director. New River Solid
.Waste Association reserves the right to reject any
or all bids or a portion thereof for any reason. Any
bids received after the specified time and date
will not be considered. For additional information
contact NRSWA at 386-431-1000. The DEADLINE
for submittal in response to the above IFB is Sep-
tember 9, 2008, 12:00 p.m. (noon).
8/28-9/4 '
NOTICE :
Call for Letters of Interest and Statements of Quali-
fication to provide:
1. RFQ #08-02.Professional Surveying
'Services
2. RFQ #08-03 Professional Accounting '
and Auditing Services .
for the New River Solid Waste Association
(NRSWA), 24276 NE 157th Street, Raiford, FL
32083. NRSWA is located 2.5 miles north ol Rai-
ford, Florida on State Road 121 in Union County,
Florida, Contact New River Regional Landfill at
386-431-1000 or send request by mail to NRSWA,
P.O. Box 647; Raiford, FL 32083 to request a copy
of the Request for Qualifications. The DEADLINE,
for submittal in response to the above RFQsJs
SSeptember 9; 2008, 5:00 p.m.
8/2.-/4


CITY OF MACCLENNY

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS

REGARIDNG A

SMALL SCALE AMENDMENT

TO THE 2010 FUTURE

A-NM-SE MAP\r.AN3DCHANG-E

TO THE ZONING MAP


The City Commission of the City of Macclenny, Florida shall consider
Ordinance No. 08-14, "AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF
*MACCLENNY, FLORIDA, AMENDING THE 2010 FUTURE LAND
-USE MAP WHICH SHALL CHANGE THE FUTURE LAND USE
DESIGNATION FOR LANDS DESCRIBED HEREIN FROM LOW
'DENSITY RESIDENTIAL TO PUBLIC/SEMI-PUBLIC RELATED
TO A SMALL SCALE DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITY KNOWN AS
BAKER COUNTY ADMINISTRATION OFFICES; PROVIDING
"FOR INTENT; AUTHORITY; FINDINGS OF CONSISTENCY;
FINDINGS OF FACT; SEVERABILITY; RECORDATION AND AN
EFFECTIVE DATE."

The City Commission of the City of Macclenny, Florida shall also
consider Ordinance No. 08-15, "AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY
OF MACCLENNY, FLORIDA, REZONING APPROXIMATELY 6
,ACRES AS DESCRIBED HEREIN FROM RESIDENTIAL SINGLE
.FAMILY (RS-2) TO GOVERNMENT USE (GU); PROVIDING
FOR A VOLUNTARY REZONING REQUEST FROM THE
BAKER COUNTY PLANNING AND ZONING DEPARTMENT;
'PROVIDING FOR INTENT; FINDINGS OF CONSISTENCY;
FINDINGS OF FACT; SEVERABILITY; RECORDATION AND AN
EFFECTIVE DATE."

SYNOPSIS: Ordinance No. 08-14 involves a small scale development
amendment to change the Subject Property's 2010 Future Land Use
Map designation from Low Density Residential td Public/Semi-Public.
Ordinance No. 08-15 will change the Subject Property's zoning from
Residential Single Family to Government Use. The two ordinances are
related and are being pursued to permit the' construction of new Baker
County Administration offices upon the Subject Property, approximately
6 acres.

FIRST READING: A public hearing on the first reading of the proposed
ordinances will .be held on Tuesday, September 9, 2008 in the City
Commission Chambers at City Hall, 118 East Macclenny Avenue,
Macclenny, Florida. There shall be no vote by the City Commission
regarding these two ordinances at this meeting. The City Commission
meeting will begin at 6:00 p.m. and the public hearing will be held
shortly after the meeting is called to order." Interested persons may appear
at the hearing and be heard regarding the adoption of the proposed
amendment.

COMMISSION VOTE: A public hearing requiring City Commission
action on the proposed ordinances will be held on Monday, September
22, 2008 in the City Commission Chambers at City Hall, 118 East
Macclenny Avenue, Macclenny, Florida. The City Commission meeting
will begin at 6:00 p.m. and the public hearing will be held shortly after the
_Imeeting is called to order. Interested persons may appear at the hearing
,and be heard regarding the adoption of the proposed amendment.

The proposed ordinance is available for review at the City Manager's
Office, City Hall, on Monday through Friday during regular business
hours. Should any person decide to appeal any decision made as a result
of this hearing, such person will need a record of the proceedings and
may need to ensure that a verbatim record of these proceedings is made.
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a
special accommodation or an interpreter to participate in this proceeding
should contact the City Manager at (904) 259-0972 at least 48 hours prior
to the time of the hearing.
|1


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118 South Fifth St., Macclenny ** 259-3737
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Obituaries


Aleane Brown,

91, of Sanderson
Aleane Vivian Brown, 91, of
Sanderson died August 23, 2008
at the Earl. B. Hadlow Center
for Caring.
Ms. Brown
was born
in Pleasant
Hill, LA
to Charlie
M. Miles
and Nellie
Binns Miles
on January
2, 1917.
Aleane was
a resident
of Baker
County for Ms. Brown
26 years
and, a member of the First Bap-
tist Church in Glen St. Mary.
Ms. Brown retired in 1976
after 20 years of employment
with Springfield Atlantic Bank
where she worked as a proof de-
partment supervisor. She loved
spending time with her family,
cooking "special" foods for her
grandchildren and embroidery.
She was predeceased by her
loving husband df 71 years, Ba-
sil Brown; twin infant son Ron-
ald Harvey Brown and daughter
Glenda Hines.
Survivors include children
Carol (Curtis) Kallam, Charlie
Donald (Marilyn) Brown; both
of Jacksonville; seven grand-
children, 15 great-grandchildren
and many nieces and nephews.
SThe funeral service was held
Wednesday August 27, at 10:00
am at V. Todd Ferreira Funeral
Services Chapel with Pas-
tor George Dugger officiating.
Interment followed at Taylor
Cemetery.

Richard Kukucka,

Former resident
SRichard Edmund Kukucka
Sr,, 64, a US Navy retiree and
president/manager of Aircraft-
ers of Enterprise, Alabama, died
on Saturday, August 23, 2008.
'He was a longtime resident of
Baker County before moving to
Alabama.
SMr. Kukucka was born Oc-
tober 15, 1943 in Pennsylvania
to the late Albert B. and Helen
Stella Hodek Kukucka.
? He is survived by his wife of
42 years, Betty Jean of Enter-
prise; daughter Beverly J. Lau-
ramore (Joel) and son Richard
E. Jr. (Jenifer), all of Macclen-
ny; grandchildren Richard III,
Emily and Allison Kukucka and
Jordan Lauramore.
The graveside service was
held on August 28 with full
military honors at Meadowlawn
Cemetery in Enterprise. At Mr.
.Kukucka's request, in lieu of
flowers please make doiationis
in care of Wiregrass Hospice,
P.O. Drawer 2127, Dothan, AL
36302.

Homecoming

atsw# Cree
The Historic Swift Creek
Church in Hamilton County
"north of White Springs will hold'
its annual homecoming on Sep-
tember 28.
The public is invited and de-
scendants of any of the pioneer'
families involved in the church
'are especially encouraged to at-
tend.
"" Services will begin at 11:45
am, followed immediately by
dinner on the grounds. Please
bring food for your family, bev-
erages will be provided. For
more information, please call
Marjorie Fiske at 352-726-
1090.


Cornerstone CMC
South' Blvd. & 7th St.
Macclenny
Pastor Keith Thomas


259-3678
Sunday School 10:00 am
Sunday Morning 11:00am
Sunday Evening 6:00 pm
Wednesday Night 7:00 pm

A


Sara Prevatt, 23,

Olustee resident
Sara E. Prevatt, 23, of Olus-
tee, Florida, died unexpectedly
early Saturday morning. She was
a lifelong resident of Olustee, a
member of the Columbia High
School graduating class of 2002
and a member of the "Tigerette"
dance team for four years. Fol-
lowing graduation she attended
Lake City Community College
where she earned certifications
as a nail technician, EMT and
ultimately a corrections officer.
Ms. Prevatt worked for CHC
Labs during college and as a
corrections officer at Baker Cor-
rectional for one year. Her spare
time was spent with family and
friends.
She is survived by mother
Amy Bullard of Olustee; father
Jim Prevatt of Olustee; broth-
ers Chan Prevatt (Debbie) and
James "Kell" Prevatt, both of
Olustee; sisterJami Kay Prevatt
of Jacksonville; maternal great-
grandmother, Vonceil Alvarez
of Olustee; maternal grandfa-
therAmos Rhoden (Pat) of Mac-
clenny; nephew K.C. Prevatt of
Olustee; aunts, uncles, cousins
and other family members and
friends also survive.
The funeral service for Sara
was at 1:00 pm Tuesday, August
26, 2008 in the chapel of the
Dees-Parrish Family Funeral
Home in Lake City with Rev.
Kenneth Edenfield officiating.
Interment followed in the Olus-
tee Cemetery.


NE O .


Lori Moody, 40,

dies August 25th
Lori Christine Moody, 40,
of Macclenny died suddenly on
August 25, 2008 at St. Vincent's
Medical Center in Jacksonville.
Ms. Moody
was born in
Gainesville
to Mari-
on Ernest
Gainey Sr.
and Carol) n
Christine
Long Gain-
ey on April
14, 1968.
Lori was
a life-long
resident
osiden Ms. Moody
of Baker
County and a graduate of Baker
County High School. She loved
playing games with he? daugh-
ter, cooking, yard sales and rais-
ing shitz-tzu puppies. She was
predeceased by son Daniel Kyle
Moody.
Survivors include her hus-
band of 14 years, Daniel L.
Moody Jr; daughter Jayla Dani-
elle Moody; brothers Ernie
(Lynn) Gainey, Clay (Andrea)
Gainey, Eddie (Kris) Hagen and.
numerous aunts, uncles, nieces
and nephews.
The funeral service will be
Thursday, August 28 at 1:00 pm
at Raiford Road Church in Mac-
clenny with Pastor Eddie Griffis
officiating.' Interment' will fol-
low at Macedonia Cemetery.
The family will receive friends
for visitation on Wednesday,
August 27 from 6:00 8:00 pm
Sat the V. Todd Ferreira Chapel.


Mr. Poliquin, 79,

dies August 22nd
Normand EF. Poliquin, : 79,
of Macclenny died August 22,
2008 in Jacksonville. He was re-
tired from St. Regis Paper Com-
pany (sawmill division) and
was a veteran of the US Army.
Mr. Poliquin was an avid Gator,
Braves, Cubs and Red Sox fan.
He. was preceded in death by
parents Alfred and Simone Poli-
quin; grandson Timmy Chasse;
brother Alfred Poliquin Jr.
He is survived by his wife of
56 years, Delores Poliquin; son
James Poliquin (Linda); daugh-
ters Janet Lane (Robert), Pat
McVay (Bobby), Paula Shepa-
rd (Kelly) and Dolly Thomas;
brothers Donald (Edith), Ray-
mond and Maurice (Ingrid)
Poliquin; sister Lorraine Proulx;
seven grandchildren and 11
great-grandchildren.
The funeral service for Mr.
Poliquin was held at 11:00 am
on Tuesday, August 26 in the
chapel of GIDDENS-REED
Funeral Home in Baldwin, and
interment followed in Sellers
Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, the
family requests memorials be
made to Community Hospice of
NE FL, 4114 Sunbeam Rd. Ste.
101, Jacksonville 32257.


S Sanderson
Congregational
Holiness Church
CR 127 N., Sanderson, FL
Sunday School 10:00 am
Morning Worship 11:00 am
Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 pm
Wed. Evening Prayer Serv. 7:30 pm
}Pastor: Oral E. Lyons,


YOUR CHILDREN


r

In Loving Memory
of *
Vernon "Tom" Davis
3/24/29-8/30/04
Love and miss you.


Salary Bapist Church
L S'' .____________


Sunday School
Preaching Service


10:00 am
11:00 am


Sunday Night Service 6:00 pm


Wednesday Service


7:00 pm


523 North Boulevard W.
Four blocks north of Hwy. 90 in Macclenny
Pastor Donnie E. Williams ** 259-4529


9:00 am
10:00 am


Sunday School 7:00 pm
Sunday Worship &
Holy Communion


-' : $.


In Loving Memory
of
Deloris Belford
8/31/43-6/23/08
A tribute to my mom, Deloris:
No words could ever describe
the emptiness that has been
in my heart since the death of
my mom. Many thoughts flood
my mind about the precious
moments we had together. But
I would rather have her being
alive.and well than just being
alive in my heart. Mom was
the center of my world, and
the joy she brought to my life
was extraordinary. Remember-
ing her beautiful eyes shining
back at me, and the sweetness
displayed in her smile, was the
ultimate example of Heavenly
love.
I miss hearing the wonder-
ful laughter flowing from her
mouth and the incredible words
of cheerfulness that fell from
her lips. Mom was the perfect
gift that God created just for
me.
There's nothing that could
ever fill this void in my life and
heart. These past few months
have been very difficult with-
out my Inom being in my life.
Each passing day is a constant
struggle to let my life move
forward because stopping time
would be much easier than fac-
ing another day without her. My
heart longs for the day when
I see mom once again. Being
able to hoqd her in my arms,
kissing her movingg face and
telling her the most important
words I love you. I will always
remember her as the amazing
person and mom that she was.
For 64 years God gave me the
most treasured gift of all. He
gave me mom.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY MOM
WE TRULY MISS YOU,
JAPAN JR, SANDI, TOOTSIE, SPARKLES


Wednesday Praise,
Prayer, Healing,
SHoly Communion,
Dessert Fellowship


THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS, Thursday, August 28, 2008 Page 9

News, polls, socials, features...

visit us online today!

http://www.bakercountypress.com

I. I


MACCLENNY
CHURCH OF CHRIST
573 S. 5th St. 259-6059
Sunday Bible Study 9:45 am
Fellowship 10:30 am -11:00 am
Worship Services
,. 11:00 am
It \'cd d Bible Study
/- ., -%' pm
'*i l, [*.;[rf'i l|,' M in stern
5 .n Sam F. Kilching


FAITH BIBLE

CHURCH
New Hopefor the Community
Five Churches Road
H\,. 127 Sanderson, FL


Sunday School
S d M, :rin Wnmhin


9:45 a.m.
11.nla 00


OUllU y lorn iI ors T u ij:a. ua.u ,
Wed. Night Bible Study 6:30 p.m.
V'idell II illiams -Pastor
\ /


23-A to Lauramore Rd. & Fairgrounds Rd.
Sunday School 9:45 am
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 am
Sunday Evening Services 6:00 pm
Wednesday Night Prayer Meeting 7:00 pm
Pastor J. C. Lauramore Welcomes All


First Assembly of God
MACCLENNY

SERVICE TIMES:
Sunday School 9:30 am Sunday Worship 10:15 am.
Sunday Evening 6:00 pm
Wednesday 7:00 pm
- Nursery providedfor all services.
Pastor oshua, Ashley Cohen Visit us online at www.macclennyag.com
andClaire Potts
206 Nor-th Fifth Street in Macclenny


Come and magnify the Lord and worship with us
Glen Friendship Tabernacle
Clinton Ave. Glen St. Mary
WJXR Radio Service Sunday .... 8:30 am
Morning Worship Service...... 10:30 am
Children's Church ............ 11:30 am
Evangelistic .................6:00 pm
Bible Study (Wed.)............. 7:30 pm
Rev. Albert Starling Home: 259-3982 Church: 259-6521




First Baptist Church
GLEN ST. MARY, FLORIDA
"A Beacon to Sunday School 9:45 AM"
Baker County" Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 AM
S. Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 PM
Wednesday Prayer Meeting 7:00 PM;
259-6977
SDr. Randy Williams, Senior Pastor '
Perry Hays, Associate Pastor


~




S


Gid Giddens
L.F.D.


270 North US Highway 301
Baldwin, Fla.

Locally Owned & Operated


904-266-2337


Mt. Zion N.C.
Methodist Church
121 North t 259-4461
Macclenny, FL
Pastor Tim Cheshire
Sunday School 9:45 am
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 am-'
Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 pm'
Wednesday Prayer Service 7:00 pm







Jesus answered, "Verily, verily
say unto thee, except a man be
born of water and of the Spirit,,
he cannot enter into the king-
dom of God." John 3:5


Need a phone number for a classified ad
.anddon't have the paper handy?
bakercountypress.com


Saint Peter


in the Glen
ANGLICAN CHURCH


(904) 259-6689 ~ Glen St. Mary, Florida
S .'t 'i .. /." lji#..r, CR i I, r .hi n ,', i .\,r -'cr, R,, IJ 11 m ie
k.'itll -lli ti ,G l i I / 'ri .r tr i at te I i r, sr. BhidL r I.illh HI.a -
i


i.


~----~-----~--~---~-


a ___j







THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS, Thursday, August 28, 2008 Page 10


Social


Christian Andrew Colvin

A son arrives
'Andrew and Jessica Colvin
ofVWest Palm Beach are pleased
to announce the birth of son
Ciristian Andrew on July 22,
20.8. He weighed 7 lbs., 7 oz.
aid was 21 inches long.
: Grandparents include Kevin
and Nancy Crews and Tim
and Vanessa Colvin, all of
Macclenny; great-granparents
Sharon Crews of Glen St. Mary,
Anglis and Jacquelyn Davis
df Macclenny, Fayette and
Elsie Wilson of Franklin, Ohio
afid Chet and Patsy Colvin of
Springboro, Ohio.


'r. iffMrs. Farmer

To renew their vows
: Ila and Gerald Farmer of
Sanderson will renew their
wedding vows on the occa-
sion of their 20th anniversary.
The ceremony will be held at
2:00 pm on September 6, 2008
at the agriculture center in
Macclenny.
SAll friends and family are
cordially invited.

Seeks donated

formal dresses
.Donations of evening dress-
es and other appropriate for-
mal wear are sought in advance
of the annual "senior prom"
sponsored by the Baker County
Council on Aging on September
1'21
SThe event will be,held at.the
-ag center in Macclenny.
The event is the highlight of
the COA social calendar and it
would mean a lot for our ladies
to look pretty that night.
You can drop off dresses at
the Council building on US 90
in Macclenny or call 259-2223
tb arrange for pickup.
Also, since we have more
dies than men, if you know of
gn older man who owns a suit
and likes to dance, please send












iCONCREGATIONAL
:METHODIST CHURCH
Cr 1'27 N. ol SAnderon
SSunday School 10:00 [ m
lundav Porning Service i 1 :0(') .Sunyvlav Niqht Servie 6 00 pmn
ed Wld, Night SLrvi 7 :0 p.n
FWhere Everyone is Somebody and
SJesus s the Leader
.. .EVERYONE KI ELCOM
Pastor Rev. Erie Terrell


Thanks to everyone
I would like to express my
heartfelt appreciation to the
Baker County Fire Department,
the Sheriff's Office and their
employees, the emergency
response people and the trash
pickup crews for the outstand-
ing jobs they did during the
storm last week.
Thanks also to the repair
crews from Florida Power and
Light for their outstanding work
keeping everyone's power on
during the storm.
v.Y.
Macclenny
Canady reunion
The Canaday family reunion
will be September 28 at 1:00
pm at North Prong Church. All
family members are welcome.
Please bring your lawn chair
and a covered dish.
Deployment halfover
Marine Corps Lance Cpl.
Thomas D. Lambert, the son
of MaryA. and David D. Lambert
of Macclenny recently reached
the halfway point in his deploy-
ment to Al Anbar province, Iraq.
Lance Cpl. Lambert is a 2006
graduate of Baker County High
School and joined the Marine
Corps in December, 2006.


Visit your favorite
local newspaper
online!

www.BakerCounty
Press.com

Take our polls,
shop in the
classified, and
read select
articles



-


Schools


JROTCin leadership school
It was a busy summer for some of the Air Force JROTC students
from Baker County High School. Ten cadets traveled to a Summer
Leadership School (SLS) at Satellite Beach, near Patrick Air Force
Base, FL, June 9-13. There, they joined 75-85 other students from five
other schools for a week of workshops and training.
The students had a good time and excelled in the classes. BCHS
students were represented in nine of the ten award categories. The SLS
was an excellent opportunity for the students to progress in their Air
Force training.
"From the moment we arrived, the cadets made their presence
known," said Master Sergeant Liz Law-Wallace. "It wasn't long before
other AFJROTC instructors were commenting on how our cadets were
very professional and looked real sharp in their uniforms. Throughout
the week several people other cadets, chaperones, dining facility
workers would make a point to take me aside to tell me how well
behaved, caring and intelligent our students were."
This was the second year the AFJROTC attended a Summer Lead-
ership School and both times Law-Wallace was impressed by how the
students represented Baker County.
S- -. IWAKJ-A T -TH-I NEWS?1


Building class
The Baker County High
School Construction Technology
students build pump houses, tool
'sheds, storage buildings, picnic
tables, dog house and more at
very reasonable prices. Please
contact Mr. Clardy at 259-6286
ext. 10322.


Federal tuition aid
Lake City Community Col-
lege's patient care technician
program has been approved for'
federal financial aid.
The program prepares, stu-
dents for entry-level positions in
the health care fields of nursing
assistant, home health aide, phle-
botomy and EKG.
Contact Ann Tison at the
school's allied health department
for more details, 386-754-4304.


III r III' I I



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Randy's Crocodile

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Weekly Specials
$10 Buckets of Beer
$2 Bottle Beer, Tuesday
$1.75 Can Beer, Thursday
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Men's night Monday night football
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i Tuesday


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What you need to know,
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THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS, Thursday, August 28, 2008 Page li'


Gets 25 years for sex


battery onyoung gir


A Glen St. Mary man convict-
ed by a jury on multiple counts
of sexual battery and assault on
a female victim during a six-year
time span was sentenced August
25 to a 25-year prison term.
Circuit Judge Phyllis Rosier
also ordered Joseph E. Tetreault,
55. to serve a five-year sexual of-
fender probation when released
from prison, and he was given.
credit for 421 days in custody
since his arrest on July 2 of last
year.
A second case for lewd and
lascivious molestation of another
female, this one under the age of
21, still pends and is set for trial
in October. Mr. Tetreault turned
down a state plea offer with an
eight-year sentence attached in
the first case.
Judge Rosier's sentence float-
ed just above the minimum rec-
ommended by state guidelines.
The maximum was 60 years.
The jury took two hours fol-
lowing a one-day trial on July
5 to find Mr. Tetreault guilty of
carrying on a sexual relationship
with the victim starting when she
was 11-years-old.
He was arrested after a friend
of the victim showed her moth-
er a letter the victim had writ-
ten about the abuse, which she
claimed ceased when she insist-
ed it end. The victim testified at
trial that Mr. Tetreault plied her
with gifts and money to buy her
silence, and threatened her and
,'\


her family if she told.
In other sentencing this wee
during the court's regular motic
and docket session:
A year on house arrest fo
lowed by three years ofprobati
were ordered for Jason Parish
return for his plea to a lesser c
fense of attempted aggravate
battery on a pregnant victim,
third-degree felony. He had bee
charged in June with aggravate
battery.
Michelle Jones entered
guilty plea to sale and delivery
cocaine and possession of dru
with intent to sell, and drew
two-year term on drug-offend
probation.
Jacob Chessman pleaded
a lesser count of having no val
driver's license and was place
on a year's probation and order
to do 50 hours of community se
vice. He was originally charge
with felony driving while licen
suspended.
A year on probation, a
$860 restitution were ordered f
Bryan Harrington in return f
his guilty plea to a lesser char
of criminal mischief, a misd
meanor. He was arrested on
felony count.
Judge Rosier withheld a
judication of guilt in the case
Michael Williams, charged wi
felony possession of marijuar
He will serve two years on dru
offender probation.


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Glen St Mary budget


is identicalto 2007-08

Glen St. Mary's operating budget for the coming fiscal year will be
ek identical to the one for fiscal 2008, with the exception of some tweak-
on ing that reduced the amount of anticipated impact revenue from new
residential construction for the year ending in September.
l"- Mayor Juanice Padgett told the town council on August 19 the
on current budget anticipated impact fees from eight new homes, and
in realized income from but two. She predicted four in fiscal 2008-09,
f- however.
ed The town's $201,770 proposed operating budget falls short of the
a anticipated $189,528 in income, and the deficit will be drawn from
en Glen St. Mary's cash surplus of $305,000; Glen does not levy prop-
ed erty taxes, and draws the bulk of its annual income from sales taxes
($47,500), telephone and electrical utility taxes ($61,300) and inter-
a est income ($21,500) from those cash reserves.
of The council last week approved without dissent several amend-
gs ments to the, current budget brought on by the drop in anticipated
a fees. Income in the planning category, for instance, was dropped to
ler $1000 this year from the anticipated $10,500 because of the dearth of
fees associated with zoning and annexation activity. The town found
to itself with $4000 more in insurance costs, to a new total of $20,000
id for the year ending next month.
ed The higher premium is due to a change in the way governments in
ed Florida account for current value appraisal of the town's assets.
er- An additional $3000 was plugged into legal fees due to an ongoing
ed lawsuit by a commercial property owner over connect fees, and half
.se the money spent for accounting services was transferred to the water
and sewer account to more accurately reflect expenditures.
nd Glen will hold budget hearings next month prior to adoption.
or In other business during the regular meeting last week:
for V/The council, at the request of Councilman Jack Reneau, who is
ge affiliated with a construction company, made a minor change to the
le- new parking ordinance to allow large vehicles with audible back-up
a warning devices to operate as early as 6:00 am instead of an hour
later.
id- The new law controlling,parking of large vehicles on town right-
of of-way was passed on first reading and included the change, as was a
th new ordinance on code enforcement operation.
la. It was altered to allow the council to reduce non-compliance fines
1g-, upon recommendation of the county's Code Enforcement Board that
hears Glen's cases. Glen's code officer Donna Loadholtz told the
board last week she has seven current code violation cases, most for
excessive junk, vehicles and refuse. One of two older cases came into
compliance; the other will be scheduled fbr a CEB hearing.
Second reading and likely passage of the new ordinances will be
next month.
i/Mayor Padgett told grants consultant Spencer Nabors the town
will not pledge $250,000 as part of the application for a $921,000
grant to expand water utilities to neighborhoods north of US 90.
Mi. Nabors indicated the project, which includes a $225,000 deep
well, will have to be scaled down as a result. The .original CBDG
block grant was to include $600,000 for construction of the well and
lines; the remainder goes to design and grant management.
Glen St. Mary will get some credit in the application process be-
cause it was turned down this year, and has completed some pre-
liminary engineering. The lack of local cash will penalize the town
SsomewhatWand itsprobability of getting the grant depends also on-i-
Sother factorsincluding tlh sounrdess of grants sought by other local-!
governments.
VTown attorney Joel Foreman of Lake City said'the re-filed law-
suit against Glen by Savage Enterprises seeking, among other things,
damages because the town allegedly over-charged with impact fees,
is moving forward.
The town has moved to dismiss a portion of the lawsuit claiming
the council did not have the authority to bring itself under the state
retirement system last year. Mr. Foreman is arguing the ordinance is
valid because it can be retroactive and did not result in "special and
private" benefit of the mayor and four council members.
S The town postponed action on the school facilities element of its
comprehensive plan after the learning the Baker County Commission
tabled it the previous day. At issue is the status, of several "planned"
developments that have yet to take shape, and whether they will trig-
ger expensive impact fees to cover costs of new schools and other
public amenities.
The county board will re-discuss the matter in a future workshop.
Councilman Dicky Foster, a plumbing contractor, predicted resi-
dential growth will come to a halt if the impact fees are kept intact.
Technically, Glen St. Mary does not have to sign on to the school
element since there are no schools inside the town, but it would in the
event of annexations.
Both Baker County High School and Westside Elementary lie just
east of the town limits.


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Pastor Rev. Shannon Conner
North 6th Street Macclenny 259-3500
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,THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS, Thursday, August 28, 2008 Pag
PROPOSED CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS
TO BE VOTED ON NOVEMBER 4, 2008
NOTICE OF ELECTION

.QWrt S. Browning, Secretary of State of the State of Florida, do hereby give notice that an election will be
,held in each county in Florida, on November 4, 2008, for the ratification or rejection of proposed amendments
-to the Constitution of the State of Florida.
No. 1
., CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
.'.. ARTICLE I, SECTION 2
'* ,.(Legislative)

Ballot Title:
.'DECLARATION OF RIGHTS
"Ballot Summary:
.Proposing an amendment to the State Constitution to delete provisions authorizing the Legislature to regulate
ir prohibit the ownership, Inheritance, disposition, and possession of real property by aliens ineligible for
"'Citenship.

:4 T Text:
S;*' ARTICLE I
DECLARATION OF RIGHTS

i"SECTION 2. Basic rights.--All natural persons, female and male alike, are equal before the law and have
',inalienable rights, among which are the right to enjoy and defend life and liberty, to pursue happiness, to be
'rewarded for industry, and to acquire, possess and protect property;ex thttht hc ownrfhip, inhritancc,
disposition and poaosion of rcul property by aliens incligiblo f or citizenship may bo r.gulatd. or prohibited
bylaw. .No person shall be deprived of any right because of race, religion, national origin, or physical dis-
ability.
No. 2
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
;.~ ": ARTICLE I, NEW SECTION
', ((Initiative Petition)

.Ballot Title:
.FLORIDA MARRIAGE PROTECTION AMENDMENT



B allot Summary:
'This amendment protects marriage as the legal union of only one man and one woman as husband and wife
S land provides that no other legal union that is treated as marriage or the substantial equivalent thereof shall be
.valid or.recognized.

Financial Impact Statement:
:The direct financial impact this amendment will have. on state and local government revenues and expendi-
itures cannot be determined, but is expected to be minor.
;;Full Text:
I' ARTICLE I, NEW SECTION
: DECLARATION OF RIGHTS

'Inasmuch as marriage is the legal union of only one man and one woman as husband and wife, no other legal
union that is treated as marriage or the substantial equivalent thereof shall be valid or recognized.
No.3
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE VII, SECTIONS 3 AND 4
ARTICLE XII, NEW SECTION
(Taxation and Budget Reform Commission)
Ballot Title:
CHANGES AND IMPROVEMENTS NOT AFFECTING THE ASSESSED VALUEDF RESIDENTIAL REAL
;,PROPERTY
'Ballot Summary:
'Authorizes the Legislature, by general law, to prohibit consideration of changes or improvements to residential
;real property which increase resistance to wind damage and installation of renewable energy source devices
;as factors in assessing the property's value for ad valorem taxation purposes. Effective upon adoption, repeals
'the existing renewable'energy source device exemption no longer in effect.
;Full Text:
r ARTICLE VII
FINANCE AND TAXATION

SECTION 3. Taxes; exemptions.--
(a) All property owned by a municipality and used exclusively by it for, municipal or public
ppurposes shall be exempt from taxation. A municipality, owning property outside the municipality, may be
required by general law to make payment to the taxing unit in which the property is located. Such portions of
Property as are used predominantly for educational, literary, scientific, religious or charitable purposes may be
exempted by general law from taxation.
(b) There shall be exempt from taxation, cumulatively, to every head of a family residing in this
State, household goods and personal effects to the value fixed by general law, not less than one thousand dol-
lars, and to every widow or widower or person who is blind or totally and permanently disabled, property to.
Sthe value fixed by general law not less than-five hundred dollars.
(c) Any county or municipality may, for the purpose of its respective tax levy and subject to the
provisions of this subsection and general law, grant community and economic development ad valorem tax
.exemptions to new businesses and expansions of existing businesses, as defined by general law. Such an
exemption may be granted only by ordinance of the county or municipality, and only after the electors of the
j county or municipality voting on such question in a referendum authorize the county or municipality to adopt
such ordinances. An exemption so granted shall apply to improvements to real property made by or for the
use of'a new business and improvements to real property related to the expansion of an existild business and
shall,also,apply.to tangiblepersonal property.of such new business and tangible personal property related to
the expansion of an existing business. The amount or limits of the amount of such exemption shall be speci-
fied by general law. The period of time for which such exemption may be granted to a new business or expan-
'si6n of an existing business shall be determined by general law. The authority to grant such exemption shall
.,',gxre ten years from the date of approval by the electors of the county or.municipality, and may be renewable
.tiy~ireferendum as provided by general law.

*-tox ex-mpton to Q renewable energy source device and to freal property on which such device I installed
Re opcratcd,.to thc vcluc fixd by general law not to exceed the original cost of the device, and for the period
At r fim ..xd by gncrl la: not t Exceed ten ycac..
S .(e) Any county or municipality may, for the purpose of its respective tax levy and subject to
,,te,.provisions of this subsection and general law, grant historic preservation ad valorem tax exemptions to
Owners of historic properties. This exemption may be granted only by ordinance of the county or municipal-
Sity. The amount or limits of the amount of this exemption and the requirements for eligible properties must
be specified by general law.The period of time for which this exemption may be granted to a property owner
shall be determined by general law.
', (fe By general law and subject to conditions specified therein, twenty-five thousand 'dollars
Sof the assessed value of property subject to tangible personal property tax shall be exempt from ad valorem
Taxation.
SECTION 4. Taxation; assessments.--By general law regulations shall be prescribed which shall
Secure a just valuation of all property for ad valorem taxation, provided:
(a) Agricultural land, land producing high water recharge to Florida's aquifers, or land used
. exclusively for noncommercial recreational purposes may be classified by general law and assessed solely on
ttle. basis of character or use.
,"t' (b) Pursuant to general law tangible personal property held for sale as stock in trade and live-
*'tock may be valued for taxation at a specified percentage of its value, may be classified for tax purposes, or
dj'.iaybe exempted from taxation: .
(c) All persons entitled to a homestead exemption under Section 6 of this Article shall have their
odmnestead assessed at just value as of January 1 of the year following the effective date of this amendment.
i p assessment shall change only as provided in this subsection herein.
(1) Assessments subject to this subsection provisiet shall be changed annually on January 1st
-_'each year; but those changes in assessments shall not exceed the lower of the following:
S a. Three percent (3%) of the assessment-for the prior year.
b. The percent change in the Consumer Price Index for all urban consumers, U.S. City Average,
4' all items 1967=100, or successor reports for the preceding calendar year as initially reported by the United
SStates Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
(2) No assessment shall exceed just value.
(3) After any change of ownership, as provided by general law, homestead property shall be
assessed at just value as of January 1 of the following year,, unless the provisions of paragraph (8) apply.
.' Thereafter, the homestead shall be assessed as provided in this subsection herein.
(4) New homestead property shall be assessed at just value as of January 1st of the year follow-
ing the establishment of the homestead, unless the provisions of paragraph (8) apply. That assessment shall
only change as provided in this subsection herein.
Sp (5) Changes; additions, reductions, or improvements to homestead property shall be assessed
Sas provided for by general law; provided, however, after the adjustment for any change, addition, reduction, or
Sirplrovement, the property shall be assessed as provided in this subsection heretn.
,*,. (6) In the event of a termination of homestead status, the property shall be assessed as provided
"bk general law.
(7) The provisions of this amendment are severable. If any of the provisions of this amendment
hall be held unconstitutional by any court of competent jurisdiction, the decision of such court shall not affect
-.pr Impair any remaining provisions of this amendment.
*.+ (8)a. A person who establishes a new homestead as of January 1, 2009, or January 1 of any
;.subsequent year and who has received a homestead exemption pursuant to. Section 6 of this Article as of
.qathuary 1 of either of the two years immediately preceding the establishment of the new homestead is entitled
,'j,*jiave the new homestead assessed at less than just value. If this revision is approved in January of 2008,
Laperson who establishes a new homestead as of January 1, 2008; is entitled to have the new homestead
,asessed at less than just value only if that person received a homestead exemption on January 1, 2007. The
'.,.sessed value of the newly established homestead shall be determined as follows:
1. If the just value of the new homestead is greater than or equal to the just value of the prior
,*'(estead as of January 1 of the year in which the prior homestead was abandoned, the assessed value of
,',t.new homestead shall be the just value of the new homestead minus an amount equal to the lesser of
i'$00,000 or the difference between the just value and the-assessed value of the prior homestead as of January
I-J'f the year in which the prior homestead was abandoned. Thereafter, the homestead shall be assessed as
'pprovided in this subsection herein.
2. If the just value of the new homestead is less than the just value of the prior homestead as of
January 1 of the year in which the prior homestead was abandoned, the assessed value of the new homestead
shall be equal to the just value of the new homestead divided by the just value of the prior homestead and
multiplied by the assessed value of the prior homestead. However, if the difference between the just value
of the new homestead and the assessed value of the new homestead calculated pursuant to this sub-sub-
paragraph is greater than $500,000, the assessed value of the new homestead shall be increased so that the
difference between the lust value and the assessed value equals $500,000. Thereafter, the homestead shall be


S assessed as provided in this subsection erein. .
b. By general law and subject to conditions specified therein, the Legislature shall provide for
application of this paragraph to property owned by more than one person.
(d) The legislature may, by general law, for assessment purposes and subject to the provisions
of this subsection, allow counties and municipalities to authorize by ordinance that historic property may be
assessed solely on the basis of character or use. Such character or use assessment shall apply only to the
jurisdiction adopting the ordinance. The requirements for eligible properties must be specified by general law.
(e) A county may, in the manner prescribed by general law, provide for a reduction in the
assessed value of homestead property to the extent of any increase in the assessed value of that property
which results from the construction or reconstruction of the property for the purpose of providing'living quar-
ters for one or more natural or adoptive grandparents or parents of the owner of the property or of the owner's
spouse if at least one of the grandparents or parents for whom the living quarters are provided is 62 years of
age or older. Such a reduction may not exceed the lesser of the following:
(1) The increase in assessed value resulting from construction or reconstruction of the property.
(2) Twenty percent ofthe total assessed value of the property as improved.
(f) For all levies other than school district levies, assessments of residential real property, as
defined by general law, which contains nine units or fewer and which is not subject to the assessment limita-
tions set forth in subsections (a) through (c) shall change only as provided in this subsection.
(1) Assessments subject to this subsection shall be changed annually on the date of assessment
provided by law; but those changes in assessments shall not exceed ten percent (10%) of the assessment for
the prior year.
.2) No assessment shall exceed just value.
3) After a change of ownership or control, as defined by general law, including any change of
ownership of a legal entity that owns the property, such property shall be assessed at just value as of the next
assessment date. Thereafter, such property shall be assessed as providedin this subsection.
(4) Changes, additions, reductions, or improvements to such property shall be assessed as pro-
vldd for by general law; however, after the adjustment for any change, addition, reduction, or improvement,
the property shall be assessed as provided in this subsection.
(g) For all levies other than school district levies, assessments of real property that is not subject
to the assessment limitations set forth in subsections (a) through (c) and (f) shall change only as provided In
this subsection.
(1) Assessments subject to this subsection shall be changed annually on the date of assessment
provided by law; but those changes in assessments shall not exceed ten percent (10%) of the assessment for


e 12
the prior year.
(2) No assessment shall exceed just value.
(3) The legislature must provide that such property shall be assessed at just value as of the
next assessment date after a qualifying improvement, as defined by general law, is made to such property.
Thereafter, such property shall be assessed as provided in this subsection.
(4) The legislature may provide that such property shall be assessed at just value as of the next
assessment date after a change of ownership or control, as defined by general law, including any change of
ownership of the legal entity that owns the property. Thereafter, such property shall be assessed as provided
in this subsection.
(5) Changes, additions, reductions, or improvements to such property shall be assessed as pro-
vided for by general law; however, after the adjustment for any change, addition, reduction, or improvement,
the property shall be assessed as provided in this subsection.
Ih) The legislature, by general law and subject to conditions specified therein. may prohibit the
consideration of the following in the determination of the assessed value of real property used for residential
purposes:
(1) Any change or improvement made for the ouroose of Imorovina the property's resistance to
wind damage.
(2) The installation of a renewable enerov source device.
ARTICLE XII
SCHEDULE

Limitation on the assessed value of real oropertv used for residential ourposes.--
(a) The repeal of the renewable energy source orooertv tax exemption in Section 3 of Article VII
shall take effect upon aooroval by the voters.
Ib) The amendment to Section 4 of Article VII authorizing the legislature to prohibit an increase
in the assessed value of real property used for residential ourooses as the result of improving the orooertv's
resistance to wind damage or installing a renewable energy source device shall take effect January 1. 2009.
No. 4
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE VII, SECTIONS 3 AND 4
ARTICLE XII, SECTION 28
(Taxation and Budget Reform Commission)

Ballot Title:
PROPERTY TAX EXEMPTION OF PERPETUALLY CONSERVED LAND; CLASSIFICATION AND ASSESSMENT OF
LAND USED FOR CONSERVATION


Ballot Summary:
Requires Legislature to provide a property tax exemption for real property encumbered by perpetual conserva-
tion easements or other perpetual conservation protections, defined by general law. Requires Legislature to
provide for classification and assessment of land used for conservation purposes, and not perpetually encum-
bered, solely on the basis of character or use. Subjects assessment benefit to conditions, limitations, and
reasonable definitions established by general law. Applies to property taxes beginning in 2010.
Full Text:
ARTICLE VII
FINANCE AND TAXATION

SSECTION 3. Taxes; exemptions.--
(a) All property owned by a municipality and used exclusively by it for municipal or public
purposes shall be exempt from taxation. A municipality, owning property outside the municipality, may be
required by general law to make payment to the taxing unit in which the property is located. Such portions of
property as are used predominantly for educational, literary, scientific, religious or charitable purposes may be
exempted by general law from taxation.
(b) There shall be exempt from taxation, cumulatively, to every head of a family residing in this
state, household goods and personal effects to the value fixed by general law, not less than one thousand dol-
lars, and to every widow or widower or person who is blind or totally and permanently disabled, property to
the value fixed by general law not less than five hundred dollars.
(c) Any county or municipality may, for the purpose of Its respective tax levy and subject to the
provisions of this subsection and general law, grant community and economic development ad valorem tax
exemptions to new businesses and expansions of existing businesses, as defined by general law. Such an
exemption may be granted only by ordinance of the county or municipality, and only after the electors of the
county or municipality voting on such question in a referendum authorize the county or municipality to adopt.
such ordinances. An exemption so granted shall apply to improvements to real property made by or for the
use of a new business and improvements to real property related to the expansion.of an existing business and
shall also apply to tangible personal property of such new business and tangible personal property related to
the expansion of an existing business. The amount or limits of the amount of such exemption,shall be speci-
fied by general law. The period of time for which such exemption may be granted to a new business or expan-
sion of an existing business shall be determined by general law. The authority to grant such exemption shall
expire ten years from the date of approval by the electors of the county Or municipality, and may be renewable
by referendum as provided by general law.
(d) By general law and subject to conditions specified therein, there may be granted an ad valor-
em tax exemption to a renewable energy source device and to real property on which such device is installed
and operated, to the value fixed by general law not to exceed the original cost of the device, and for the period
of time fixed by general law not to exceed ten years.
(e) Any county or municipality may, for the purpose of its respective tax levy and subject to the
provisions of this subsection and general law, grant historic preservation ad valorem tax exemptions to own-
ers of historic properties. This exemption may be granted only by ordinance of the county or municipality. The
amount or limits of the amount of this exemption and the requirements for eligible properties must be speci-
fied by general law. The period of time for which this exemption may be granted to a property owner shall be
determined by general law.
(f) By general law and subject to conditions specified therein, twenty-five thousand dollars of the
assessed value of property subject to tangible personal property tax shall be exempt from ad valorem taxation.
(o) There shall be granted an ad valorem tax exemption for real orooertv dedicated in pernetuitv
for conservation ourooses, including real orooertv encumbered by oeroetual conservation easements or.by
other neroetual conservation protections. as defined by general law.
SECTION 4. Taxation; assessments.-By general law regulations shall be prescribed which shall
secure a just valuation of all property for ad valorem taxation, provided:
(a) Agricultural land, land producing high water recharge to Florida's aquifers, or land used
exclusively for noncommercial recreational purposes may be classified by general law and assessed solely on
the basis of character or use.
(b) As provided by general law and subject to conditions, limitations. and reasonable definitions
specified therein, land used for conservation ourooses shall be classified by general law and assessed solelv-
on the basis of character or use,; .
g' b' Pursuant to gerferal law tangible personal property held for sai'le a 'l in irAjdb jd,
livestock may be valuedfortaxitib; at a specified percentage:bfits'vAMb6.may-b cla slf6ili~dliat( otoes,
or may be exempted from taxation.
l.(e All persons entitled to a homestead exemption under Section 6 of this Article shall have
their homestead assessed adjust value as of January 1 of the year following the effective date of this amend-
ment. This assessment shall change only as provided herein.
(1) Assessments subject to this provision shall be changed annually on January 1st of each
year; but those changes in assessments shall not exceed the lower of the following:
a. Three percent (3%) of the assessment for the prior year.
b. The percent change in the Consumer Price Index for all urban consumers, U.S. City Average,
all items 1967=100, or successor reports for the preceding calendar year as initially reported by the United
States Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
(2) No assessment shall exceed just value.
(3) After any change of ownership, as provided by general law, homestead property shall be
assessed at just value as of January 1 of the following year, unless the provisions of paragraph (8) apply.
Thereafter, the homestead shall be assessed as provided herein.
(4) New homestead property shall be assessed at just value as of January 1st of the year follovw-
ing the establishment of the homestead, unless the provisions of paragraph (8) apply. That assessment shall
only change as provided herein.
(5) Changes, additions, reductions, or improvements to homestead property shall be assessed
as provided for by general law; provided, however, after the adjustment for any change, addition, reduction, or
improvement, the property shall be assessed as provided herein:
(6) In the event of a termination of homestead status, the property shall be assessed as provided
by general law.
(7) The provisions of this amendment are severable. If any of the provisions of this amendment
shall be held unconstitutional by any court of competent jurisdiction, the decision of suoh court shall not affect
or impair any remaining provisions of this amendment.
(8)a. A person who establishes a new homestead as of January 1,2009; or January 1 of any
subsequefit year and who has received a homestead exemption pursuant to Section 6 of this Article as of
January 1 of either of the two years immediately preceding the establishment of the new homestead is entitled
.to have the new homestead assessed at less than just value. If this revision is approved in January of 2008,
a person who establishes a new homestead as of January 1, 2008, is entitled to have the new homestead
assessed at less than just value only if that person received a homestead exemption on January 1, 2007. The
assessed value of the newly established homestead shall be determined as follows:
S1.- If the just value of the new homestead is greater than or equal to the just value of the prior
homestead as of January 1 of the year in which the prior homestead was abandoned, the assessed value of
the new homestead shall be the just value of the new homestead minus an amount equal to the lesser of
$500,000 or the difference between the just value and the assessed value of the prior homestead as of January
1 of the year in which the prior homestead was abandoned. Thereafter, the homestead shall be assessed as
provided herein.
2. If the just value of the new homestead is less than the just value of the prior homestead as of
January 1 of the year in which the prior homestead was abandoned, the assessed value of the new homestead
shall be equal to the just value of the new homestead divided by the just value of the prior homestead and
multiplied by the assessed value of the prior homestead. However, if the difference between the just value
of the new homestead and the assessed value of the new homestead calculated pursuant to this sub-sub-
paragraph is greater than $500,000, the assessed value of the new homestead shall be increased so that the
difference between the just value and the assessed value equals $500,000. Thereafter, the homestead shall be
assessed as provided herein.
b. By general law and subject to conditions specified therein, the Legislature shall provide for
application of this paragraph to property owned by more than one person.
e(d) The legislature may, by general law, for assessment purposes and subject to the provi-
sions of this subsection, allow counties and municipalities to authorize by ordinance that historic property
may be assessed solely on the basis of character or use. Such character or use assessment shall apply only to
the jurisdiction adopting the ordinance. The requirements for eligible properties must be specified by general
law.
flt(e) A county may, in the manner prescribed by general law, provide for a reduction jn the
assessed value of homestead property to the extent of any increase in the assessed value of that property
which results from the construction or reconstruction of the property for the purpose of providing living quar-
ters for one or more natural or adoptive grandparents or parents of the owner of the property or of the owner's
spouse if at least one of the grandparents or parents for whom the living quarters are provided is 62 years of
age or older. Such a reduction may not exceed the lesser of the following:
(1) The increase in assessed value resulting from construction or reconstruction of the property.
(2) Twenty percent of the total assessed value of the property as improved.
(g.(ff For all levies other than school'district levies, assessments of residential real property, as
defined by general law, which contains nine units or fewer and which is not subject to the assessment limita-
tions set forth in subsections (a) through l).(e) shall change only as provided in this subsection.
(1) Assessments subject to this subsection shall be changed annually on the date of assessment
provided by law; but those changes in assessments shall not exceed ten percent (10%) of the assessment for
the prior year.
(2) No assessment shall exceed just value.
(3) After a change of ownership or control, as defined by general law, including any change of
ownership of a legal entity that owns the property, such property shall be assessed at just value as of the next
assessment date. Thereafter, such property shall be assessed as provided in this subsection.


(4) Changes, additions, reductions, or improvements to such property shall be assessed as pro-
vided for by general law; however, after the adjustment for any change, addition, reduction, or improvement,
the property shall be assessed as provided in this subsection.
Jl.)(g) For all levies other than school district levies, assessments of real property that is not
subject to the assessment limitations set forth in subsections (a) through lf(e) and gi(ff shall change only
as provided.in this subsection.
(1) Assessments subject to this subsection shall be changed annually on the date of assessment
provided by law; but those changes in assessments shall not exceed ten percent (10%) of the assessment for
the prior year.
(2) No assessment shall exceed just value.
(3) The legislature must provide that such property shall be assessed at just value as of the
next assessment date after a qualifying improvement, as defined by general law, is made to such property.
Thereafter, such property shall be assessed as provided in this subsection.
(4) The legislature may provide that such property shall be assessed at just value as of the next
assessment date after a change of ownership or control, as defined by general law, including any change of
ownership of the legal entity that owns the property. Thereafter, such property shall be assessed as provided
in this subsection.
(5) Changes, additions, reductions, or improvements to such property shall be assessed as pro-
vided for by general law; however, after the adjustment for any change, addition, reduction, or improvement,
the property shall be assessed as provided in this subsection.
ARTICLE XII
SCHEDULE

SECTION 28. Pronertv tax exemption and classification and assessment of land used for con-
servation purposes. The amendment to Section 3 of Article VII requiring the creation of an ad valorem tax
exemption for real orooertv dedicated in oerpetuity for conservation purposes, and the amendment to Section
4 of Article VII requiring land used for conservation purposes to be classified by general law and assessed
solelvyon the basis of character or use for purposes of ad valorem taxation. shall take effect upon aooroval by
the electors and shall be implemented bv January 1. 2010. This section shall take effect upon anoroval of the
electors.


No. 5
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE VII, SECTIONS 4, 9, AND 19
ARTICLE XII, SECTION 28
(Taxation and Budget Reform Commission)
Ballot Title:
ELIMINATING STATE REQUIRED SCHOOL PROPERTY TAX AND REPLACING WITH EQUIVALENT STATE
REVENUES TO FUND EDUCATION
Ballot Summary:
Replacing state required school property taxes with state revenues generating an equivalent hold harmless
amount for schools through one or more of the following options: repealing sales tax exemptions not spe-
cifically excluded; increasing sales tax rate up to one percentage point; spending reductions; other revenue
options created by the legislature. Limiting subject matter of laws granting future exemptions. Limiting annual
increases in assessment of non-homestead real property. Lowering property tax millage rate for schools.
Full Text:
ARTICLE VII
FINANCE AND TAXATION
SECTION 4. Taxation; assessments.--By general law regulations shall be prescribed which shall
secure a just valuation of all property for ad valorem taxation, provided:
(a) Agricultural land, land producing high water recharge to Florida's aquifers, or land used
exclusively for noncommercial recreational purposes may be classified by general law and assessed solely on
the basis of character or use.
(b) Pursuant to general law tangible personal property held for sale as stock in trade and live-
stock may be valued for taxation at a specified percentage of its value, may be classified for tax purposes, or
may be exempted from taxation.
(c) All persons entitled to a homestead exemption under Section 6 of this Article shall have their
homestead assessed at just value as of January 1 of the year following the effective date of this amendment.
This assessment shall change only as provided herein.
(1) Assessments subject to this provision shall be changed annually on January 1st of each
year; but those changes in assessments shall not exceed the lower of the following:
a. Three percent (3%) of the assessment for the prior year.
b. The percent change in the Consumer Price Index for all urban consumers, U.S. City Average,
all items 1967=100, or successor reports for the preceding calendar year as initially reported by the United
States Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
(2) No assessment shall exceed just value.
(3) After any change of-ownership, as provided by general law, homestead property shall be
assessed at just value as of January 1 of the following year, unless the provisions of paragraph (8) apply.
Thereafter, the homestead shall be assessed as provided herein.
(4) New homestead property shall be assessed at just value as of January 1st of the year follow-
ing the establishment ofthe homestead, unless the provisions of paragraph (8) apply. That assessment shall
only change asprovided herein.
(5) Changes, additions, reductions, or improvements to homestead property shall be assessed
as provided for by general law; provided, however, after the adjustment for any change, addition, reduction, or
improvement, the property shall-be assessed as provided herein.
(6) In the event of a termination of homestead status, the property shall be assessed as provided
by general law.
S (7) The provisions of.this amendment are severable. If any of the provisions of this amendment
shall be held unconstitutional by any court of competent jurisdiction, the decision of such court shall not affect
or impair any remaining provisions of this amendment.
(8)a. A person who establishes a new homestead as of January 1, 2009, or January 1, of any
subsequent year and who has received a homestead exemption pursuant to Section 6 of this Article as of
January 1 of either of the two years immediately preceding the establishment of the new homestead is entitled
to have the new homestead assessed at less than just value. If this revision is approved in January of 2008,
a person who establishes a new homestead as of January 1, 2008, is entitled to have the new homestead
assessed at less than just value only if that person received a homestead exemption on January 1, 2007. The
assessed value of the newly established homestead shall be determined as follows:
1. If the just value of the new homestead is greater than or equal to the just value of the prior
homestead as of January 1 of the year.in which the prior homestead was abandoned, the assessed value of
the new homestead shall be the just value of the new homestead minus an.amount equal to the lesser of
$500,000 or the difference between the just value and the assessed value of the prior homestead as of January
1 of the year in which the prior homestead was abandoned. Thereafter, the homestead shall be assessed as
provided herein.
2. If the just value of the new homestead is.less than the just value of the prior homestead as of
January 1 of the year in which the prior homestead was abandoned, the assessed value of the new homestead
shall be equal to the just value of the new homestead divided by the just value of the prior homestead and
multiplied by the assessed.value of the prior homestead. However, if the difference between the just value
of the new homestead and the assessed value of the new homestead calculated pursuant to this sub-sub-
paragraph is greater than $500,000, the assessed value of the new homestead shall be increased so that the
difference between the just value and the assessed value equals $500,000. Thereafter, the homestead shall be
assessed as provided herein.
b. By general law'and subject to conditions specified therein, the Legislature shall provide for
application of this paragraph to property owned by more than one person.
(d) The legislature may, by general law, for assessment purposes and subject to the provisions
of this subsection, allow counties and municipalities to authorize by ordinance that historic property may be
assessed solely on the basis of character or use. Such character or use assessment shall apply only to the
jurisdiction adopting the ordinance. The requirements for eligible properties'mlist be specified by general law.
(e) A county may, in the manner prescribed by general law, provide for a reduction in the
assessed value of homestead property to the extent of any Increase in the assessed value of that property
which results from the construction or reconstruction of the property for the purpose of providing living quar-
ters for one or more natural or adoptive grandparents or parents of the owner of the property or of the owner's
spouse if at least one of the grandparents or parents for whom the living quarters are provided is 62 years of
age or older. Such a reduction may not exceed the lesser of the following:
(1) The increase in assessed value resulting from construction or reconstruction of the property.
(2) Twenty percent of the total assessed value of the property as improved.
(f) For all levies other than school district levies, assessments of residential real property, as
'defined by general law, which contains nine units or fewer and which is not subject to the assessment limita-
tions set forth in subsections (a) through (c) shall change only as provided in this-subsection.
(1) Assessments subject to this subsection shall be changed annually on the date of assess-
ment provided by law; but those changes in assessments shall not exceed fiye te percent 15% (10%} of the
assessment for the prior year.
(2) No assessment shall exceed just value.
(3) After a change of ownership or control, as defined by general law, including any change of
ownership of a legal enrity, ji r -r,l: Ie pr.perti u,:h property shall be assessed at just value as of-the next
'-absessment date. Thereaher, sucn property shall De assessed'asroided'ihs' t.i
(4) Changes, additions,'-rfc tibi ftiMrnlrtfve r' assessedss -
vided for by general law; however, after the adjustment fpor any change, addition, reduction, or improvement,
the property shall be assessed as provided in this subsection.
(g) For all levies' other than school district levies, assessments of real property that is not subject
to the assessment limitations set forth in subsections (a) through (c) end (f) shall change only as provided in
this subsection.
S(1) Assessments subject to this subsection shall be changed annually on the date,of assess-
ment provided by law; but those changes in assessments shall not exceed fijy tent percent L=% (t0%)-of the
assessment for the prior year.
(2) No assessment shall exceed just value.
(3) The legislature must provide that such property shall be assessed at just value as of the
next assessment date after a qualifying improvement, as defined by general law, is made to such property.
Thereafter, such property shall be assessed as provided in this subsection.
(4) The legislature may provide that such property shall be assessed at just value as of the next
assessment date after a change of ownership or control, as defined by general law, including any change of
ownership Of the legal entity that owns the property. Thereafter, such property shall be assessed as provided,
in this subsection.
(5) Changes, additions, reductions, or improvements to such property shall be assessed as pr-
vided for by general law; however, after the adjustment for any change, addition, reduction, or improvement,
the property shall be assessed as provided in this subsection.
SECTION 9. Local taxes.--
(a) Counties, school districts, and municipalities shall, and special districts may, be authorized
by law to levy ad valorem taxes and may be authorized by general law to levy other taxes, for their respective
purposes, except ad valorem taxes on intangible personal property and taxes prohibited by this constitution.'
(b) Ad valorem taxes, exclusive of taxes levied for the payment of bonds and taxes levied
for periods not longer than two years when authorized by vote of the electors'who are the owners of free-
holds therein not wholly exempt from taxation, shall not be levied in excess of the following millages upon
the assessed value of real estate and tangible personal property: for all county purposes, ten mills; for all
municipal purposes, ten mills; for all school purposes, figv ten mills; for water management purposes for the
northwest portion of the state lying west of the line between ranges two and three east, 0.05 mill; for water
management purposes for the remaining portions of the state, .1.0 mill; and for all other special districts'a
millage authorized by law approved by vote of the electors who are owners of freeholds therein not'wh.lly
exempt-from taxation. A county furnishing municipal servicesrmay, to the extent authorized by law, levy addi-
tional taxes within the limits fixed-for municipal purposes.
SECTION 19. Replacement of ad valorem taxes required by the legislature with other funds for
education.--
(a) Commencing in the 2010-2011 fiscal year. the legislature shall be prohibited from requiring
school districts to lew an ad valorem tax as a required local effort for participation in the Florida Education
Finance Prooram or a successor oroaram.
.(b)(1) The legislature shall replace the revenue impact of the elimination of the required local
effort as provided in subsection (a) through one or more of the following options:
a. the repeal of sales tax exemptibns, which are determined not to advance or serve a public
purpose, except for the current.exemotions for: food: orescriotion drugs: health services: charitable organiza-
tions: religious organizations: residential rent. electricity and heating fuel: sales of tangible personal orooertv
purchased for resale or imoorted- produced, or manufactured in this state for export: sales of real orooerty:
and sales of intangible personal property.
b. an increase of uP to one oercentaoe point to the sales and use tax rate in existence on January
6.2009.
c. spending reductions for other components of the state budget and revenue increases-result-
ing from economic orowth'attributable to lower proertyv taxes.
d. other revenues identified or created by the legislature.
12) In implementing this section, the amount aooropriated and set in the General Appoorooriations
Act in the 2010-2011 fiscal year shall not be less than the amount aoorooriated and set in the 2008-2009 fis-
cal year for the funding of public schools under the Florida Education Finance Prooram. as increased by the
average historical growth for such amounts during state fiscal years 2006-2007 and 2007-2008. which appro-
priated and set amount shall be referred to as the "education hold harmless amount."
(3) Nothing contained herein shall be construed to replace or eliminate: the ad valorem tax mill-
ace dedicated to capital outlay, school renovation and repair, or for the payment of lease purchase obligations
authorized by general law: voter-aooroved millage authorized in the constitution: or discretionary ad valorem
millage for school districts authorized by law.
I(c Each law creating a sales tax exemption shall contain the single subject of a single exemption
and a legislative finding that the exemption advances or serves the public ourmose of: encouraging economic
development and competitiveness: suooortino educational, governmental, literary, scientific. religious. or
charitable initiatives or organizations: or securing tax fairness.
ARTICLE XII
SCHEDULE

SECTION 28. Implementation of school oronerty tax reform.--
(a) The amendments to Section 4 of Article VII reducing the maximum annual change in assess-
ments for non-homestead properties to five percent f5%1 from ten percent f10o% shall take effect January 1.
fbi The amendment to Section 9 of Article VII reducing to five mills from ten mills the authorized
ad valorem millage for school ourooses shall take effect January 1. 2010.
No. 6
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT


ARTICLE VII, SECTION 4
ARTICLE XII, NEW SECTION
(Taxation and Budget Reform Commission)
Ballot Title:
ASSESSMENT OF WORKING WATERFRONT PROPERTY BASED UPON CURRENT USE

Ballot Summary:
Provides for assessment based upon use of land used predominantly for commercial fishing purposes; land
used for vessel launches into waters that are navigable and accessible to the public; marinas and drystacks
that are open to the public; and water-dependent marine manufacturing facilities, commercial fishing facilities,
and marine vessel construction and repair facilities and'their support activities, subject to conditions, limita-
tions, and reasonable definitions specified by general law.
Full Text:
ARTICLE VII
FINANCE AND TAXATION

SECTION 4. Taxation; assessments.-- By general law regulations shall be prescribed which shall
secure a just valuation of all property for ad valorem taxation, provided: *
(a) Agricultural land, land producing high water recharge to Florida's aquifers, or land used
exclusively for noncommercial recreational purposes may be classified by general law and assessed solely on
the basis of character or use.
(b) Pursuant to general law tangible personal property held for sale as stock in trade and live-
stodk may be valued for taxation at a specified percentage of its value, may be classified for tax purposes, or
may be exempted from taxation.









THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS, Thursday, August 28, 2008 Page--


(c) All persons entitled to a homestead exemption under Section 6 of this Article shall have their
homestead assessed at just value as of January 1 of the year following the effective date of this amendment.
This assessment shall change only as provided herein.
(1) Assessments subject to this provision shall be changed annually on January 1st of each
year; but those changes in assessments shall not exceed the lower of the following:
a. Three percent (3%) of the assessment for the prior year.
b. The percent change in the Consumer Price Index for all urban consumers, U.S. City Average,
all items 1967=100, or successor reports for the preceding calendar year as initially reported by the United
States Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
(2) No assessment shall exceed just value.
(3) After any change of ownership, as provided by general law, homestead property shall be
assessed at just value as of January 1 of the following year, unless the provisions of paragraph (8) apply.
Thereafter, the homestead shall be assessed as provided herein.
(4) New homestead property shall be assessed at just value as of January 1st of the year follow-
ing the establishment of the homestead, unless the provisions of paragraph (8) apply. That assessment shall
only change as provided herein.
(5) Changes, additions, reductions, or Improvements to homestead property shall be assessed
as provided for by general law; provided, however, after the adjustment for any change, addition, reduction, or
improvement, the property shall be assessed as provided herein.
(6) In the event of a termination of homestead status, the property shall be assessed as provided
by general law.
(7) The provisions of this amendment are severable. If any of the provisions of this amendment
shall be held unconstitutional by any court of competent jurisdiction, the decision of such court shall not affect
or Impair any remaining provisions of this amendment.
(8)a. A person who establishes a new homestead as of January 1, 2009, or January 1 of any
Subsequent year and who has received a homestead exemption pursuant to Section 6 of this Article as of
January 1 of either of the two years immediately preceding the establishment of the new homestead is entitled
to have the new homestead assessed at less than just value. If this revision is approved in January of.2008,
'a person who establishes a new homestead as of January 1, 2008, is entitled to have the new homestead
assessed at less than just value only if that person received a homestead exemption on January 1, 2007. The
assessed value of the newly established homestead shall be determined as follows:
1. If the just value of the new homestead Is greater than or equal to the just value of the prior
homestead as of January 1 of the year in which the prior homestead was abandoned, the assessed value of
the new homestead shall be the just value of the new homestead minus an amount equal'to the lesser of
$500,000 or the difference between the just value and the assessed value of the prior homestead as of January
1 of the year in which the prior homestead was abandoned. Thereafter, the homestead shall be assessed as
provided herein.
2. If the just value of the new homestead is less than the just value of the prior homestead as of
January 1 of the year in'which the prior homestead was abandoned, the assessed value of the new homestead
,shall be equal to the just value of the new homestead divided by the just value of the prior homestead and
multiplied by the assessed value of the prior homestead. However, if the difference between the just value
of the new homestead and the assessed value of the new homestead calculated pursuant to this sub-sub-
paragraph is greater than $500,000, the assessed value of the new homestead shall be increased so that the
difference between the just value and the assessed value equals $500,000. Thereafter, the homestead shall be
assessed as provided herein.
b. By general law and subject to conditions specified therein, the Legislature shall provide for
application of this paragraph to property owned by more than one person.
S(d) The legislature may; by general law, for assessment purposes and subject to the provisions
of-this subsection, allow counties and municipalities to authorize by ordinance that historic property may be
assessed solely on the basis of character or use. Such character or use assessment shall apply only to the
jurisdiction adopting the ordinance. The requirements for eligible properties must be specified by general law.
(e) A county may, in the manner prescribed by general law, provide for a reduction in the
assessed value of homestead property to the extent of any Increase in the assessed value of that property
which results from the construction or reconstruction of the property for the purpose of providing living quar-
S'ters for one or more natural or adoptive grandparents or parents of the owner of the property or of the owner's
spouse if at least one of the grandparents or parents for whom the living quarters are provided is 62 years of
age or older. Such a reduction may not exceed the lesser of the following:
(1) The increase in assessed value resulting from construction or reconstruction of the property.
2) Twenty percent of the total assessed value of the property as improved.
(f) For all levies other than school district levies, assessments of residential real property, as
defined by general law, which contains nine units or fewer and which Is not subject to the assessment limita-
tions set forth in subsections (a) through (c) shall change only as provided in this subsection.
(1) Assessments subject to this subsection shall be changed annually on the date of assessment
provided by law; but those changes in assessments shall not exceed ten percent (10%) of the assessment for
the prior year.
(2) No assessment shall exceed just value.
(3) After a change of ownership or control, as defined by general law, including any change of
ownership of a legal entity that owns the property, such property shall be assessed.at just value as of the next
.assessment date. Thereafter, such property shall be assessed as provided in this subsection.
(4) Changes, additions, reductions, or improvements to such property shall be assessed as pro-
vided for by general law; however, after the adjustment for any change, addition, reduction, or improvement,
the property shall be assessed as provided in this subsection.
(g) For all'levies other than'school district levies, assessments of real property that is not subject
to the assessment limitations set forth in subsections (a) through (c) and (f) shall change only as provided in.
this subsection.
(1) Assessments subject to this subsection shall be changed annually on the date of assessment
provided by law; but those changes in assessments shall not exceed ten percent (10%) of the assessment for
the prior year. .
(2) No assessment shall exceed just value.
(3) The legislature must provide that such property shall be assessed at just value as of the
next assessment date after a qualifying improvement, as defined by general law, is made to such property,
'Thereafter, such property shall be assessed as provided in this subsection.
(4) The legislature may provide that such property shall be assessed at just value as of the next
,assessment date after a change of ownership or control, as defined by general law, including any change of"
ownership of the legal entity that owns the property. Thereafter, such property shall be assessed as provided
'in this subsection.
(5) Changes, additions, reductions, or improvements to such property shall be assessed as pro-
vided for by general law; however, after the adjustment for any change, addition, reduction, or improvement,
the property shall be assessed as provided in this subsection.
f(hr(1) The assessment of the following working waterfront properties shall be based uoon the
current use of the cropertv:
a. Land used predominantly for commercial fishing nurooses.
.h I and that is apannihle tn the nnhlie andl' Ine fnr uvesel launches into waters that are navi-


(21 The assessmenentefit provided bv this subsection is subject to condition


and reasonable de fiitloniisas specified bvthe legislature b general law.


frr 'S H""" l I ATEiULEXII ''
SCHEDULE


Sssessmem OT worKino waIenrioni rouerIv.-i-The amendnmelt to Sctioin 4 o n
inn for the assessment of working waterfront orooertv based on current use. and this section
unon aooroval by the electors and shall first apply to assessments for tax years beginning Jan
No.7
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE I, SECTION 3
(Taxation and Budget Reform Commission)
Ballot Title:
.RELIGIOUS FREEDOM.


ties. and marine
s and limitations



articlee VII orovid-
. shall take effect
uarv 1. 2010.


Ballqt Summary: r
Proposing an amendment to the State Constitution to provide that an individual or entity may not be barred
'from participating in any public program because of religion and to delete the prohibition against using rev-
enues from the public treasury directly or indirectly in aid of any church, sect, or religious denomination or in
,aid of any sectarian Institution.
'Full Text:
ARTICLE I
DECLARATION OF RIGHTS
SSECTION 3. Religious freedom.--There shall be no law respecting the establishment of religion
or prohibiting or penalizing the free exercise thereof. Religious freedom shall not justify practices inconsistent
with public morals, peace or safety. An individual or entity may not be barred from oarticioatina in any public
program because of religion. No revenue of the state or rny political subdivision or agency thereof shaHll e r
k.b^m dli^r.e.o H. .... I......n r indke.... ti ir, ^$ ..... .A,,i.h see,. ef....ifA- I Wi.,, d i-. .


in ald of a..y scI tarian Iniitution.


No. 8
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE VII, SECTION 9
(Taxation and Budget Reform Commission)
SBallot Title:
LOCAL OPTION COMMUNITY COLLEGE FUNDING.

-Ballot Summary:
Proposing an amendment to the State Constitution to require that the Legislature authorize counties to levy a
local option sales tax to supplement community college funding; requiring voter approval to levy the tax; pro-
:'viding that approved taxes will sunset after 5 years and may be reauthorized by the voters,
Full Text:
ARTICLE VII
FINANCE AND TAXATION
S SECTION 9. Local taxes.-
S (a) Counties, school districts, and municipalities shall, and special districts may, be authorized
:by law to levy ad valorem taxes and may be authorized by general law to levy other taxes, for their respective
purposes, except ad valorem taxes on intangible personal property and taxes prohibited by this constitution.
(b) Ad valorem taxes, exclusive of taxes levied for the payment of bonds and taxes, levied for
periods not longer than two years when authorized by vote of the electors who are the owners of freeholds
therein not wholly exempt from taxation, shall not be levied in excess of the following millages upon the
assessed value of real estate and tangible personal property: for all county purposes, ten mills; for all munici-
pal purposes, ten mills; for all school purposes, ten mills; for water management purposes for the northwest
portion of the state lying west of the line between ranges two and three east 0.05 mill; for water management
purposes for the remaining portions of the state, 1.0 mill; and for all other special districts a millage autho-
rized by law approved by vote of the electors who are owners of freeholds therein not wholly exempt from
taxation. A county furnishing municipal services may, to the extent authorized by law, levy additional taxes
within the limits fixed for municipal purposes.
(c) Counties served by an ooen-access public institution whose orimarv mission and resnon-
sibility includes orovidino lower level undergraduate instruction and awarding associate degrees shall be
authorized bv law to lew a local option sales tax to supplement the funding of the institution. The tax may not
-be levied unless annroved bv the electors of each county served by the institution. The local option tax shall
-sunset after five years and may be reauthorized bv the electors as provided by law.
f' No. 9
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE IX, SECTIONS 1 AND 8
ARTICLE XII, SECTION 28
(Taxation and Budget Reform Commission)
Ballot Title:
REQUIRING 65 PERCENT OF SCHOOL FUNDING FOR CLASSROOM INSTRUCTION; STATE'S DUTY FOR
CHILDREN'S EDUCATION.


Ballot Summary:
Requires at least 65 percent of school funding received by school districts be spent on classroom instruction,
rather than administration; allows for differences in administrative expenditures by district. Provides the con-
stitutional requirement for the state to provide a "uniform, efficient, safe, secure, and high quality system of
free public schools" is a minimum, nonexclusive duty. Reverses legal precedent prohibiting public funding of
private school alternatives to public school programs without creating an entitlement.
Full Text:
ARTICLE IX
EDUCATION
SECTION 1. Public funding of education.--
(a) The education of children is a fundamental Value of the people of the State of Florida. It is,
therefore, a paramount duty of the state to make adequate provision for the
education of all children residing within its borders. This dutyshall be fulfilled at a minimum and not exclI-
Sslvelv. through adeonuat Adequate provision shell- bemade by law for a uniform, efficient, safe, secure, and
high quality system of free public schools that allows students to obtain a high quality education and for
the establishment, maintenance, and operation of institutions of higher learning and other public education
programs that the needs of the people may require. Nothing in this subsection creates an entitlement to a
nuo vly-financad nrivata nrnram.
4


L To assure that children attending public schools obtain a high quality education, the legisla-
ture shall make adequate provision to ensure that, by the beginning of the 2010 school year, there are a suf-
ficient number of classrooms so that:
(1) The.maximum number of students who are assigned to each teacher who is teaching in pub-
lic school classrooms for prekindergarten through grade 3 does not exceed 18 students;
(2) The maximum number of students who are assigned to each teacher who is teaching in pub-
lic school classrooms for grades 4 through 8 does not exceed 22 students; and
(3) The maximum number of students who are assigned to each teacher who is teaching in pub-
lic school classrooms for grades 9 through 12 does not exceed 25 students.
The class size requirements of this subsection do not apply to extracurricular classes. Payment of the costs
associated with reducing class size to meet these requirements is the responsibility of the state and not of
local schools districts. Beginning with the 2003-2004 fiscal year, the legislature shall provide sufficient funds
to reduce the average number of students in each classroom by at least two students per year until the maxi-
mum number of students per classroom does not exceed the requirements of this subsection.
lg)(b) Every four-year old child in Florida shall be provided by the State a high quality pre-kinder-
garten learning opportunity In the form of an early childhood development and education program which shall
be voluntary, high quality, free, and delivered according to professionally accepted standards. An early child-
hood development and education program means an organized program designed to address and enhance
each child's ability to make age appropriate progress in an appropriate range of settings in the development of
language and cognitive capabilities and emotional, social, regulatory and moral capacities through education
in basic skills and such other skills as the Legislature may determine to be appropriate.
ldl(e) The early childhood education and development programs provided by reason of ubsec-
tiOCG a..ubpara=grph (b) shall be implemented no later than the beginning of the 2005 school year through
funds generated In addition to those used for existing'education, health, and development'programs. Existing
education, health, and development programs are those funded by the State as of January 1, 2002 that pro-
vided for child or adult education, health care, or development.
SECTION 8. Reauirino sixty-five percent of school funding for classroom instruction.--At least
sixty-five percent of the school funding received by school districts shall be sent on classroom instruction.
rather than on administration. Classroom Instruction and administration shall be defined by law. The lelisla-
ture may also address differences in administrative expenditures by district for necessary services. such as
transportation and food services: Funds for capital outlay shall not be included in the calculation required by
this section.
ARTICLE XII
SCHEDULE
Section 28. Reouirina sixty-five percent of school funding for classroom instruction.--The
requirement that sixty-five percent of school funding received by school districts be spent on classroom
instruction in Section 8 of Article IX. and this section, shall first be aoolicable to school years commencing
during the state fiscal year 2009-2010.



Coachforecasts volleyball



team will be a contender


Bump, set, SPIKE!
You can just feel the excite-
ment in the air. Not only is
Baker County High School
getting pumped up about foot-
ball season, there are plenty of,
reasons to be pumped up for the
upcoming volleyball season.
The 2008 Lady Wildcats volley-
ball team has been working and
training hard all summer long.
"We have a very talented
team and there is no doubt in
my mina that we will give all
the teams in our district a run foi
their Ihoney," said Coach Chris
Armoreda.
Armoreda will field a varsity
team with a lot of senior leader-
ship and seven seniors. How-
ever, only three of the seniors
are returners from last year's
team. Whitney Coffell, Tina
Fraze and Ashley Curry are the
returning starters while Taylor
Fraser, Heather Roberson, Erin
. Midyette and Heather High
are key additions and will be
expected to demonstrate a lot'
of leadership to the underclass-,
men moving up from last year's
junior varsity squad.
In addition to the seniors,
Armoreda returns junior Ashley
Holtoh. who should add a lot of
offense. Holton can spike the
ball with a lot of pace.
Juniors Kari Harris, Meagan
Osteen and Brittany Alford,
sophomore Jordan Hand and
freshman Stephanie Collett
round out the team.
"There is just a different
feeling in the gymnasium," said
Armoreda. "The team feels
comfortable with each other and
there is a high level of enthusi-
asm and renewed focus." The
Cats' outside hitters and middle


players will be relied on very
heavily this season on both the
offensive and defensive side
of the net. Newcomers Fraser,
Meagan Osteen and'Stephanie
Collett will provide depth at the
outside hitter position. All three
have a lot of height that will
give a big frontline presence
with improved blocking and hit-
ting capability.
Holton, Coffell and Fraze are
savvy veterans providing stabil-
ity on the frontline, hard hitting
and timely blocks. Armoreda
feels the trio has the ability to
play all six positions on the
court.
Setters Ashley Curry Kari
Harris and Brittany Alford are
the cogs of the team. All three
have been working hard to im-
prove accuracy and footwork.
Seniors Heather Roberson,
Heather High, Erin Midyette
and sophomore Jordan Hand are
the team's defensive specialists.
They have been spending a lot
of time practicing their digging,
, passing hitting and defensive,,n
positioning.
The junior varsity volley-
ball team coached by Vanessa
Roberts includes Harli Liv-
ingston, Chelsea Crews, Jaime
SLee Norman, Ta'Kenya Ruise,
Kari Crummey, Ashley Stuhr,
Tiffany Edge, Catherine Fraze,
Tori Paulson, LoganRaulerson,
Caitlyn Smith, Kallie Raulersop
and Cindy Chisholm.
The varsity serves up the
season on Aug. 30 in Fernandina
Beach at a pre-season classic
and will open regular season
play on Sept. 2 at home versus
Bradford County.


Teens try to burglarize store


Three juvenile males were
arrested early on August 21 for
attempting to break into the Fast-
way Food Store on Woodlawn
Rd. southwest of Macclenny.
The unsuccessful attempt to
enter the store's front door by
breaking glass marked the sec-
ond incident at the location in
three days. On August 18, the
glass was broken out and two
cases of beer taken.
This time, a neighbor-witness
who saw the youths on the prop-
erty called police and, based on
his description of their dark 1995
Infinity, Deputy John Hardin
stopped it near the intersection of
Woodlawn and SR 121 just after
midnight.
The youths, all 17 years old,
initially denied involvement
and were arrested when witness
Dana Herring affirmed they were
the persons he saw at the scene.
One of the suspects has a Glen
St. Mary address, the others in
Orange Park and Jacksonville.
All were charged with attempted
burglary, a third-degree felony,
and released to parents.
Deputy Hardin said a plastic
crate was tossed at the door sev-
eral times in an attempt to break
it. In the earlier burglary, a brick
was used.
Investigator Steve Harvey
of the sheriff's department said
there is no concrete connection
as yet between the suspects and
the earlier incident.
In an earlier burglary case,
someone entered the North
Prong Church off CR 120 oier-


night on August 17 but nothing
was reported taken.
Lonzie Altman reported the
incident later that morning, and
police say it appeared a window
was broken out to gain entry af-
ter attempts to kick down doors
were unsuccessful.


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TUESDAY NIGHT
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NIGHT
at 9:00 pm
Pool Tournament
& DJ Doug LIVE


U.
aran


Open Daily
12:00 pm 2:00 am


THURSDAY NIGHT

Karaoke

Ladies' Night -,
Ladies drink free wells '"
9-11 pm
Karaoke with
Tracy & Bud


FRIDAY & SATURDAY NIGHT DJ Doug LIVE Nocovercharge ,

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HOMES
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iIC6lsi Iy..lnding "BV"*' L"" f l.<'*lFmdfiaidln$ Trom *ne 'letv OdtB*!inpet3padt:ttbd-
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Large. Ande- per kitchen a nd separaml dining rcom \elcomng IfNiig ro id deal for frulni. and
* _seepmiT great room and ,:,puon to turn fourth ai-nrdy ,j'
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Home a lntutlon may inude opons or. modifiaton not pad of or staandrd ofenngn Shubs ainad c aun g have been added or eect.
Specllcations an plans subec to change anonnnaetlOm I Pnrce are subject io change wntout rotlli. Slate lrnRs number F.-CRC05712.
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ALL INTERNET ACCOUNTS INCLUDE:
5 email addresses, personal web space, video email,
N-Drive Remote storage, parental controls,'
24/7 tech support, pop-up and spam blocking








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* Classified ads and notices must be
paid in advance, and be in our office
no later than 4:00 pm the Monday
preceding publication, unless other-
wise arranged in advance. Ads can
be mailed provided they are accom-
panied by payment and instructions.
They should be mailed to: Classified
Ads, The Baker County Press, P.O.
( Box 598, Macclenny, FL,32063. We
cannot assume responsibility for
accuracy of ads or notices given over
the telephone. Liability for errors in all
advertising will be limited to the first
publication only. If after that time, the
ad continues to run without notifica-
tion of error by the person or agency
for whom it was published, then that
party assumes full payment respon-
sibility. The Baker County Press
reserves the right to refuse advertis-
ing or any other material which in
the opinion of the publisher does not
meet standards of publication.






50 caliber Thomas Center black dia-
mond, camo stock, Jennings Air master
single-bam bow, true glow sights. 904-
334-4323. 8/28p
16" styled 5 bolt alloy wheels with
P275/60 Cobra GT radial tires with hubs
and locks, $300 OBO. 266-0058.
B/21-8/28p
2001 Keystone Cougar 5th wheel,
29' double slide, excellent condition,
$13,900. 838-0035. 7/24tfc
.^,-aho ntsr4etary, beautiful-. aiece,;
excellent condition. Southern Charm
259-4140 no.. n 12/9tfc
Butterfly dining table with 6 chairs,
very ornate, fluted legs, rare; half round
foyer console. All pieces are mahogany
wood. Southern Charm. 259-4140.
2/3tfc
TV's, Sanyo 20", Sears 19" $35 each,
stainless steel rangehood $45, white
Magic Chef cooktop and built in oven,
JenAir downdraft cooktop with grill
$100, white pedestal sink with faucets
$45. 259-1947 or 571-2636. 8/28p
Artists! Oils, acrylics, water colors,
canvases, drawing pads and much
more! The Office Mart, 110 S. Fifth
Street, 259-3737. tfc
1972 Space Craft fiberglass 24' out-
board motor boat and trailer for sale as
is for $750. Please call 904-626-8424.
8/7tfc
Fresh green peanuts, $37 per bushel,
hand picked, washed and graded.. Tru-
luck Farms; pick up in Macclenny. 259-
2055. 8/7-9/25p
14' Jon boat with trailer, two live wells,
trolling motor, $450, bush hog $900,
box blade and sprayer, antique wash
stand in excellent condition with bev-
eled mirrors, distressed $250, antique
dresser $100, preacher's desk $100.
238-7519 or 238-7527: 8/28-9/4p
Impex Multi-Station home gym for sale,
two weight stations with cable weights
on each side. A full body workout for
$300. Call 370-0766. 8/21-8/28p
1984 Stryker fiberglass bass boat,
89', 90 horsepower Yamaha mo-
tor. New items include: 55 lb. thrust
MinnKota, carpet, tail lights, live well
aerator, bilge pump, prop,,jack cou-
pier, gas tank and line. Just spent
over $450 on a new engine brain-
:box. This boat is an absolute steal,
$2500 OBO. 259-8929 anytime.
8/14-8/28p
Patio furniture, table, four chairs
with casters, four additional chairs
without casters and two ottomans.
Paid $1300, sell for $650. 904-
237-7703 8/28p






2004 Jeep Grand Cherokee, 6 cyl-
inder $9500. 838-0035. 8/14tfc
1998 Chevy Lumina, low miles on
engine and transmission, cold air,
four door, $1800. 571-0913.8/28p
2004 Honda VTX 1300, 10,000
miles, upgraded seat and pipes
$6500. Call 904-626-4536. 8/28p
2003 Suzuki Intruder 1300, 10,500
miles $5500. 386-397-3481.8/28p
Pair Fiat convertibles, 1976, tops
and bodies great, asking $2500
both. 259-8188. 8/28p


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WdvrtsgIn


ellaneo


Storm debris and yard cleanup. Call
259-7574. 8/28c
Professional resume writing and re-
sume distribution services .now only
$49.95. Call today for your new resume.
877-875-7706. 8/21-8/28p
Babysitting in my home, all ages 6:00
am until ? Monday-Friday near 125 &
127. 838-2287. 8/14-8/28p
Need hunting club members, still hunt.
Call 259-3580 cell 327-6433. 8/28p
Now accepting antique furniture on
consignment. Pieces have to be in good
condition. Call Karin at Southern Charm
259-4140. 2/13tfc
Experienced mother of two looking to
watch children in home. All ages are
welcome and flexible times. 625-5951.
8/28p
Do you have a junk car or truck to sell
or haul off. Gall 259-7968. 1/10tfc
Art and music lessons in Macclenny
for elementary through middle school
students. Instruction in piano, guitar,
violin, cello and bass. 904-653-1737.
8/28-9/18p
If you are interested in learning how
you.can own your own travel website
give us a call at 904-653-1117 or 904-
408-9339. 8/28-9/18p








Dogs: all types from puppies to adults.
Animal Control, $50 boarding fees will
apply. 259-6786. 11/20tfc
Birds for sale, Finches $10 each or two
for $15, Diamond Doves $20 or two for
' $25, cash only. 434-2424. 8/28p '
Taco Bell Chihuahuas, short hair, small,
four males, parents present, health cer-
tificates, $200-$275. 259-8188. 8/28p
Three male half Chihuahua puppies,
have health certificates, includes shots
and worms, $50 each. 259-3794 or cell
571-2636. 8/28p.
Lost, apricot small poodle mix, red col-
lar, name is Brownie. Small reward. Left
during storm. Last seen around Bob
Burnsed Road. Please call 534-7848.
48/28p
Lost, medium-small brown dachshund/
jack russell mix. Lost on Thursday, Au-
gust 21 from 10854 Westside Loop,
behind high school in Glen. Please call
Pam at cell # 904-536-1326. 8/28p
Found, female hunting dog, no col-
lar, black and white with'some brown
on head. Has had puppies previously.
Found in Trailridge area. Call 259-4194
to identify. 8/28
Found early Sunday, August 24 in Glen,
black and white female puppy approxi-
mately 8 weeks old. Call 727-2237 or
259-3930, 8/28







Notice to readers:
The newspaper often publishes classified
advertising on subjects like work-at-home,
weight loss products, health products. While
the newspaper uses reasonable discretion
in deciding on publication of such ads, it
takes no responsibility as to the truthful-
ness of claims. Respondents should use
caution and common sense before send-
ing any money or making 'other commit-
ments based on statements and/or prom-
ises; demand specifics in writing. You can
also call the Federal Trade Commission at
1-877-FTC-HELP to find out how to spot
fraudulent solicitations. Remember: if it
sounds too good to be true, it probably is.
The Baker County Press
Home Health Nurse, Total Patient Care
Home Health, a leader in Home Health
Care Services in Northeast Florida,
is hiring for the position of full time
and part time Registered Nurse (RN)
and LPN for the Macclenny and west
Jacksonville areas. We are seeking
candidates with Home Health experi-
ence who are interested in working
in a teamwork environment. We offer
flexible work schedules, competitive
pay, full benefits and a-pleasant work
environment. Please contact Suzanne
at 904-399-1142, fax your resume to
904-346-4380, or email to marshall@
tpchomehealth.com 8/28p
Full time auto//light truck techni-
cian needed. Must have own tools.
Experience with GM products a plus.
ASE certification and dealership expe-
rience a plus. Vacation, health insur-
ance and benefits. Apply in person at
Pineview Chevrolet on US 90.8/21-9/4c
Hairstylist wanted at Cuts-N-Stuff
Beauty Salon in Glen St. Mary. 259-
6735. 7/31tfc


2.89 acres in Macclenny II subdivision,
Unit III, on cul-de-sac, partially cleared
$130,000. 613-7759 or 610-9974.
8/21-9/11p
9.39 acres 1 mile north of Sanderson
on CR 229. $103,500. Owner financing
available. 904-813-1580. 1/10tfc
Residential lot 108'x290' on Estate
Street at entrance to Macclenny II,
$59,900. 904-219-0480. 7/24tfc
4 BR, 2 BA brick home with 1876 SF
heated on acre in Macclenny, all eleq-
tric appliances, $210,000. 813-1580
(18GFO). 4/10tfc
2.18 acres in heart of Glen St. Mary,
close to schools and tennis courts,
mobile homes O.K. $69,900. 904-219-
0480. 7/24tfc
4 BR, 21/ BA, all brick home on one
acre, large detached garage, over 3000
SF, hardwood floors throughout. Large
separate dining room, built-in enter-
tainment center, large front and back
porches. Nicely landscaped. 591-0261
or 259-6244. 8/21-8/28p
3 BR, 2 BA brick home with 1721 SF
heated on 1/2 acre in Macclenny, all
electric appliances, $180,000. Call 813-
1580 (8WE). 5/10tfc


100-879-
.4/10tfc


Charlton VNS has an opening for a full-
time registered nurse for the, Charlton
County area. Great benefit package. Call
Amanda Anderson to set up an inter-
view 1-800-446-9116. 12/6tfc
Experienced HVAC service technician,
must have clean driving record. 259-
8038. 8/28-9/11p
West Fraser is currently seeking mill-
wrights and electricians with previous
industrial maintenance experience.
Previous sawmill experience a plus.
Must be able to pass skills assess-
ment, background check and drug test.
Apply in person 109 Halsema Road S.
Jacksonville, Fl 32220. EEO/V/DV
8/21-9/4p
Property Manager, part-time, section
eight experience required, good pay
and benefits. Fax resume 259-8950 or
e-mail ram380@comcast.net 5/22tfc
Class A trailer mechanic, must have
tools and valid driver's license. 904-
813-4099. 8/21-9/4p
Local home care agency seeking. PRN,
RN, OT and a full-time PT. Please call
259-3111 for more information.4/19tfc
VPK teacher needed for four year old
class. Must have CDA. Apply in person
to Westside Nursery Preschool, or call
259-4899. 8/21-8/28c
RN needed 7:00 am-7:00' pm day
shift, every other weekend. Must pass
FDLE background. Apply in person at
Macclenny Nursing and Rehab. Ask for
Sharon. 8/21-8/28c
Part lime,, tractor experience helpful.
Call 904-334-4323. 8/28p






Notice to Readers
All real estate advertising in this newspaper is
subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise "any preference, limita-
tion or discrimination based on race, color,
religion; sex, handicap', famillgar statug'"r "
national origin, or an intention, to make any
such preference, limitation or discrimina-
tion." Familial status includes children under
the age of 18 living with parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant women and people secur-
ing custody of children under 18. -
This newspaper will not knowingly accept
any advertising for real estate which is in
violation of the law. Our readers are hereby
informed that all dwellings advertised in this
newspaper are available on an equal oppor-
tunity basis. To complain of discrimination,
call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll
free telephone number for the impaired is
1-800-927-9275.
Must sell 4 BR, 2 BA brick home with
pool on 2 acre lot in city limits of
Macclenny. $118,000. 259-8662 or
486-0918. 8/21-8/28p
Baldwin, 4 BR 2 BA 1876 SF, .33 acres.
Nice location, close to park and schools.
Call 904-553-5996. 8/7-8/28p
1997 40x24 doublewide Redmond
mobile home, 2 BR, 2 BA, one acre, new
4" well, septic tank and drainfield, one
mile north of Glen, shown by appoint-
ment only, $79,000 firm. 259-6546 day
or 219-2842 evening. 7/24tfc
3 BR, 2 BA brick home w/1576 SF heat-
ed on 1/2 acre in Macclenny all electric
appliances, $190,000. Please call 813-
1580. (2.1GFO). 3/10tfc
Need cash? Have land? Sell your land
to me for cash, I will lease back to you,
you can buy back when ready. 904-219-
0480. 8/21tfc
Designed for compact living, if you
want an open compact home, we can
build it on your lot. Call 1-800-879-


.-,2.BR, 1 BA apartment in.Glen, $600/
month, $600 deposit. 259-2645. 8/28c


One acre on Steelbridge Road,
$20,000. Call 334-3361. 8/21-8/28p
2 BR 1 BA, central H/A, washer/dryer
hook-up, no pets.-179 Ivy Street,
Macclenny. $650/month, $500 deposit.
259-6488. .8/28p
1 BR, 1 BA mobile home $300 deposit,
$400/month. 259-2787. 8/28p
3 BR, 2 BA mobile home like new, $700/
month, first and last, $500 deposit. Glen
area, no pets. 259-2121. 7/24tfc
3 BR, 1 BA newly remodeled single-
wide with addition in Cuyler area, $585/
month, $585 deposit. 904-424-4788.
8/28p
3 BR, 1 BA home on acre lot in
Sanderson, all electric appliances, vinyl
flooring, $750 security deposit, $750/
month. No indoor pets. 259-3343.
6/26tfc
2 BR, 11/2 BA central H/A, washer/dryer
hookup, $525/month, $525 deposit,
garbage, water, sewage and lawn care
included, no pets. 904-219-2690, 912-
843-8165. 8/28c
3 BR, 1 BA home on acre in
Macclenny with all electric appliances,
$750 security deposit, $750/month.
Please call 259-3343. 8/21tfc
Prices are low, build new and save
money over renting. Call 1-800-879-
3132. License #FLCRC-057112.4/1 Otfc
3 BR, 1 BA, fenced acre lot, huge
garage/workshop, close to 1-10, $750/
month, first, last, security deposit. Must
have good references. 904-614-6337.
8/28p


* O 3 BR & 2 BR mobile homes, no pets,
4/10tfc garbage pickup, water & yard mowing
our land provided, $385-$585. 912-843-8118.
nt when 7/5tfc


3 BR, 2 BA on one acre, 9013 Eastwood
Road, $850 deposit, $850/month. 813-
3091. 8/21tfc
3 BR, 2 BA mobile home on acre
lot, references required, no pets, $650/
month, $500 deposit. 259-5853.
8/28-9/4p
2 BR, 1 BA duplex apartment with cen-
tral H/A, recently remodeled with large
back yard. Security deposit $550 and
$550/month. No inside pets. Please call
259-3343. 7/31tfc
2 BR, 1 BA, $650/month plus deposit,
fenced yard, central H/A, 9171 North
CR. 229, Sanderson. Andy 904-923-
6661. 8/28p


Crockett Building
Downtown
19 W. Macclenny Ave.
Office space available

Off street parking
$250 per month, one year lease.
Full building access
including conference room.
Call 259-5361


Mobile homes. 2 and 3 BR, A/C, no'
pets, $500-$575 plus deposit. 904-
860-4604. 13/17tfc,
Fire your landlord, build new. Your
payments could be lower than rent.
Call 1-800-8793132. License #FLCRC-
057112. 4/10tfc
3 BR, 2 BA with all electric appliances
on large lot in Copper Creek, $1800
security deposit, $1800/month. Please
call 626-8428. 8/21tfc
Beautiful wood style cabin on the river,
2 BR, 1 BA with large screened in back;
porch, fire place, huge family room,
extremely clean in great condition,
$950/month plus deposit. Will work;
with the right renter on the deposit
amount. Call Nikki 904-434-0755.
8/28o


2 BR, 1 BA mobile home, central H/A,
no pets, $565/month, first, last plus
$300 deposit. Includes water, lawn ser-
vice aid trash. 259-7335. 6/12tfc


3 BR,.-2-BA-mobile-home, carpet and
vinyl flooring with garden tub on Y acre
lot in Sanderson. All electric appliances,
$850 security deposit, $850/month.'
Please call 259-3343. 8/7tfc ,
House for rent in Copper Creek 2300.
SF, 3 BR, 2 .BA, dining room and"
office, very nice house in great location,,
lots of upgrades $1600/month. 904-
994-6552.
8/21-8/28p
2 BR, 11/2 BA, mobile home, $350
deposit, $580/month. 259-2787. 8/28p
3 BR, 2 BA house in Baldwin, $695/.
month. 3 BR, 1 BA house in Sanderson,
$695/month. 904-318-9019.8/28-9/4c,-
3 BR, 2 BA, no pets, lease required,
$900/month, $700 security deposit.,
718 Chipshot or 715 Long Drive for
$825/month. 259-9797. 8/21tfc
14x70, 2 BR, in Macclenny with central
H/A, all appliances, all electric, clean and'
new carpet, $600/month, $600 deposit
plus first month's rent, no pets. 259-
6966.
8/28c
3 BR, 1 BA home in city, fenced yard,.
$750/month, first and last months rent,.
$500 deposit, no smoking, no pets. 904-
813-5558. 8/28p
Maxville, 3 BR, 2 BA doublewide, central
H/A, carport, porches, fenced yard, one..
acre, no pets, $950/month. 289-7784,
591-1763. 8/28-9/4p.








Original price $172,500
Reduced to $139,900
Located in Fox Ridge Estates
in Macclenny.
3 bedroom, 2 bath
with 2 car garage
Call Tim Combs at 259-2563




Business Meetings,
Conferences,
Specialty Sales
Events

Crockett Building
Downtown
19 W. Macclenny Ave.

Very nice conference room
rental by the hour,
half day or day.

Based on availability,
book ahead with deposit

Call 259-5361


4/2/2 with huge great room 1682 sf
with designer kitchen, covered rear
porch, high ceilings. Must see master
bath. From $145,000 built on your lot.
Call 1-800-879-3132. License #FLCRC-
057112. 4/10tfc
George buys houses you wanted to
sell, now yoy need to sell. Cash offers
or terms. 904-219-0480. 7/24tfc
3 acres, high & dry, fish pond, homes
or mobile homes, set-up included,
owner financing or cash discount. 912-
843-8118. 2/22,fc
FSBO. Copper Creek Hills, Unit III,
2 large. lots $65,000 each, 1 lot @
$55,000. Owner financing available.-
904-813-1580. 1/10tfc


YARD SALES
Friday and Saturday, 9:00 am-5:00 pm, Corner of
Mclver and 228 S. directly across from Macclenny
Womans Club. Ladies clothing, Bill Bass, Jones and
Jones, Liz, etc. Hundreds of items, odds and ends.
Three family
Friday 2:00 pm 8:00 pm and Saturday 1:00 pm-8:00 pm, Movie
Gallery sidewalk sale. Previously viewed movies $7.99 each or regu-
larly priced buy two get two free, candy and drinks two for $2.22,
new movies $7.99 or three for $18, new movies $9.99 or three for
$25, rentals five for $17.12, four for $13.87, all game rentals two for
$10 or three for $12.00.
Saturday, 8:00 am-noon, 14493 Hunters Ridge West off Odis Yar-
borough.
Saturday, 8:30 am-12:30 pm, 170 N. College Street, two blocks
north of 90 on right, white house.


3132 License FrLLR-07112 I

Own land? Use the equity. Yi
equity can be your down payme
building. Ask how. Call 1-8
3132. License #FLCRC-057112


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THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS, Thursday, August 28, 2008 Page 15


Health department warns of mosquitoes


Must see 2006 triplewide like
of Merit sheetrock/tape and te
throughout, 3 BR, 2 BA, large
stainless steel appliances, ste
with fireplace, foyer and large
ing room and dining. Furnish
included and owner is willing t
tion of moving expense. Hom
2727 or cell 904-200-6280.
1999 Skyline 32x80, 4 BR, 2
$59,000 minus $5,000 for mov
es, will sell for $44,000. 259-8






Oceanfront condo, Beachers L
sleeps 4-5, kitchen equipped, I
diate access to the beach $675
904--483-7617.


The more than 10 inches of
new Homes rain dumped on Baker County
xtured walls by Tropical Storm Fay brings
kitchen with with it another potentially large
epdown den problem.
Sformalliv-quitoes
wings can be Mosquitoes.
o pay a por- They will become more nu-
ne 912-843- merous and troublesome in com-
8/21-9/11p ing days, and the Baker County
? BA, asking Health Department reminds resi-
ving expens- dents that the risk of mosquito-
000.
-000. borne illness to both humans and
/2 p animals increases.
S Terry Graham, one of the
county's environmental health
specialists, said this week he is
aware of four current cases of
dodge, 1 BR, horses infected with equine en-
pool, imme- cephalitis, and that number could
i/week. jump in the aftermath of Fay.
For humans, Mr. Graham sug-
8/7-8/28p gets they review some simple
tips to lessen the chances of dis-


eases.
"Everyone needs to rid areas
around their-homes of standing
water where mosquitoes lay their
eggs," said Mr. Graham. "We of-
ten see instances where flower
pots and containers are sitting
there with the mosquito larvae
clearly visible."
Other prime breeding grounds
include stagnant bird baths and
buckets left outside to.fill with
rain water.
Some common-sense precau-
tions:
Avoid being outdoors near
dusk and dawn.
If you are outside, wear
clothing that covers your skin.
Use repelJents when pos-
sible, but check labels before ap-
plying to young children.
If you come down with


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symptoms associated with mos-
quito-borne illnesses, seek medi-
cal help. Those symptoms may
include headache, fever, fatigue,
dizziness, weakness and confu-
sion.
Mr. Graham also cautioned
homeowners that heavy rainfall
has the potential to contaminate
wells used for drinking water.
For advice on how to flush out
and disinfect the wells, or if you
have questions about mosquito-
related diseases, telephone him
at 259-3569.
.~~~~~ ~ .-- - -. ----- -- - --

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STUCCO HOME OVERLOOKING PRESERVE- MLS#
427473 Beautiful 4BR/2BA overlooking man-made
lake and preserve, kitchen has upgraded cabinets.
Covered patio. $229,000 (6121 Sands Point Dr
-Diane Izzo)
NEW CONSTRUCTION IS THE WAY TO GO MLS#
444732 This 3BR/2BA charmer sits on good size lot
w/mature oak trees lining the property. $134,900
(9915 Jefferson AVE Diane Izzo)
BRICK HOME ON 10 ACRES- MLS# 418999 Home
features guest cottage, in-ground pool, add'l 3 car
garage landscaped beautifully, 2 fireplaces, wet bar
and much more. $699,000 (13860 N. State RD 121
- Diane Izzo)
TALK ABOUT THIS GREAT CHANCE TO OWN-
MLS# 445781 All brick home on 11.72 acres with
in-ground pool, upgrades throughout. .$415,000
(13415 DeerTrack DR Kim Allen & Michael Myers)
CAN'T GET NO SATISFACTION? THEN CALL
ABOUT THIS MLS# 438950 You can own this
great buy of 13 acres, private & secluded, zoned
for horses or mobile home, approx 4 acres cleared
w/pump well & septic and power installed. Ready
to go.40 X 24 pole barn. $155,000 (0000 Bill Davis
RD-Tammie Gray)
IDEAL COMMERCIAL IDEAL FOR YOU! MLS #
397003 Property can'be purchased for the asking
price of first parcel at $2.75sf Seller will also
consider build to suit. $3,500,000 (0 County RD 229
-Tammie Gray)
IT'S NO JOKE MLS# 436747 Vacant land can be
found, here is 46.17acres with all the possibilities
you can imagine. Be the owner today! $330,000
(8165 CR-139B-Tammie Gray)
DON'T GET CAUGHT MLS#.440833 Don't get
caught missing this great opportunity to buy 4BR/
2BA on 10 acres w/2,296sf, build-in book shelves,
marble window sills, garden tub'& shower, wood
burning fireplace w/mantle & more. $187,000
(11619 Cowpen Tammie Gray)
YOU'LL BE SEEING RED MLS# 436748 When
you miss the change to own this 322' paved road
frontageon 11 great acresw/tons of potential, build
your house or put a mobile home on it. $150,000
(8165 Cr 139B-Tammie Gray)


I SN


Watson Realty Corp. REALTORS


. this
lovely 3BR/3.5BA 2,359sf home on 3.67acres, new flooring,
paint & roof, plenty of storage to meet your needs.Call today to
make yours! $200,000 (7155 State Road 121 South Tammie
Gray)
DESIGN YOUR LIFE MLS# 428488 High and dry 5.63acres
waiting for you to build your dream home, surrounded by
gorgeous homes & country setting, large pole barn located
on property is 40'X 72'x 14'tall. $159,000 (8157 Mud Lake RD
-Tammie Gray)
EXCITED TO SHOW YOU THIS GREAT HOME MLS# 395751
Wow! 2928sf all brick custom build home on .50acre, perfectly
manicured landscaping, solar heating, in-ground pool,
attached 2 car garage, detached 1 car garage/workshop.
$320,000 (6073 Michele RD -Tammie Gray)
YOUR NO FOOL MLS# 435375 Established Ranch located
on 61 of the most beautiful acres this county has to offer,
zoned agricultural, 6 chicken houses 40' X 500; completely
operational & income producing, several different pastures &
more! $1,062,000 (10167 Kinghom RD-Tammie Gray)
WOW FACTOR IN THIS GREAT HOME MLS# 431773 Brick
house with 3BR/2.SBA w/office and bonus room, formal living
room w/marble fireplace, sep family room w/brick fireplace,
large screened room overlooking in-ground pool & more.
$289,000 (14300 Janice LN-Tammie Gray)
ATASTEOFCOUNTRY-MLS#400516Allbrick4bedroo &3
bathroomswith 2,061sfon 1 acre. In-ground pool with decking,
detached game room and storage shed. Sits on gorgeous piece
of land with fenced property w/wooden privacy & chain link.
$255,900 (5826 Irvin ST-Tammie Gray)
REACH AND GRAB THIS GREAT BUY MLS# 417797 Only
$3,000 per acre, located in beautiful Glen St Mary in one of the
fastestgrowing counties. Endless possibilities with convenience
and privacy. $278,000 (0000 Creek RD -Tammie Gray)
READYFORYOU MLS# 395644 Cute 3/2 in the country offers
1,512sf 5.35 acres very well maintained mobile hm. Deck in
back!! $125,000 (9518 Hopkins RD -Tammie Gray)


395 Chaffee Road

outh, Jacksonville

904.772.9800

YOU'LL BE ALL SMILES WITH THIS MLS# 394430 Large
mature trees, great 3BR/2BA triple wide on 4.62 acres, partially
geared on comer lot, walk-in dosets, wood burning fireplace
w/mantle, breakfast nook & island. $119,000 (19114Crews RD
-Tammie Gray)
DOUBLE TAKE THIS! MLS# 404867 Your head will spin to
own this 6BR/3BA 3,001sf on 1 acre; paved road frontage,
home was previously a church, Commercial kitchen, indoor
utility room & storage shed outside. $199,000 (8188 County
RD139B-TammieGray)
SUPER DEAL MLS# 444050 Adorable 2 bedroom/1 bath.
home that has been completely remodel & ready, Stucco
home with new metal roof, new chain link fencing, gorgeous
landscaping, covered front porch & more! $104,900 (519 South
9th ST -Tammie Gray)
SURE TO CATCH & HOLD YOUR EYE MLS# 421513 This
former model home boasts architectural upgrade, shingled
roof, knockdown ceilings, kitchen appliance. package,
5.5baseboards, 3BR/2BA approx. 1,744sf and 2.01acres. Sure
to please call office to see to appreciate! $257,000 (7033 East
Smooth Bore AVE- Tammie Gray & Scott Scherer)
GREAT STARTER HOME MLS# 446670 Welcome home to
this well maintained 3BR/2BA 1,300sf with a great floor plan.
You've found a place to park yourtwo cars! $163,500 (431 3rd
ST North Cindy Lee)
SAMPLE THIS AND OWN IT! MLS# 404397 Great Bungalow
home is here for you to make your own; 2BR/1BA 1,091sf,
ceramic tile and wall to wall carpet comer lot on just over 1
acre. $90,000 (6485 Bob Kirkiand -Tammie Gray)
NEW HOME SITES MLS# 434374,434377,434378,434371
Beautiful new home sites, 4 available, build your dream home
in this all brick community. $59,900 each. (6093,6104,6108
Copper DR,1322 Copper Oaks CT Susan Krawczyk)
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THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS, Thursday, August 28, 2008 Page 16


Sports


From left are Chaz Johns, J.D. Milton, Jackie Baker Jr., Garrett Milton and Dale Johnson of The County
Boys, champions of the YMCA's 4-on-4 summer flag football league. Also on the team but not pictured
are Brandon Gonzalez and Cameron Shouppe.
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE YMi C


'County Boys'take Yflagfootballchampionship
\n o


.from left, coaches David Manning, Ricky Dugger, Jim Wagstaff and Timmy Hodges
discuss players and strategies prior to the draft.
S. PHOTO BY CIIUCK NIICOLS


Player draft held for


local football club


BY CHUCK NICHOLS
Press Staff
The Baker County Touch-
down Club (BCTC) held its an-
nual player draft on August 11.
Head coaches met with other
coaches in their respective divi-
sion and drew names from a hat
to form up teams.
"I'm here because I love the
game," said David Manning, a
coach in the league since 1986.
He said one of the driving
forces is to teach the youth of
Baker County about teamwork
and character.
Ricky Dugger, a nine-year
coach in the league, will be lead-
ing the Pee Wee Cowboys this
year and was actually coached
Sby Manning.
Dugger, a Baker County High
School Wildcat alumnus, said
She enjoys teaching the boys what
She's learned.
1%tst 4h-Ad coach ein
the Iggpesstasted by coaching
their sons and continued to help'
other youth. A BCTC coach's job
is very demanding and requires
a special dedication.
They spend countless hours
preparing for and holding prac-
tice sessions that include teach-
ing the fundamentals of the
game, conditioning and game
day preparation.
Other duties include finding
sponsors to help with uniform
costs, team rosters, scheduling
practices and practice games,
and keeping parents happy.
This season will begin with
a traditional Jamboree on Sep-
tember 13 during which teams
play one half of football. League
games will begin two days later
,for the senior division and on
"September 22 for the middle and
pee wee divisions.
Many of the senior players
have foregone the opportunity to
[play for the Baker County Mid-
idle School Bobcats because they
get more game time experience
in the BCTC league.
"I have the opportunity to
play offense and defense in all
games," said Joshua Allen of the
senior division's Steelers.
At 5'7" and 210 pounds, he is
a natural at the game and played
almost every snap last year in
the Touchdown Club league as a
sixth grader.
The Bobcat team tends to
start eighth-grade players with
very few seventh graders in their
games. Sixth graders seldom
,start in the Bobcat program.
"I just like to play and this
*league gives me more experi-
,ence in preparation for playing
Junior varsity and Wildcat foot-
;ball," said Allen.
SHe will almost certainly be
Successful at the high school
Level with his' solid scholastic,
size, speed, hands and attitude.
"He and others also rave about
:the chance to play on the same
field as the Wildcats under the
" lights on Monday nights.
S Now that the BCTC teams
'have been selected, more than
'.250 boys and girls have begun
:practice and look forward to.
,playing on the same field as the
S Wildcats, only on Monday nights
'under the lights. Good Luck to
all the coaches and players.
The teams and coaches for
this year's BCTC season:
S- Pee Wee Division


Cowboys, Ricky Dugger
Jaguars, Rolland Gaskins
Packers, Brad Hodges
Vikings, Buffy Mallory
Buccaneers, JC Crews
Eagles, Jerry brown
Middle Division
Broncos, Joey Mash
Jets, Phillip Monds
Lions, Benny Logan
Panthers, Cecil Horne
Raiders, David Crummy
Titans, Freddy Conner
Senior Division
49er's, Tucker Roberts
Falcons, David Starling
Patriots, Timmy Hodges
-Redskins, Freddy Bennett
Steelers, Mitch Mitchell


Baton Twirling!


Siaton J&vi idinq om hQ oAY Rit!
The All-American Twirling Academy staff includes
Baker County Middle School and High School Instructor and former
Intermediate Miss Majorette of Florida Kristen Haddock and
UF's majorette instructor and former World Champion twirler June Stoeber!
First time beginners through Advanced -
Age 4 through High School -
Registration and Orientation meeting at 5pm
on Thursday, September 4th
at Keller Intermediate School Gymnasium


All-American
Twirling
Academy


For more information,
call 904-338-4760
or 352-486-6516


BY CHUCK NICHOLS
Press Staff
The County Boys won the
YMCA's 2008 4-on-4 flag foot-
ball championship last Saturday
by a score of 48-0.
County Boys captain Garrett
Milton attributed the dominat-
ing win to solid offense and a
stifling defense.
"Quarterback Dale Johnson
was just on fire," said Milton.
"And our defense was incred-
ible. The defense never allowed
a team to score more than 20


special."
Brandon Gonzalez led the de-
fensive backs with four intercep-
tions while Jackie Baker Jr. and
Chaz Johns each supplied an in-
terception.
Key to the win was J.D. Mil-
ton, who delivered four sacks.
A rain-drenched second half
played into the hands of the
County Boys and their defensive
strength.
The team defeated the aptly-
named Get Over the Hump team
who, despite making it to the


ished second for the last three
years.
The County Boys, seeded seq-
ond in the tournament, eliminat-
ed two-time champion Grumpy
Old Men in the semi-final game
before cruising through the
championship.
Freddie Oca, director of the
YMCA League, declared this
to be one of the best years for
the program and hopes to see
growth next year.
Congratulations to The Courn-
ty Boys!


this season, but this effort was championship game again, fin-

Sneak peek at first game vs. Nassau Waiors

An embattled Wildcat football team will play West Nassau's Warriors on Friday in the Kickoff Classic
at home.
The varsity will play one half and the junior varsity the second half.
With young defensive back Milton Johnson still in critical condition following a neck injury suffered in
practice last week, the team and its coaches will enter the game with a lot more on its mind than football. :
However, the game might be just the thing to help take their minds off the tragedy for a few hours as they
get to take out their frustration on the gridiron.
The Cats will face a West Nassau team looking to bounce back from a less than stellar season a year ago
when they went 4-5. They will be anxious to improve upon that performance.
Last season had to make Coach Chris Hicken shake his head in dismay. In an odd reversal of what is com-
mon in sports, the Warriors were much better on the road than they were in Callahan. They were undefeated
away from home, but sported a 1-5 record in Nassau County.
Their only home win as a 48-14 pounding of Yulee. They fell to Episcopal, Clay, Bradford, Keystone
Heights and Bolles. Granted they were playing some quality teams with strong playoff records on their
home field, a fact that has a tendency to nullify home field advantage.
Friday they'll be facing thedistrictchampiontlildcats. The Cats have struggled to leam their new triple-
,'"op aori this summer, butvemein to the game w a strong defensive presence that Coai Bobby Johns will
"'rely O'f util th offeniselb.1'4Wle~o'come up to sed
Also, the new Jumbotron will be available for advertising and special messages at all home games in
2008. Messages are being offered in as short as 15 second increments. If interested, please contact Scott
McDonald at (904) 728-2685.


years, every unit is protected
by our Quality Pledge.

Call us today so you can
stop thinking about your air
conditioner and focus on the
things that matter.
Ask us for warranty details or visit I
www.nutonehvac.com

0 2007 NORDYNE. All Rights Reserved.


NuTone


10-YEAR NO WORRY WARRANTY
Call us today for your free estimate on a NuTone System
Dependable Heating & Air Conditioning
& Electrical
259-6546 Serving Northeast Florida for 40 years
State License: CAC057649


ATTORNEY

David P. Dearing
former Baker County Prosecutor

SERIOUS INJURIES CAUSED BY

NEGLIGENCE OF ANOTHER
AND

CRIMINAL DEFENSE

Jacksonville (904) 399-8989. Macclenny 259-1352
Toll Free (888) 211-9451
All initial consultations are absolutely free.
The hiring ofa lawyer is an important decision that should not be basedsolely upon
advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to sendyou fire written information
about our qualifications and experience.





THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS, Thursday, August 28, 2008 Page 17


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31EFR6 SR
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THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS Thursday. Augulst 28. 2008 Page 18


OU PAY


H


IOT A CENT MO
Announcing the Chevy Employee Discount for Everyone.
Available on all 2008 models and 2009 Cobalt & HHR.


IWE



RE.


Pay.


108Sle ra: 1500.. ,,LSI


I ;


Crew Cab #8105
'28,595 MSRP


125,563


s45,194 sRP Crew Cab #8049
$39,465 EMPLOYEE DISCOUNT PRICE


EMPLOYEE DISCOUNT PRICE


wl,
TOA
CUTOE


- 5,000 CASH BACK


- 5,000 CASH BACK


$20,563


EMPLOYEE DISCOUNT PRICE
AFTER ALL OFFERS


34,465


EMPLOYEE DISCOUNT PRICE
AFTER ALL OFFERS


12008 ImpaliaL e


I--- .C -.L. L


41,520 MSRP
$36,666 EMPLOYEE DISCOUNT PRICE
S'5,000 CASH BACK


$28,300 MSRP
$25,816 EMPLOYEE DISCOUNT PRICE
- 6,000 CASH BACK


$22,925 MSRP
21,167 EMPLOYEE DISCOUNT PRICE
- 1,750 CASH BACK


$31 6 EMPLOYEE DISCOUNT PRIE $ EMPLOYEE DISCOUNT PRIE $1 EMPLOYEE DISCOUNT PRICE
AFTER ALL OFFERS AFTER ALL OFFERS AFTERALLOFFERS


'97 Nissan Maxima SE
Automatic, V6, PW, PL
NADA Price $7,995
Pineview Discount $3,407


TODAY'S PRICE


'07 Chevy Cob
Automatic, 4 Cyl.
NADA Price
Pineview Discount
TODAY'S PRICE


$4,588


'07 Ford Tauru
Automatic, V6 PW, PL
NADA Price
Pineview Discount


TODAY'S PRICE


alt '07 Chevy HHR
Automatic, Sunroof, Leather
S$12,987 NADA Price $16,987
$3,001 Pineview Discount -$3.017


$9,986


TODAY'S PRICE


$13,970


is '03 Chevy Silverado
X-Cab, 4WD Stk #7336AA
$13,995 NADA Price $17,925
-$4.000 Pineview Discount $5,070


$9,995 TODAY'S PRICE


'03 Ford Escap
Automatic, V6, Stk #P810
NADA Price
Pineview Discount


TODAY'S PRICE


'05 Chevy Silverado
Crew Cab, 4WD Stk #8078A
NADA Price $19,800
Pineview Discount $6.805


$12,925 TODAY'S PRICE


$12,995


'04 Chevy Monte Carlo
Stk #P3641


$10,525 NADA Price
- $2,530 Pineview Discount


$7,995


TODAY'S PRICE


'03 Chevy Silverado 2500
Crew Cab, 4WD, Stk #8015B
NADA Price $19,625
Pineview Discount $6,630


TODAY'S PRICE


$12,995


'07 Chevy Impala
Stk #AP3613


$9,275 NADA Price
,$1,280 Pineview Discount


$7,995 TODAY'S PRICE


NADA Price
Pineview Discount


TODAY'S PRICE


$16,125 NADA Price
-$1,130 Pineview Discount


$14,995 TODAY'S PRICE


119 S. Sixth St. Macclenny *
273 E. Macclenny Ave.


259-5796 -Pre-Owned
259-6117 -New


www.PineviewChevrolet.com


LZjJs


AN AMERICAN REVOLUTION


Mike Dees
New Car
Sales Manager


Rick Rielli
Finance Mgr.


Marvin Nelson
Used Car Mgr.


Wil Carter
Sales Associate


Brian Patterson
Sales Associate


'07 Chrysler 300
V6, Stk #AP3624


$18,600
- $3.60


$14,995


'07 Chevy Aveo
Hatchback, 4 Cyl,


$12,97!
- $2,98(


$9,99E


EMPLOYEE DISCOUNT PRICE
AFTER ALL OFFERS


,.. ..


6


LJ


ri


2008Trailblazer1LT #8169


L2r L Ffhi eLT2W rD#821


. ..


il




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