Lily Sweet-briar's birthday

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Material Information

Title:
Lily Sweet-briar's birthday
Series Title:
Aunt Louisa's London toy books
Physical Description:
6 leaves : col. ill.
Language:
English
Creator:
Frederick Warne and Co ( Publisher )
Kronheim & Co ( Printer )
Publisher:
Frederick Warne & Co.
Place of Publication:
London
Manufacturer:
Kronheim & Co.
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1880   ( rbgenr )
Poems -- 1880   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1880   ( rbgenr )
Juvenile literature -- 1880   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1880
Genre:
Children's poetry   ( rbgenr )
Poems   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Juvenile literature   ( rbgenr )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Includes publisher's advertisement.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001736207
notis - AJE8896
oclc - 26099753
System ID:
UF00023927:00001

Related Items

Related Items:
Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Full Text
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FREDERIC(/ W'ARIE & C
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LILY SWEETBRIAR'S BIRTHDAY.
HAVE known many dear little people,
And num'rous the charms they possess'd;
But bright little Lily Sweetbriar .
I ever loved dearest and best.
A child fond of frolic and sunshine,
A wee, winsome, mischieyous elf;
Yet, gentle, and loving, and ,kindly,
She thought very little of self.
She came when the \snowdrops were, nodding
O'er violets timid and sweet;
When pert little crocus looked daring,
And laughed at the cold driving sleet.
Dear reader, you've oft seen a sunbeam
Glide into a dark dingy room,
And spread light and warmth by its presence,
Where all ihad been chillness and gloom?
\
Thus a child with a bright cheerful spirit
Sheds pleasure and gladness around,
In the home of the peer or the peasant,
Wherever its light may be found.
Papa was quite proud of his Lily;
And when her next birthday drew near,
Told Mamma to invite a large party,
For music, and games, and good cheer.
an ,,aUniity
The Baldwin Libraiy
BRjny


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Lily's eyes shone like two little planets
When she heard the resolve of Papa,
And off to the nurs'ry she scamper'd,
To relate the consent of Mamma.
Papa then produced a neat inkstand,
Mamma brought a golden-nibbed pen;
Lily sat down to write invitations,
"Tea at six, and the supper at ten."
Old Time cannot run any faster
For our birthdays, wish it as we may;
He has too many matters to settle,
In his twelve working hours per day.
But at last dawned the longed-for morning,
And Lily woke up in delight;
The first thing that entered her wise head
Was "My birthday, and party to-night!"
The first to arrive was Aunt Susan,
Pale, pensive, and quiet, and fair;
She brought a pearl locket for Lily;
Inside was a piece of her hair.
And while she bestowed it, dear Auntie
Breath'd over her darling a pray'r,
"The Pearl of Great Price might be Lily's,
To keep her soul spotless and fair."
The next was Aunt Florence, the widow,
So calm and so sweetly resigned;
To know her was surely to love her,
So cheerful, so thoughtful, so kind.
2


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This page contains no text.


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A warm kiss she gave to dear Lily,
With a book bound in crimson and gold,
And murmur'd a pray'r that her darling
Might be good, both when young and when old.
And then Cousin Hector, the soldier,
All bombast, moustachios, and scent,
With a speech wherein nonsense abounded,
Presented a watch made by Dent.
And young Cousin Emma, the orphan,
Gave a purse made of blue silk and beads,
With a hope its contents might be always
Spent on kindly and generous deeds.
Next, pale Cousin Edward, the poet,
Brought a rose and a most melting lay,
Written all about Truth, Love, and Beauty;
Just fit for the child and the day.
Now, brave Cousin Hal, the young sailor,
Just returned from the perilous sea,
Had jotted before in his "Log-book,"
"Cousin Lily" and "Music and tea."
He brought two green birds from Australia,
A curious box from Japan,
A queer little idol from China,
And a lovely carved ivory fan.
On Bachelor Ben, the rich Uncle,
Red and portly, and brim-full of fun,
Ev'ry face in the room beam'd a welcome;
Mamma said, "So glad you are come!"
3


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After answering all the kind greetings,
He held up his arm in the air,
And begg'd those who were present to notice
That not one sleeve-button was there!
Then he called aloud for Niece Lily,
And declared he'd his darling disown
If she did not the very next minute
Sew the buttons, now wanting, all on.
"Oh, Uncle," said poor little Lily,
"You can't be in earnest, I know!
'Tis my birthday; I haven't my work-box;
You surely don't want me to sew?"
"Come hither, you pert little monkey,"
He said with a shake of his head,
And drew out a beautiful housewife,
Full of buttons, and needles, and thread.
Poor Lily could hardly help crying;
But she knew that she must not be rude,
So at once did her best by complying
With her Uncle Ben's whimsical mood.
Hal's blue eyes then opened still wider,-
He thought her a fairy outright;
But I think both the soldier and poet
Were a "leetle bit" shocked at the sight.
Uncle Ben gave her cheek a sly pinching,
And then a good warm hearty kiss;
And Lily's sweet smile gave assurance
His joke was not taken amiss.
4


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At last Uncle John, the young curate,
Came in, looking pale and careworn;
He had worked for the service of others
Till eve from the earliest morn.
And now he had come from a night-school;
It had once been a mere robbers' den;
Where he tried hard to turn boyish vagrants
Into honest and hard-working men.
He said he need not, for late coming,
Apology make, he well knew;
Then smilingly, from his coat-pocket,
A purple-bound volume he drew.
He said, with a look at dear Lily,
"Dont fear, I am not going to preach;
My gift if you ponder it duly,
Your duty, my darling, will teach.
"Take this book, my dear girl, for your guide,
Companion, and counsellor sweet;
May its honey still sweeten your life,
Its lamp be a light to your feet.
"Drink often at Wisdom's pure fountain,
Weigh all in her balance of gold;
She has rubies and treasures to give you,
Whose value have never been told.
"Seek her early, and she will be with you,
Imparting a beauty divine;
For they only who walk in her footsteps,
In true and pure loveliness shine."
5


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Now came supper, and afterwards parting,
Warm wraps, and looks out at the sky;
Little laughs, kisses sweet, and good wishes;
And then the last cab, and "good bye."
And then little Lily, quite tired,
Was left to her presents and dreams,
In which green birds changed into squirrels,
Her rose into cakes and ice creams.
They talk of the gifts of the Fairies,
The presents Queen Nab often brings;
But, to me, aunts, uncles, and cousins,
Are by far the more sensible things.
I fear that some dear little reader
Is now very likely to cry,
"I am not in the least like your Lily,-
No presents for me my friends buy."
Come here, lay your head on my bosom;
This is but one day in a life;
For twenty of feasting and pleasure,
There are hundreds of struggle and strife.
We are not made only for pleasure:
'Our life is a nursery, a school,
Where presents and parties come seldom,
And happiness is not the rule.
Strive first to be useful, then happy,-
I know that the roses will bloom;
But there must be labour and waiting
Ere the ripe sheaves are carried safe home.
6


I i ,
A
WARNE'S NURSERY LITERATURE.
WARNE'S LARGE PICTURE TOY BOOKSX
In large crown 8vo., price Sixpence, with handsome wrapper ; or, mounted on linen, One Shilling each.
BOOK OF TRADES. HORSES. EDITH'S A. B. C.
JACK IN THE BOX. PUNCH AND JUDY.
CHILDREN IN THE WOOD.
COCK ROBIN'S DEATH AND BURIAL.
HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT.
DOGS. GULLIVER'S TRAVELS.
CINDERELLA. OUR PETS. RED RIDING HOOD.
OLD MOTHER HUBBARD. OBJECT ALPHABET
DTURSERY RHYME ALPHABET.
COCK ROBIN'S COURTSHIP AND MARRIAGE.
THE ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS.
SUNDAY ALPHABET.
** These Toy Books are produced at a very large outlay, on thick, hard paper, in the best style of Colour Printing, with the determination
of having them better than any yet published.
"Plenty to praise in 'Warne's Nursery Literature.' The artistic character of their publications is near perfection."-DAILY TELEGRAPII.
"Warne's Toy Books bear away the the palm from all competitors."-ATLAS.
AUNT FRIENDLY'S TOY BOOKS.
In imperial 16mo,, Threepence each, picture covers, each containing Six large Plates, printed in six colours;
or, mounted on Linen, Sixpence each.
A COMPLETE NEW SERIES OF "NURSERY FAVOURITES,"
In the best style of Colour Printing, from Original Designs, by first-class Artists.
First Series, Comprising
LITTLE TOTTY. CINDERELLA. COCK ROBIN.
SNURSERY RHYMES. A, APPLE PIE.
THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT.
NURSERY SONGS. NURSERY DITTIES.
MOTHER HUBBARD. RED RIDING-HOOD.
DOMESTIC ANIMALS. ROYAL ALPHABET.
Second Series, Comprising ;
THE FROG WHO WOULD A WOOING GO. TOM TH
DAME TROT AND H lR AT.-: T HRE TTLE
SING-A-SONG OF SIXPE NCE. THE
,PUSS IN BOOTS. OLD WOM iAN ANi
THE THREE BEARS. JACK AND THE' BEA'A
DIAMONDS AND TOADS. HOP MYTHU B.
What has been done by AUTJT LOUISA'S TOY BOOKS at One Shilling, and WARNE'S LARGE- PICTURE TOYS, at
Sixpence each, has, with greater perfection than in either of those now celebrated Series, been accomplished in these THREEPENNY
BOOKS-viz., making them the very Best and Cheapest Nursery Books ever published.
AUNT LOUISA'S LONDON TOY BOOKS.
In demy 4to., One Shilling each, stif covers; or, mounted on linen, Two Shillings.
THE RAILWAY A. B. C. THE LIFE OF A DOLL.
CHILDHOOD'S HAPPY HOURS A, APPLE PIE.
JON GILPIN. EDITH AND MILLY'S HOUSEKEEPING.
NURSERY SONGS. NURSERY RHYMES.
SING-A-SONG OF SIXPENCE.
THE ROBIN'S CHRISTMAS EVE. THE SEA-SIDE.
HECTOR, THE DOG. PUSSY'S LONDON LIFE.
FRISKY, THE SQUIRREL.
COUNTRY PETS. ROBIN HOOD AND HIS MERRY XEN.
ALPHABET OF FRUITS.
AUNT
LOUISA S
SUNDAY BOOKS,
A I
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K4'g
1
THE PROVERBS OF SOLOMON.
JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.
THE WONDERS OF PROVIDENCE.
THE STORY OF KING DAVID.
.
"l`""~~~""~wu"~~w"""U~* ^rru^x*"""""u~~
LONDON :-FREDERICK WARNE & Co., BEDFORD STREET, COVENT GARDEN.
NEW YORK:-SCRIBNER, WELFORD, & Co.
-
-
-. II i I I II -








WARNED'S NURSERY LITERATURE.


WARNE'S LARGE PICTURE TOY BOOKS,
In large crown 8vo., price Sixpence, with handsome wrapper ; or, mounted on linen, One Shilling each.


BOOK OF TRADES. HORSES. EDITH'S A. B. C.
JACK IN THE BOX. PUNCH AND JUDY.
CHILDREN IN THE WOOD.
COCK ROBIN'S DEATH AND BURIAL.
HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT.
DOGS. GULLIVER'S TRAVELS.


CINDERELLA. OUR PETS. RED RIDING HOOD.
OLD MOTHER HUBBARD. OBJECT ALPHABET.
ITURSERY RHYME ALPHABET.
COCK ROBIN'S COURTSHIP AND MARRIAGE.
THE ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS.
SUNDAY ALPHABET.


*** These Toy Books are produced at a very large outlay, on thick, hard paper, in the best style of Colour Printing, with the determination
of having them better than any yet published.
" Plenty to praise in 'Warne's Nursery Literature.' The artistic character of their publications is near perfection."-DAILY TELEGRAPn.
Warne's Toy Books bear away the the palm from all competitors."-ATLAS.


AUNT FRIENDLY'S TOY BOOKS.
In impe,'ial 16,ao., Threepence each, picture covers, each coal.,;'aly Six large Plates, printed in six colours;
or, mounted on Linen, Sixpence each.
A COMPLETE NEW SERIES OF "NURSERY FAVOURITES,"
:In the best style of Colour Printing, from Original Designs, by first-class Artists.


First Series, Comprising
LITTLE TOTTY. CINDERELLA. COCK ROBIN.
, NURSERY RHYMES. A, APPLE PIE.
THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT.
NURSERY SONGS. NURSERY DITTIES.
MO.OHER HUBBARD. RED RIDING-HOOD.
DOMESTIC ANIMALS. ROYAL ALPHABET.


Second Series. Comprising
THE FROG WHO WOULD A WOOING GO. TOM THUMB.
DAME TROT AND HER CAT. THREE LITTLE PIGS.
SING-A-SONG OF SIXPENCE. THE UGLY DUCKLING.
,PUSS IN BOOTS. OLD WOMAN AND HER PIG.
THE THREE BEARS. JACK AND THE BEAN STALK.
DIAMONDS AND TOADS. HOP 0' MY THUMB.


What h.,s bon done by AUAT LOUISA'S TOY BOOKS at One Shilling, and WANNE'S LARGE PICTURE TOUS. at
S;.rp,-nce each has, will greater perf action than in either of those now celebrated Series, been accomplished in thi:se THREEPENNY
BOOKS-viz., making them the very Best and Cheapest Nursery Books ever published.


AUNT LOUISA'S LONDON TOY,BOOKS.
In demy 4to., One .'-;!. '; each, stif covers; or, mounted on linen, Two Shillings.


THE RAILWAY A. B. C. THE LIFE OF A DOLL.
CHILDHOOD'S HAPPY HOURS. A, APPLE PIE.
JOHN GILPIN. EDITH AND MILLY'S HOUSEKEEPING.
NURSERY SONGS. NURSERY RHYMES.
SING-A-SONG OF SIXPENCE.


THE ROBIN'S CHRISTMAS EVE. THE SEA-SIDE.
HECTOR, THE DOG. PUSSY'S LONDON LIFE.
FRISKY, THE SQUIRREL.
COUNTRY PETS. ROBIN HOOD AND HIS MERRY MEN.
ALPHABET OF FRUITS.


AUNT


LOUISA'S


SUNDAY


BOOKS,


THE PROVERBS OF SOLOMON.
JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.


THE WONDERS OF PROVIDENCE.
THE STORY OF KING DAVID.


LONDON:-FREDERICK WARNE & Co., BEDFORD STREET, COVENT GARDEN.
NEW YORK:-SGRIBNER, WELFORD, & Co.


____


_





After answering all the kind greetings,
He held up his arm in the air,
And begg'd those who were present to notice
That not one sleeve-button was there!

Then he called aloud for Niece Lily,
And declared he'd his darling disown
If she did not the very next minute
Sew the buttons, now wanting, all on.

"Oh, Uncle," said poor little Lily,
"You can't be in earnest, I know!
'T is my birthday; I haven't my work-box;
You surely don't want me to sew?"

"Come hither, you pert little monkey,"
He said with a shake of his head,
And drew out a beautiful housewife,
Full of buttons, and needles, and thread.

Poor Lily could hardly help crying;
But she knew that she must not be rude,
So at once did her best by complying
With her Uncle Ben's whimsical mood.

Hal's blue eyes then opened still wider,-
He thought her a fairy outright;
But I think both the soldier and poet
Were a "leetle bit" shocked at the sight.

Uncle Ben gave her cheek a sly pinching,
And then a good warm hearty kiss;
And Lily's sweet smile gave assurance
His joke was not taken amiss.




FIPHl: ONE SHILLING; OR, MOUNTED WITH LINEN, TWO SHILLINGS.
^ --^-r- fF -- --On- 1riT _.-" --- 1y


DON TOY BOO


RTfHDi
LONDON.
FREDE RICK VWAR(E & C


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Now came supper, and afterwards parting,
Warm wraps, and looks out at the sky;
Little laughs, kisses sweet, and good wishes;
And then the last cab, and "good bye."

And then little Lily, quite tired,
Was left to her presents and dreams,
In which green birds changed into squirrels,
Her rose into cakes and ice creams.

They talk of the gifts of the Fairies,
The presents Queen Nab often brings;
But, to me, aunts, uncles, and cousins,
Are by far the more sensible things.

I fear that some dear little reader
Is now very likely to cry,
"I am not in the least like your Lily,-
No presents for me my friends buy."

Come here, lay your head on my bosom;
This is but one day in a life;
For twenty of feasting and pleasure,
There are hundreds of struggle and strife.

We are not made only for pleasure:
'Our life is a nursery, a school,
Where presents and parties come seldom,
And happiness is not the rule.

Strive first to be useful, then happy,-
I know that the roses will bloom;
But there must be labour and waiting
Ere the ripe sheaves are carried safe home.





Lily's eyes shone like two little planets
When she heard the resolve of Papa,
And off to the nurs'ry she scamper'd,
To relate the consent of Mamma.

Papa then produced a neat inkstand,
Mamma brought a golden-nibbed pen;
Lily sat down to write invitations,
"Tea at six, and the supper at ten."

Old Time cannot run any faster
For our birthdays, wish it as we may;
He has too many matters to settle,
In his twelve working hours per day.

But at last dawned the longed-for morning,
And Lily woke up in delight;
The first thing that entered her wise head
Was "My birthday, and party to-night!"

The first to arrive was Aunt Susan,
Pale, pensive, and quiet, and fair;
She brought a pearl locket for Lily;
Inside was a piece of her hair.

And while she bestowed it, dear Auntie
Breath'd over her darling a pray'r,
"The Pearl of Great Price might be Lily's,
To keep her soul spotless and fair."

The next was Aunt Florence, the widow,
So calm and so sweetly resigned;
To know her was surely to love her,
So cheerful, so thoughtful, so kind.
2







LILY SWE TBRIAR'S BIRTIIDAY.



HAVE known many dear little people,
And numerous the charms they possess'd;
But bright little Lily Sweetbriar r
I ever loved dearest and best.
A child fond of frolic and sunshine,
A wee, winsome, mischievous elf;
Yet gentle, and loving, and 'kindly,
She thought very little of self.

She came when the \snowdrops were hodding
O'er violets timid and sweet;
When pert little crocus looked daring,
And laughed at the cold driving sleet.

Dear reader, you've oft seen a sunbeam
Glide into a dark dingy room,
And spread light and warmth by its presence,
Where all ihad been chillness and gloom?
Thus a child with a bright cheerful spirit
Sheds pleasure and gladness around,
In the home of the peer or the peasant,
Wherever its light may be found.

Papa was quite proud of his Lily;
And when her next birthday drew near,
Told Mamma to invite a large party,
For music, and games, and good cheer.
The Baldwin Libray





A warm kiss she gave to dear Lily,
With a book bound in crimson and gold,
And murmur'd a pray'r that her darling
Might be good, both when young and when old.

And then Cousin Hector, the soldier,
All bombast, moustachios, and scent,
With a speech wherein nonsense abounded,
Presented a watch made by Dent.

And young Cousin Emma, the orphan,
Gave a purse made of blue silk and beads,
With a hope its contents might be always
Spent on kindly and generous deeds.

Next, pale Cousin Edward, the poet,
Brought a rose and a most melting lay,
Written all about Truth, Love, and Beauty;
Just fit for the child and the day.

Now, brave Cousin Hal, the young sailor,
Just returned from the perilous sea,
Had jotted before in his "Log-book,"
"Cousin Lily" and "Music and tea."

He brought two green birds from Australia,
A curious box from Japan,
A queer little idol from China,
And a lovely carved ivory fan.

On Bachelor Ben, the rich Uncle,
Red and portly, and brim-fall of fun,
Ev'ry face in the room beam'd a welcome;
Mamma said, "So glad you are come!"
3




At last Uncle John, the young curate,
Came in, looking pale and careworn;
He had worked for the service of others
Till eve from the earliest morn.

And now he had come from a night-school;
It had once been a mere robbers' den;
Where he tried hard to turn boyish vagrants
Into honest and hard-working men.

He said he need not, for late coming,
Apology make, he well knew;
Then smilingly, from his coat-pocket,
A purple-bound volume he drew.

He said, with a look at dear Lily,
"Dont fear, I am not going to preach;
My gift if you ponder it duly,
Your duty, my darling, will teach.
"Take this book, my dear girl, for your guide,
Companion, and counsellor sweet;
May its honey still sweeten your life,
Its lamp be a light to your feet.

"Drink often at Wisdom's pure fountain,
Weigh all in her balance of gold;
She has rubies and treasures to give you,
Whose value have never been told.

"Seek her early, and she will be with you,
Imparting a beauty divine;
For they only who walk in her footsteps,
In true and pure loveliness shine."
5




Full Text

PAGE 1

LILY SWE]TBRIAR'S BIRTHDAY. HAVE known many dear little people, And numerous the charms they possess'd; But bright little Lily Sweetbriar | I ever loved dearest and best. A child fond of frolic and sunshine, A wee, winsome, mischievous elf; Yet gentle, and loving, and ,kindly, She thought very little of ,self. She came when the \snowdrops were, nodding O'er violets timid and sweet; When pert little crocus looked daring, i And laughed at the cold driving sleet. Dear reader, you've oft seen a sunbeam Glide into a dark dingy room, And spread light and warmth by its presence, Where all /had been chillness and gloom? \ Thus a child with a bright cheerful spirit Sheds pleasure and gladness around, In the home of the peer or the peasant, Wherever its light may be found. Papa was quite proud of his Lily; And when her next birthday drew near, Told Mamma to invite a large party, For music, and games, and good cheer. The Baldwin Library B Juisity I RmB oz. =



PAGE 1

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PAGE 1

Now came supper, and afterwards parting, Warm wraps, and looks out at the sky; Little laughs, kisses sweet, and good wishes; And then the last cab, and "good bye." And then little Lily, quite tired, Was left to her presents and dreams, In which green birds changed into squirrels, Her rose into cakes and ice creams. They talk of the gifts of the Fairies, The presents Queen Nab often brings; But, to me, aunts, uncles, and cousins, Are by far the more sensible things. I fear that some dear little reader Is now very likely to cry, "I am not in the least like your Lily,No presents for me my friends buy." Come here, lay your head on my bosom; This is but one day in a life; For twenty of feasting and pleasure, There are hundreds of struggle and strife. We are not made only for pleasure: 'Our life is a nursery, a school, Where presents and parties come seldom, And happiness is not the rule. Strive first to be useful, then happy,I know that the roses will bloom; But there must be labour and waiting Ere the ripe sheaves are carried safe home. 6



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PAGE 1

At last Uncle John, the young curate, Came in, looking pale and careworn; He had worked for the service of others Till eve from the earliest morn. And now he had come from a night-school; It had once been a mere robbers' den; Where he tried hard to turn boyish vagrants Into honest and hard-working men. He said he need not, for late coming, Apology make, he well knew; Then smilingly, from his coat-pocket, A purple-bound volume he drew. He said, with a look at dear Lily, "Dont fear, I am not going to preach; My gift if you ponder it duly, Your duty, my darling, will teach. Take this book, my dear girl, for your guide, Companion, and counsellor sweet; May its honey still sweeten your life, Its lamp be a light to your feet. "Drink often at Wisdom's pure fountain, Weigh all in her balance of gold; She has rubies and treasures to give you, Whose value have never been told. "Seek her early, and she will be with you, Imparting a beauty divine; For they only who walk in her footsteps, In true and pure loveliness shine." 5



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After answering all the kind greetings, He held up his arm in the air, And begg'd those who were present to notice That not one sleeve-button was there! Then he called aloud for Niece Lily, And declared he'd his darling disown If she did not the very next minute Sew the buttons, now wanting, all on. "Oh, Uncle," said poor little Lily, "You can't be in earnest, I know! 'Tis my birthday; I haven't my work-box; You surely don't want me to sew?" "Come hither, you pert little monkey," He said with a shake of his head, And drew out a beautiful housewife, Full of buttons, and needles, and thread. Poor Lily could hardly help crying; But she knew that she must not be rude, So at once did her best by complying With her Uncle Ben's whimsical mood. Hal's blue eyes then opened still wider,He thought her a fairy outright; But I think both the soldier and poet Were a "leetle bit" shocked at the sight. Uncle Ben gave her cheek a sly pinching, And then a good warm hearty kiss; And Lily's sweet smile gave assurance His joke was not taken amiss. 4





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A warm kiss she gave to dear Lily, With a book bound in crimson and gold, And murmur'd a pray'r that her darling Might be good, both when young and when old. And then Cousin Hector, the soldier, All bombast, moustachios, and scent, With a speech wherein nonsense abounded, Presented a watch made by Dent. And young Cousin Emma, the orphan, Gave a purse made of blue silk and beads, With a hope its contents might be always Spent on kindly and generous deeds. Next, pale Cousin Edward, the poet, Brought a rose and a most melting lay, Written all about Truth, Love, and Beauty; Just fit for the child and the day. Now, brave Cousin Hal, the young sailor, Just returned from the perilous sea, Had jotted before in his "Log-book," "Cousin Lily" and "Music and tea." He brought two green birds from Australia, A curious box from Japan, A queer little idol from China, And a lovely carved ivory fan. On Bachelor Ben, the rich Uncle, Red and portly, and brim-fall of fun, Ev'ry face in the room beamed a welcome; Mamma said, "So glad you are come!" 3



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WARNE'S NURSERY LITERATURE. WARNE'S LARGE PICTURE TOY BOOKS, In large crown 8vo., price Sixpence, with handsome wrapper; or, mounted on linen, One Shilling each. BOOK OF TRADES. HORSES. EDITH'S A. B. C. CINDERELLA. OUR PETS. RED RIDING HOOD. JACK IN THE BOX. PUNCH AND JUDY. OLD MOTHER HUBBARD. OBJECT ALPHABET CHILDREN IN THE WOOD. DTURSERY RHYME ALPHABET. COCK ROBIN'S DEATH AND BURIAL. COCK ROBIN'S COURTSHIP AND MARRIAGE. HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT. THE ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS. DOGS. GULLIVER'S TRAVELS. SUNDAY ALPHABET. *** These Toy Books are produced at a very large outlay, on thick, hard paper, in the best style of Colour Printing, with the determination of having them better than any yet published. "Plenty to praise in Warne's Nursery Literature.' The artistic character of their publications is near perfection."-DAILY TELEGRAPII. "Warne's Toy Books bear away the the palm from all competitors."-ATLAS. AUNT FRIENDLY'S TOY' BOOKS. In iipe,'ial 16ro., Threepence each, picture covers, each coa.i;,,.:.. Six large Plates, printed in sir colors; or, mounted on Linen, Sixpence each. A COMPLETE NEW SERIES OF "NURSERY FAVOURITES," In the best style of Colour Printing, from Original Designs, by first-class Artists. First Series, Comprising Second Series. Comprising LITTLE TOTTY. CINDERELLA. COCK ROBIN. THE FROG WHO WOULD A WOOING GO. TOM THUMB. ', NURSERY RHYMES. A, APPLE PIE. DAME TROT AND HER CAT. THREE LITTLE PIGrS. THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT. SING-A-SONG OF SIXPENCE. THE UGLY DUCKLING. NURSERY SONGS. NURSERY DITTIES. ,PUSS IN BOOTS. OLD WOMAN AND HER PIG. MO.'.HER HUBBARD. RED RIDING-HOOD. THE THREE BEARS. JACK AND THE BEAN STALK. DOMESTIC ANIMALS. ROYAL ALPHABET. DIAMONDS AND TOADS. HOP O' MY THUMB. 'What has .L a done by AUAT LOUISA'S TOY BOOKS at One Shilling, and WAkNE'S LARGE PICTURE TO(S. at S;.r/,,cie eaclh. has, wilt greater perfection than in either of those now celebrated Series, been accomplished in tliI:e TH R EEPEN NY BOOKS-viz., making them the very Best and Cheapest Nursery Books ever published. AUNT LOUISA 5 S LONDON TOY BOOKSX 1'" ~ ~In demy 4to., One s/';l''i/ each, stiff covers; or, mounted on linen, Two Shillings. THE RAILWAY A. B. C. THE LIFE OF A DOLL. THE ROBIN'S CHRISTMAS EVE. THE SEA-SIDE. CHILDHOOD'S HAPPY HOURS. A, APPLE PIE. HECTOR, THE DOG. PUSSY'S LONDON LIFE. JOHN GILPIN. EDITH AND MILLY'S HOUSEKEEPING. FRISKY, THE SQUIRREL. NURSERY SONGS. NURSERY RHYMES. COUNTRY PETS. ROBIN HOOD AND HIS MERRY MEN. SING-A-SONG OF SIXPENCE. ALPHABET OF FRUITS. AUNT LOUISA 5 S SUNDAY BOOKS, THE PROVERBS OF SOLOMON. THE WONDERS OF PROVIDENCE. JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN. THE STORY OF KING DAVID. E LONDON:-FREDERICK WARNE & Co., BEDFORD STREET, COVENT GARDEN. NEW YORK:-SCRIBNER, WELFORD, & Co,





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Lily's eyes shone like two little planets When she heard the resolve of Papa, And off to the nurs'ry she scamper'd, To relate the consent of Mamma. Papa then produced a neat inkstand, Mamma brought a golden-nibbed pen; Lily sat down to write invitations, "Tea at six, and the supper at ten." Old Time cannot run any faster For our birthdays, wish it as we may; He has too many matters to settle, In his twelve working hours per day. But at last dawned the longed-for morning, And Lily woke up in delight; The first thing that entered her wise head Was "My birthday, and party to-night!" The first to arrive was Aunt Susan, Pale, pensive, and quiet, and fair; She brought a pearl locket for Lily; Inside was a piece of her hair. And while she bestowed it, dear Auntie Breath'd over her darling a pray'r, "The Pearl of Great Price might be Lily's, To keep her soul spotless and fair." The next was Aunt Florence, the widow, So calm and so sweetly resigned; To know her was surely to love her, So cheerful, so thoughtful, so kind. 2



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