• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Cover
 The Faithful Friend
 Front Cover






Group Title: Aunt Louisa's London toy books ;, 41
Title: The faithful friend
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00023895/00001
 Material Information
Title: The faithful friend
Series Title: Aunt Louisa's London toy books
Physical Description: 5 leaves : col. ill. ;
Language: English
Creator: Frederick Warne and Co ( Publisher )
Kronheim & Co ( Printer )
Publisher: Frederick Warne & Co.
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: Kronheim & Co.
Publication Date: [ca. 1880]
 Subjects
Subject: Dogs -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1880   ( lcsh )
Poems -- 1880   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1880   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1880
Genre: Children's poetry
Poems   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: Includes publisher's advertisement.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00023895
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001735256
notis - AJE7933
oclc - 26081884
 Related Items
Other version: Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    The Faithful Friend
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Front Cover
        Page 23
Full Text
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THEFAITHFUL FRIEND.ITHE crimson glory of the setting sunIs flushing with long rays of ruby lightA barren heath, where, 'midst the heather blooms,A weary band have halted for the night.A circus and its followers are there: ;The jaded horses crop the herbage round;The yellow vans are empty; a great fireOf wood and cones is kindled on the ground.The tired people gather round its blaze;+: ~Upon the grass the little children play;While distant chimes from a cathedral towerRing out a farewell to the dying day.Apart-beside a tuft of golden gorse-Two little ones have sought a distant seatTo eat their crusts of bread, which oft they shareWith a poor dog close lying at their feet.Young orphans these: their father-once the Clown,Whose merry jests had caused such frequent mirth-Has lately died of fever; leaving themFriendless and penniless upon the earth.i -X~~~~~~~~ I ['The Baldwin LibraryXmS glu


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Did I say friendless? No! they had a friend-Their father's dog, a shrewd one of his race,Their guardian-playfellow-in whose true heartNo selfish wish could find a moment's place.The circus-master, a hard, cruel man,Had kept the orphans in his service still;For both could ride and dance upon the rope,And people loved to watch their childish skill.And then the dog, that would not leave their side,Was just the funniest actor of them all;Could dance, turn somersaults, stand on his head,Tell fortunes, walk the tight-rope, feign a fall;He, too, brought money to the trav'lling show;But still the tyrant, who received their gains,Never bestowed upon them a kind word,But paid with cruel blows and threats their pains.A sad and cheerless life the children led;But little Jane, with sense beyond her years,Watched over Willie with a mother's care,Shared all his troubles; kissed away his tears.And now they list'ning sat; and Janie said,"The Lincoln bells! Willie, what do they say?"And Willie, nestling close up to her side,Whispered, " I think they bid us run away.2


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"To-morrow we shall reach the great big town-There must be room in it for you and meAnd poor dear Snap-and we can go aboutJust as we like, and never beaten be."But Jane replied, "We could not earn our bread;We must not think of such a foolish thing;But patiently perform our daily task,Nor heed the folly that the sweet bells ring."Next day the circus people travelled on:By noon they entered at the city gate,With music, flags, and horses ambling by;Threading the ancient streets in mimic state.At evening in the market-square they played,And all the people to the circus went;For it was Whitsuntide and holidays,And merry children filled the spacious tent."Oh! look, papa!" exclaimed a fair-haired girl,"Look how those pretty little children ride!If I could only spring and dance like them,I should not care for anything beside."How happy they must be to have such fun!They don't do hortrid lessons, like poor me!And then that darling dog!-oh, dear papa,I never thought such wondrous things could be!"3


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"My love," her father said, "I fear, poor things!That they would very gladly change with you:Their lives are very hard; their toil is great;Appearances, you know, are oft untrue."But Alice thought theirs. must be pleasant toil;And when at night she sank to soft repose,Gay dreams of snow-white ponies, dancing dogs,And little riders, on her sleep arose.Alas! the following night, poor little Will,While dancing on the tight-rope, slipped and fell,And was severely hurt. The master's rageAnd cruelty, it grieves me much to tell.He struck, with his thick whip, the moaning boy,And would have beaten him, but Snap was near,And flew at him so savagely, the manWas fain to stay his cruel blows, from fear.All night Jane wept beside her brother's bed,While by her side their faithful guardian lay;And oft poor Willie's words about the bellsCame back to her-"They bid us run away."Just a week after-one bright summer's day-As Alice with her father crossed the street,Quite suddenly, a dog before them stood,And made a somersault close by their feet;4


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Then stood upon his head; marched gravely roundIn many circles; feigned to fall and diePanting and breathless; then sprang up alive,Glancing around to see who might be nigh.His tricks all finished, he stood up and begged,With strong entreaty in his wistful gaze:Around his neck a little bag they see,Bearing these words: "For help, a sick child prays.'The merchant dropped a shilling in the bag,And instantly the dog ran swiftly on."Alice," her father said, "we'll follow him,And see where this strange beggar can have gone."They followed,-keeping still the dog in sight,-Up courts and narrow alleys, dull and dank,Till down a cellar window, suddenly,Before their eyes the panting creature sank.When they had gained the spot, the merchant sawSome steps that led to the dark place below;And, bidding Alice wait for him awhile,Down, after their strange guide, prepared to go.Soon he returned, and, took her little hand,And gently led her, down the narrow way,To a dark cellar; where, on bed of straw,The little rider of the circus lay.5


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She knows his face again, though pale and wanBeside him, too, his little sister stands,Clasping the bag their faithful dog has brought-Unopen'd still-within her trembling hands.But soon her fears were soothed, and then she toldHow Willie from the tight-rope had a fall,For which their master struck him cruelly,Although the child could neither stand nor crawl.How, on the night before the circus left,She stole (bearing him in her arms) away,And took Snap with them; who had earned their breadBy acting in the streets, from day to day;At first with her; but soon she could not leaveHer ailing brother, but was forced to sendPoor Snap alone, and trust for daily foodTo the true instinct of their only friend."And he has brought us here," the merchant said;"We followed him, as he ran on before: ,Henceforward, children, you shall have a home,And faithful Dash need beg for alms no more."He kept his word: under his generous careThe circus children's sorrows found an end;And Snap a silver collar henceforth wore,Bearing his well-earned name, THE FAITHFUL FRIEND.-s.


WA RNE't NURSERY LITERATURWARNE'S VICTORIA TOY-BOOKS.With Coloured Illustrations. 12 Varieties in Packet. Price One Shilling." :- CONTENTS OF PACKET.JACK AND THE BEANSTALK NURSERY SONGS PUSS IN BOOTS v LITTLE RED RIDING HOODCINDERELLA COCK ROBIN'S DEATH OUR PETS NURSERY RHYMESAlso, the same in Two Sixpenny Packets, THE CINDERELLA PACKET, THE PETS PACKET, each containing Six Books.Also, Warne's Penny Victoria Toy Alphabets:-EDITH'S ALPHABET RQYAL ALPHABET | ALEXANDRA ALPHABET | SUNDAY ALPHABETAUNT LOUISA'S LONDQN TOY BOOKS.With large Original Page Plates by the First Artists, in the verybest style of Colour Printing, with Letterpress DIscriptionu.In demy 4to. Is. each, picture covers, or Mounted on inen, 2s.I. THE RAILWAY A B C2. A, APPLE PIE3. NURSERY RHYMES4. CHILDHOOD'S HAPPY HOURS5. NURSERY SONGS6. THE LIFE*OF A DOLL7. EDITH AND MILLY'S HOUSEKEEPING8. JOHN GILPIN9. SING A SONG OFSIXPENCEIo. THE SEA SIDEix. THE ROBIN'S CHRISTMAS EVE13. ALPHABET OF FRUITS14. FRISKY, THE SQUIRREL15. COUNTRY PETS .x6. PUSSY'S LONDON LIFE17. HECTOR, THE DOG8. DICK WHITTINGTON19, DIAMONDS AND TOADS20. LILY SWEETBRIAR'S BIRTHDAY21. UNCLE'S FARMYARD22. ,LONDON ALPHABET23. COUNTRY ALPHABET24. AMES AND SPORTS25. HOUSEHOLD PETS29. THE BIRTHDAY PARTY3 KING, QUEEN, AND KNAVE OF HEARTS3. COCK R BIN'S COURTSHIP, MARRIAGE, DEATH,AND BURIAL32. CHILDREN'S LULLABIES33. THE NURSERY ALPHABET34. GOOD CHILDREN35. BRUINStHE BEAR36. DAME TROT AND HER CAT37. HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS38. PUNCH AND JUDY39 MY CHILDREN40. JACK AND JILL4t. THE FAITHFUL FRIEND43. TEN LITTLE NIGGEgSWARNE'S "EXCELSIOR" TOY BOOKS.In large crown 8vo., beautifully printed in Colours, price 6d.each, with handsome Wrapper; or, Mounted on Linen,One Shilling each..i. RED RIDING HOOD2. COCK ROBIN'S DE4TH AND BUIIAL3. HORSES4. OLD MOTHER HUBBARD5.DOGS6. BOOK OF TRADES7. CIILDREN IN THE WOOD8. SUNDAY ALPHABET9. EDITH'S A B Co1. OBJECT ALPHABET1. JACK IN TIIE BOX12. OUR PETS13. PUNCH AND JUDY14. CINDERELLA15. THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILTi6. NURSERY RHYME ALPHABETI7. COCK ROBIN'S 'COURTSHIP18. THE ZOOLOGICAL GARDENSI9. GULLIVER'S TRAVELS20. NURSERY NUMBERS21. BANQUET OF BIRDS22. NURSERY LULLABIES23. THE ROBINS24. THE SILLY LITTLE BA-A LAMB25. THE TINY TEA PARTY26. ALEXANDRA ALPHABET27. THE STORY OF MOSES28. THE STORY, OF RUTH29. THE STORY OF DANIEI,30. THE PRODIGAL SON31. THE PILGRIM'S PROGRE32. WATTS' HYMNS33. ROBINSON CRUSOEJ:^SII; Imperial i6mo, 3d. each, Ptre Covers; or on Linen, 6d.AUNT :PRIE NDIAL TOY BOOKS.Each containing Six Large Plates, printed in ou in Sin KRONHEIM'S and DALZIEL' be. style of Colour Printing.From Original Jesigns by First Class Artists.RED RIDING HOOD DOMESTIC ANIMALS | COCK ROBIN'S DEATH THREE LITTLE PIGS HOP 0' MY THUMB TIE UGIY )UCKLINGLITTLE TOTTY NURSERY RHYMES MOTHER HUBBARD PUSS IN BOOTS THE FROG DIAMONDS AND TOADSCINDERELLA COCK ROBIN'S COURTSHIP NURSERY SONGS SING A SONG OF SIXPENCE TOM THUMB OLD WOMAN & HER PJACK AND JILL HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT NURSERY DII'IES JACK & THE BEAN STALK TH THREE BEARS DAME TROT & HER CATROYAL ALPHABET .A, APPLE PIE NURSEY IALONDON :-FREDERICK WARNE & CO., BEDFORD STREET, COVENT ARD ENNEW YORK :-SCRIBNER, WEL'ORD AND ARMSTRONG.L__________________rsasll I I I l i: I : 3 111


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