Puss in Boots

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Puss in Boots
Series Title:
Aunt Louisa's big picture series
Physical Description:
9 leaves.
Language:
English
Publisher:
McLoughlin Brothers
Place of Publication:
New York
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1880

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Bldn -- 1880   ( lcsh )
Cats -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Genre:
fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 26032649
notis - AAB7320
System ID:
UF00023607:00001

Full Text
AUNT LOUISA'S BIG PICTURE SERIES.


NEW YORK: MoLOUGHLIN BROS.


BOOTS




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PUSS-IN-BOOTS.


TIHERE was once a poor miller, who had three
sons; and, when he was about to die, he left
the mill to the eldest, his donkey to the second,
and to the youngest boy only his cat. This last,
poor fellow! thought himself very badly off, in
comparison with his brothers, who, by joining
their property together, he would say, could get
on very well; but as he had nothing but Pussy,
he feared he should really starve.
Now, it happened that the Cat was one day
lying quietly in a cupboard, and overheard him
making this complaint; so he came out, and thus
spoke to his young master:
"Pray do not grieve at your lot---that is not
right, you know; but trust in me, and I will do
all I can to help you. Give me a bag, and get a
pair of boots made for me, that I may make my
way well through the mire and the brambles, and
you will soon see what I can do."

The Baldwin Library
Univcrity
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2 Puss-in Boots.

The poor youth was too sad to heed Pussy's
speech much; but still he got the bag and the
little boots made for him, not thinking anything
would come of it, for all the Cat's fine speech.
No sooner had Puss put on the boots, and
placed the bag on his neck, than he bade his
master good morning, and boldly started off to
the woods. The sly-boots had put some parsley
in his bag, that he might tempt some rabbits in
a warren he knew of, close by, to come and take
a taste of it. Poor little things! they were too
simple to suppose he meant mischief; so he very
soon coaxed a nice plump young rabbit to have
a nibble, and the moment he put his little nose
in the bag, Puss drew the string tight, and killed
him, as well as one or two more in the same
way.
SPuss was very proud of the good sport' he
had had, and went straight off to the Court, where
he asked to speak to the King. When he came
before the monarch, who was seated -on a throne,
with the Princess, his daughter, by his side, he
made a graceful bow, and said:











































J, -.






3 Puss i Boots.
"Please your Majesty, I have brought this
game from the warren belonging to my master,
the Marquis of Carabas, who desired me to lay
it, with his loyal respects, and offers of service,
at your Majesty's feet."
Sly Puss! he had himself given his poor
master that grand title. The King, much pleased
at this mark of homage, graciously accepted of
the gift, and sent his thanks to the Marquis.
One fine morning, not long after this, Puss
heard that the King was going to take a ride by
the river's side, with his lovely daughter; so he
said to his master:
"If you only follow my advice, your fortune
is made. Take off your clothes, and get into the
river to bathe, just where I shall point out, and
leave the rest to me."
The young man did as he was bid, without
being in the least able to guess what the Cat
meant. While he was bathing very coolly, the
King and the royal party passed by, and Puss-in
Boots, running after them, called out, as loud as
he could bawl:

















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Puss- Bools.


"Help! help! my lord, the Marquis of Cara-
bas, is in danger of being drowned!"


The Kin
had brought


,, seeing it was the same Cat that
him the game, sent some of his


servants to assist the poor Marquis.


Puss then told


his Majesty, that


Lordship was bathing, some thieves had stolen


his clothes---which was not true, for


Master


had hidden them behind a tree, a little way off.


The King accordingly sent to


the Palace for


a rich Court-suit for him to put on, which became
him very much, and he looked so handsome that
the King's daughter fell in love with him.


The King, soon after, invited the Marquis


to


travel with


him, and they came near to a grand


Castle, in which an Ogre lived.


But Pussy slipped in


before them, and was


soon quite chatty with the Ogre, saying:
"Can't you change yourself into any
you please?"


"Of course I can," said he;
he became a roaring lion.


animal


and in a moment


The Cat rushed away in alarm;


while


his


Puss


but, when

































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IW *






Puss-in Boots. 5
he came back again, no lion was to be seen---
only the Ogre. Puss then said:
"Please, do change into a mouse, now."
But no sooner had he done so, than the Cat
sprang upon him, and ate him up.
Puss-in-Boots, hearing the royal party ap-
proach, went out to meet them, and bowing to
the King, said:
"Your Majesty is right welcome to the Cas-
tle of the Marquis of Carabas!
The King was delighted to find his Lord-
ship had so noble a Castle, and gladly accepted
the invitation to view it.
The young Marquis gave his' hand- to the
Princess as she alighted, and both followed the
King as he entered the great hall, when they all,
soon after, partook of a rich feast, which the
Ogre had prepared for some of his own friends,
little thinking how he should be himself eaten up
by a Cat.
The King was quite charmed with all he
saw, and he liked the young Marquis more and
more, not only because he was so rich, and had














































































I 1




































Af
.1






Fuss-in -Boots.


so grand


a Castle


and so


fine an estate, but be-


cause he was both good and wise; and he soon
noticed, also, how much the Princess was in love


with the


handsome youth.


So he said


to him:


My dear Marquis, it will be your own fault
if you do not become my son-in-law; my daugh-
ter loves you, 'and you have my full consent."
The Marquis was overjoyed at this great
mark of royal favor, and was united to his fair


bride the very next day.
You may be sure that his
Boots was not forgotten. That


old friend Puss-in
clever Cat became


a great favorite at Court, was richly dressed, and
had such choice dainties for his food that he


never again touched rats and mice.


pleasure was to


His greatest


lounge by the balcony, on a


couch, and look out on the park, when his young
master and the Princess were walking in its


shady groves; and Puss-IN-BOOTS lived
happily to a good old age.


thus







AUNT LOUISA'S BIG PICTURE SERIES.
36 KINDS.--25 CENTS EACH.
Quarto Demi-Six full-page Illustrations, Elegantly Printed in Colors.


Ten Little Niogers.
Hey Diddle Diddle.
Children in the Wood.
Jack and the(- Bean Stalk.
Tit, Tiny, and Tittens.
Four-Footed Friends.
Three Little Kittens.
Three Good Friends.
Hare and Tortoise.
Rip Van Winkle.
Domestic Animals.
Robinson Crusoe.


Bab)v.
Putnam.
Po cahontas.
Puss in Boots.
My Mother.
Cock Robiin.
Three Bears.
Toni Thumb.
White Cat.
Yankee Doodle.
Fat Boy.
Nursery Rhymes.


Alp1hab)et ( f Coulintrv Scenes.
Visit to tile Meinag'erie.
House that Jack Built.
Wild Animals.-Part One.
Wild Alnimals.-Part Two.
Mother Hubb)ard's Do .
Visit of St. Nicholas.
Santa Claus and His Works.
ILumpty Dumpty.-Vol. 1.
Humipty D)umpty.-Vol. 2.
Hollme (ames ftir Little Boys.
Home (Games tfr Little Girls.


NEWV


PAPER DOLLS.


Elegantly Printed in Colors. Put up in Envelopes. The most Amusement for a small
outlay of Money that can be found for Little Girls.
SIX CENTS EACH, TEN CENTS EACH. FIFTEEN CENTS EACH.
Polly Prim. Bessie Bliss. Dottie Dimple. Bride;
Gerty Good. Lottie Love. Susie Simple. Bridesmaid, and
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MVAGICAL HAND AND MYSTERIOUS QUE-STION-ANSWERER.
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Gives a large variety of Quest ns ald Answers, and affords almost endless Amusement
for the Famniiy Circle. PRICE $2.00.
McL 0 VGHLIN BROS., PUBLISHERS, NEW I YORK.


--


v




Full Text

PAGE 1

PUSS-IN-BOOTS. Ti HERE was once a poor miller, who had three sons; and, when he was about to die, he left the mill to the eldest, his donkey to the second, and to the youngest boy only his cat. This last, poor fellow! thought himself very badly off, in comparison with his brothers, who, by joining their property together, he would say, could get on very well; but as he had nothing but Pussy, he feared he should really starve. Now, it happened that the Cat was one day lying quietly in a cupboard, and overheard him making this complaint; so he came out, and thus spoke to his young master: "Pray do not grieve at your lot---that is not right, you know; but trust in me, and I will do all I can to help you. Give me a bag, and get a pair of boots made for me, that I may make my way well through the mire and the brambles, and you will soon see what I can do." The Badwin Lb _t Untcaity f UmB rik



PAGE 1

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PAGE 1

Puss-in -Boots. 6 so grand a Castle and so fine an estate, but because he was both good and wise; and he soon noticed, also, how much the Princess was in love with the handsome youth. So he said to him: "My dear Marquis, it will be your own fault if you do not become my son-in-law; my daughter loves you, 'and you have my full consent." The Marquis was overjoyed at this great mark of royal favor, and was united to his fair bride the very next day. You may be sure that his old friend Puss-in Boots was not forgotten. That clever Cat became a great favorite at Court, was richly dressed, and had such choice dainties for his food that he never again touched rats and mice. His greatest pleasure was to lounge by the balcony, on a couch, and look out on the park, when his young master and the Princess were walking in its shady groves; and Puss-IN-BooTS lived thus happily to a good old age.



PAGE 1

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PAGE 1

a. 4.



PAGE 1

Pussin-Boots. 5 he came back again, no lion was to be seen--only the Ogre. Puss then said: Please, do change into a mouse, now." But no sooner had he done so, than the Cat sprang upon him, and ate him up. Puss-in-Boots, hearing the royal party approach, went out to meet them, and bowing to the King, said: "Your Majesty is right welcome to the Castle of the Marquis of Carabas! The King was delighted to find his Lordship had so noble a Castle, and gladly accepted the invitation to view it. The young Marquis gave his' handto the Princess as she alighted, and both followed the King as he entered the great hall, when they all, soon after, partook of a rich feast, which the Ogre had prepared for some of his own friends, little thinking how he should be himself eaten up by a Cat. The King was quite charmed with all he saw, and he liked the young Marquis more and more, not only because he was so rich, and had



PAGE 1

Pussziz Bools. 4 "Help! help! my lord, the Marquis of Carabas, is in danger of being drowned!" The King, seeing it was the same Cat that had brought him the game, sent some of his servants to assist the poor Marquis. Puss then told his Majesty, that while his Lordship was bathing, some thieves had stolen his clothes---which was not true, for Master Puss had hidden them behind a tree, a little way off. The King accordingly sent to the Palace for a rich Court-suit for him to put on, which became him very much, and he looked so handsome that the King's daughter fell in love with him. The King, soon after, invited the Marquis to travel with him, and they came near to a grand Castle, in which an Ogre lived. But Pussy slipped in before them, and was soon quite chatty with the Ogre, saying: "Can't you change yourself into any animal you please ?" "Of course I can," said he; and in a moment he became a roaring lion. The Cat rushed away in alarm; but, when



PAGE 1

I, 1 t 4 V K



PAGE 1

3 Puss z Boots. "Please your Majesty, I have brought this game from the warren belonging to my master, the Marquis of Carabas, who desired me to lay it, with his loyal respects, and offers of service, at your Majesty's feet." Sly Puss! he had himself given his poor master that grand title. The King, much pleased at this mark of homage, graciously accepted of the gift, and sent his thanks to the Marquis. One fine morning, not long after this, Puss heard that the King was going to take a ride by the river's side, with his lovely daughter; so he said to his master: "If you only follow my advice, your fortune is made. Take off your clothes, and get into the river to bathe, just where I shall point out, and leave the rest to me." The young man did as he was bid, without being in the least able to guess what the Cat meant. While he was bathing very coolly, the King and the royal party passed by, and Puss-in Boots, running after them, called out, as loud as he could bawl:



PAGE 1

.. I. 7. II V.., / A



PAGE 1

/.



PAGE 1

AUNT LOUISA'S BIG PICTURE SERIES. 36 KINDS.2 CENTS EACH. Quarto Demi-Six full-page Illustrations, Elegantly Printed in Colors. Teln Little Ni,'' ers. Balby. 1Alplha.let. (f C'Counlltry Scne's. IHe D)iddle Diddle. Plutnanl. Visit to tlie Me llaerie. (Childlrenl in the Wood. Poealhontas. House that Jack Built.. Jack andl t.lle Bean(,1 Stalk. Puss in Boots. Wild Animals.-Part, Oe. Tit., Tiny, and Tittells. My Mother. W ildl ,inmals.-Part Two. Four-Footed Friends. (Cock Robin. Mother Hublard's D)o. Three Little Kitten.' Three Bears. Visit of St. Nicholas. Three GoodFriellds. Toni TllThlumb. Santa (lauis and His Works. Iare and Tortoise. White Cat. ILumpty D)umllpty.-Vol. 1. Rip Van Winkle. Yankee Doodle. HIuml:ty I)umltv.-Vol. 2. Dome.s;tic Anlials. Ft. Ftl. Hole Game fi:;r Little B(os. Robilnson CI'rusoe. Nurselr RPhymes. H-ome lGames flor Little Girls. NE\V PAPER DOLLS. Elegantly Printed in Colors. Put up in Envelopes. The most Amusement for a small outlay of Money that can be found for Little Girls. SIX CENTS EACH, TEN CENTS EACH. FIFTEEN CENTS EACH. Polly Priml. Bessie Bliss. Dottie Dimple. Bride; Gerty Good. Lottie Love. Susie Simple. Bridesmaid, and .JeInny June. Myra Mlild. Beie Brieiglt. Groomsnln. DOJLLY VARDEN DOLLS. Large size, Figures cut out, and Put up in fine Envelopes. TWCENTY'-FIIVE CIEN"TS EC('-1 Baby Blue. | Bertha Blonde. Betsy Brunette. MAGICAL HAND AND MYSTERIOUS QUE-STION-ANSWERER. A JW-EALLY 'ON DNER FUlIJ CONTRL I'VANC'E. Gives a large variety of Questp.ns and Answers, and affords almost endless Amusement for the Family Circle. PRICE $2.00. .Mc L 0 VG HLIN BRI, 0S., P UBLIISHERS,, NEl IFV IYORIK.





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AUNT LOUISA'S BIG PICTURE SERIES. NEW YOK LOIN BRO



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2 Puss-zi Boo/s. The poor youth was too sad to heed Pussy's speech much; but still he got the bag and the little boots made for him, not thinking anything would come of it, for all the Cat's fine speech. No sooner had Puss put on the boots, and placed the bag on his neck, than he bade his master good morning, and boldly started off to the woods. The sly-boots had put some parsley in his bag, that he might tempt some rabbits in a warren he knew of, close by, to come and take a taste of it. Poor little things! they were too simple to suppose he meant mischief; so he very soon coaxed a nice plump young rabbit to have a nibble, and the moment he put his little nose in the bag, Puss drew the string tight, and killed him, as well as one or two more in the same way. Puss was very proud of the good sport' he had had, and went straightoff to the Court, where he asked to speak to the King. When he came before the monarch, who was seated -on a throne, with the Princess, his daughter, by his side, he made a graceful bow, and said:



PAGE 1

* -*q