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Group Title: Aunt Louisa's big picture series
Title: Hare and the tortoise
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00023600/00001
 Material Information
Title: Hare and the tortoise
Series Title: Aunt Louisa's big picture series
Physical Description: 10 leaves. : ;
Language: English
Creator: McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Publisher: McLoughlin Brothers
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: [ca. 1880]
 Subjects
Subject: Animals -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Fables -- 1880   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1880   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1880
Genre: Fables   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: Includes publisher's advertisement.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00023600
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001733485
oclc - 26074500
notis - AJE6149
 Related Items
Other version: Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Content
        Page 1
        Page 1a
        Page 2
        Page 2a
        Page 3
        Page 3a
        Page 3b
        Page 4
        Page 4a
        Page 5
        Page 5a
        Page 6
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
Full Text
AUNT LOUISA'S BIG PICTURE SERIES,


w -~
srTO


.I'


NEW YORK: McLOUGHLIN BR,08,







THE


HARE AND THE TORTOISE.
(NEW VERSION.)


ON


a fine


summer


afternoon the animals


Farmer Jesper's farm met


.for a friendly gossip. There were
cart-horse, and Crummy the cow;


in a shady


I


Captain


on
lane
the


a motherly


sow who had left her litter fast asleep, and who
was familiarly addressed as Tiggy; Cockalorum
Wakemup, who dated his letters from "The Barn


Door;"


Pintoe, a gander;


Bubbleyjock, the tur-


key, and a dozen or more of the female


of the three gallants last named.


farm matters were freely
and Crummy signified that


concerned


exchange


so far


things went on pleasantly


relatives


Opinions on
ed. Captain


as they were


enough;


but Tiggy declared that the stuff put into her


trough was shamefully
of her family; and th


thin, considering the


size


e poultry complained that


the new maid was stingy with the barley.


The Baldwin Library
&f/jn VSij


Bub-


-- --





The Hare and Fte Tortoise.


bleyjock vowed that if


Bob Jesper did not leave


off pelting him when he came from school he
would make his ugly red calves smart (Bubbley-.
jock said "ugly" because his own calves were
mere drumsticks); and Cockalorum Wakemup,


perched on the top rail of


a five-barred


was just thrilling his friends with a "creepy" story
of how a fox prowled about the fowl-house for


several hours on the previous night, when


who


should come up but


Tibby, a pert young cox-


comb of a hare, well known, in those parts.
Hullo! you fellows, what's your diminutive


diversion ?"


said Tibby, as he bounded into the


middle of the group. (Tibby, like other conceit-
ed people, was noted for -using fine words.)


Captain, "we're


quiet chat after dinner, Tib.
game ?"


"Well, look


just having a
iat's your little


here; I'm ready-to run any


you for anything you like to name."
"There he is again," cried several,


of


impati-


"Run, run, run; nothing but 'run' when-


" "As though," added Crummy,


gate,


replied


ently.


ever you see him.






3 The Hare at

"it was something very


Tortoise.


grand to


spend one's


in eating, sleeping,


and running.


"What do you know about it, you cross old


thing ?
to be


(This to Crummy, who was old enough


his grandmother.)


Well, if you are not


game, I am;" and laughing heartily at
little joke, he was tuning away, when
voice was heard from out the grass:


his


own


a sleepy


"Stop a bit, Tib;


if nobody


else will


I will,


for two miles."


"Who's that?" the company cried in a breath;
and they answered themselves as they exclaimed
in great amazement, "Why, it's little Tortums!"
And sure enough it was Tortums. Now Tor-
tums, I must tell you, was a tortoise, whose quiet,
modest behavior had made him a general favor-


ite, and who, hearing the clatter of


crawled


down


voices, had


from the farm-house unperceived,


to learn what was going on..


Need I say that his


friends, who were quite


taken aback by this extraordinary piece of
assertion on the part of Tortums, entreated


not to expose himself to certain defeat? Tibby


life


you,


race


self
him


Yd the






The Hare andl the 2

laughed until his sides ached;


matter
was a


of that, did Cockalorum


bit of


a friend


ortoise.


and so, for the
Wakemup, who


of his: but Tortums was


not to be put off.
"If nobody else will


race him, I will,


all;" and he winked at Tiggy, as much as to say,
"I know my man."


So they agreed that, just


for


thing, Tortums should race Tibby.


the fun of the
The challen-


ger at first stood upon his dignity, and declared
the whole thing to be too absurd to be thought
of for a moment, but the company threatened to
cut him if he backed out; so off they ran to the


turnpike road, in high
sport.


glee at the prospect of


When Tortums had come up, Captain drew a
line across the road with his hoof, and required


Tibby and Tortums to toe it.
"Are you ready ?" cried (


"All right,"


replied the


Captain.
)mpetitors.


"Very well, then:
'Bell, horses; bell, horses; what time of day ?
One o'clock, two o'clock, three and awayl'"


that's


C(






The Hare and /he


Off galloped Tibby, and was instantly lost to
sight round a bend in the road, whilst little Tor-
turs started at a brisk crawl under a volley of
good-natured banter from his friends, who re-


garded the race as the best joke of the


season.


When Tibby had reached the first milestone


he slackened his


pace,


and said to himself,


"Pheugh!


it's melting hot this afternoon.


It will


be an hour at least before that little idiot reaches
here, so I'll lie down in the grass and have a rest."
He lay down---he dozed---he fell fast asleep!
Meanwhile, Tortums stuck to his work brave-
ly, accompanied .by his friends, and within an hour
had nearly reached the first milestone, when Cap-


fatigued


had stepped out to the fr


with walking so slowly,
ont to stretch his legs,


came running back with the momentous news
that he had spied Tib fast asleep at the side of


those present that after all


win, and they


of


little Tortums might


agreed to pass the unconscious


braggart on tiptoe and in


perfect silence.


plan answered admirably, though


The
awk-


tain, who, being


the road.


The truth flashed across the minds


Tortoise.


Tiggy's





The Hare and the Tortoise.


wardness in doing her best to carry out the tip-
toe plan nearly led to a burst of laughter.
On, and on, and on plodded little Sobersides,
His friends were in momentary expectation of
seeing Tibby flash past them; but he came not,
and just as twilight was .setting in, Tortums
reached the goal.
"Three cheers for Tortums," cried the excite-
able Cockalorum, "and take the time from me.
"Hip, hip, hurrah!" shouted the company,
and at that moment Tibby was seen coming up
the road at a mad gallop. But it was too late.
SHe had lost the race!
"And now, dears, for the moral," I said, as I
first told the story at my own fireside.
"Oh, never mind the moral, papa; we know
all about that," interjected Frank, my eldest; and
it being the first duty of papas in this enlight-
ened age to do as they are bid, I left the story
to point its own moral. Fortunately it lies upon
the s.urface.




7'"A-VI 3


. New Picture.Books for Little Children.

4 A&UNT LOS UIS ASanta Claus and his Works.
SU IWonderful Adventures of Hunipty C
BIG PICTURE SERIES.
TDurpty.--vTwo VOLUMES.
Quarto, demi. Sixfull page Illustrations
printed in colors in each. Nursery hlyinis,
PICE, IS. house tlhat Jack lBuilt,
PRICE, SD N EACH.
"i!--- Wild'Aiimnals.--'l'Two BooKSs.
Three Bears, Mo,,I i ,,l)lrl's l),,
Tj flfom rh1 mil), Tit, Tiy', aid Tittells,
I Domestic Animals, ou,'-l i r S
Vi 1' 'our-loot e(l Fie s l(Is
Visit to tih Menagerie, ,li, i e
STh-ree Little Kittens,
I Home Gaimes for Little Boys, ( Ii
FHome Gane. I'm- Little Girls, COl Kl.
o little Girls, (Cock Robin.
Yankee Doodlle
I Kobinson CIusoe,
White Cat, GOLDEN LIGHT SERIES. 6
H1cy Didhdle )id L h'l (_lildren il tlhe \oo, Illuminations elegantly printed in colors.
< Jack anId t lic llcl-Stalk. 6 kinds. Covers printed in Gilt.
Hawe ait 1m oi-tois
S ire and tortoisee, PrICE, 15i CENTS I
SlI'ss in Boots,
M1 My other, Early Life of Jesus,
Sip "an Winkle, Wondrious Wor)ks of1 .Jess,
Yankee Doodle, Last )Davs of Jesus,
Tat Boy, The Twelve Apostles,
From Charles Dickens. Peter's Miraculous )Deliverance.
Visit of St. Nicholas, The Proial So.i.
Old Poem, with New Illustrations. The P nodigal Soil.
McLOUGHLIN BROS., Publishers, 71 & 73 Duane St., N.Y.
_- t
~~_~,~Iji




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