On the journey

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
On the journey
Series Title:
Violet stories
Alternate title:
Little Rosy's travels
Physical Description:
61, 2 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 12 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Miller, Thomas, 1807-1874 ( Attributed name )
Sheldon & Company (New York, N.Y.) ( Publisher )
Boston Stereotype Foundry ( Electrotyper )
Publisher:
Sheldon and Company
Place of Publication:
New York
Manufacturer:
Electrotyped at the Boston Stereotype Foundry
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1868

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Railroad travel -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Fathers and daughters -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Invalids -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Hand-colored illustrations -- 1870   ( local )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1870   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1870
Genre:
Hand-colored illustrations   ( local )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston

Notes

General Note:
Attributed to Thomas Miller ... et al.. Cf. NUC pre-1956, v. 336, p. 287.
General Note:
Added engraved series t.p.
General Note:
Publisher's advertisements follow text.
General Note:
Baldwin Library copy illustrations are hand-colored: probably by young owner.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
General Note:
"Marion Jennison from her teacher Mary A. Rawson"

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002447117
notis - AMF2371
oclc - 56811568
System ID:
UF00023507:00001

Related Items

Related Items:
Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
This page contains no text.


I
The Baldwin Library
m Plonda
.f- .. ....UnlvC sity
IRtBH


A m"
- 2.;-.-~~L,,,.....;-. ...._:r~I


This page contains no text.


I


" Rosy thought she might as well pack her own box,
and save her mamma the trouble."
(2) I


il// is
<I
/ ,<
I
I
(Uk


LITTLE ROSY'S TRAVELS.
SIX VOLUMES.
ON THE JOURNEY.
A WALK AND A DRIVE.
THE DUCKS AND PIGS.
THE WOUNDED BIRD.
A SAD ADVENTURE.
THE DOCTOR'S VISIT.


Little osy's Travels.
ON THE JOURNEY.
ILLUSTRA TED.
Stfn ?00ft:
SHELDON AND COMPANY.
1870.


Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 188,
BY SHELDON AND COMPANY,
'In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the Southern
District of New York.
Eletrotyped at the
BOSTON STEREOTYPE FOUNDRY,
NO. 19 Spring L.ne.


PACKING UP.
HE summer had come
and gone, and the au-
tumn had come, too, and
was nearly gone, when
Rosy Girard sat on her papa's knee i,
one evening and heard a grand piece :
of news% None of my little friends
could ever guess what this piece of
news was about, or what made her
deap her little fat hands so very
loud, and give her dear papa so
(7)


8 ON THE JOURNEY.
many hugs and kisses: so they may
as well be told at once that Rosy
was going into the country; and that
was the very thing she liked above
all things~
'Now Rosy had been born in Lon-
don, and every day when it was fine
she went out, of course, like other
little girls, for what nurse called a
nice walk in one of the squares."
She had no little brother or sister to
go with her; but then she had her
dear doll, Julia, who always went
out with her, and to whom she told
all her secrets. Sometimes, too,
she took her hoop, and had great
games with that, while nurse carried'
Miss Julia'for her. Still, though


PACKING UP.
9
Rosy liked these walks all very
well, they were nothing like such
good fun as it would be to run about
in the sweet fields, picking flowers
and making daisy-chains for her
dear mamma, or playing on the
sea-shore with the sand and shells,
while the wild waves "ran after
her."
Rosy was going a very long we
off, first in a train and then in a boat,
and then in a train again, till she
came to a place where it would be
warm all the winter, and where she
would be able to pick flowers just
when her little! cousins in England
were making snow-balls. In short,
Rosy was going to a place called


10 ON THE JOURNEY.
Cannes, in her papa's own country
- France; for Rosy's mamma hal
been very poorly lately, and papa
was sure there was no place like
that for making her strong again.
It was a fine thing to tell nurse,
certainly: or, rather, to make nurse
guess. Rosy thought she never
could guess it right; but somehow
she did, even to the day when they
were to go; and when she had
washed the little girl and put on her
night-gown, the good nurse bade
her kneel down by her little bed and
pray to her great Father in heaven
that he would take care of them all
on that long, long journey, and
make the nice, warm place do dear


PACKING UP.
11
mamma a great deal of good, so
that she might come back quite
strong and well again. Afterwards
she gave Rosy a kiss, and tucked her
up very tight and snug in bed, and
told her to go to sleep very fast,
because they were going to begin
packing to-morrow.
Rosy wished very much then that
to-morrow were already come; but
her little eyelids soon shut over the
blue eyes, and did notgpen again
until it was nearly breakfast time.
How busy the little maiden was
all that morning! First, she had to
dress Julia, of course; and while
she was putting her day clothes on,
she had to tell her the good news ?
.n' "t ';/.*


12 ON THE JOURNEY.
Rosy fancied, however, that the
good doll was not much pleased;
she said that she had made a great
face when she heard that she was
going away from all the fine shops;
but that might have been fancy, of
course. Dolls are never so rude as
to make faces!
Rosy's mamma and nurse were
very busy packing up all day, and
they went out two or three times
to buy things which they thought
would be wanted for the journey;
so the little girl was left to run
about, and amuse herself with hIr
doll. But she did not like to see
other people busy, and do noth-
ing but play herself; so she thought


PACKING UP.
13
she might as well pack her own box,
and save her mamma the trouble.
Dear mamma would be so pleased
when she found it was all done, and
that she had not got to stoop down
any more!
First, she put in the dearest of
all her treasures, I mean Julia her-
self, her cradle, and all the dolly's
clothes- the common ones, and the
company frocks, the beautiful new
hat, and the two cloaks, as well as
the shoes and stockings.
Next came a cage with another
great pet, Mr. Tommy, the yellow
canary which uncle Henry had
given her not long ago. This cage
was on the nursery table, as


14 ON THE JOURNEY.
happened, that day, and the little
girl managed very cleverly, as she
thought, by mounting on a chair to
draw it to the edge, and then when
she got down again she was just
able to carry it in her little fat hands
from the table to the box, though in
doing so she spilt some of the water
in. the glass and made the cage very
wet.
It was a great matter to get Julia
and Tommy safely packed, and Rosy
thought she was getting on splen-
didly. But there were two other
treasures that must go, too; and
these were a beautiful vase of flowers
which grandmamma had given her
only yesterday, and the rose-tree


PACKING UP.
15
which still had many roses on it,
and from which Rosy often picked
one as a present for mamma.
The vase got quite safely into its
corner, and the great big pot was
tightly clasped in the fat round arms,
and just going to be popped in. It
was almost too heavy for the little
woman to carry; and perhaps in
going down into its place the hard
pot might have broken the glass
vase. Mamma, however, came into
the room just in time.
She showed her little girl that
the lid of the trunk could never
shut over so tall a thing; how dark
it would be for the poor bird if he
were fastened up for so long a time;


16 ON THE JOURNEY
and besides that, if all these things
went in, there would be no place
for Rosy's own frocks and pina-
fores. So, though it did cost a few
tears at first, when she thought of
leaving the dickey-bird and the
flowers behind, yet the little maiden
was very brave, and choked down
her sobs as soon as she could, that
she might go with a pleasant face to
ask dear grandmamma to take care
of her treasures until she came back
again to Old England.
Grandmamma lived just across
the road: but nurse was so very
busy that Rosy had to coax Sally,
the housemaid, to tie on her hat and
take her over. She could not be


PACKING UP.
17
quite happy again until she knew
that dear little Tommy would have
some one to sing to, and some one
to give him seed and water every
morning. But when the good
grandmamma had promised to take
great care of him, and to water the,
rose-tree every day, she came back
very fast, that the good-natured Sally
might have time to run back with
them both before dinner time.
And then, when Rosy had said,
"Good by" two or three times to
Tommy, and picked one pretty rose
for mamma's waistband, she ran
into the nursery, and was soon very
busy again folding; up her doll's
clothes and putting: them into a little
2


18 ON THE JOURNEY.
box which her mamma had given
her on purpose.
So Rosy had some packing to do
after all.


IN THE TRAIN.
19
IN THE TRAIN.
Hi" HE happy "journey-day"
soon came, and Rosy
found herself for the first
time looking out of the
window of a train. At first the
loud whistles and shrieks of the
engine made her just a little bit
afraid as she walked along the plat-
form; and she held her papa's hand
very tightly. But when they got
into the carriage, he took her on his
knee, and told her that it was only in
a hurry to be off; so she tried to
laugh, and very soon they began to


20 ON THE JOURNEY.
move, and everything seemed to
move, too.
"0, look, papa !" she said; "all
the houses are running along, and
the bridges, too look, they are run-
ning away from us so fast! "
It was a long while before she
could understand that the houses
and bridges stood just where they
always had done, and that the train
with Rosy in it was running away
from them.
They seemed to go over the tops
of a great many houses, and past
some very narrow streets. And
down a long way below them, on
the: pavements and in the roads,
there were many children at play.


* O locl, papa, all the houses are running along !
- and the bridges, too! "
(21)


0
Ii
~~~~~~~~~~


IN THE TRAIN.
23
k But they were poor, ragged chil-
dren, with pale faces, and they did
not look happy at all.
Rosy saw some also looking out
of the windows with their mothers,
and she turned round, and said to
her mamma that they were dirty and
cross, not nice little girls at all.
"And how would Rosy look,"
asked mamma, "if she had had no
breakfast this morning, or if nurse
were ill and could not wash her
face, or if she were very ill herself,
and no one had money to buy her
medicine ?"
Rosy looked very grave then, and
said she would save some of her
pennies to give these poor little


24 ON THE JOURNEY.
children when she came back again;
and by that time they had passed
the narrow streets, and had come to
some very, very large houses, with
great, tall chimneys; and papa told
her that once upon a time he had
been inside a place like those, and
seen lots of boys and girls helping
to make the little round night-lights,
one of which nurse once had burning
all night in a saucer when Rosy was
sick.
Afterwards they passed some very
bare fields, with little rows of cab-
bages growing first here and there
in patches; and a few very black-
looking trees; and the little girl
cried out so loud that they were


IN THE TRAIN.
25
coming to the country at last, that
she quite startled an old gentleman,
who was trying to go to sleep in
the opposite corner, and made papa
say, -
"Hush, Rosy! not so loud; we
shall see something much prettier
soon."
And so they did. For in a little
while out of both windows they
could only see real green fields and
delightful hills, with many trees
growing on them. And Rosy, who
was beginning to grow tired of
sitting still, thought she should very
much like to get out for a little
while and pick daisies and butter-
cups.


26 ON THE JOURNEY.
So mamma looked in her bag to
find a biscuit, and told Rosy that
when she had eaten that she had
better go to sleep.
Papa put some earpet-bags for
mamma to rest her feet upon, and
he put his little girl down by her
side; and though she was quite
sure that she was not one wee bit
sleepy, yet mamma soon saw the
little head begin to droop, and the
eyelashes fall over the eyes; and
then she just put her arm round her
darling, and both of them went fast
asleep.
They were waked up again by a
very loud squeal from the engiy,
and by feeling that the train was
stopping.


IN THE TRAIN. 27
Rosy started up, and was so
frightened that she began to cry.
But her kind papa took her in his
arms again, and said "it was all
right; they were only stopping at a
station." And though Rosy did not
know what they meant, yet she saw
that there was a great bustle, and
that some people were getting out
and others getting into the car-
riages.
She asked whether it were not
time for them to get out too; but
mamma said, -
"O, no, dear, not yet; you had
better lie down and go to sleep
again."
But Rosy was wide awake now;


28 ON THE JOURNEY.
and besides, just at that moment
there came up to the carriage door
a very merry-looking little boy,
with a monkey on his shoulder.
The monkey had a chain fastened
to his leg, and looked very good-
tempered, though rather mischiev-
ous; and the boy wanted to get into
the carriage and bring his monkey,
too.
Rosy's mamma looked rather
frightened about this, and papa said
it could not come in. He told its
young master to have it put with
the dogs, or anywhere, except
among the passengers; but Rosy
said, -
"0, do let it come in, papa It
will be such fun."


IN THE TRAIN.
29
Just then up came a man to take
the monkey away; and Rosy looked
quite disappointed, till her papa told
her that monkeys are often very
spiteful, and will bite and scratch.
Then she thought she would
rather not have such a companion,
though she did want something to
play with very badly. And to her
great joy, just before the train
started again, in came an old lady
with a little girl, just about her own
size, and a large bird-cage covered
with a shawl.
0, how curious she was to know
what sort of bird was under that
shawl! But she had not to wait
long; for very soon the other little


30 ON THE JOURNEY.
girl began to pull it aside, and Rosy
heard something say, -
"Pretty Polly! pretty Polly!
pretty dear !"
" 0, mamma, a parrot, I do de-
clare said Rosy, in a very loud
whisper, as she slid down off the
seat, and, with her finger in her
mouth, sidled up to the cage.
Rosy was rather bashful some-
times, but she soon got over it now,
when the kind old lady asked her to
come and look at her little one's
pet.
It was a beautiful green bird,
with a long tail, and a rose-colored
ring round its neck, and it seemed
to like little girls very much, and


IN THE TRAIN.
31
came to the front of the cage to talk
to them.
Her papa told Rosy that the par-
rot and the monkey most likely
came from the same country -a
country where it was too 'hot for
little girls to go out in the middle
of the day. And the old lady said
that her little girl had only just
come from that hot country, and that
it was called India. She said, too,
that Polly came with her, and could
say her name, which was Annie;
and she put the two little girls side
by side, and told them to be very
good friends, and talk to each other
until they got to Dover.
So Rosy had a great pleasure on


32 ON THE JOURNEY.
that first train-journey of hers, and
she and Annie played very nicely
together, without quarrelling at all,
until they were not far from their
journey's end.
Then Rosy went back to her
mamma, and said she was tired of
playing. So papa lifted her on his
knee again, and let her look out of
the window and watch for Dover
Castle, and the first peep of the sea
and the ships.


IN THE TRAIN.
33
STILL ON THE JOURNEY.
M""" ~UT still the train went on
and on. Now there was
a whistle, just as if it were
going to stop, and Rosy
strained her eyes to see what they
were coming to, and strained them
in vain. At last she said she was
quite sure that "Dover was never
coming at all," and quietly laid her
head against her papa, and began to
amuse herself with his watch and
seals. And what do our little
readers think happened then? Why
then, in spite of her having made
3


34 ON THE JOURNEY.
up her mind not to go to sleep, she
did go to sleep. And when mamma
saw that, she said "it was a very
good thing."
So papa did not wake her up,
but held her tight and snug. His
arm made a very comfortable pillow,
and for a counterpane he put a shawl
over her.
The train went jogging and shak-
ing on, till it rocked her into a
sounder sleep than I think she had
ever had in her life. And then, as
most people do, Rosy began to
dream.
Dreams are sometimes very nasty
things, and sometimes very nice
ones, you know. Sometimes, when


IN THE TRAIN.
little boys and girls have been
Ireaming, they wake up laughing;
that must be when the dream was
about something funny: sometimes
they wake up crying, and that must
be when the dream was about some-
thing which they do not like.
Well, Rosy's dream was rather
a nice one, and rathei a long one
too: and it was partly about some-
thing that she liked very much in-
deed. I mean her dear dolly, who
was all this while lying comfortably
in the trunk that Rosy had helped
to pack.
In her dream Rosy forgot all
about this journey, and thought that
she was in the Zoological Gardens,


36 ON THE JOURNEY.
carrying Julia in one arm, and a
bun for the bears in the other hand.
It was a large bun, and Rosy
could not help thinking that there
would be enough left for the bears
if she were to take just a little bite
herself. But then her mamma told
her that it was not the sort of bun
that she would like; that it had a
bitter taste. So, in her dream,
Rosy hoped that when she got home
again her dear mamma might, per-
haps, give her a nice piece of cake
instead, if she were very good.
So she walked on very fast, and
talked to Julia as she went along.
She told her that bears bite, and
even eat little children if they can


IN THE TRAIN.
37
get them, and that they growl and
fight, and that little children must
not be like bears.
Rosy thought that it was very hot
in these gardens, and that she ran
on the grass, and wished she might
pick some flowers. But the grass
was not thick and soft under her
feet, but brown and dry, and in
some places it was all trodden off.
There seemed to be a great many
people walking along, and the bears'
den seemed to be just in front of
them, yet, though they all kept walk-
ing on, no one seemed to get near it.
Rosy thought too that she saw
the pelicans, and all the curious
water-birds only a little way off,


38 ON THE JOURNEY.
some in their cages, some by the
water side. She heard the monkeys,
and peeped in at the door of the
great monkey-house. But that was
full of people too. She only saw
two monkeys, high up in their cage,
grinning at one another; and one
of these monkeys had got a sort of
paper cap, which he would keep
squeezing on to the head of the
other monkey, over face and all, so
that he could not see a bit. And
when Rosy saw that, she told Julia
that that was mischief, and that she
must not be mischievous.
Then they seemed to go on again,
and to come to the lions' den, where
the lions and lionesses were walking


IN THE TRAIN.
39
up and down, just as they always
do, looking at the people now and
then, but not at all unkindly. And
Rosy told Julia that the lion was
the king of beasts papa said so."
All this was in her dream, you
know. She did not really see any-
thing, though in the summer time
she had been to these gardens with
her papa and mamma, and now in
her sleep she thought she was there
again.
It seemed to be a long time that
she wandered about, seeing all kinds
of animals and birds, but never
getting any nearer to the bears the
whole time.
And all the while she thought


40 ON THE JOURNEY.
that she was talking to her doll,
and teaching her to be good. How
very odd it is that little girls always
know exactly how dolls ought to
behave, and so often forget to be
good themselves !
Rosy finished her dream by think-
ing that she and Julia went home in a
goat-chaise. She thought that she
had the reins in her own hand, and
that the goats went very fast-
faster than her mamma could walk,
so that she had to stop sometimes to
let her come up.
She had tried to make room for
her inside the chaise, but mamma
would not get in; so they went jog-
ging on, till, in her dream, Rosy got


IN THE TRALN.
41
very sleepy and tired, and wished
that she were at home again.
This dream did not take long after
all, though it sounds so long; and
before it was done, the train had
stopped, and mamma had got out,
and sent nurse to look after the
boxes. Papa took Rosy's hand,
and then they all walked down to
the steamboat.
Mamma went to lie down in the
ladies' cabin, and nurse went into
the cabin where the nurses were,
and Rosy was laid on a cushion
beside her, where she soon fell asleep
again, and slept nicely till the boat
stopped.
Then papa came in to fetch her,


42 ON THE JOURNEY.
and carried her on deck, and she saw
the great wide sea, with its rolling
waves running after one another,
and tossing all the little boats about.
She saw lots of boxes on board too,
and lots of Englishmen putting them
on to the shore, and the Frenchmen
taking them, and saying a great
many words that Rosy could not
understand, though she did know a
little French, because her papa had
taught her.
And very soon they were in a
great room, full of little tables, and
having their dinner with the other
people who had been in the boat.
And after dinner they got into a
train once more. It was getting


"rapa had his little girl to carry, and he did not
want her to wake."
(43)


This page contains no text.


IN THE TRATN. 45
dark then, and Rosy's bed time.
So she soon went fast asleep again.
And when they got to the end of
their journey, nurse took care of
the boxes, for papa had his little
girl to carry, and he did not want
her to wake. And she never woke
till she found herself in a strange
bed next morning, and heard nurse
telling her it was breakfast time.
""basd$


46 ON THE JOURNEY.
IN FRANCE.
S OSY was so surprised
[ ,- I She could not make it
j~,,i out at all, and she said,
I-"- "But I was in a boat
yesterday, and then I was in a train;
how did I get here ?"
It took a long time to explain.
But Rosy had slept in a very pretty
little bed, which had curtains round
it all covered with roses, and she
had to ask a great many questions
about that. It was a dear little
bed, and Rosy wanted to know if
she were to sleep in it always now.
I


" But I was in a boat yesterday, and then I was in a
train. How did I get here?"
(47)


I


IN FRANCE.
49
"0, no," nurse said, "we are not
in our new home yet: there are
more trains to come before we get
there."
So Rosy made haste to dress, and
go down to her mamma, that she
might find out all sorts of things.
Papa told her that they were in
Paris now; that soon she should go
out and see the fine streets and
shops. The house belonged to an
old friend of papa's. It was a
funny old house, with trees round
it, and quite away from the busy
streets.
Her legs were too short to carry
her a very long way; but she liked
very much going into a toy-shop to
4


50 ON THE JOURNEY.
buy a beautiful soft lamb, which her
papa gave her to play with in the
next train. And she was not very
sorry when mamma took her into
another shop to buy a pretty box of
sweet things, which the French call
bon-bons." There were some
white, and some buff, and some
pink ones; but Rosy was only al-
lowed to taste one, because, they
were intended to amuse her when
they went on again.
So when the little girl thought
of all these nice things, she was not
so sorry as before that the journey
was not done yet, and did not feel
so tired at the idea of "trains
again."


IN FRANCE.
51
But mamma was very tired and
very poorly too, and papa had a
great many friends to visit, whom he
had not seen for a long time. And
they had not seen his little girl
either; so they all staid in Paris
for a few days: and that was very
nice.
One day Rosy was taken into a
large house, where there were a
great many pictures. It was called
a palace. Another day she walked
in a very fine garden, and a third
day she went to play with some
little French girls, and see their
dolls.
That was a very funny visit, for
they could only say a very little


52 ON THE JOURNEY.
English, and Rosy could only speak
a very little French; so they looked
at each other and laughed, and
pointed to things, and kissed one
another, but did not talk much.
Then came the train journey
again. It was not new now; and
Rosy did get very tired. But her
papa held her on his knee again, and
let her look out of the window; and
then she played with her lamb, and
ate her sugar-plums, and tried to be
a good girl.
They stopped again to see some
other friends at a large, large town
called Lyons, where lots of silks
are made for ladies' dresses. Rosy's
mamma took her to see how they


IN FRANCE.
53
were made, and a kind gentleman
gave her a little piece of bright
blue silk to make her doll a new
frock.
Then came the last long ride, and
Rosy was so tired this time that she
could not help crying for a part of
the way.
At last the train came close to
the sea, and papa told her that now
they would soon be there. She
watched the boats on the sea, and
thought how she would like to be in
one of them. And she watched the
great high hills as they seemed to
run by them; and in the fields there
were some very funny-looking
sheep, so tall and with such long


54 ON THE JOURNEY.
legs that they did not look like the
sheep that Rosy used to see.
At last there came a very loud,
long whistle, and papa cried out,-
"Here we are Here we are in
Cannes at last! "
Then there came a great bustle,
and very soon papa, mamma, and
Rosy were all sitting at lunch to-
gether in a pretty room which had a
garden in front of it full of orange-
trees.
0, what fun it was to see the
oranges growing! Rosy was so
fond of oranges But unfortunately
these were not ripe yet; they were
still only green, and not yellow;


IN FRANCE.
55
so she must wait, and watch them
very patiently until they got ripe.
Now there was a little grass
growing under the trees; not a
regular grass-plot -it is too dry at
Cannes for grass-plots such as we
have in England; but still a little,
growing tall and thin, and mixed
with pretty wild flowers of many
sorts, and much larger and brighter
than she had ever seen growing wild
before.
So after lunch was over Rosy
slipped down off her chair, got on
her mamma's lap, and whispered
something. I dare say you will
know what it was when I tell you
that her mamma said "Yes," and


56 ON THE JOURNEY.
put on her little girl's hat again. At
any rate it was not long before a
little round maiden was to be seen
stooping down under one of the
largest trees and picking something
as fast as her fat hand would move.
They seemed in a short time to
have picked more than they could
anyhow hold at once, for just when
a splendid nosegay was coming to-
gether, down fell a lot of the very
prettiest flowers from the side at
which the blue eyes were not look-
ing. And this happened two or
three times, until at last that fat
little woman got quite impatient; and
sitting down on the ground, let all
the red and pink and blue and yel-


IN FRANCE.
57
low flowers tumble in a heap into
her lap.
And as she let them fall she gave
them a little slap, and said, -
"You naughty things! you are
very tiresome. Rosy won't try any
more, she won't."
Then she covered them over with
her frock, lest the wind should blow
them all away, and held up her little
head to see if any of the green
oranges were getting just a little
wee bit yellow.
She looked so longingly and so
eagerly that there came a step closer
and closer to her, and some one
even sat down by her side and put
an arm all round her, before she


58 ON THE JOURNEY.
guessed that any one was near.
But it was a kind arm, and a voice
that she knew very well; for it was
her own nursey who said, -
" So, Rosy has quite forgotten all
about
'Try, try, try again,
You can do it if you try.'"
No, I can't, nurse," cried Rosy;
"I can't, I can't: they're naughty
flowers, and won't be tied together.
I wanted to make a nosegay for
mamma; but they won't go up into
a nosegay, they won't."
" Then see if you can't make two
instead of one: a nosegay for mamma
and another for papa. Then there
won't be so many together, and


IN FRANCE.
59
perhaps they won't quarrel so
much."
Rosy gave a merry laugh at the
idea of flowers quarrelling, and set
to work very busily to sort the flow-
ers, as nurse advised her.
First she picked out all the red
ones and put them by themselves,
then all the pink, and then the blue
and yellow, and when she had got
four heaps, she took half of each of
them, and found that now she had a
bunch which she could quite well
hold in her fat hands-yes, even
in one hand; so she held it quite
tight, so that not one flower should
tumble out while she wound the
string which she had brought on


60 ON THE JOURNEY.
purpose all the way from London,
round and round and round them,
and then asked nurse to tie the two
ends.
But nurse said, "No; she must
try and do it all herself," and told her
to lay it carefully down, and have
both hands free to tie the bow.
Rosy knew how to tie a bow, be-
cause she had learnt a good while
ago. She did not like learning
that, for at first the tape on which
she learnt would keep coming un-
done; but nurse said then, too,
"Try, try, try," and so Rosy was
brave, and did try. So now she
could tie her nosegays up quite well
when she had both hands free. And


IN FRANCE. 61
when she had made them both up,
don't you think she was much more
pleased to be able to say, "I did
them all myself," than she would
have been if she had gone in and
said, "Mamma, I began to make
you a nosegay, but it won't go up
at all ?"


This page contains no text.


JUVENILE BOOKS
PUBLISHED BY
SHELDON & COMPANY,
N ~ W Y- C I K .
ROLLO'S TOUR IN EUROPE. By
JACOB ABBOTT. 10 vols. Price per vol. $.90
ABBOTT'S AMERICAN HISTORY.
By JACOB ABBO'rr. 8 vols. Price per
vol .................. 1.25
THE FLORENCE STORIES. By
JACOB ABBIOTT. 6 vols. Price per vol. 1.00
THE ROLLO BOOKS. By JACOB
ABBOTT. 14 vols. Price per vol ... .65
THE SAME. Large Paper Edition.
Per vol................. .90
THE ROLLO STORY BOOKS. By
JACOB ABBOTT. 12 vols. Price per vol. .40
THE HARLIE STORIES. 6 vols. By
JACOB ABBOTT. Price per vol..... .50
WALTER'S TOUR IN THE EAST.
By D. C. EDDY, D. 6 vols. Price
per vol................ .90
THE OAKLAND STORIES. By GEO.
B. TAYLOR. 4 vols. Price per vol... .90


Sheldon 4 Co.'s Juvenile Publications.
ARTHUR'S HOME STORIES. By
T. S. ARTHUR. 3 vols. Price per vol.. $1.00
THE GOOD BOY'S LIBRARY. 10
vols. Price per vol ......... .60
THE GOOD GIRL'S LIBRARY. 10
vols. Price per vol.......... .60
ROSE MORTON SERIES. 5 vols.
Price per vol. ......... .65
PARLEY'S COTTAGE LIBRARY.
By PETER PARLEY. 12 vols. Price per
vol................... .0
THE BRIGHTHOPE SERIES. By
J. T. TROWBRIDGE. 5 vols. Price per
vol ................. .80
THE SUNNYSIDE SERIES. 3 vols.
By MRS. E. STUART PHELPS. Price per
vol. .. ......... ...... .80
STORIES OF OLD. 3 vols. By CARO-
LINE HADLEY. Price per vol ...... 1.25
CHILDREN'S SAYINGS. By CARO-
LINE HADLEY. Price ......... 1.00
THE SPECTACLE SERIES FOR
YOUNG EYES. By SARAH W. LAN-
DER. 8 vols., elegantly illustrated. Price
per vol.................. 1.00
THE GELDART SERIES. By MRS.
THOMAS GELDART. Illustrated by John
Gilbert. 6vols. 16mo. Gilt back. Per
vol.................... 60


I


.&


~, I -;-;. - ,
llM am^ tl .


This page contains no text.


This page contains no text.





Sheldon 4 Co.'s Juvenile Publications.

ARTHUR'S HOME STORIES. By
T. S. ARTHUR. 3 vols. Price per vol.. $1.00

THE GOOD BOY'S LIBRARY. 10
vols. Price per vol. ...... ... .60

THE GOOD GIRL'S LIBRARY. 10
vols. Price per vol..... .... .60

ROSE MORTON SERIES. 5 vols.
Price per vol...... ............ .65

PARLEY'S COTTAGE LIBRARY.
By PETER PARLEY. 12 vols. Price per
vol .. ......... ....... .00

THE BRIGHTHOPE SERIES. By
J. T. TROWBRIDGE. 5 vols. Price per
vol ............. .... ... .80

THE SUNNYSIDE SERIES. 3 vols.
By MRS. E. STUART PHELPS. Price per
vol.............. ....... .80

STORIES OF OLD. 3 vols. By CARO-
LINE HADLEY. Price per vol ...... .1.25

CHILDREN'S SAYINGS. By CARO-
LINE HADLEY. Price ......... 1.00

THE SPECTACLE SERIES FOR
YOUNG EYES. By SARAH W. LAN-
DER. 8 vols., elegantly illustrated. Price
per vol .................. 1.00

THE GELDART SERIES. By MRS.
THOMAS GELDART. Illustrated by John
Gilbert. 6vols. 16mo. Gilt back. Per
vol .................... .60






IN FRANCE.


O, no," nurse said, "we are not
in our new home yet: there are
more trains to come before we get
there."
So Rosy made haste to dress, and
go down to her mamma, that she
might find out all sorts of things.
Papa told her that they were in
Paris now; that soon she should go
out and see the fine streets and
shops. The house belonged to an
old friend of papa's. It was a
funny old house, with trees round
it, and quite away from the busy
streets.
Her legs were too short to carry
her a very long way; but she liked
very much going into a toy-shop to
4





IN FRANCE.


low flowers tumble in a heap into
her lap.
And as she let them fall she gave
them a little slap, and said, -
"You naughty things! you are
very tiresome. Rosy won't try any
more, she won't."
Then she covered them over with
her frock, lest the wind should blow
them all away, and held up her little
head to see if any of the green
oranges were getting just a little
wee bit yellow.
She looked so longingly and so
eagerly that there came a step closer
and closer to her, and some one
even sat down by her side and put
an arm all round her, before she






20 ON THE JOURNEY.


move, and everything seemed to
move, too.
"O, look, papa !" she said; "all
the houses are running along, and
the bridges, too look, they are run-
ning away from us so fast! "
It was a long while before she
could understand that the houses
and bridges stood just where they
always had done, and that the train
with Rosy in it was running away
from them.
They seemed to go over the tops
of a great many houses, and past
some very narrow streets. And
down 'a long way below them, on
the pavements and in the roads,
there were many children at play.




36 ON THE JOURNEY.


carrying Julia in one arm, and a
bun for the bears in the other hand.
It was a large bun, and Rosy
could not help thinking that there
would be enough left for the bears
if she were to take just a little bite
herself. But then her mamma told
her that it was not the sort of bun
that she would like; that it had a
bitter taste. So, in her dream,
Rosy hoped that when she got home
again her dear mamma might, per-
haps, give her a nice piece of cake
instead, if she were very good.
So she walked on very fast, and
talked to Julia as she went along.
She told her that bears bite, and
even eat little children if they can






PACKING UP.


mamma a great deal of good, so
that she might come back quite
strong and well again. Afterwards
she gave Rosy a kiss, and tucked her
up very tight and snug in bed, and
told her to go to sleep very fast,
because they were going to begin
packing to-morrow.
Rosy wished very much then that
to-morrow were already come; but
her little eyelids soon shut over the
blue eyes, and did notapen again
until it was nearly I.ri:akt:.it time.
How busy the little maiden was
all that morning! First, she had to
dress Julia, of course; and while
she was putting her day clothes on,
she had to tell her the go.ud Iueis.






18 ON THE JOURNEY.

box which her mamma had given
her on purpose.
So Rosy had some packing to do
after all.





IN FRANCE.


so she must wait, and watch them
very patiently until they got ripe.
Now there was a little grass
growing under the trees; not a
regular grass-plot it is too dry at
Cannes for grass-plots such as we
have in England; but still a little,
growing tall and thin, and mixed
with pretty wild flowers of many
sorts, and much larger and brighter
than she had ever seen growing wild
before.
So after lunch was over Rosy
slipped down off her chair, got on
her mamma's lap, and whispered
something. I dare say you will
know what it was when I tell you
that her mamma said "Yes," and






IN FRANCE.


were made, and a kind gentleman
gave her a little piece of bright
blue silk to make her doll a new
frock.
Then came the last long ride, and
Rosy was so tired this time that she
could not help crying for a part of
the way.
At last the train came close to
the sea, and papa told her that now
they would soon be there. She
watched the boats on the sea, and
thought how she would like to be in
one of them. And she watched the
great high hills as they seemed to
run by them; and in the fields there
were some very funny-looking
sheep, so tall and with such long


















'.(lII1 r~
-.j Pf~~Lj
RWIiO i,1
_, -

N11 &COMPANY2F





IN THE TRAIN.


But they were poor, ragged chil-
dren, with pale faces, and they did
not look happy at all.
Rosy saw some also looking out
of the windows with their mothers,
and she turned round, and said to
her mamma that they were dirty and
cross, not nice little girls at all.
"And how would Rosy look,"
asked mamma, "if she had had no
breakfast this morning, or if nurse
were ill and could not wash her
face, or if she were very ill herself,
and no one had money to buy her
medicine ?"
Rosy looked very grave then, and
said she would save some of her
pennies to give these poor little





24 ON THE JOURNEY.


children when she came back again;
and by that time they had passed
the narrow streets, and had come to
some very, very large houses, with
great, tall chimneys; and papa told
her that once upon a time he had
been inside a place like those, and
seen lots of boys and girls helping
to make the little round night-lights,
one of which nurse once had burning
all night in a saucer when Rosy was
sick.
Afterwards they passed some very
bare fields, with little rows of cab-
bages growing first here and there
in patches, and a few very black-
looking trees; and the little girl
cried out so loud that they were





60 ON THE JOURNEY.


purpose all the way from London,
round and round and round them,
and then asked nurse to tie the two
ends.
But nurse said, "No; she must
try and do it all herself," and told her
to lay it carefully down, and have
both hands free to tie the bow.
Rosy knew how to tie a bow, be-
cause she had learnt a good while
ago. She did not like learning
that, for at first the tape on which
she learnt would keep coming un-
done; but nurse said then, too,
"Try, try, try," and so Rosy was
brave, and did try. So now she
could tie her nosegays up quite well
when she had both hands free. And





54 ON THE JOURNEY.

legs that they did not look like the
sheep that Rosy used to see.
At last there came a very loud,
long whistle, and papa cried out, -
"Here we are Here we are in
Cannes at last! "
Then there came a great bustle,
and very soon papa, mamma, and
Rosy were all sitting at lunch to-
gether in a pretty room which had a
garden in front of it full of orange-
trees.
O, what fun it was to see the
oranges growing! Rosy was so
fond of oranges But unfortunately
these were not ripe yet; they were
still only green, and not yellow;





IN THE TRAIN.


came to the front of the cage to talk
to them.
Her papa told Rosy that the par-
rot and the monkey most likely
came from the same country a
country where it was too *hot for
little girls to go out in the middle
of the day. And the old lady said
that her little girl had only just
come from that hot country, and that
it was called India. She said, too,
that Polly came with her, and could
say her name, which was Annie;
and she put the two little girls side
by side, and told them to be very
good friends, and talk to each other
until they got to Dover.
So Rosy had a great pleasure on





46 ON THE JOURNEY.


IN FRANCE.

SOSY was so surprised
S She could not make it
out at all, and she said,
-- "But I was in a boat
yesterday, and then I was in a train;
how did I get here ?"
It took a long time to explain.
But Rosy had slept in a very pretty
little bed, which had curtains round
it all covered with roses, and she
had to ask a great many questions
about that. It was a dear little
bed, and Rosy wanted to know if
she were to sleep in it always now.














PACKING UP.

HE summer had come
and gone, and the au-
tumn had come, too, and
was nearly gone, when
Rosy Girard sat on her papa's knee
one evening and heard a grand piece
of news, None of my little friends
could ever guess what this piece of
news was about, or what made her
dap her little fat hands so very
loud, and give her dear papa so
(7)





52 ON THE JOURNEY.


English, and Rosy could only speak
a very little French; so they looked
at each other and laughed, and
pointed to things, and kissed one
another, but did not talk much.
Then came the train journey
again. It was not new now; and
Rosy did get very tired. But her
papa held her on his knee again, and
let her look out of the window; and
then she played with her lamb, and
ate her sugar-plums, and tried to be
a good girl.
They stopped again to see some
other friends at a large, large town
called Lyons, where lots of silks
are made for ladies' dresses. Rosy's
mamma took her to see how'they






































"rapa had his little girl to carry, and he did not
want her to wake."
(43)








58 ON THE JOURNEY.


guessed that any one was near.
But it was a kind arm, and a voice
that she knew very well; for it was
her own nursey who said, -
So, Rosy has quite forgotten all
about
'Try, try, try again,
You can do it if you try.'"
SNo, I can't, nurse," cried Rosy;
"I can't, I can't: they're naughty
flowers, and won't be tied together.
I wanted to make a nosegay for
mamma; but they won't go up into
a nosegay, they won't."
Then see if you can't make two
instead of one: a nosegay for mamma
and another for papa. Then there
won't be so many together, and





56 ON THE JOURNEY.


put on her little girl's hat again. At
any rate it was not long before a
little round maiden was to be seen
stooping down under one of the
largest trees and picking something
as fast as her fat hand would move.
They seemed in a short time to
have picked more than they could
anyhow hold at once, for just when
a splendid nosegay was coming to-
gether, down fell a lot of the very
prettiest flowers from the side at
which the blue eyes were not look-
ing. And this happened two or
three times, until at last that fat
little woman got quite impatient; and
sitting down on the ground, let all
the red and pink and blue and yel-





IN THE TRAIN.


little boys and girls have been
Dreaming, they wake up laughing;
that must be when the dream was
about something funny: sometimes
they wake up crying, and that must
be when the dream was about some-
thing which they do not like.
Well, Rosy's dream was rather
a nice one, and rather a long one
too: and it was partly about some-
thing that she liked very much in-
deed. I mean her dear dolly, who
was all this while lying comfortably
in the trunk that Rosy had helped
to pack.
In her dream Rosy forgot all
about this journey, and thought that
she was in the Zoological Gardens,





26 ON THE JOURNEY.


So mamma looked in her bag to
find a biscuit, and told Rosy that
when she had eaten that she had
better go to sleep.
Papa put some carpet-bags for
mamma to rest her feet upon, and
he put his little girl down by her
side; and though she was quite
sure that she was not one wee bit
sleepy, yet mamma soon saw the
little head begin to droop, and the
eyelashes fall over the eyes; and
then she just put her arm round her
darling, and both of them went fast
asleep.
They were waked up again by a
very loud squeal from the engiv,
and by feeling that the train was
stopping.





IN THE TRAIN.


Just then up came a man to take
the monkey away; and Rosy looked
quite disappointed, till her papa told
her that monkeys are often very
spiteful, and will bite and scratch.
Then she thought she would
rather not have such a companion,
though she did want something to
play with very badly. And to her
great joy, just before the train
started again, in came an old lady
with a little girl, just about her own
size, and a large bird-cage covered
with a shawl.
0, how curious she was to know
what sort of bird was under that
shawl! But she had not to wait
long; for very soon the other little