A walk and a drive

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
A walk and a drive
Series Title:
Violet stories
Alternate title:
Little Rosy's travels
Physical Description:
63 p., 2 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 12 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Miller, Thomas, 1807-1874 ( Attributed name )
Sheldon & Company (New York, N.Y.) ( Publisher )
Boston Stereotype Foundry ( Electrotyper )
Publisher:
Sheldon and Company
Place of Publication:
New York
Manufacturer:
Electrotyped at the Boston Stereotype Foundry
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1868

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Fathers and daughters -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Landscape -- Juvenile fiction -- France   ( lcsh )
Natural history -- Juvenile fiction -- France   ( lcsh )
Invalids -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Hand-colored illustrations -- 1870   ( local )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1870   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1870
Genre:
Hand-colored illustrations   ( local )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston

Notes

General Note:
Attributed to Thomas Miller ... et al.. Cf. NUC pre-1956, v. 336, p. 287.
General Note:
Added engraved series t.p.
General Note:
Publisher's advertisements follow text.
General Note:
Baldwin Library copy illustrations are hand-colored: probably by young owner.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002447353
notis - AMF2608
oclc - 56811570
System ID:
UF00023506:00001

Related Items

Related Items:
Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Full Text
This page contains no text.


The Baldwin LibraryUniversityOfB^*^--Al


S --


This page contains no text.


This page contains no text.


" She was very pleased to have her mug filled -themug which she had brought on purpose."(2)


IfSIONMO PAOWalPM


LITTLE ROSY'S TRAVELS.SIX VOLUMES.ON THE JOURNEY.A WALK AND A DRIVE.THE DUCKS AND PIGS.THE WOUNDED BIRD.A SAD ADVENTURE.THE DOCTOR'S VISIT.


A WALK AND A DRIVE.ILLUSTRA TED."Sdt gorf:SHELDON AND COMPANY.1870.


Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1888,BY SHELDON AND COMPANY,In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the SouthernDistrict of New York.Eletrotyped at tbeBOSTON STEREOTYPE FOUNDRY,No. 19 Spring Lae.


A Walk aid a DrIv .VISIT TO THE DAIRY.WHEN Rosy opened hereyes the next morning thesun was shining so bright-ly that the was obliged toshut them again. But a greatmany thoughts came into her littlehead, and she was in a great hurryto get up.Nurse said it was not time yet,and that she was very sleepy; butwhen the little girl had climbed into(7)


8 A WALK AND A DRIVE.her bed, and given her a great manysoft kisses, and told her how muchshe wanted to take a walk beforebreakfast, the kind nursey firstrubbed her eyes, then opened them,and then got out of bed.While she was dressing, Rosybegan to put on her own shoes andstockings and some of her clothes;for she,had already learnt to do agreat deal for herself.She peeped out of window tolook for the birds, but for some timeshe could not see any.Rosy thought this very strange,for she remembered how she usedto hear the dear little birdies singwhen she had been in the country


"VISIT TO THE DAIRY. 9in England; but nurse could notexplain the puzzle; so Rosy settledthat it was to be a question for herpapa. Of course he would know;he always knew everything."When they were quite ready,nurse said,-"Now, my darling, if you like,we will go and get your milk forbreakfast; for I know where it isto be had, and nice, new, good milkI hope it may be, to make my littleTrotty very fat."" Is not Rosy fat now?" askedthe tittle girl, in surprise, and feelingfirst her plump cheeks and then herSround arms with her stumpy littlefingers.


10 A. WALK AND A DRIVE."0, pretty well," said nurselaughing, " but you may be fatteryet, and I like fat little girls."They had not to walk far beforethey came to the place where themilk was sold. It was called afarm; and nurse took Rosy in, andsaid she should see the dairy if thegood woman would let her.Rosy did not know what a dairymeant; but she supposed that itwas something curious, and trippedmerrily along, wondering what sheshould see, till they came to a roomwhich had a floor made of red tiles,on which stood qt least ten or twelvelarge open bowls full of new milk.Now Rosy happened to be very


VISIT TO THE DAIRY. 11fond of milk; and as she was justthen quite ready for her breakfast,she was very pleased to have hermug filled,- the mug which shehad brought on purpose, as nursetold her,- and then take a gooddrink."Ah, nurse, how good it is!"she cried; "but what is all this stick-ing to my lips ? It is not white likeour milk. See, there is somethingon the top of it! " and she held outher mug to show her."Ah, that's cream, good cream.We did not get milk like this inParis," said nurse; "and I'm surewe don't in London. There's nowater here, is there, madame?"


12 A WALK AND A DRIVE.But madame did not understandEnglish; so nurse was obliged, bylooking very pleased, to make hersee that she thought her milk verygood."But it's very bad of the otherpeople to put water in my milk,"said Rosy, frowning. "I shall askmy papa to scold them when we gohome ; and I shall take a great mug-ful of this nice milk to show mygrandmamma."" Well, now say good by prettilyin French, as your papa teachesyou," said nurse, "and then we'llgo home, and I dare say we shallfind some more milk there.""Adieu, madame," said the little


VISIT TO THE DATRY. 13girl, and off she trotted again, asready to go as she had been tocome.They say " madame " to every onein France, you know, and not torich ladies only.Now there are beautiful hills allround the back of Cannes, and alittle way up one of these was thehouse where Rosy was going to live.She did so like running up anddown hills and there were two orthree little ones between the farmand this house, which was called avilla.When she got on to the top ofone, she cried out, -"Ah, there's the sea, I do declare


14 A WALK AND A DRIVE.and there's a boat on it with a whitesail! Shall we go in a boat someday?"" I don't know," said nurse," you must ask your mamma; butyou don't want to be sick, do you? ""I won't be sick," cried the littlegirl. "Rosy is never sick in abeau'ful boat like that. I'll ask mymamma," and she bustled on." Stay, stay !" cried nurse, "you'regoing too far, my pet; this is theway; look, who stands up there?"Rosy looked up, and there wasthe villa with its green blinds highup over her head; and some onestood outside the door calling her by,name.


"VISIT TO THE DAIRY. 150, what a number of steps therewere for those little legs to climbbefore she reached her papa !They went up by the side of agarden, which was itself like a lotof wide steps, and on each stepthere was a row of vines, not trainedagainst a wall as we train ourvines in England, but growing onthe ground like bean plants.Rosy saw lots of such nice grapesthat her little mouth quite watered,and she would have liked to havestopped to pick some; but then sheknew that would be stealing, be-cause they were not hers. And Ihope that Rosy would not havestolen even if nurse had not been


16 A WALK AND A DRIVE.following her, or her papa watchingher.She got the grapes, too, withoutpicking them; for when she hadclimbed up to the very top, therewas papa waiting for her with abeautiful bunch in his hand. Andhe said, -" Come in, Rosy; mamma wantsher breakfast very badly. See,mamma, what a pair of roses yourlittle girl has been getting already! "Rosy knew very well what thatmeant, for she rubbed her cheekswith her little fat hands, and thentumbled her merry little head abouther mamma's lap to "roll the rosesoff," as she said.


VISIT TO THE DAIRY. 17But that little head was too fullof thoughts to stay there long.There was so much to tell and totalk about, and that dairy took a,long time to describe. Then whenpapa asked if she had seen the dearcows that gave the milk, she thoughtthat that would be a capital littlejaunt for to-morrow, and clappedher hands with glee."So you are going to find somenew pets, Rosy," he said, " to doinstead of Mr. Tommy and thekittens?""Ah, papa, but there are nodickies here I mean, hardly any,"she answered. " We looked so forthe birdies all, all the time; but


18 A WALK AND A DRIVE.only two came, and went awayagain directly."" We must go out and see thereason of that," said papa, smiling,- "you and I, Rosy, directly afterbreakfast. We must go and tellthe dear birds that Rosy has come."


A WALK AND A DRIVE. 19A WALK AND A DRIVE.OSY made such haste tofinish her bread and milk,that she was ready to goout before any one else haddone breakfast. But her papa wasnot long before he was ready too,and she was soon tripping along byhis side.They went only a little way upthe road, and then they came to afield, on one side of which weresome high bushes. Rosy knewwhere to look for birds, and peepedvery anxiously amidst the boughs


20 A WALK AND A DRIVE.till she saw something hopping.Then she pulled her papa's hand,and let him know that she wantedhim to stoop down and look too.He looked, and then whispered,-"Yes, Rosy. There is a prettylittle robin; let us go round theother side and see if we can makehim come out with these crumbswhich I have brought with me."So they went softly to the gate,and were just going in, when papasaid, -"Stop, Rosy; look what that manhas got in his hand."Then she looked, and saw a manwith a very long gun and two dogs." What is he going to do, papa ?"


A WALK AND A DRIVE. 21asked the little girl, drawing back;" will he shoot us if we go in ?"" O, no, Rosy; don't be afraid.It is the robin that he wants to shootand not us. So now you see howit is that the dicky-birds don't singmuch at Cannes. It is because theyshoot so many of them."Poor little Rosy! She loved somuch to watch the little birds andhear them sing! And when shethought of this dear robin beingshot quite dead, and that perhapsthere was a nest somewhere withlittle ones who would have no mam-ma, she began to cry, and to call theman "a cruel fellow."She was not much comforted by


22 A WALK AND A DRIVE.being told that such little birdswere eaten there; so that if theman could shoot one, he would getsome money for it which might buybread for his little ones. But shewas rather glad to hear that thelittle robins must be able by thattime of year to take care of themZselves, and had left the nest sometime; and much more pleased,when, soon after, she saw the dearrobin fly right away, so that theman with the gun was not likely toshoot that one at any rate.Then papa said, " I shouldn'twonder if mamma would like to goout this morning. Shall we goback and see?"


"Rosy was very much pleased when soon aftershe saw the robin fly right away."(23)


This page contains no text.


A WALK AND A DRIVE. 25Rosy thought that would be verynice; and then her papa lifted uphis little girl, and showed her allthe beautiful hills that were behindthem. There were some that hadpeaked tops, and some rather round-ish; and just in one place she couldsee some hills a very long way off,that seemed to climb right up intothe sky and were all white on thetop. He told her that those hillswere called mountains, because theywere so very high, a great dealtoo high for Rosy to walk up, andthat the white stuff which she sawwas snow." We don't have snow when it iswarm in England, Rosy, do we?"


26 A WALK AND A DRIVE.said papa, "nor yet here, but upthere, you see, it is so cold that thesnow never melts. Those are called'the snow Alps.'"Rosy had nearly forgotten thepoor birds now, because there wereso many other things to think about.She saw some poppies a little wayoff, and then some blue flowers;and they were so pretty that shewas quite obliged to stop a goodmany times to pick some for dearmamma. The wind was very hightoo, and it blew little Rosy's hatright off, so that papa and she hadboth to run after it.Mamma was ready for a walkwhen they got in, but she staid to


A WALK AND A DRIVE. 27put Rosy's flowers in water; andthey looked very gay and pretty.Nurse and every one admired them;and Rosy said that she was not abit tired, and was quite sure thatshe could go for another long, longwalk.But papa said that though Rosymight be a little horse, her mammawas not, and that it was a long wayto the town and to the shops whereshe wanted to go; so he would goand get a carriage for them.Now, though Rosy certainly wasvery tired of trains, she found abasket pony-carriage a very differ-ent thing, and enjoyed her ride somuch that she was obliged to change


28 A WALK AND A DRIVE.pretty often from her mamma's lapto her papa's and back again, justbecause she was too happy to sitstill.The ponies went along merrilytoo, as if they were nearly as happy.They had bells on their necks whichjingled delightfully, and every nowand then they met a carriage, oreven a cart, the horses of which hadbells too. So they had plenty ofmusic.They went up one hill and downanother, and the ponies ran so fast,and turned round the corners of theroads so quickly, that sometimesmamma was afraid that the carriagewould be upset, and that they


A WALK AND A DRIVE. 29would all be " tipped out in a heap."Rosy thought it would be good funif they were. She often rolledabout herself, like a little ball, with-out hurting herself; and she thoughtthat papa and mamma would onlyget a little dusty, and that it wouldbe a nice little job for her to brushthe dust off when she got home.Just then a number of boys andgirls came along the road to meetthem, and Rosy saw that all thelittle ones wore caps, not hats orbonnets. There was one baby withlarge black eyes, 'whom she wouldhave liked to kiss and hug. It wasso fat and pretty. But it was dress-ed in a way that she had never seen


30 A WALK AND A DRIVE.any baby dressed before, for its feetand legs were put into a sort oflarge bag, so that it could not kicklike other children; and Rosy won-dered how it could laugh so mer-rily."When the carriage came near thislittle party the man did not hold thereins of his horses tight as an Eng-lish coachman would have done.He only screamed out to the chil-dren, " Gare! gare I" which Rosy'spapa told her meant " Get out ofthe way."And when they were all pastthere came next a great wagon,piled up with the trunks of trees.The horses which drew this had no


A WALK AND A DRIVE. 31bells; but they had a funny sort ofpost sticking up high between theirears, with lots of things hanging onto it. They had also three pinktassels hanging on their faces, onein front and one on each side.These tassels shook as they wentalong, and looked so pretty thatRosy thought to herself that if evershe had a toy horse again she wouldask nurse to make some little tasselsfor it just like them. Her papa hadtold her, too, that they were tokeep off the flies, which teased thepoor horses very often dreadfully.And of course Rosy would not likeher horse to be teased.But the carriage went on while


32 A WALK, AND A DRIVE.she was thinking this; and soonthey saw four old women comingalong the road with large baskets,full of some green stuff, on theirheads. The little girl did not sayanything as they went by, but shelooked very particularly to see howthey were dressed.Now I must tell you why she didthis.In the first place, then, she hadnever seen any old women a bit likethem before.They walked all in a row withtheir baskets on their heads, andwith their hands stuck into theirsides, and they talked very fast asthey came along. On their heads


A WALK AND A DRIVE. 33they wore very, very large hats,with small crowns. Rosy had neverseen such hats before, and sheheard her mamma say that she hadnever seen them either. Underthese great hats they had nice whitecaps, with colored handkerchiefsover them, which hung down be-hind. They had, besides, othercolored handkerchiefs over theirshoulders, and two of them had redgowns.Now Rosy had had a presentgiven her in Paris. It was a pieceof French money, worth ten Englishpennies; and with this money shehad bought ten Dutch dolls, whichnursey was going to dress for her.3


34 A WALK AND A DRIVE.At first she meant them to make anEnglish school; but now that shehad seen so many funny people shethought she would like her dolls tobe dressed like the people in Cannes,because then they would just showher dear grandmamma how verynice they looked, and how verydifferent to English people.She was very quiet for a littlewhile, because she was making thisgrand plan; but they soon turnedout of the narrow street, and all atonce she saw the sea again.They had come now to what wascalled the " port," and there wereall the great ships which had comehome lately, and were waiting to-


A WALK AND A DRIVE. 35go out again, one, two, three,four, five, six, all in a row, quitequiet, and " taking their naps," asRosy's papa said, "after all theirhard work."He lifted Rosy out first, and saidthat they would go and look atthem, while mamma went into theshops.Rosy was not quite sure whethershe was pleased at that, becausesometimes her mamma bought hervery nice things, such as toys, orsugar-plums, or cakes, when shetook her out shopping. But theysoon found plenty to look at, andsome funny men with blue coats andcocked hats amused the little girl


36 A WALK AND A DRIVE.very much. Her papa wonderedwhy she looked at them so often;but then he did not know Rosy'sgrand scheme, and how she wasthinking of asking nurse to dressone doll just like them. She keptthis little plan quite a secret till shegot back to her nurse.It was half the fun to have asecret.cZD


ROSY'S VISIT TO THE COWS. 37ROSY'S VISIT TO THE COWS.HE dear, good nursey didnot forget about the cowsnext morning, for whenRosy opened her littleblue peepers there she was halfdressed.Rosy jumped up in a minute,crying out, -"The cows the cows! Shall wego and see them?"" If you will make great haste,"said the nurse; "but it is gettinglate."Rosy never got dressed more


"38 A WALK AND A DRIVE.quickly. She did not much likeeven to wait for her morning splash;and while her curls were beingcombed, she kept saying, "Won'tit do, nurse?" and then ratherhindering by holding up her littleface for a kiss.As soon as she was quite readyshe bustled off, and got down stairsfirst. Whom should she see therebut papa himself, with his haton?He said that he would take herto see the cows, and even carry hera little way if she got tired.How very kind that was I Butwould such a great girl as Rosy gettired?


ROSY'S VISIT TO THE COWS. 390, dear, no; at least, so she said,for Rosy did not like to be thoughta baby now, though somehow orother it did sometimes happens thatafter a long walk her feet wouldache a little bit, and then papa'sshoulder made a very comfortableseat.She was half afraid now thatnursey might be sorry not to seethe cows, and ran back to whis-per that if she liked she mightdress one of the dollies instead.That was meant for a treat, youknow ; and nursey laughed, andsaid, -"Perhaps, we shall see; " andgave her another kiss.


40 A WALK AND A DRIVE.Then Rosy showed her papawhere the farm was ; and whenthey came near, they saw thefarmer's wife standing at the door,as if she expected her little visitor.Rosy did not forget to say, -" Bon jour, madame," whichmeans " Good morning "in English,you know.Papa asked in French if theycould see the cows, and the goodwoman was kind enough to takethem round to the water where theywere drinking.There was a black one, and ablack and white one, and a red one,and another with red spots. Wecannot find room for them all in the


ROSY'S VISIT TO THE COWS. 41picture; but you will see the onewhich was drinking.Rosy admired them very much,and wanted to go as near as she,could that she might see them well;for although they were so very bigand had such long legs, she wasnot a bit afraid of them. Shenever was afraid of anything whenher papa was by, because he was sovery strong stronger than allthe world she thought.".Who made the cows, Rosy?"asked her papa, when she hadlooked at them a little while."God," said Rosy, softly; " Godmade everything, didn't he, papa?Why did he make the cows?" sheasked, after thinking a minute.


42 A WALK AND A DRIVE."To give us good milk, such asyou had yesterday, Rosy, and tomake you and other little girls andboys fat and strong. Was not thatvery good of God !""Yes, papa," said Rosy, again."Then will you remember that,my little one, when you say, by andby, 'I thank God for my nicebread and milk'"?Rosy said she would, and thenshe asked, -" And do the pretty cows giveus coffee, too, papa?""No, no, my silly little Rosy;don't you recollect that we buy thatat the grocer's shop? We must gosome day and ask him to let you see


"And do the pretty cows give us coffee, too, papa."(43)


This page contains no text.


ROSY'S VISIT TO THE COWS. 45it ground up to powder. The coffeecomes from a long, long way off.It grows on a tree in a very hotcountry, and looks like little berriestill they put it into a mill and turna handle. Then the berries areground up to powder, and we putsome boiling water over the powder,and when it gets cool we drink it.Haven't you seen mamma pour itout into the cup and put some sugarand milk in for herself and papa?"Rosy remembered now; but shehad not taken much notice before,because she did not like coffee atall. She liked her nice milk muchbetter; and so when she went awaywith her papa she called out,


46 A WALK AND A DRIVE." Good by, dear cowies, and"thank you very much for my nicemilk."Rosy wanted to walk round theother side where there was a verygentle, kind-looking cow, that was'not in the water, because shethought that she would like to strokeher; but her papa told her to lookat those two great horns. And hesaid that cows did not like littlegirls to take liberties with them;unless they knew them, and thatthis cow did not know her, andmight think her very saucy, andpoke out her horns to teach her tokeep a proper distance. If she did,he said he thought Rosy would not


ROSY'S VISIT TO THE COWS. 47like that poke, for it might hurther, so he advised her to keep quite-out of the good cow's way.Then she stood at a little distanceto watch her drinking, and Rosy'spapa said, -"See how she enjoys it I Cowslike to come here sometimes, likelittle girls; but French cows don'tget out of their houses so often asEnglish ones."" Don't they, papa?" said Rosy." Then I should think they mustoften wish to go to England."Papa laughed, and said, -"Perhaps they would wish it ifthey knew how their English cousinsenjoy themselves; but I think they


48 A WALK AND A DRIVE.look pretty happy; don't you,Rosy?"Rosy said, -" Yes, papa; but how funnily thecow drinks! She puts her headinto the water."" And you think that if she werea polite cow she would not thinkof doing such a vulgar thing, but"would wait till they gave her a glass;eh, Rosy?'" She hasn't got any hands, papa,"cried Rosy, "so she .couldn't, I'spose.""No," said papa; "so I thinkthat we must excuse and forgive thepoor thing, until Rosy can teachher a better plan."


ROSY'S VISIT TO THE COWS. 49And Rosy trotted home by hisside, thinking how much she should.like to try drinking after the cow'sfashion.


50 A WALK AND A DRIVE.ROSY'S VISIT TO THE HENS.OSY was very hungrywhen she got home tobreakfast, for the freshmorning air had givenher an appetite.Her mamma took off her hat andher little jacket, and said, -"So, Rosy, you have brought metwo more roses.""But my roses don't smell, mam-ma," said Rosy, laughing and pat-ting her own fat cheeks, as she al-ways did when mamma said that.Then she made haste to scramble up


ROSY'S VTSIT TO THE HENS. 51on to her little chair, and pull hernice basin of bread and milk closeto her. She looked at her papaafter she had said her little grace,and said, -"I didn't forget, papa."Then she began to eat away as ifshe liked it very much; and whenshe had eaten a little, her mammasaid, -"Look here, Rosy."And Rosy turned round and sawa whole spoonful of egg waiting forher to eat it. Mamma was holdingit for her; and it looked so yellowand so delicious!Rosy opened her mouth, but shedid not take it all in at once. It


52 A WALK AND A DRIVE.was -too good for that, and shethought it better to make it last alittle.But some of the yellow wouldstick on Rosy's lips; so mammawiped it off, and then Rosy put herarms round her neck and kissed her,and said, -"So nice, dear mamma."Then mamma said, -" At the end of the garden, Rosy,there lives the good hen that gaveus this nice egg, and a great manyother hens, and very fine cocks too,- the cocks that you heard crowingthis morning. Shall we, go and seethem after breakfast?"" yes, yes, yes " cried Rosy,


ROSY'S VISIT TO THE HENS. 53clapping her hands, "that will befean. Pve almost done mine;" andthe little girl made great haste tofinish her bread and milk; butmamma said, -" Ah, but not quite directly. I'venot done my breakfast. If youhave done yours, you had better goand see what nurse is doing, andask her to get ready to come andhear papa read about Daniel in thelions' den."Rosy did not mind waiting forthat, for she was never tired ofhearing that story. I dare say thatsome of her young friends know ittoo.Her mamma got ready soon after,


54 A WALK AND A DRIVE.and they both went round to a partof the garden which Rosy had notseen before.There they saw that one piecewas railed off from all the rest, andthat a hen-house was inside it.Rosy's mamma opened a gate in.the railing, and took her little girlinto the enclosure amongst all thecocks and hens.The cocks did not seem much tolike this, and they both made agreat crowing, and then marchedoff into the farthest corer, with alot of hens after them.Rosy said, -" 0, mamma, show them thenice seed, and then they won't goaway!"


ROSY'S VISIT TO THE HENS. 55But her mamma answered, -" Not yet, Rosy; let us go firstand look at these good ladies thatare walking about inside their house.We can have a good look at thembefore they get away. See, theycan't get out if we stand at thedoor."" Ah, look at these beauties, allover speckly feathers," cried Rosy,as she ran forward to catch one.She put out her little arms toseize her; but the hen seemed tothink this a great liberty from sosmall a child, and instead of run-ning away, she turned and openedher beak in a very angry manner."Take care, Rosy," said her


56 A WALK AND A DRIVEmamma, as the little girl drew backhalf frightened. "This hen seemsrather a fierce lady. I will giveher some seed to persuade her to bequiet. Perhaps she has got some-thing there that she does not chooseus to see. I wonder what it cam,be."Rosy took one more peep, andthen called out," O, mamma, mamma, some littlechickens, I do declare! If youstoop down you can see them run.ning about behind her, such dear,pretty, soft little creatures! Doget me one to play with."" Little chickens I" said mamma;"why, they must have come out of


ROSY'S VISIT TO THE HENS. 57their shells very late in the year ifthey are little ones still, and I amafraid their mother won't let me,touch them.""Do chickens come out of shells ?"said Rosy, making very large eyes,and looking quite puzzled."Yes, Rosy, out of just, suchshells as our eggs had this morning,;and if in the summer we had giventhis good hen five or six of her owneggs in this little house of hers, shewould have sat upon them, andspread her wings over them to keepthem warm; and there she wouldhave staid so patiently all day long,and day after day, until the dearlittle chickens were ready to cometoo."


58 A WALK AND A DRIYE."And wouldn't the hen get tired? "said Rosy. " I shouldn't like to staystill so long.""No, I don't think you would,"shid her mamma, chucking her littlegirl under the chin'; " but then, yousee, you are like the little chickens,and. not like the mamma hen. Ithink you will find that she has notgot tired even yet, for if you peepdown again you will see that she iskeeping two of the little chickenswarm under her even now. Littlechickens are like little babies, andthey very soon get cold, so they likekeeping very close to their mam-mas.""Are the little chickens naughtysometimes ?" asked Rosy.


" If you stoop down you will see that she is keeping twoof the little chickens warm under her."(59)


This page contains no text.


ROSY'S VISIT TO THE HENS. 61" Well, I don't know, Rosy; but Iknow that I have often thought itvery pretty to see how they will allrun to their mother when the greathen clucks for them.""0, mamma, I should so like tohear her cluck," cried Rosy, clap-ping her hands."Well, Rosy, you go a little wayoff, and keep quite quiet; and thenI will see if I can tempt the goodlady out of her nest with some ofthis nice seed."So Rosy ran away, and her mam-ma stepped back a few paces andthrew down some of the seed.The hen saw it directly, and lookedfor an instant as if she would like


62 A WALK AND A DRIVE.some very much; and she did notwait long, but soon stepped out ofher house, and began picking up theseed.Just at that moment a cat camecreeping along the outside of thepaling, and watching to see if shecould pounce on one of the littlechickens. The hen saw the cat, andbegan to stretch out her neck veryfiercely, as if she meant to fly at itseyes, and then began to cluck forher little ones, which all came run-ning to her as fast as their legswould carry them.Rosy's little eyes sparkled withpleasure, and she went up and puther hand into her mamma's, andsaid softly,


ROSY'S VISIT TO THE HENS. 63" Wasn't it nice?""Yes, Rosy," said her mamma," and I hope that my little chickenwill always run to my side as quickly,as these did to their mother. Yousee she knew that they were indanger when they didn't themselves;and so do I sometimes when myRosy thinks she is quite safe."


This page contains no text.


This page contains no text.


611k n


ts u5V LA1


This page contains no text.


. ..




ROSY'S VTSIT TO THE HENS. 51

on to her little chair, and pull her
nice basin of bread and milk close
to her. She looked at her papa
after she had said her little grace,
and said,-
"I didn't forget, papa."
Then she began to eat away as if
she liked it very much; and when
she had eaten a little, her mamma
said, -
"Look here, Rosy."
And Rosy turned round and saw
a whole spoonful of egg waiting for
her to eat it. Mamma was holding
it for her; and it looked so yellow
and so delicious!
Rosy opened her mouth, but she
did not take it all in at once. It










































SIf you stoop down you will see that she is keeping two
of the little chickens warm under her."
(59)






22 A WALK AND A DRIVE.

being told that such little birds
were eaten there; so that if the
man could shoot one, he would get
some money for it which might buy
bread for his little ones. But she
was rather glad to hear that the
little robins must be able by that
time of year to take care of them-
selves, and had left the nest some
time; and much more pleased,
when, soon after, she saw the dear
robin fly right away, so that the
man with the gun was not likely to
shoot that one at any rate.
Then papa said, I shouldn't
wonder if mamma would like to go
out this morning. Shall we go
back and see?"





38 A WALK AND A DRIVE.

quickly. She did not much like
even to wait for her morning splash;
and while her curls were being
combed, she kept saying, Won't
it do, nurse?" and then rather
hindering by holding up her little
face for a kiss.
As soon as she was quite ready
she bustled off, and got down stairs
first. Whom should she see there
but papa himself, with his hat
on?
He said that he would take her
to see the cows, and even carry her
a little way if she got tired.
How very kind that was I But
would such a great girl as Rosy get
tired?





VISIT TO THE DATRY. 13


girl, and off she trotted again, as
ready to go as she had been to
come.
They say madame to every one
in France, you know, and not to
rich ladies only.
Now there are beautiful hills all
round the back of Cannes, and a
little way up one of these was the
house where Rosy was going to live.
She did so like running up and
down hills and there were two or
three little ones between the farm
and this house, which was called a
villa.
When she got on to the top of
one, she cried out, -
Ah, there's the sea, I do declare !
















. .. . .....






20 A WALK AND A DRIVE.


till she saw something hopping.
Then she pulled her papa's hand,
and let him know that she wanted
him to stoop down and look too.
He looked, and then whispered,-
"Yes, Rosy. There is a pretty
little robin; let us go round the
other side and see if we can make
him come out with these crumbs
which I have brought with me."
So they went softly to the gate,
and were just going in, when papa
said, -
Stop, Rosy; look what that man
has got in his hand."
Then she looked, and saw a man
with a very long gun and two dogs.
What is he going to do, papa ?"






ROSY'S VISIT TO THE HENS. 57

their shells very late in the year if
they are little ones still, and I am
afraid their mother won't let me
touch them."
"Do chickens come out of shells ?"
said Rosy, making very large eyes,
and looking quite puzzled.
"Yes, Rosy, out of just such
shells as our eggs had this morning,;
and if in the summer we had given
this good hen five or six of her own
eggs in this little house of hers, she
would have sat upon them, and
spread her wings over them to keep
them warm; and there she would
have staid so patiently all day long,
and day after day, until the dear
little chickens were ready to come
too."





ROSY'S VISIT TO THE HENS. 55

But her mamma answered, -
Not yet, Rosy; let us go first
and look at these good ladies that
are walking about inside their house.
We can have a good look at them
before they get away. See, they
can't get out if we stand at the
door."
Ah, look at these beauties, all
over speckly feathers," cried Rosy,
as she ran forward to catch one.
She put out her little arms to
seize her; but the hen seemed to
think this a great liberty from so
small a child, and instead of run-
ning away, she turned and opened
her beak in a very angry manner.
"Take care, Rosy," said her






Little Ros's Travels.




A WALK AND A DRIVE.




ILLUSTRATED.





et gorfe: -
SHELDON AND COMPANY.
1870.





A WALK AND A DRIVE. 25

Rosy thought that would be very
nice; and then her papa lifted up
his little girl, and showed her all
the beautiful hills that were behind
them. There were some that had
peaked tops, and some rather round-
ish; and just in one place she could
see some hills a very long way off,
that seemed to climb right up into
the sky and were all white on the
top. He told her that those hills
were called mountains, because they
were so very high, a great deal
too high for Rosy to walk up, and
that the white stuff which she saw
was snow.
We don't have snow when it is
warm in England, Rosy, do we?"





26 A WALK AND A DRIVE.

said papa, "nor yet here, but up
there, you see, it is so cold that the
snow never melts. Those are called
'the snow Alps.'"
Rosy had nearly forgotten the
poor birds now, because there were
so many other things to think about.
She saw some poppies a little way
off, and then some blue flowers;
and they were so pretty that she
was quite obliged to stop a good
many times to pick some for dear
mamma. The wind was very high
too, and it blew little Rosy's hat
right off, so that papa and she had
both to run after it.
Mamma was ready for a walk
when they got in, but she staid to






62 A WALK AND A DRIVE.

some very much; and she did not
wait long, but soon stepped out of
her house, and began picking up the
seed.
Just at that moment a cat came
creeping along the outside of the
paling, and watching to see if she
could pounce on one of the little
chickens. The hen saw the cat, and
began to stretch out her neck very
fiercely, as if she meant to fly at its
eyes, and then began to cluck for
her little ones, which all came run-
ning to her as fast as their legs
would carry them.
Rosy's little eyes sparkled with
pleasure, and she went up and put
her hand into her mamma's, and
said softly, -


















KS LDO N COMPANY N





56 A WALK AND A DRIVE.

mamma, as the little girl drew back
half frightened. "This hen seems
rather a fierce lady. I will give
her some seed to persuade her to be
quiet. Perhaps she has got some-
thing there that she does not choose
us to see. I wonder what it canm
be."
Rosy took one more peep, and
then called out,
O, mamma, mamma, some little
chickens, I do declare! If you
stoop down you can see them run,
ning about behind her, such dear,
pretty, soft little creatures! Do
get me one to play with."
"Little chickens I" said mamma;
Swhy, they must have come out of





A WALK AND A DRIVE. 33

they wore very, very large hats,
with small crowns. Rosy had never
seen such hats before, and she
heard her mamma say that she had
never seen them either. Under
these great hats they had nice white
caps, with colored handkerchiefs
over them, which hung down be-
hind. They had, besides, other
colored handkerchiefs over their
shoulders, and two of them had red
gowns.
Now Rosy had had a present
given her in Paris. It was a piece
of French money, worth ten English
pennies; and with this money she
had bought ten Dutch dolls, which
nursey was going to dress for her.
3





48 A WALK AND A DRIVE.

look pretty happy; don't you,
Rosy?"
Rosy said, -
Yes, papa; but how funnily the
cow drinks! She puts her head
into the water."
And you think that if she were
a polite cow she would not think
of doing such a vulgar thing, but
would wait till they gave her a glass;
eh, Rosy?'
She hasn't got any hands, papa,"
cried Rosy, so she .couldn't, I
'spose."
"No," said papa; "so I think
that we must excuse and forgive the
poor thing, until Rosy can teach
her a better plan."





VISIT TO THE DAIRY.


in England; but nurse could not
explain the puzzle; so Rosy settled
that it was to be a question for her
papa. Of course he would know;
he always knew everything.
When they were quite ready,
nurse said,-
"Now, my darling, if you like,
we will go and get your milk for
breakfast; for I know where it is
to be had, and nice, new, good milk
I hope it may be, to make my little
Trotty very fat."
Is not Rosy fat now?" asked
the little girl, in surprise, and feeling
first her plump cheeks and then her
round arms with her stumpy little
fingers.





54 A WALK AND A DRIVE.

and they both went round to a part
of the garden which Rosy had not
seen before.
There they saw that one piece
was railed off from all the rest, and
that a hen-house was inside it.
Rosy's mamma opened a gate in.
the railing, and took her little girl
into the enclosure amongst all the
cocks and hens.
The cocks did not seem much to
like this, and they both made a
great crowing, and then marched
off into the farthest corer, with a
lot of hens after them.
Rosy said, -
0, mamma, show them the
nice seed, and then they won't go
away !"





ROSY'S VISIT TO THE COWS. 45

it ground up to powder. The coffee
comes from a long, long way off.
It grows on a tree in a very hot
country, and looks like little berries
till they put it into a mill and turn
a handle. Then the berries are
ground up to powder, and we put
some boiling water over the powder,
and when it gets cool we drink it.
Haven't you seen mamma pour it
out into the cup and put some sugar
and milk in for herself and papa?"
Rosy remembered now; but she
had not taken much notice before,
because she did not like coffee at
all. She liked her nice milk much
better; and so when she went away
with her papa she called out, -





58 A WALK AND A DRIYE.

"And wouldn't the hen get tired ?"
said Rosy. I shouldn't like to stay
still so long."
"No, I don't think you would,"
siid her mamma, chucking her little
girl under the chin'; but then, you
see, you are like the little chickens,
and. not like the mamma hen. I
think you will find that she has not
got tired even yet, for if you peep
down again you will see that she is
keeping two of the little chickens
warm under her even now. Little
chickens are like little babies, and
they very soon get cold, so they like
keeping very close to their mam-
mas."
"Are the little chickens naughty
sometimes?" asked Rosy.





ROSY'S VISIT TO THE COWS. 37


ROSY'S VISIT TO THE COWS.

I HE dear, good nursey did
i ii -'t forget about the cows
in, xt morning, for when
IRosy opened her little
blue peepers there she was half
dressed.
Rosy jumped up in a minute,
crying out, -
"The cows the cows! Shall we
go and see them?"
If you will make great haste,"
said the nurse; but it is getting
late."
Rosy never got dressed more






28 A WALK AND A DRIVE.

pretty often from her mamma's lap
to her papa's and back again, just
because she was too happy to sit
still.
The ponies went along merrily
too, as if they were nearly as happy.
They had bells on their necks which
jingled delightfully, and every now
and then they met a carriage, or
even a cart, the horses of which had
bells too. So they had plenty of
music.
They went up one hill and down
another, and the ponies ran so fast,
and turned round the corners of the
roads so quickly, that sometimes
mamma was afraid that the carriage
would be upset, and that they




Full Text

PAGE 1

The Baldwin Library University OfB^ *^--Al



PAGE 1

20 A WALK AND A DRIVE. till she saw something hopping. Then she pulled her papa's hand, and let him know that she wanted him to stoop down and look too. He looked, and then whispered,"Yes, Rosy. There is a pretty little robin; let us go round the other side and see if we can make him come out with these crumbs which I have brought with me." So they went softly to the gate, and were just going in, when papa said, "Stop, Rosy; look what that man has got in his hand." Then she looked, and saw a man with a very long gun and two dogs. What is he going to do, papa ?"





PAGE 1

A WALK AND A DRIVE. 21 asked the little girl, drawing back; will he shoot us if we go in ?" O, no, Rosy; don't be afraid. It is the robin that he wants to shoot and not us. So now you see how it is that the dicky-birds don't sing much at Cannes. It is because they shoot so many of them." Poor little Rosy! She loved so much to watch the little birds and hear them sing! And when she thought of this dear robin being shot quite dead, and that perhaps there was a nest somewhere with little ones who would have no mamma, she began to cry, and to call the man "a cruel fellow." She was not much comforted by





PAGE 1

18 A WALK AND A DRIVE. only two came, and went away again directly." We must go out and see the reason of that," said papa, smiling, -"you and I, Rosy, directly after breakfast. We must go and tell the dear birds that Rosy has come."



PAGE 1

"Rosy was very much pleased when soon after she saw the robin fly right away." (23)



PAGE 1

52 A WALK AND A DRIVE. was -too good for that, and she thought it better to make it last a little. But some of the yellow would stick on Rosy's lips; so mamma wiped it off, and then Rosy put her arms round her neck and kissed her, and said, "So nice, dear mamma." Then mamma said, At the end of the garden, Rosy, there lives the good hen that gave us this nice egg, and a great many other hens, and very fine cocks too, -the cocks that you heard crowing this morning. Shall we, go and see them after breakfast?" yes, yes, yes cried Rosy,



PAGE 1

VISIT TO THE DAIRY. 11 fond of milk; and as she was just then quite ready for her breakfast, she was very pleased to have her mug filled,the mug which she had brought on purpose, as nurse told her,and then take a good drink. "Ah, nurse, how good it is!" she cried; "but what is all this sticking to my lips ? It is not white like our milk. See, there is something on the top of it! and she held out her mug to show her. "Ah, that's cream, good cream. We did not get milk like this in Paris," said nurse; "and I'm sure we don't in London. There's no water here, is there, madame?"



PAGE 1

A Walk aid a DrIv VISIT TO THE DAIRY. WHEN Rosy opened her eyes the next morning the sun was shining so brightly that the was obliged to shut them again. But a great many thoughts came into her little head, and she was in a great hurry to get up. Nurse said it was not time yet, and that she was very sleepy; but when the little girl had climbed into (7)



PAGE 1

VISIT TO THE DAIRY. 17 But that little head was too full of thoughts to stay there long. There was so much to tell and to talk about, and that dairy took a, long time to describe. Then when papa asked if she had seen the dear cows that gave the milk, she thought that that would be a capital little jaunt for to-morrow, and clapped her hands with glee. "So you are going to find some new pets, Rosy," he said, to do instead of Mr. Tommy and the kittens?" "Ah, papa, but there are no dickies here -I mean, hardly any," she answered. We looked so for the birdies all, all the time; but



PAGE 1

32 A WALK, AND A DRIVE. she was thinking this; and soon they saw four old women coming along the road with large baskets, full of some green stuff, on their heads. The little girl did not say anything as they went by, but she looked very particularly to see how they were dressed. Now I must tell you why she did this. In the first place, then, she had never seen any old women a bit like them before. They walked all in a row with their baskets on their heads, and with their hands stuck into their sides, and they talked very fast as they came along. On their heads





PAGE 1

ROSY'S VISIT TO THE COWS. 47 like that poke, for it might hurt her, so he advised her to keep quiteout of the good cow's way. Then she stood at a little distance to watch her drinking, and Rosy's papa said, "See how she enjoys it I Cows like to come here sometimes, like little girls; but French cows don't get out of their houses so often as English ones." Don't they, papa?" said Rosy. Then I should think they must often wish to go to England." Papa laughed, and said, "Perhaps they would wish it if they knew how their English cousins enjoy themselves; but I think they



PAGE 1

VISIT TO THE DATRY. 13 girl, and off she trotted again, as ready to go as she had been to come. They say madame to every one in France, you know, and not to rich ladies only. Now there are beautiful hills all round the back of Cannes, and a little way up one of these was the house where Rosy was going to live. She did so like running up and down hills and there were two or three little ones between the farm and this house, which was called a villa. When she got on to the top of one, she cried out, "Ah, there's the sea, I do declare



PAGE 1

Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1888, BY SHELDON AND COMPANY, In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the Southern District of New York. Eletrotyped at tbe BOSTON STEREOTYPE FOUNDRY, No. 19 Spring Lae.



PAGE 1

A WALK AND A DRIVE. 35 go out again, -one, two, three, four, five, six, all in a row, quite quiet, and taking their naps," as Rosy's papa said, "after all their hard work." He lifted Rosy out first, and said that they would go and look at them, while mamma went into the shops. Rosy was not quite sure whether she was pleased at that, because sometimes her mamma bought her very nice things, such as toys, or sugar-plums, or cakes, when she took her out shopping. But they soon found plenty to look at, and some funny men with blue coats and cocked hats amused the little girl



PAGE 1

8 A WALK AND A DRIVE. her bed, and given her a great many soft kisses, and told her how much she wanted to take a walk before breakfast, the kind nursey first rubbed her eyes, then opened them, and then got out of bed. While she was dressing, Rosy began to put on her own shoes and stockings and some of her clothes; for she,had already learnt to do a great deal for herself. She peeped out of window to look for the birds, but for some time she could not see any. Rosy thought this very strange, for she remembered how she used to hear the dear little birdies sing when she had been in the country



PAGE 1

"VISIT TO THE DAIRY. 9 in England; but nurse could not explain the puzzle; so Rosy settled that it was to be a question for her papa. Of course he would know; he always knew everything. "When they were quite ready, nurse said,"Now, my darling, if you like, we will go and get your milk for breakfast; for I know where it is to be had, and nice, new, good milk I hope it may be, to make my little Trotty very fat." Is not Rosy fat now?" asked the tittle girl, in surprise, and feeling first her plump cheeks and then her Sround arms with her stumpy little fingers.



PAGE 1

36 A WALK AND A DRIVE. very much. Her papa wondered why she looked at them so often; but then he did not know Rosy's grand scheme, and how she was thinking of asking nurse to dress one doll just like them. She kept this little plan quite a secret till she got back to her nurse. It was half the fun to have a secret. cZ§D



PAGE 1

ts u5V LA1





PAGE 1

S --



PAGE 1

46 A WALK AND A DRIVE. Good by, dear cowies, and" thank you very much for my nice milk." Rosy wanted to walk round the other side where there was a very gentle, kind-looking cow, that was' not in the water, because she thought that she would like to stroke her; but her papa told her to look at those two great horns. And he said that cows did not like little girls to take liberties with them; unless they knew them, and that this cow did not know her, and might think her very saucy, and poke out her horns to teach her to keep a proper distance. If she did, he said he thought Rosy would not



PAGE 1

A WALK AND A DRIVE. 25 Rosy thought that would be very nice; and then her papa lifted up his little girl, and showed her all the beautiful hills that were behind them. There were some that had peaked tops, and some rather roundish; and just in one place she could see some hills a very long way off, that seemed to climb right up into the sky and were all white on the top. He told her that those hills were called mountains, because they were so very high, -a great deal too high for Rosy to walk up, and that the white stuff which she saw was snow. We don't have snow when it is warm in England, Rosy, do we?"



PAGE 1

ROSY'S VISIT TO THE HENS. 57 their shells very late in the year if they are little ones still, and I am afraid their mother won't let me, touch them." "Do chickens come out of shells ?" said Rosy, making very large eyes, and looking quite puzzled. "Yes, Rosy, out of just, such shells as our eggs had this morning,; and if in the summer we had given this good hen five or six of her own eggs in this little house of hers, she would have sat upon them, and spread her wings over them to keep them warm; and there she would have staid so patiently all day long, and day after day, until the dear little chickens were ready to come too."



PAGE 1

ROSY'S VISIT TO THE HENS. 61 Well, I don't know, Rosy; but I know that I have often thought it very pretty to see how they will all run to their mother when the great hen clucks for them." "0, mamma, I should so like to hear her cluck," cried Rosy, clapping her hands. "Well, Rosy, you go a little way off, and keep quite quiet; and then I will see if I can tempt the good lady out of her nest with some of this nice seed." So Rosy ran away, and her mamma stepped back a few paces and threw down some of the seed. The hen saw it directly, and looked for an instant as if she would like



PAGE 1

42 A WALK AND A DRIVE. "To give us good milk, such as you had yesterday, Rosy, and to make you and other little girls and boys fat and strong. Was not that very good of God !" "Yes, papa," said Rosy, again. "Then will you remember that, my little one, when you say, by and by, 'I thank God for my nice bread and milk'"? Rosy said she would, and then she asked, And do the pretty cows give us coffee, too, papa?" "No, no, my silly little Rosy; don't you recollect that we buy that at the grocer's shop? We must go some day and ask him to let you see



PAGE 1

ROSY'S VTSIT TO THE HENS. 51 on to her little chair, and pull her nice basin of bread and milk close to her. She looked at her papa after she had said her little grace, and said, "I didn't forget, papa." Then she began to eat away as if she liked it very much; and when she had eaten a little, her mamma said, "Look here, Rosy." And Rosy turned round and saw a whole spoonful of egg waiting for her to eat it. Mamma was holding it for her; and it looked so yellow and so delicious! Rosy opened her mouth, but she did not take it all in at once. It



PAGE 1

48 A WALK AND A DRIVE. look pretty happy; don't you, Rosy?" Rosy said, Yes, papa; but how funnily the cow drinks! She puts her head into the water." And you think that if she were a polite cow she would not think of doing such a vulgar thing, but "would wait till they gave her a glass; eh, Rosy?' She hasn't got any hands, papa," cried Rosy, "so she .couldn't, I 'spose." "No," said papa; "so I think that we must excuse and forgive the poor thing, until Rosy can teach her a better plan."



PAGE 1

22 A WALK AND A DRIVE. being told that such little birds were eaten there; so that if the man could shoot one, he would get some money for it which might buy bread for his little ones. But she was rather glad to hear that the little robins must be able by that time of year to take care of themZ selves, and had left the nest some time; and much more pleased, when, soon after, she saw the dear robin fly right away, so that the man with the gun was not likely to shoot that one at any rate. Then papa said, I shouldn't wonder if mamma would like to go out this morning. Shall we go back and see?"



PAGE 1

A WALK AND A DRIVE. 29 would all be tipped out in a heap." Rosy thought it would be good fun if they were. She often rolled about herself, like a little ball, without hurting herself; and she thought that papa and mamma would only get a little dusty, and that it would be a nice little job for her to brush the dust off when she got home. Just then a number of boys and girls came along the road to meet them, and Rosy saw that all the little ones wore caps, not hats or bonnets. There was one baby with large black eyes, 'whom she would have liked to kiss and hug. It was so fat and pretty. But it was dressed in a way that she had never seen



PAGE 1

ROSY'S VISIT TO THE COWS. 39 0, dear, no; at least, so she said, for Rosy did not like to be thought a baby now, though somehow or other it did sometimes happens that after a long walk her feet would ache a little bit, and then papa's shoulder made a very comfortable seat. She was half afraid now that nursey might be sorry not to see the cows, and ran back to whisper that if she liked she might dress one of the dollies instead. That was meant for a treat, you know ; and nursey laughed, and said, "Perhaps, we shall see; and gave her another kiss.



PAGE 1

"38 A WALK AND A DRIVE. quickly. She did not much like even to wait for her morning splash; and while her curls were being combed, she kept saying, "Won't it do, nurse?" and then rather hindering by holding up her little face for a kiss. As soon as she was quite ready she bustled off, and got down stairs first. Whom should she see there but papa himself, with his hat on? He said that he would take her to see the cows, and even carry her a little way if she got tired. How very kind that was I But would such a great girl as Rosy get tired?



PAGE 1

A WALK AND A DRIVE. 19 A WALK AND A DRIVE. OSY made such haste to finish her bread and milk, that she was ready to go out before any one else had done breakfast. But her papa was not long before he was ready too, and she was soon tripping along by his side. They went only a little way up the road, and then they came to a field, on one side of which were some high bushes. Rosy knew where to look for birds, and peeped very anxiously amidst the boughs



PAGE 1

50 A WALK AND A DRIVE. ROSY'S VISIT TO THE HENS. OSY was very hungry when she got home to breakfast, for the fresh morning air had given her an appetite. Her mamma took off her hat and her little jacket, and said, "So, Rosy, you have brought me two more roses." "But my roses don't smell, mamma," said Rosy, laughing and patting her own fat cheeks, as she always did when mamma said that. Then she made haste to scramble up



PAGE 1

40 A WALK AND A DRIVE. Then Rosy showed her papa where the farm was ; and when they came near, they saw the farmer's wife standing at the door, as if she expected her little visitor. Rosy did not forget to say, Bon jour, madame," which means Good morning "in English, you know. Papa asked in French if they could see the cows, and the good woman was kind enough to take them round to the water where they were drinking. There was a black one, and a black and white one, and a red one, and another with red spots. We cannot find room for them all in the



PAGE 1

A WALK AND A DRIVE. 31 bells; but they had a funny sort of post sticking up high between their ears, with lots of things hanging on to it. They had also three pink tassels hanging on their faces, one in front and one on each side. These tassels shook as they went along, and looked so pretty that Rosy thought to herself that if ever she had a toy horse again she would ask nurse to make some little tassels for it just like them. Her papa had told her, too, that they were to keep off the flies, which teased the poor horses very often dreadfully. And of course Rosy would not like her horse to be teased. But the carriage went on while



PAGE 1

A WALK AND A DRIVE. ILLUSTRA TED. "Sdt gorf: SHELDON AND COMPANY. 1870.



PAGE 1

ROSY'S VISIT TO THE HENS. 55 But her mamma answered, Not yet, Rosy; let us go first and look at these good ladies that are walking about inside their house. We can have a good look at them before they get away. See, they can't get out if we stand at the door." Ah, look at these beauties, all over speckly feathers," cried Rosy, as she ran forward to catch one. She put out her little arms to seize her; but the hen seemed to think this a great liberty from so small a child, and instead of running away, she turned and opened her beak in a very angry manner. "Take care, Rosy," said her



PAGE 1

62 A WALK AND A DRIVE. some very much; and she did not wait long, but soon stepped out of her house, and began picking up the seed. Just at that moment a cat came creeping along the outside of the paling, and watching to see if she could pounce on one of the little chickens. The hen saw the cat, and began to stretch out her neck very fiercely, as if she meant to fly at its eyes, and then began to cluck for her little ones, which all came running to her as fast as their legs would carry them. Rosy's little eyes sparkled with pleasure, and she went up and put her hand into her mamma's, and said softly,



PAGE 1

If SIONMO PA OWalPM



PAGE 1

30 A WALK AND A DRIVE. any baby dressed before, for its feet and legs were put into a sort of large bag, so that it could not kick like other children; and Rosy wondered how it could laugh so merrily. "When the carriage came near this little party the man did not hold the reins of his horses tight as an English coachman would have done. He only screamed out to the children, Gare! gare I" which Rosy's papa told her meant Get out of the way." And when they were all past there came next a great wagon, piled up with the trunks of trees. The horses which drew this had no



PAGE 1

14 A WALK AND A DRIVE. and there's a boat on it with a white sail! Shall we go in a boat some day?" I don't know," said nurse, you must ask your mamma; but you don't want to be sick, do you? "I won't be sick," cried the little girl. "Rosy is never sick in a beau'ful boat like that. I'll ask my mamma," and she bustled on. Stay, stay !" cried nurse, "you're going too far, my pet; this is the way; look, who stands up there?" Rosy looked up, and there was the villa with its green blinds high up over her head; and some one stood outside the door calling her by, name.



PAGE 1

54 A WALK AND A DRIVE. and they both went round to a part of the garden which Rosy had not seen before. There they saw that one piece was railed off from all the rest, and that a hen-house was inside it. Rosy's mamma opened a gate in. the railing, and took her little girl into the enclosure amongst all the cocks and hens. The cocks did not seem much to like this, and they both made a great crowing, and then marched off into the farthest corer, with a lot of hens after them. Rosy said, 0, mamma, show them the nice seed, and then they won't go away!"



PAGE 1

ROSY'S VISIT TO THE COWS. 37 ROSY'S VISIT TO THE COWS. HE dear, good nursey did not forget about the cows next morning, for when Rosy opened her little blue peepers there she was half dressed. Rosy jumped up in a minute, crying out, "The cows the cows! Shall we go and see them?" If you will make great haste," said the nurse; "but it is getting late." Rosy never got dressed more



PAGE 1

"VISIT TO THE DAIRY. 15 0, what a number of steps there were for those little legs to climb before she reached her papa They went up by the side of a garden, which was itself like a lot of wide steps, and on each step there was a row of vines, not trained against a wall as we train our vines in England, but growing on the ground like bean plants. Rosy saw lots of such nice grapes that her little mouth quite watered, and she would have liked to have stopped to pick some; but then she knew that would be stealing, because they were not hers. And I hope that Rosy would not have stolen even if nurse had not been



PAGE 1

34 A WALK AND A DRIVE. At first she meant them to make an English school; but now that she had seen so many funny people she thought she would like her dolls to be dressed like the people in Cannes, because then they would just show her dear grandmamma how very nice they looked, and how very different to English people. She was very quiet for a little while, because she was making this grand plan; but they soon turned out of the narrow street, and all at once she saw the sea again. They had come now to what was called the port," and there were all the great ships which had come home lately, and were waiting to-







PAGE 1

ROSY'S VISIT TO THE COWS. 41 picture; but you will see the one which was drinking. Rosy admired them very much, and wanted to go as near as she, could that she might see them well; for although they were so very big and had such long legs, she was not a bit afraid of them. She never was afraid of anything when her papa was by, because he was so very strong -stronger than all the world she thought. "Who made the cows, Rosy?" asked her papa, when she had looked at them a little while. "God," said Rosy, softly; God made everything, didn't he, papa? Why did he make the cows?" she asked, after thinking a minute.



PAGE 1

" If you stoop down you will see that she is keeping two of the little chickens warm under her." (59)



PAGE 1

"And do the pretty cows give us coffee, too, papa." (43)



PAGE 1

.....



PAGE 1

ROSY'S VISIT TO THE COWS. 45 it ground up to powder. The coffee comes from a long, long way off. It grows on a tree in a very hot country, and looks like little berries till they put it into a mill and turn a handle. Then the berries are ground up to powder, and we put some boiling water over the powder, and when it gets cool we drink it. Haven't you seen mamma pour it out into the cup and put some sugar and milk in for herself and papa?" Rosy remembered now; but she had not taken much notice before, because she did not like coffee at all. She liked her nice milk much better; and so when she went away with her papa she called out,



PAGE 1

611 k n



PAGE 1

ROSY'S VISIT TO THE HENS. 63 Wasn't it nice?" "Yes, Rosy," said her mamma, and I hope that my little chicken will always run to my side as quickly, as these did to their mother. You see she knew that they were in danger when they didn't themselves; and so do I sometimes when my Rosy thinks she is quite safe."



PAGE 1

28 A WALK AND A DRIVE. pretty often from her mamma's lap to her papa's and back again, just because she was too happy to sit still. The ponies went along merrily too, as if they were nearly as happy. They had bells on their necks which jingled delightfully, and every now and then they met a carriage, or even a cart, the horses of which had bells too. So they had plenty of music. They went up one hill and down another, and the ponies ran so fast, and turned round the corners of the roads so quickly, that sometimes mamma was afraid that the carriage would be upset, and that they



PAGE 1

10 A. WALK AND A DRIVE. "0, pretty well," said nurse laughing, but you may be fatter yet, and I like fat little girls." They had not to walk far before they came to the place where the milk was sold. It was called a farm; and nurse took Rosy in, and said she should see the dairy if the good woman would let her. Rosy did not know what a dairy meant; but she supposed that it was something curious, and tripped merrily along, wondering what she should see, till they came to a room which had a floor made of red tiles, on which stood qt least ten or twelve large open bowls full of new milk. Now Rosy happened to be very



PAGE 1

16 A WALK AND A DRIVE. following her, or her papa watching her. She got the grapes, too, without picking them; for when she had climbed up to the very top, there was papa waiting for her with a beautiful bunch in his hand. And he said, Come in, Rosy; mamma wants her breakfast very badly. See, mamma, what a pair of roses your little girl has been getting already! Rosy knew very well what that meant, for she rubbed her cheeks with her little fat hands, and then tumbled her merry little head about her mamma's lap to "roll the roses off," as she said.





PAGE 1

A WALK AND A DRIVE. 27 put Rosy's flowers in water; and they looked very gay and pretty. Nurse and every one admired them; and Rosy said that she was not a bit tired, and was quite sure that she could go for another long, long walk. But papa said that though Rosy might be a little horse, her mamma was not, and that it was a long way to the town and to the shops where she wanted to go; so he would go and get a carriage for them. Now, though Rosy certainly was very tired of trains, she found a basket pony-carriage a very different thing, and enjoyed her ride so much that she was obliged to change





PAGE 1

LITTLE ROSY'S TRAVELS. SIX VOLUMES. ON THE JOURNEY. A WALK AND A DRIVE. THE DUCKS AND PIGS. THE WOUNDED BIRD. A SAD ADVENTURE. THE DOCTOR'S VISIT.





PAGE 1

12 A WALK AND A DRIVE. But madame did not understand English; so nurse was obliged, by looking very pleased, to make her see that she thought her milk very good. "But it's very bad of the other people to put water in my milk," said Rosy, frowning. "I shall ask my papa to scold them when we go home ; and I shall take a great mugful of this nice milk to show my grandmamma." Well, now say good by prettily in French, as your papa teaches you," said nurse, "and then we'll go home, and I dare say we shall find some more milk there." "Adieu, madame," said the little



PAGE 1

58 A WALK AND A DRIYE. "And wouldn't the hen get tired? said Rosy. I shouldn't like to stay still so long." "No, I don't think you would," shid her mamma, chucking her little girl under the chin'; but then, you see, you are like the little chickens, and. not like the mamma hen. I think you will find that she has not got tired even yet, for if you peep down again you will see that she is keeping two of the little chickens warm under her even now. Little chickens are like little babies, and they very soon get cold, so they like keeping very close to their mammas." "Are the little chickens naughty sometimes ?" asked Rosy.



PAGE 1

ROSY'S VISIT TO THE COWS. 49 And Rosy trotted home by his side, thinking how much she should .like to try drinking after the cow's fashion.



PAGE 1

" She was very pleased to have her mug filled -the mug which she had brought on purpose." (2)



PAGE 1

26 A WALK AND A DRIVE. said papa, "nor yet here, but up there, you see, it is so cold that the snow never melts. Those are called 'the snow Alps.'" Rosy had nearly forgotten the poor birds now, because there were so many other things to think about. She saw some poppies a little way off, and then some blue flowers; and they were so pretty that she was quite obliged to stop a good many times to pick some for dear mamma. The wind was very high too, and it blew little Rosy's hat right off, so that papa and she had both to run after it. Mamma was ready for a walk when they got in, but she staid to



PAGE 1

A WALK AND A DRIVE. 33 they wore very, very large hats, with small crowns. Rosy had never seen such hats before, and she heard her mamma say that she had never seen them either. Under these great hats they had nice white caps, with colored handkerchiefs over them, which hung down behind. They had, besides, other colored handkerchiefs over their shoulders, and two of them had red gowns. Now Rosy had had a present given her in Paris. It was a piece of French money, worth ten English pennies; and with this money she had bought ten Dutch dolls, which nursey was going to dress for her. 3



PAGE 1

ROSY'S VISIT TO THE HENS. 53 clapping her hands, "that will be fean. Pve almost done mine;" and the little girl made great haste to finish her bread and milk; but mamma said, Ah, but not quite directly. I've not done my breakfast. If you have done yours, you had better go and see what nurse is doing, and ask her to get ready to come and hear papa read about Daniel in the lions' den." Rosy did not mind waiting for that, for she was never tired of hearing that story. I dare say that some of her young friends know it too. Her mamma got ready soon after,



PAGE 1

56 A WALK AND A DRIVE mamma, as the little girl drew back half frightened. "This hen seems rather a fierce lady. I will give her some seed to persuade her to be quiet. Perhaps she has got something there that she does not choose us to see. I wonder what it cam, be." Rosy took one more peep, and then called out, O, mamma, mamma, somelittle chickens, I do declare! If you stoop down you can see them run. ning about behind her, -such dear, pretty, soft little creatures! Do get me one to play with." Little chickens I" said mamma; "why, they must have come out of