Pocahontas, the Indian princess

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Material Information

Title:
Pocahontas, the Indian princess
Series Title:
Golden picture books
Physical Description:
14 p. : 8 col. plates. ; 22 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Cozans, Philip J ( Publisher )
Publisher:
P.J. Cozans
Place of Publication:
New York (107 Nassau St.)
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
History -- Juvenile fiction -- Virginia -- Colonial period, ca. 1600-1775   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1880
Genre:
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York

Notes

Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001759966
oclc - 25514931
notis - AJH3050
oclc - 77717249
System ID:
UF00023478:00001

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w-cr~rrcNNrchhhhMCC..6d.lf$..THEWIT HEIGHT LITHOGRAPH ILLUSTRATIONS.PUBLISHEED BEPE I r 'J. C O Z A ,CoR. NASSAU AND ANN STREETS.STEREOTYPED by LVNCENT L. DILL,128 FULTON STRERT, N'. Y.


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~BOUT two hundred and fifty years ago, in- .) the State of Viirginia, at the Falls of James,River, where now stands the city of Rich-mond,-there lived a powerful Indian King, orhead chief, whose name was Pow-ha-tan. Thisgreat chief was the ruler of many large tribes,who looked upon him as their master in all things.He was the possessor of vast wealth, yet hiswealth did not consist entirely in broad lands andwell filled store-houses. There was somethingdearer to him than all these; it was a daughter,the gentle, loving Po-ca-hon-tas, tie joy of herfather, and the pride of the Red man. AlthoughPocahontas was an Indian girl, living amid thewild scenes of savage life, yet her heart was everopen to the distress of others, possete all the '; :j P~r~~~^~~"W"MM.' M~~~`"^"M " *'*


I? U 'A Oatender feelings of the white girl. One day, whenPocahontas was about twelve years of age, therewas brought before Powhatan, her father, a pris-oner, a white man. This man was an Englishman,who had come across the great ocean, with manyothers, to make discoveries. They landed on theshores of Virginia, where they built themselves atown, and called it Jamestown.This place being near the residence of Powha-tan, it aroused the jealousy of his majesty againstthe white men, fearing they might intrude uponhis lands, and annoy his people. He therefore,determined to destroy all who came in his power.When the prisoner, whose name was Captain JohnSmith, was brought before him, he was surround-ed by the flower of his Court. By his side, stoodhis daughter, Pocahontas with her companions;while around him, stood the principle chiefs of thenation, with their wives. The king himself satbefore a fire, upon a wooden throne, clothed withta v~~- - -- - - -hmaM


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a great robe of raccoon skins, and with a coronet iof feathers about his head, looking the picture ofsavage majesty.When Captain Smith entered, all the peoplegave a shout; and one of the women was appoint-ed to bring him water to wash his hands, andanother brought a bunch of feathers instead of atowel, to dry them. After that, they gave him toeat plentifully of the best they could produce.While the captain was thus engaged, the Kingwas holding a consultation with his chiefs; at theconclusion of which, two large stones were broughtbefore him, and poor Smith was dragged to themand his head laid thereon, for the purpose of beingbeat to death with clubs.This, our young readers may consider strangetreatment, after such good fare, but such was thecustom of those savages. The clubs were raisedabove the victim, when Pocahontas rushed fromthe side of her father, and clasped the prostratei A,- ---^^^^^^^^--:----


~I? "A M M 8I S Al TOSmith about the neck, thus saving him from in-stant death. When the king saw the position ofhis darling daughtert he ordered the execution tobe stopped. After seeing such interest displayedby her towards the Captain, he was persuaded tospare his lift providing he would stay with themawhile and make bells, and beads, and trinketsof various kinds, for Pocahontas; and robes, bows,arrows, and shoes for himself. After seven weeksCaptain Smith was allowed to return back toJamestown, where he found his people in greatdistress; being so much in want of provisions thatmany of them were starving. Here Pocahontaswas again instrumental in serving the white men.On hearing of the condition of the people atJamestown, she prevailed upon her father, whohad become friendly towards Smith, while in hispower, to send them provisions. Pocahontascould be seen, with her attendants, every four orfive days, riding toward the white settlement withi-r -- -- -- - - -- ---------- -LPIZ11


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CCARRYING CORN TO THE WHITE SETTLEMENT.UT'.OFSYDEtFBziACKJ&Sr RVrR Y.K


provisions, also 'precious roots and herbs of herown gathering, for the sick. Several others alsoof the natives repaired daily to the fort, with suchfood as served from hand to mouth. Part theyalways brought Smith, as presents from their kingor Pocahontas. So much had he astonished andenchanted the Indians, while their prisoner, thatthey'esteemed him as a demi-god, and were readyat his word, to do whatever he wished them, andin speaking of the God who created all things,they would call him the " god of Captain Smith."Thus time passed pleasantly on with the whitemen and Indians, and although Pocahontas hadbecome quite a young woman, she never waveredin her. attachment to the English, and her influ-ence and timely warning, often saved them fromtreachery and its horrid consequences if not, fromabsolute massacre and expulsion.An instance is related by historians, when someGermans having leagued with Powhatan, to kill31EKwRww~cwuc~,-,------~r~vvr ~M/v~wucrv5


all the English, that Pocahontas. one "dark andall the English, that Pocahontas. one " dark anddismal night," came alone, some ten or twelvemiles through the woods to warn them, even intears, of the foul plot against them, at the risk ofher own life.Captain Smith, owing to the disagreementamong the people, and their wicked conduct to-wards him, was at length compelled to leave themfor his home, England. Before leaving for theship, which was to carry him across the broaddeep, he sought out his preserver, Pocahontas,and bade her a sincere and tearful good-bye.Pocahontas was much grieved to have him leavethem, for she deemed him a good and great man,moreover, she knew when he had departed, thelink that united her father with the white men,would be broken, and open warfare would prevail.Shortly after Smith had gone, a Captain Argallwas sent to trade for corn. The Indians thenhaving none to spare, and no disposition to spare


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it when they had, he determined to get it by strat-agem. He therefore, gained the good will of oneof the chiefs, and offered him a copper kettle "tothem a valued article," to betray into his hands,the innocent Pocahontas, and was to bring hersafely aboard his ship. Accordingly the chief'swife persuaded Pocahontas to accompany her onboard the vessel, and they were no sooner in thecabin of the ship, than she was taken prisoner.On seeing this, the deceitful savages began to cry,hoping to deceive Pocahontas. The captain toldher, he wished her to make peace with her coun-try, and the whites, before ever she should see herfather.The captain was kind to her in every respect,except keeping her captive. Pocahontas everready to make peace, promised to do all in herpower. A messenger was sent to Powhatan, tell-ing him of the situation of his daughter, intimatingthat she could only be ransomed by giving back:- ------- -- --- --- --- --- %- oi^m


the swords, cannon, tools, &c., which he had takenfrom them, and that he must also trade with them.It was three months before he deigned an an-swer. He then sent back a few old rusty muskets,with word that when his daughter was restored,he would give satisfaction for all harm he haddone them, and give five hundred bushels of cornwith an assurance, that he would ever remain onfriendly terms. The articles were received as partpayment, but word was sent back, that unless allthe rest were returned, they would detain hisdaughter until doomsday. This answer displeasedthe king so much, that nothing was heard fromhim for a long time, and it is quite uncertainwhether he would have paid any further attentionto the matter, had not some determined measuresbeen taken to secure the promised ransom. Cap-tain Argall took his ship and several vessels be-longing to the colony, with two hundred well-arm-ed men, went up the river to the principle resi-i longing< ^/^^< ^>^.^^^- <^^^-~^^^^n^^^^^/^^^/^, <%^S^ ^/^< /^^>^S/^^^ ^^/^^^ ^s<-3KM X"^ ww""'"^M^M""rWY~


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I.:,7KULFE & PCAHONTAS.Z/tr. a,


I~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~dence of Powhatan in the hope, of accomplishingtheir object by a show of force, but they werereceived in a warlike spirit by his chiefs, who toldthem if they came to fight, they were welcome,and finally sent a shower of arrows among theirvessels, but without doing any serious harm. Thisso enraged the captain, that he manned his boats,went on shore and burned their houses.On the next day they had another meeting withthe Indians. A truce was arranged until the nextday, that they might send once more to the King,to know his pleasure. Two of Powhatan's sons,took advantage of this truce, to visit their sister,and were rejoiced to find her well, and as happyas she could be, so situated. They promised theywould persuade her father to redeem her, and en-deavour to make peace.Pocahontas was not as unhappy as might besupposed, in her state of bondage, for she waskindly treated, and every care taken for her com-X -----on


WA-" - - - -fort. She was also allowed to go out to walk, orride, when she pleased, but always in companywith some one, as they did not wish her to leavethem without their consent, and that, they werenot willing yet to give.It was during these rides, that she was frequent-ly met by a Mr. John Rolfe, a fine young gentle-man of high character and standing in England,who had been sent over by the government, tohelp manage affairs. He had heard of the worthand true heart of the Indian girl, long before hemet her, and when he saw her, he loved her. Hewas not long in keeping it a secret, but told her afew days after their first meeting, of the sincereaffection he had for her. Pocahontas knew hisheart, and consented to become his wife; for shetoo, had loved him from their first meeting. Thefriends of both parties highly approving of theirunion, it was soon settled upon. Powhatan, onhearing of his daughter's approaching marriage,w~rc^c~^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^-^ ^ ^ ^ ^^.-- -. -- ^~


Y4


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was highly pleased, and gave his consent at once.He sent an old uncle of her's to see the form ofthe marriage. It was therefore solemnized in thebeginning of April, 1613, and ever after they hadfriendly trade and commerce as well with Pow-hatan himself, as with all his subjects.After her marriage, Mr. Rolfe and his friends,were very careful and patient in instructing Poca-hontas in the Christian religion, and she on herpart, expressed an eager desire to learn; and sheproved an apt scholar. Her advancement wasso satisfactory, that she soon renounced theidolatry of her people, and was baptized by thename of Rebecca. Although she was the favor-ite of her father, she never had any desire toreturn to him; yet she would ever express thewarmest feelings, when speaking of him. Ano-ther great change took place with Pocahontas,shortly after her marriage. The Governor of thecolony, was about to return to England, and Rolfe.CyVYV.rVVVYYWYYINCyWYCC.WYWI.- ------ -------


VI.was to accompany him. Accordingly, Pocahon-tas and her husband were soon on their way. Ontheir arrival, there was much excitement; as an"Indian princess" was a curiosity that had neverbeen seen in England before. Captain Smith wasunexpectedly apprised of the arrival of his friendand benefactress Pocahontas, or the Lady Rebec-ca, as she was generally called. He gladly seizedupon every opportunity to show that her formerkindness was still as much appreciated as ever.Many lords and ladies of the court, daily flockedto Captain Smith, to be introduced to her. Shewas carried to court by lady Delaware attendedby her husband, and other persons of distinction.The whole court were charmed at the grace of herdeportment, and the king and queen were pleasedto receive and esteem her. Mr Rolfe was appoint-ed to a high office in Virginia, but his youngwife whom he prized above every thing, Was neveragain to behold her native land._- - - - _- - _ _ __


APR.EtEt4TAT$0N OF POCAtITA$ ( T..m.mpE444rA*n,. NY.


I.


IThey were making preparations for their depar-ture, when it pleased God to take her to himself.Thus passed away, a kind and gentle heart; aninstrument from the hands of God, who hadwrought miracles among the savages, and broughtpeace and joy to thousands. We trust our youngreaders have found some little interest throughthe foregoing pages, yet we fear they are some-what dry, but there is one thing to be observed,the subject which composes them, is from authen-tic History.Her eyes were to be closed among strangers,far from the happy scenes of her childhood, andfrom the anxious care of a well-beloved fatherwho, savage though he was, had ever manifestedfor her the tenderest regard; 'leaving behind ming-led with sorrow for her death, joy at her "reli-gious and godly end," at the evidence that herembrace of Christianity was not in name only, butfrom the heart.


^-- -The historian, poet and painter, have all beeneloquent in depicting the character of Pocahon-tas, her fame is in all lands, her praise on alltongues. To enlarge, would be like adding " per-fume to the violet." Who reading the simplestory of her heroism, has not felt his heart throbquick with generous emotion. She has been asilent though powerful advocate, in behalf of therace to which she belonged. Her deeds havecovered a multitude of their sins. With a soften-ed heart we turn from the cruel recitals of Indiantreachery, and admit there must have been fineelements of character in a people from whom sucha being could spring.(((())]))' -- ^ ^ ^ ^.*,-,-,.,.-..-.,--,.-.- .--..- -,-..-,.-..-,-.-..- ----. Mr


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Full Text

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the swords, cannon, tools, &c., which he had taken from them, and that he must also trade with them. It was three months before he deigned an answer. He then sent back a few old rusty muskets, with word that when his daughter was restored, he would give satisfaction for all harm he had done them, and give five hundred bushels of corn with an assurance, that he would ever remain on friendly terms. The articles were received as part payment, but word was sent back, that unless all the rest were returned, they would detain his daughter until doomsday. This answer displeased the king so much, that nothing was heard from him for a long time, and it is quite uncertain whether he would have paid any further attention to the matter, had not some determined measures been taken to secure the promised ransom. Captain Argall took his ship and several vessels belonging to the colony, with two hundred well-armed men, went up the river to the principle resi-



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I i~~~~~~~~~*i I ***<0-I I N F



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I;



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dence of Powhatan in the hope, of accomplishing their object by a show of force, but they were received in a warlike spirit by his chiefs, who told them if they came to fight, they were welcome, and finally sent a shower of arrows among their vessels, but without doing any serious harm. This so enraged the captain, that he manned his boats, went on shore and burned their houses. On the next day they had another meeting with the Indians. A truce was arranged until the next day, that they might send once more to the King, to know his pleasure. Two of Powhatan's sons, took advantage of this truce, to visit their sister, and were rejoiced to find her well, and as happy as she could be, so situated. They promised they would persuade her father to redeem her, and endeavour to make peace. Pocahontas was not as unhappy as might be supposed, in her state of bondage, for she was kindly treated, and every care taken for her com-



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a great robe of raccoon skins, and with a coronet of feathers about his head, looking the picture of savage majesty. When Captain Smith entered, all the people gave a shout; and one of the women was appointed to bring him water to wash his hands, and another brought a bunch of feathers instead of a towel, to dry them. After that, they gave him to eat plentifully of the best they could produce. While the captain was thus engaged, the King was holding a consultation with his chiefs; at the conclusion of which, two large stones were brought before him, and poor Smith was dragged to them and his head laid thereon, for the purpose of being beat to death with clubs. This, our young readers may consider strange treatment, after such good fare, but such was the custom of those savages. The clubs were raised above the victim, when Pocahontas rushed from the side of her father, and clasped the prostrate il ,----------^>^^^^^^^^^-^^-^^^^--^-^-'**;



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cBOUT two hundred and fifty years ago, in .the State of Virginia, at the Falls of James, .¢ River, where now stands the city of Richmond,-there lived a powerful Indian King, or head chief, whose name was Pow-ha-tan. This great chief was the ruler of many large tribes, who looked upon him as their master in all things. He was the possessor of vast wealth, yet his wealth did not consist entirely in broad lands and well filled store-houses. There was something dearer to him than all these; it was a daughter, the gentle, loving Po-ca-hon-tas, tie joy of her father, and the pride of the Red man. Although Pocahontas was an Indian girl, living amid the wild scenes of savage life, yet her heart was ever open to the distress of others, poss.om -all the "' ri 1 ; ** ^'T"^M~WM"^^^^^^^^^>^^^^^^^^^^^^~>^^^^\^^>^V*^^^wN^^yi



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POCAHONTAS IMPRISONED. L rere srfCflrf #S rvPg *.



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The historian, poet and painter, have all been eloquent in depicting the character of Pocahontas, her fame is in all lands, her praise on all tongues. To enlarge, would be like adding perfume to the violet." Who reading the simple story of her heroism, has not felt his heart throb quick with generous emotion. She has been a silent though powerful advocate, in behalf of the race to which she belonged. Her deeds have covered a multitude of their sins. With a softened heart we turn from the cruel recitals of Indian treachery, and admit there must have been fine elements of character in a people from whom such a being could spring. ~ ~ ~ -i, ,, -,... ,,.^,.^ ^,., ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ -^ ^, -... as



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fort. She was also allowed to go out to walk, or ride, when she pleased, but always in company with some one, as they did not wish her to leave them without their consent, and that, they were not willing yet to give. It was during these rides, that she was frequently met by a Mr. John Rolfe, a fine young gentleman of high character and standing in England, who had been sent over by the government, to help manage affairs. He had heard of the worth and true heart of the Indian girl, long before he met her, and when he saw her, he loved her. He was not long in keeping it a secret, but told her a few days after their first meeting, of the sincere affection he had for her. Pocahontas knew his heart, and consented to become his wife; for she too, had loved him from their first meeting. The friends of both parties highly approving of their union, it was soon settled upon. Powhatan, on hearing of his daughter's approaching marriage, ~~N^-^^^--rr^^H-hL^^rCCCC--H^LH.---^o---^--



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IfI SMIT .. B! :,, SMITH BEFORE POWHATAN. t" L~r.t in^ )' B ~~~~~~~~I~II.Y~I l*11



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tender feelings of the white girl. One day, when Pocahontas was about twelve years of age, there was brought before Powhatan, her father, a prisoner, a white man. This man was an Englishman, who had come across the great ocean, with many others, to make discoveries. They landed on the shores of Virginia, where they built themselves a town, and called it Jamestown. This place being near the residence of Powhatan, it aroused the jealousy of his majesty against the white men, fearing they might intrude upon his lands, and annoy his people. He therefore, determined to destroy all who came in his power. When the prisoner, whose name was Captain John Smith, was brought before him, he was surrounded by the flower of his Court. By his side, stood his daughter, Pocahontas with her companions; while around him, stood the principle chiefs of the nation, with their wives. The king himself sat before a fire, upon a wooden throne, clothed with



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:; i. s. PO C A H O N TAS SAVING CAPT SMITH. /lrwshrtasLrA SJ#



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-El S r AQtŽ7< <'4 9 I Ž4 4 ) A --4 I --



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MARRIAGE OF POCAHONTAS A ROLFE. MARRI~~~~~~~~~~AGE~Lt O .. N foa L ,S¢A.&Ti



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-al: RI & P O A O T S z f o,~^tA-k& f-l ROLFE & POCAHONTAS. z.t T .fthtr MAc. 6¢A'*..yrt-'/,z y



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, ~~:..-~~~~~ -. b',ta;fl*fiel;a;T: -e. I PR'ESENTATION OF POCAHONTAS AT COURT.



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it when they had, he determined to get it by stratagem. He therefore, gained the good will of one of the chiefs, and offered him a copper kettle "to them a valued article," to betray into his hands, the innocent Pocahontas, and was to bring her safely aboard his ship. Accordingly the chief's wife persuaded Pocahontas to accompany her on board the vessel, and they were no sooner in the cabin of the ship, than she was taken prisoner. On seeing this, the deceitful savages began to cry, hoping to deceive Pocahontas. The captain told her, he wished her to make peace with her country, and the whites, before ever she should see her father. The captain was kind to her in every respect, except keeping her captive. Pocahontas ever ready to make peace, promised to do all in her power. A messenger was sent to Powhatan, telling him of the situation of his daughter, intimating that she could only be ransomed by giving back



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They were making preparations for their departure, when it pleased God to take her to himself. Thus passed away, a kind and gentle heart; an instrument from the hands of God, who had wrought miracles among the savages, and brought peace and joy to thousands. We trust our young readers have found some little interest through the foregoing pages, yet we fear they are somewhat dry, but there is one thing to be observed, the subject which composes them, is from authentic History. Her eyes were to be closed among strangers, far from the happy scenes of her childhood, and from the anxious care of a well-beloved father who, savage though he was, had ever manifested for her the tenderest regard; 'leaving behind mingled with sorrow for her death, joy at her "religious and godly end," at the evidence that her embrace of Christianity was not in name only, but from the heart.



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* 7



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THE WITH EIGHT LITHOGRAPH ILLUSTRATIONS. PUBLISHE DBE 1 : 5 T 5 r C O Z A N , CoR. NASSAU AND ANN STREETS. STEREOTYPED by YLNCENT L. DILL, 128 FULTON STRERT, N. Y. t'"M^"^~M"^~^^^^^^M^^"""~^^^^^^^^^^^^^~^*^^^^^



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CARRYING CORN TO THE WHITE SETTLEMENT. Ur*.OFJSMYDEtBazACK&r SrvRNM M.



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To I?(DA V I Ai(Dao provisions, also 'precious roots and herbs of her own gathering, for the sick. Several others also of the natives repaired daily to the fort, with such food as served from hand to mouth. Part they always brought Smith, as presents from their king or Pocahontas. So much had he astonished and enchanted the Indians, while their prisoner, that theyesteemed him as a demi-god, and were ready at his word, to do whatever he wished them, and in speaking of the God who created all things, they would call him the god of Captain Smith." Thus time passed pleasantly on with the white men and Indians, and although Pocahontas had become quite a young woman, she never wavered in her. attachment to the English, and her influence and timely warning, often saved them from treachery and its horrid consequences if not, from absolute massacre and expulsion. An instance is related by historians, when some Germans having league with Powhatan, to kill 31E~~w~~ww~~cwuc~~,-,--,--r~~~r~vvr~~M/v~~wucrv~5



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was to accompany him. Accordingly, Pocahlontas and her husband were soon on their way. On their arrival, there was much excitement; as an "Indian princess" was a curiosity that had never been seen in England before. Captain Smith was unexpectedly apprised of the arrival of his friend and benefactress Pocahontas, or the Lady Rebecca, as she was generally called. He gladly seized upon every opportunity to show that her former kindness was still as much appreciated as ever. Many lords and ladies of the court, daily flocked to Captain Smith, to be introduced to her. She was carried to court by lady Delaware attended by her husband, and other persons of distinction. The whole court were charmed at the grace of her deportment, and the king and queen were pleased to receive and esteem her. Mr Rolfe was appointed to a high office in Virginia, but his young wife whom he prized above every thing, Was never again to behold her native land. ys ${?~"~^c~-rY~---~u~^v





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all the English, that Pocahontas. one "dark and dismal night," came alone, some ten or twelve miles through the woods to warn them, even in tears, of the foul plot against them, at the risk of her own life. Captain Smith, owing to the disagreement among the people, and their wicked conduct towards him, was at length compelled to leave them for his home, England. Before leaving for the ship, which was to carry him across the broad deep, he sought out his preserver, Pocahontas, and bade her a sincere and tearful good-bye. Pocahontas was much grieved to have him leave them, for she deemed him a good and great man, moreover, she knew when he had departed, the link that united her father with the white men, would be broken, and open warfare would prevail. Shortly after Smith had gone, a Captain Argall was sent to trade for corn. The Indians then having none to spare, and no disposition to spare yS -----------*---------------------------^~



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was highly pleased, and gave his consent at once. He sent an old uncle of her's to see the form of the marriage. It was therefore solemnized in the beginning of April, 1613, and ever after they had friendly trade and commerce as well with Powhatan himself, as with all his subjects. After her marriage, Mr. Rolfe and his friends, were very careful and patient in instructing Pocahontas in the Christian religion, and she on her part, expressed an eager desire to learn; and she proved an apt scholar. Her advancement was so satisfactory, that she soon renounced the idolatry of her people, and was baptized by the name of Rebecca. Although she was the favorite of her father, she never had any desire to return to him; yet she would ever express the warmest feelings, when speaking of him. Another great change took place with Pocahontas, shortly after her marriage. The Governor of the colony, was about to return to England, and Rolfe #"M""~W^ 9K"~HC~~CI~MV



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lI? M S I Al MT O Smith about the neck, thus saving him from instant death. When the king saw the position of his darling daughter he ordered the execution to be stopped. After seeing such interest displayed by her t(owards the Captain, he was persuaded to spare his lifi providing he would stay with them awhile and make bells, and beads, and trinkets of various kinds, for Pocahontas; and robes, bows, arrows, and shoes for himself. After seven weeks Captain Smith was allowed to return back to Jamestown, where he found his people in great distress; being so much in want of provisions that many of them were starving. Here Pocahontas was again instrumental in serving the white men. On hearing of the condition of the people at Jamestown, she prevailed upon her father, who had become friendly towards Smith, while in his power, to send them provisions. Pocahontas could be seen, with her attendants, every four or five days, riding toward the white settlement with it ^^^^-rr^< ~~~"~~~~~~^~ < l r l n r l ^-~ l -~ < ^-^ -h"


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